Most Popular Podcast Episodes of 2018
Most Popular Podcast Episodes of 2018

As 2018 comes to a close, we look back at the most popular podcast episodes from After Hours, Cold Call, Managing the Future of Work, and Sky Deck. Each episode is available below.

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14 Dec 2018   Cullen Schmitt
Listen in as Harvard Business School faculty discuss hot topics at the intersection of business and society.


In this episode, hosts Youngme Moon, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, and Mihir Desai discuss whether there’s a market for a Netflix for News; debate the future of newspapers like The New York Times; argue about which Big Tech company (Apple, Alphabet, Amazon, Facebook) is most and least vulnerable; and offer their After Hours picks for the week.


Host Youngme Moon interviews Eugene Soltes, who talks about Why They Do It: Inside the Mind of the White Collar Criminal. Among other things, Eugene discusses his unique relationship with Bernie Madoff, the motivations behind white collar crime, how firms can prevent such crimes from occurring, and his most memorable conversations with criminals he has interviewed. Eugene also shares an After Hours recommendation.

ABOUT COLD CALL:
Twice monthly, host and Chief Marketing and Communications Officer Brian Kenny invites an HBS professor to take listeners behind the scenes of a case he or she has written, probing what inspired the case, and exploring how it relates to management practice.

In early 2015, Microsoft CFO Amy Hood and the rest of the senior leadership team faced a fundamental choice. Was the company ready to invest in long-term growth at the expense of some short-term profit margins? Fritz Foley discusses how leadership faced these difficult decisions, and worked to get investors and employees on board.



Coming out of the financial crisis, Wells Fargo was one of the world’s largest and most successful banks, viewed as a role model in how to manage in times of crisis. The news of its sales misconduct—opening more than 2 million fake accounts—in 2016 rocked consumer confidence and inundated the news. Suraj Srinivasan discusses how sales culture, leadership, board oversight, and risk management all played a role.



The Chase Sapphire Reserve credit card was one of the hottest product launches in 2016, enthusiastically received by millennial consumers, a group that had previously eluded JPMorgan Chase and its competitors. Shelle Santana discusses how protagonists Pam Codispoti and Eileen Serra shifted their focus to retaining customers attracted by the one-time signup bonus of 100,000 reward points and on acquiring new customers now that the bonus had been reduced.Shelle Santana discusses




Harvard Business School Professors Bill Kerr and Joe Fuller talk to leaders grappling with the forces reshaping the nature of work.

As businesses grapple with advancing artificial intelligence they must make strategic choices. Senior McKinsey Partner Scott Rutherford finds that the best companies ask: How can we delight customers? Which functions can we trust to the technology and how will employee roles evolve alongside? How do we invest in human capital? Where should we be located? How can we reorganize to become more competitive?



America’s skills ecosystem is broken. Employers are confounded by workforce development institutions. Middle skills employees can’t get the training they need. Educators aren’t held accountable for outcomes. Now, innovative providers are aligning stakeholders around a common cause: creating a pipeline of workers with 21st century skills. Joe quizzes Frank Britt, CEO of Penn Foster, one of the oldest non-traditional educators in the U.S., on how the new skills ecosystem must be radically redesigned.




ABOUT SKY DECK:
Sky Deck is the HBS alumni podcast series that features interviews with HBS alumni from across the world of business, sharing lessons learned and their own life experiences.

Today’s story is a break from our typical in-depth interview format. Today, we’re going to tell a story. It’s a story that starts with a tragic plane crash in 1944 outside a small town in the hills of Northern Italy and ends 73 years later in that same small town with celebration and a sense of closure.



Lindsay Ronga (MBA 2009) suffered from a severe eating disorder for seven years before eventually finding a path to successful recovery. Now, as a recovery coach, she wants to let people know that they are not alone—and they have other treatment options.



Lindsay Ronga (MBA 2009) suffered from a severe eating disorder for seven years before eventually finding a path to successful recovery. Now, as a recovery coach, she wants to let people know that they are not alone—and they have other treatment options.





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