Ashish Nanda - Faculty & Research - Harvard Business School
Photo of Ashish Nanda

Ashish Nanda

Senior Lecturer of Business Administration


Ashish Nanda is Senior Lecturer at Harvard Business School.

From 2013 to 2017, he was Director of Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad. Before joining IIMA, he was Robert Braucher Professor of Practice at Harvard Law School for seven years. Before that, he was a Harvard Business School faculty member for 13 years.

Nanda was Fellow, Harvard Business School Executive Education from 2013 to 2017 and Officiating Director, IIM Nagpur from its inception in 2015 to 2017. He is Distinguished Fellow, Harvard Law School Executive Education.

Professor Nanda stepped aside as Director, IIMA in September 2017 and in October 2017 joined the Strategy Unit of Harvard Business School.

Nanda’s research, teaching, and advisory work focus on leadership, particularly in the context of professional services and institutions of higher education. He has published case studies and articles on professional services in three primary streams – management of professional service organizations, professionals’ labor markets, and professionalism. During his stint as Director, IIMA, Nanda has written on, and participated in conferences and task forces related to, administration of higher education institutions, particularly Indian professional schools.

Nanda was born in New Delhi. He is married to Shubha Nanda, faculty at Tufts Dental School, Boston. The couple has a son, Pranav Nanda who is studying Medicine at College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University, New York.

Nanda is fond of reading and playing squash.

Books
Journal Articles
  1. Does Individual Performance Affect Entrepreneurial Mobility? Empirical Evidence from the Financial Analysis Market

    Boris Groysberg, Ashish Nanda and M. Julia Prats

    Our paper contributes to the studies on the relationship between workers' human capital and their decision to become self-employed as well as their probability to survive as entrepreneurs. Analysis from a panel data set of research analysts in investment banks over 1988-1996 reveals that star analysts are more likely than non-star analysts to become entrepreneurs. Furthermore, we find that ventures started by star analysts have a higher probability of survival than ventures established by non-star analysts. Extending traditional theories of entrepreneurship and labor mobility, our results also suggest that drivers of turnover vary by destination: (a) turnover to entrepreneurship and (b) other turnover. In contrast to turnover to entrepreneurship, star analysts are less likely to move to other firms than non-star analysts.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Investment Banking; Retention; Human Capital; Performance Effectiveness; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Groysberg, Boris, Ashish Nanda, and M. Julia Prats. "Does Individual Performance Affect Entrepreneurial Mobility? Empirical Evidence from the Financial Analysis Market." Journal of Financial Transformation 25 (March 2009): 95–106.  View Details
  2. Can They Take It with Them? The Portability of Star Knowledge Workers' Performance: Myth or Reality

    Boris Groysberg, Linda-Eling Lee and Ashish Nanda

    Keywords: Knowledge; Employees; Performance;

    Citation:

    Groysberg, Boris, Linda-Eling Lee, and Ashish Nanda. "Can They Take It with Them? The Portability of Star Knowledge Workers' Performance: Myth or Reality." Management Science 54, no. 7 (July 2008): 1213 – 1230.  View Details
Cases and Teaching Materials
  1. EY China (B): An Emerging Giant

    Ashish Nanda, Das Narayandas and Lisa Rohrer

    The case outlines how regional managing partner (RMP) Albert Ng steered Ernst & Young (EY) China through a period of significant growth from 2009, when it was the smallest of the Big Four firms in China, to 2017, by when it had become the second largest firm. Partners worldwide felt a sense of shared achievement, since EY Global had come together with China leadership to invest in building a strong China practice that was integral to all of EY.
    But Ng was not resting content. He believed that EY China was at a critical juncture. Chinese economic growth, which had partially fueled EY China’s dramatic rise, was slowing down, just as competition was intensifying. Was EY China prepared to face the challenges that lay ahead?

