News & Highlights

  • January 2021
  • MBA Experience

MBA Voices: A French Student’s HBS Experience—Interview with Marc Duranteau, MBA 2019

MBA Voices is a collection of community perspectives that provides prospective students with insight into life at HBS. In this interview, French student Marc Duranteau, MBA 2019, explains why he applied to HBS via the 2+2 deferred admissions process, and which opportunities he pursued after graduation. The 2+2 program grants deferred admission to students, who are either in college or in a full-time master’s degree program. It is comprised of at least two years of professional work experience (maximum of four years) followed by two years in the regular HBS MBA program.
  • October 2020
  • Events

Worldwide Week at Harvard

Worldwide Week at Harvard showcases the breadth of Harvard’s global engagement through academic and cultural events with global or international themes. On October 7th-8th, 2020, Harvard broadcasted 24 Hours of Harvard, which featured 24 consecutive hours of around-the-clock and around-the-world events and activities. The ERC contributed by stringing together stories from faculty members, a doctoral graduate, and staff members—showcasing the variety of the Center’s activities in Europe, from supporting faculty members with cases and research work, to supporting students and alumni in career coaching and orientation.
  • August 2020
  • Managing the Future of Work

Unilever’s Workforce Transformation: Hard Truths and Help with Change

In this podcast, Professor Bill Kerr talks to Nick Dalton, Executive Vice President of Business Transformation at Unilever and the protagonist of a new Harvard Business School case study supported by Emilie Billaud and Mette Fuglsang Hjortshøj of the Europe Research Center. Unilever is several years into a company-wide plan to revolutionize its workforce. This vast program includes operational and cultural change across many divisions in more than 100 countries. The effort includes job counseling, retraining, and assistance with career moves—within the company or elsewhere. Dalton discusses what it takes to be transparent about coming changes and work with employees, unions, governments, and others to identify mutually beneficial transitions.

New Research on the Region

  • February 2021
  • Case

Brainlab: Imaging A MedTech Future

By: Regina E. Herzlinger, Gregory P. Licholai and Federica Gabrieli

Can Brainlab, a privately held firm, compete with giants like Medtronic and Amazon in delivering the Digital Operating Room of the future? The CEO is pondering solutions for secure exchange of medical information, pricing a new robotic imaging device, and reorganizing the firm. Thirty years have passed since the self-taught computer programmer Stefan Vilsmeier founded the firm and achieved dominance in many fields. How can he maintain it in the face of this new, powerful, and well-funded competition?

  • January 2021
  • Case

Eaton Corporation: Portfolio Transformation and the Cost of Capital (Abridged)

By: Benjamin C. Esty, E. Scott Mayfield and Daniel Fisher

In 2000, Eaton Corporation was a broadly diversified industrial conglomerate. But its strategy was evolving and its focus was narrowing around “power management” and more recently on “intelligent power,” the use of digitally enabled products and services designed to enhance efficiency and reliability. To implement this transition, Eaton had acquired more than 70 companies and divested another 50. Such active portfolio management required Eaton to regularly assess the prospects of each business unit—the profit and growth potential—and to explore opportunities to enhance its capabilities through acquisitions. In January 2020, Eaton got an offer from Danfoss, a Danish conglomerate, to buy its hydraulics business for $3.3 billion. Recently appointed CEO Craig Arnold must decide whether this deal makes sense strategically and financially. In particular, he must decide if $3.3 billion is a fair price for the firm’s hydraulics business. This abridged version is shorter than the original version (HBS Case #221-006) and does not contain the appendix that explains and derives the formulas for the WACC using the capital asset pricing model (CAPM).

  • January 2021
  • Teaching Material

Eaton Corporation: Portfolio Transformation and The Cost of Capital (Abridged)

By: Benjamin C. Esty, E. Scott Mayfield and Daniel Fisher

In 2000, Eaton Corporation was a broadly diversified industrial conglomerate. But its strategy was evolving and its focus was narrowing around “power management” and more recently on “intelligent power,” the use of digitally enabled products and services designed to enhance efficiency and reliability. To implement this transition, Eaton had acquired more than 70 companies and divested another 50. Such active portfolio management required Eaton to regularly assess the prospects of each business unit—the profit and growth potential—and to explore opportunities to enhance its capabilities through acquisitions. In January 2020, Eaton got an offer from Danfoss, a Danish conglomerate, to buy its hydraulics business for $3.3 billion. Recently appointed CEO Craig Arnold must decide whether this deal makes sense strategically and financially. In particular, he must decide if $3.3 billion is a fair price for the firm’s hydraulics business. This abridged version is shorter than the original version (HBS Case #221-006) and does not contain the appendix that explains and derives the formulas for the WACC using the capital asset pricing model (CAPM).

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Paris Staff

Vincent Dessain
Executive Director
Daniela Beyersdorfer
Senior Associate Director, Research and Administration
Emilie Billaud
Assistant Director
Giulia Bussoletti
Executive Assistant
Elena Corsi
Assistant Director
Federica Gabrieli
Research Associate
Mette Hjortshoej
Research Associate
Tonia Labruyere
Research Associate
Emer Moloney
Senior Researcher
Jan Pianca
Associate Director, Educational Programs
Oksana Sichi
Assistant Director, Administration