05 Mar 2019
Female Faculty Leading the Conversation
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In honor of Women's History Month and International Women's Day, Harvard Business School presents Cold Call podcast episodes from the past year featuring female faculty members talking about Hershey's chocolate, fintech, big data, accessibility of drug trials, and making credit cool for millenials.

Have you ever wondered how Hershey chocolate came to be so popular? Professor Nancy Koehn discusses the life and vision of Milton Hershey, the entrepreneur and philanthropist behind the Hershey chocolate bar, the town of Hershey, Pennsylvania, and the Milton Hershey School.



Was Eastern Labs a huge success or an expensive mistake? Eastern Bank CEO Bob Rivers innovated from within by partnering with fintech entrepreneur Dan O’Malley to launch a completely automated small-business lending product. Karen Mills discusses key questions from her case study: Did Rivers have the right intrapreneurship model? Did he change the culture at Eastern? Did he make a mistake spinning off Numerated into a separate company?



Is it time to throw out the creative director and rely on big data to predict what consumers want to wear next? Assistant Professor Ayelet Israeli discusses how Gap CEO Art Peck considers this bold idea to boost sales.



Dr. Brian Alexander at the Dana-Farber Cancer Center was in the process of launching a new type of clinical trial called an adaptive platform trial. Unlike traditional randomized controlled trials, adaptive platform trials facilitate simultaneously studying multiple therapies for a given disease and have the potential to make clinical trials for new cancer drugs more efficient and accessible to patients. Developing questions around design, operations, and financing set the stage for this discussion with Ariel Stern about her case, Adaptive Platform Trials: The Clinical Trial of the Future?



The Chase Sapphire Reserve credit card was one of the hottest product launches in 2016, enthusiastically received by millennial consumers, a group that had previously eluded JPMorgan Chase and its competitors. Shelle Santana discusses how protagonists Pam Codispoti and Eileen Serra shifted their focus to retaining customers attracted by the one-time signup bonus of 100,000 reward points and on acquiring new customers now that the bonus had been reduced.Shelle Santana discusses how protagonists Pam Codispoti and Eileen Serra shifted their focus to retaining customers attracted by the one-time signup bonus of 100,000 reward points and on acquiring new customers now that the bonus had been reduced.



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