    Keywords: leadership; professional services; international management; Big Four; accounting industry; strategy and execution; emerging market; Strategy; Growth Management; Leadership; Global Range; Emerging Markets; Competitive Strategy; Accounting Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Das Narayandas, and Lisa Rohrer. "EY China (B): An Emerging Giant." Harvard Business School Supplement 718-465, May 2018. (Revised July 2018.)  View Details
  2. EY China (A): Strengthening Presence in a Critical Market

    Ashish Nanda, Das Narayandas and Lisa Rohrer

    Soon after being named regional managing partner for Ernst & Yong (EY) China in September 2009, Albert Ng reflects on the enormity of challenges facing EY China. Despite EY Global's commitment to the China practice, EY China’s growth agenda has been reversed, post global financial crisis. The smallest of the Big Four global accounting firms in China, EY China’s reputation has weakened in the market, morale of its professionals has plummeted, and it faces the threat of a major lawsuit. Ng is musing how to address all these challenges confronting EY China.

    Keywords: leadership; professional services; international management; Big Four; accounting industry; strategy and execution; emerging market; Strategy; Leadership; Global Range; Growth and Development Strategy; Emerging Markets; Accounting Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Das Narayandas, and Lisa Rohrer. "EY China (A): Strengthening Presence in a Critical Market." Harvard Business School Case 718-464, May 2018. (Revised July 2018.)  View Details
Cases and Notes Related to Professionalism
  1. AdNet (A)

    Confronted by a business proposal that is remarkably similar to a project recently financed by a sister office, venture capitalist Monique LeMieux ponders what she should do.

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Ethics; Standards; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kimberly A. Haddad. "AdNet (A)." Harvard Business School Case 902-024, July 2001. (Revised August 2004.)  View Details
  2. Ethics in Venture Capital

    Discusses potential conflicts of interest that venture capitalists face in dealing with entrepreneurs. Critiques arguments that such conflicts are easily managed and unproblematic. Suggests four ways to address potential conflicts.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Venture Capital; Ethics;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Ethics in Venture Capital." Harvard Business School Background Note 902-028, July 2001.  View Details
  3. Analyst Conflicts (A): Resolved?

    This case tracks the events leading to the April 2003 industry settlement on equity research in financial services companies.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Law; Negotiation Deal; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Analyst Conflicts (A): Resolved?" Harvard Business School Case 904-021, September 2003. (Revised February 2005.)  View Details
  4. Being a Professional

    We encounter in all aspects of our daily lives groups of individuals who identify themselves as professionals. Many of us aspire to be professionals in our vocation and conduct. But what are the aspects of being a professional? The following anthology of book excerpts addresses this question.

    Keywords: Behavior; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    "Being a Professional." Harvard Business School Compilation 904-041, November 2003. (Revised March 2005.)  View Details
  5. Broken Trust: Role of Professionals in the Enron Debacle

    Discusses the role of professionals in the Enron debacle. Argues that professionals failed to prevent or predict Enron's collapse because of the conflicts of interest they faced. Concludes with observations on management and regulation of conflicts of interest facing professionals.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Trust; Management Teams; Energy Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Broken Trust: Role of Professionals in the Enron Debacle." Harvard Business School Case 903-084, December 2002. (Revised February 2003.)  View Details
  6. Consulting by Auditors (A): Levitt's Campaign

    This case highlights the debate between the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and several of the large accounting firms over whether the same firms should offer consulting services to clients they audit.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Accounting Industry; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kimberly A. Haddad. "Consulting by Auditors (A): Levitt's Campaign." Harvard Business School Case 902-161, January 2002. (Revised September 2004.)  View Details
  7. Consulting by Auditors (B): The Compromise and its Fallout

    This case tracks the evolution from October 2000 to July 2001 of public debate, regulatory decisions, and firm perspectives on the subject of consulting by accounting firms.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Service Delivery; Accounting Industry; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kimberly A. Haddad. "Consulting by Auditors (B): The Compromise and its Fallout." Harvard Business School Case 903-069, January 2003. (Revised September 2004.)  View Details
  8. An Ancient Fable

    This case presents a thinly disguised account of Andersen's collapse, followed by a tightening of the oversight of audit firms. It raises questions on who lost and who gained, as well as the long-term implications of the changes for the accounting profession and society. It is distributed toward the end of class discussion on consulting by auditors.

    Keywords: Accounting Audits; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "An Ancient Fable." Harvard Business School Case 903-138, June 2003. (Revised October 2003.)  View Details
  9. Crisis and Response: Sexual Abuse Allegations in the Boston Archdiocese (A)

    This case describes how the Boston archdiocese of the Roman Catholic Church handled allegations of clergy sexual abuse during the 1990s. In 2002, the archdiocese was confronted by public revelations of how the allegations were handled. Professional organizations first and foremost must protect the interests of those whom the profession serves. Professional organizations, however, also protect and further the interests of their members. The case also describes the Boston archdiocese's initial response to the storm of public criticism that followed the revelations.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Crime and Corruption; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Religion; Crisis Management; Boston;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Crisis and Response: Sexual Abuse Allegations in the Boston Archdiocese (A)." Harvard Business School Case 904-048, January 2004. (Revised April 2004.)  View Details
  10. Crisis and Response: Sexual Abuse Allegations in the Boston Archdiocese (B)

    In 2002, the Boston archdiocese of the Roman Catholic Church was confronted by public revelations of how allegations of clergy sexual abuse were handled by the archdiocese during the 1990s. This case describes how the Boston archdiocese addressed the issue over the next two years. It also describes the reverberations of the scandal nationwide, theories on the root causes of the problem, and emerging sentiment in church hierarchy and the laity. Professional organizations first and foremost must protect the interests of those whom the profession serves. Professional organizations, however, also protect and further the interests of their members.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Crime and Corruption; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Religion; Crisis Management; Boston;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Crisis and Response: Sexual Abuse Allegations in the Boston Archdiocese (B)." Harvard Business School Case 904-049, January 2004. (Revised April 2004.)  View Details
  11. Evolution of Public Reputation of a Profession (A)

    This case explores how the public reputation of a profession evolves as its membership changes. The public reputation of a professional relies on its association's credibility for ensuring, through rigorous certification and self-regulation, that its members place client interests foremost. It demonstrates that if associations deviate from this objective and focus instead on the well-being of their members, the public goodwill of the profession suffers.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Ethics; Organizations; Reputation;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Evolution of Public Reputation of a Profession (A)." Harvard Business School Case 904-052, January 2004. (Revised February 2004.)  View Details
  12. Learning from Scandals: Responsibility of Professional Organizations

    This case comments on the responsibility of professional organizations to respond openly to public accusations of wrongdoing by its members. It briefly relates the circumstances of the sexual abuse scandal in the Boston archdiocese of the Roman Catholic Church and the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants' handling of concerns about auditor independence. The case suggests that professional associations can learn from these unsuccessful attempts to suppress public concerns about practitioners.

    Keywords: Corporate Disclosure; Ethics;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Learning from Scandals: Responsibility of Professional Organizations." Harvard Business School Background Note 905-037, October 2004. (Revised March 2006.)  View Details
  13. Managing Client Conflicts

    This case describes the two types of client conflict--conflict of duty and conflict of service--that professionals manage. It delineates how the management of these conflicts affects the scale and scope of service that professionals provide.

    Keywords: Conflict Management; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Managing Client Conflicts." Harvard Business School Background Note 904-059, January 2004. (Revised March 2005.)  View Details
  14. Professional Associations

    This case discusses why society grants professional associations the rights of certification and self-regulation. In exercising these rights, professional associations serve client interests but also the interest of member practitioners. The case discusses how associations that place practitioner interest over client interest risk the separation of their profession. It concludes with a discussion of the relationship between professional associations and professional service firms.

    Keywords: Governance; Conflict of Interests; Society;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Professional Associations." Harvard Business School Background Note 904-054, January 2004. (Revised May 2004.)  View Details
  15. Professionals' Quandaries

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Scot H. Landry

    Presents five situations in which professionals face ethical dilemmas.

    Keywords: Ethics; Personal Development and Career; Human Resources; Management Practices and Processes; Situation or Environment;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Professionals' Quandaries." Harvard Business School Case 800-371, April 2000.  View Details
  16. Sherif Mityas at A.T. Kearney (A): Negotiating a Client Service Predicament

    Sherif Mityas, recently promoted as project manager at A.T. Kearney, faced a client service challenge in his very first project experience. Mityas had been working closely for six weeks with the management team of the U.S. subsidiary of a Japan-headquartered consumer products company to identify ways to turn around the U.S. operations. Following the midproject status meeting, executives from the Japanese parent company made an unexpected request that placed Mityas in a quandary. Mityas related the situation: "At the conclusion of the midproject meeting, I felt confident that we had made solid recommendations about turning around the U.S. operations, but the Japanese parent company executives made a difficult request. They wanted us to evaluate the ability of the U.S. management team to carry out the turnaround. U.S. management had been instrumental in our being able to understand and analyze the situation comprehensively, and we would need their cooperation for our future work to be meaningful. If they came to know that we were simultaneously evaluating them, we could lose their trust--but, then, the Japanese executives represented the client. I didn't know how to proceed."

    Keywords: Management; Conflict of Interests; Business Subsidiaries; Trust; Consumer Products Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kelley Elizabeth Morrell. "Sherif Mityas at A.T. Kearney (A): Negotiating a Client Service Predicament." Harvard Business School Case 904-031, December 2003. (Revised April 2004.)  View Details
  17. American Medical Association-Sunbeam Deal, The (A): Serpent on the Staff Meets Chainsaw Al

    Facing dwindling membership and looking to increase its revenue, the American Medical Association (AMA) signed an endorsement deal with Sunbeam Corp., a leader in the small home appliance industry, in August 1997. In the deal, the AMA would receive significant royalties from Sunbeam in exchange for the use of its seal on Sunbeam's home health-care products. Critics protested that this deal posed a conflict of interest before the AMA. Supporters argued, however, that the deal was a good way for the AMA to ease the association's financial troubles. Furthermore, the deal would be beneficial to patients because it encouraged people to monitor their own health.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Organizations; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kimberly A. Haddad. "American Medical Association-Sunbeam Deal, The (A): Serpent on the Staff Meets Chainsaw Al." Harvard Business School Case 801-326, January 2001. (Revised October 2002.)  View Details
  18. American Medical Association-Sunbeam Deal (C), The: Denouement

    On September 5, 1997, the American Medical Association(AMA) withdrew from a contract with Sunbeam Corporation, the maker of samll home appliances. Sunbeam sued the AMA to pay for the damages or to comply with the contract. The fracas led to the dismissal of three top AMA executives. The AMA initiated an investigation into the episode. As a result of the failed deal, the AMA's CEO resigned, and the failed deal eventually cost the AMA an estimated $16 million. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Contracts; Corporate Accountability; Organizations; Lawsuits and Litigation; Consumer Products Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kimberly A. Haddad. "American Medical Association-Sunbeam Deal (C), The: Denouement." Harvard Business School Case 802-091, September 2001. (Revised January 2002.)  View Details
  19. Essence of Professionalism, The: Managing Conflict of Interest

    This case argues that central to being a professional is the pledge to manage conflicts of interest such that client interest is placed foremost.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Essence of Professionalism, The: Managing Conflict of Interest." Harvard Business School Background Note 903-120, June 2003. (Revised December 2003.)  View Details
  20. Professional Pledge and Conflict of Interest, The

    It is argued that professionals pledge fiduciary responsibility towards their clients to minimize the occurrence of conflicts of interest, which are socially inefficient. Professional associations are formed to ensure that in their practices, professionals live by their professional pledges.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Ethics; Organizations;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Professional Pledge and Conflict of Interest, The." Harvard Business School Background Note 899-177, January 1999.  View Details
  21. Saga of Prince Jefri and KPMG (A), The: Mystery of the Missing Billions

    Accounting and law firms around the globe are following with great interest the progress through British courts of a lawsuit. Those familiar with the suit, filed by Prince Jefri of Brunei against the professional service firm KPMG Peat Marwick, remark that its judgment will be "a landmark ruling with profound implications." At stake is nothing less than how professional service firms conduct their business. The case highlights: (1) the emerging tension between how accounting firms and law firms view their responsibility to clients and (2) the use and limitations of "Chinese walls" in managing potential conflicts within firms.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Saga of Prince Jefri and KPMG (A), The: Mystery of the Missing Billions." Harvard Business School Case 899-266, May 1999.  View Details
  22. Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (A)

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Scot H. Landry

    Ten years into his career after graduating from HBS, Tim Hertach discovers billing irregularities at his consulting firm. He must decide whether (and how) to challenge senior management or to stay quiet and protect his career.

    Keywords: Decisions; Ethics; Accounting; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-153, November 1999. (Revised April 2002.)  View Details
  23. Who is a Professional?

    Many occupations lay claim to professional status. Business executives, social workers, musicians, sportsmen, and academics describe their occupations as "professions". Office assistants call themselves "administrative professionals". Obviously, not all occupations that claim to be professions are so recognized by society. Society attaches the professional label only to certain occupations. Doctors and lawyers are professionals; auto mechanics and restaurant wait staff are not. Yet, gray areas exist. Are nurses professionals? Teachers? Real estate brokers? This case identifies the distinguishing characteristics of professional work. Professionals are a subcategory of service providers. An understanding of what distinguishes professionals from other service providers must be grounded in an understanding of 1.) what constitutes service provisions and 2.) how the various categories of service provision differ.

    Keywords: Status and Position; Jobs and Positions; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Who is a Professional?" Harvard Business School Background Note 904-047, December 2003. (Revised March 2005.)  View Details
Cases and Notes Related to Leadership and Management of Professional Service Firms
  1. EY China (B): An Emerging Giant

    Ashish Nanda, Das Narayandas and Lisa Rohrer

    The case outlines how regional managing partner (RMP) Albert Ng steered Ernst & Young (EY) China through a period of significant growth from 2009, when it was the smallest of the Big Four firms in China, to 2017, by when it had become the second largest firm. Partners worldwide felt a sense of shared achievement, since EY Global had come together with China leadership to invest in building a strong China practice that was integral to all of EY.
    But Ng was not resting content. He believed that EY China was at a critical juncture. Chinese economic growth, which had partially fueled EY China’s dramatic rise, was slowing down, just as competition was intensifying. Was EY China prepared to face the challenges that lay ahead?

    Keywords: leadership; professional services; international management; Big Four; accounting industry; strategy and execution; emerging market; Strategy; Growth Management; Leadership; Global Range; Emerging Markets; Competitive Strategy; Accounting Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Das Narayandas, and Lisa Rohrer. "EY China (B): An Emerging Giant." Harvard Business School Supplement 718-465, May 2018. (Revised July 2018.)  View Details
  2. EY China (A): Strengthening Presence in a Critical Market

    Ashish Nanda, Das Narayandas and Lisa Rohrer

    Soon after being named regional managing partner for Ernst & Yong (EY) China in September 2009, Albert Ng reflects on the enormity of challenges facing EY China. Despite EY Global's commitment to the China practice, EY China’s growth agenda has been reversed, post global financial crisis. The smallest of the Big Four global accounting firms in China, EY China’s reputation has weakened in the market, morale of its professionals has plummeted, and it faces the threat of a major lawsuit. Ng is musing how to address all these challenges confronting EY China.

    Keywords: leadership; professional services; international management; Big Four; accounting industry; strategy and execution; emerging market; Strategy; Leadership; Global Range; Growth and Development Strategy; Emerging Markets; Accounting Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Das Narayandas, and Lisa Rohrer. "EY China (A): Strengthening Presence in a Critical Market." Harvard Business School Case 718-464, May 2018. (Revised July 2018.)  View Details
  3. Abby Joseph Cohen: A Career Retrospective

    This case provides a career retrospective as of 2003 on Goldman Sachs strategist Abby Joseph Cohen. It reviews Cohen's career path and progress through key decision points.

    Keywords: Decisions; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kristin Lieb. "Abby Joseph Cohen: A Career Retrospective." Harvard Business School Case 903-118, April 2003. (Revised June 2003.)  View Details
  4. AGENCY.COM (A): Launching an Interactive Service Agency

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Scot H. Landry

    Having recently launched one of Silicon Valley's first start-ups, cofounders Chan Suh and Kyle Shannon ponder whether their interactive consulting firm is prepared to bid for work from a very large client.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Internet; Problems and Challenges; Business Strategy; Decision Making; Entrepreneurship; Consulting Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "AGENCY.COM (A): Launching an Interactive Service Agency." Harvard Business School Case 800-061, November 1999. (Revised May 2001.)  View Details
  5. AGENCY.COM (B): Managing Rapid Growth

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scot H. Landry

    AGENCY.COM continues on its path of rapid growth, emerging as a leading interactive consulting firm. Its growth leads to new challenges related to the integration of diverse operations and the financing of future growth.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Problems and Challenges; Entrepreneurship; Internet; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "AGENCY.COM (B): Managing Rapid Growth." Harvard Business School Case 800-062, November 1999. (Revised June 2000.)  View Details
  6. AGENCY.COM (A) and (B) TN

    Ashish Nanda and Thomas J. DeLong

    Teaching Note for (9-800-061) and (9-800-062).

    Keywords: Internet; Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Corporate Finance; Growth and Development; Web Services Industry; Consulting Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Thomas J. DeLong. "AGENCY.COM (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-014, September 2000. (Revised August 2011.)  View Details
  7. e-Consulting

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong, Thomas E. Agan and Scot H. Landry

    Provides an overview of the history and development of the e-consulting industry, as well as the issues facing it.

    Keywords: History; Internet; Growth and Development; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, Thomas E. Agan, and Scot H. Landry. "e-Consulting." Harvard Business School Background Note 800-312, April 2000.  View Details
  8. Andersen Consulting - EMEAI: Reorganization for Revitalization

    Ashish Nanda and Michael Y. Yoshino

    Vernon Ellis, managing partner of Andersen Consulting -- Europe, Middle East, Africa, and India (AC -- EMEAI), is considering how best to reorganize. AC -- EMEAI has grown rapidly over the past five years to become Europe's largest consulting operation. However, Ellis feels that the organization needs to be reconfigured if it has to continue on its trajectory of rapid growth. Each of the various alternatives that he is considering offers intriguing potential benefits but also carries considerable risks.

    Keywords: Restructuring; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Business or Company Management; Organizational Design; Growth Management; Cost vs Benefits; Leading Change; Management Teams; Consulting Industry; Europe; Africa; India; Middle East;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Michael Y. Yoshino. "Andersen Consulting - EMEAI: Reorganization for Revitalization." Harvard Business School Case 396-007, October 1995. (Revised May 2006.)  View Details
  9. Andersen Consulting - EMEAI: Bill Barnard on Organization Change

    Ashish Nanda and Michael Y. Yoshino

    Remarks by William (Bill) Barnard, partner-in-charge for Strategic Services in the subregion of Western Europe, in a conversation he had with Professors Ashish Nanda and Michael Yoshino of the Harvard Business School on November 1, 1995.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Consulting Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Michael Y. Yoshino. "Andersen Consulting - EMEAI: Bill Barnard on Organization Change." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 397-501, August 1996.  View Details
  10. Andersen Consulting--EMEAI: Bill Barnard on Organizational Change

    Michael Y. Yoshino and Ashish Nanda

    Supplements Andersen Consulting - EMEA: Reorganization for Revitalization.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Yoshino, Michael Y., and Ashish Nanda. "Andersen Consulting--EMEAI: Bill Barnard on Organizational Change." Harvard Business School Supplement 396-375, June 1996. (Revised April 1997.)  View Details
  11. Organizational Change at Andersen Consulting - EMEAI

    Supplements Andersen Consulting - EMEAI: Reorganization for Revitalization. An alternative to video Organizational Change at Anderson Consulting - EMEAI, Video.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Organizational Change at Andersen Consulting - EMEAI." Harvard Business School Supplement 899-035, July 1998.  View Details
  12. Bain & Company, Inc.: Making Partner

    In June 1998, Bain's compensation and policy committee meets to review candidates for elevation to partnership. The case presents the profiles of four candidates and ends with the promotion committee debating the merits of the candidates.

    Keywords: Partners and Partnerships; Personal Development and Career; Employees;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Perry Fagan. "Bain & Company, Inc.: Making Partner." Harvard Business School Case 899-066, February 1999. (Revised April 1999.)  View Details
  13. Bain & Co., Inc.: Phyllis Yale in Conversation with MBA students

    Phyllis Yale, chairman of Bain's Compensation and Promotion Committee (CPC), discusses how the CPC decided on four promotion cases. She reflects on the impact of the promotion decision-making process on the firm.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Compensation and Benefits; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Bain & Co., Inc.: Phyllis Yale in Conversation with MBA students." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 800-503, May 2000.  View Details
  14. Camp Dresser & McKee: Getting Incentives Right

    "If you try to use money to motivate behavior, you are in a powerful and dangerous place, especially with engineers and scientists," remarked Tom Furman, CEO of Camp Dresser & McKee, Inc. (CDM), a consulting environmental engineering firm. Historically, CDM had followed an "egalitarian" management bonus program based on qualitative measures. As industry growth decelerated and competition intensified since 1991, management changed the incentive plan to tie it closer to the achievement of business objectives. This case describes the bonus and incentive compensation system and the evaluation process. It ends with Furman reflecting on how to interpret the CDM system to reward four CDM executives suitably.

    Keywords: Motivation and Incentives; Compensation and Benefits; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and M. Julia Prats. "Camp Dresser & McKee: Getting Incentives Right." Harvard Business School Case 902-122, November 2001. (Revised April 2003.)  View Details
  15. Cap Gemini Ernst & Young (A): A Global Merger

    French IT consulting giant Cap Gemini is poised to purchase the consulting arm of Ernst & Young, a U.S.-based Big 5 accounting firm. In doing so, many differences need to be resolved, including negotiating with Ernst & Young entities all over the world as well as converting Ernst & Young partners into employees of publicly held Cap Gemini. Amidst all of the decisions, the market for IT consulting services is changing rapidly, further complicating the merger negotiations and implementation. Teaching Purpose: To study the range of issues that must be considered and resolved in negotiating a professional services firm merger, the valuation and motivational challenges associated with merging a private entity into a public entity, and the challenges of negotiating a cross-border merger.

    Keywords: Negotiation; Multinational Firms and Management; Mergers and Acquisitions; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Information Technology Industry; Consulting Industry; France;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Bertrand Moingeon, Lisa Haueisen Rohrer, and Guillaume Soenen. "Cap Gemini Ernst & Young (A): A Global Merger." Harvard Business School Case 903-056, December 2002. (Revised February 2005.)  View Details
  16. Cap Gemini Ernst & Young (B): A Global Merger

    The negotiations for the merger between Cap Gemini and Ernst & Young conclude, resolving issues of how to bring together Ernst & Young consulting partnerships from all over the world into the publicly held Cap Gemini. Reactions to the merger were optimistic within Cap Gemini and Ernst & Young, but analysts voiced concerns about a cultural clash between the two firms and the viability of the new firm's strategy.

    Keywords: Partners and Partnerships; Negotiation; Multinational Firms and Management; Mergers and Acquisitions; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Bertrand Moingeon, Lisa Haueisen Rohrer, and Guillaume Soenen. "Cap Gemini Ernst & Young (B): A Global Merger." Harvard Business School Case 903-057, December 2002. (Revised February 2005.)  View Details
  17. Note on Valuation-Compensation Tradeoff in Professional Service Firm Acquisitions

    This case highlights the tradeoff between valuation ascribed to professionals at the time of a professional services firm (PSF) acquisition and the postacquisition compensation of these professionals. It emphasizes how a high valuation at acquisition carries with it the requirement to lower professionals' compensation postacquisition.

    Keywords: Valuation; Employees; Acquisition; Compensation and Benefits; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Note on Valuation-Compensation Tradeoff in Professional Service Firm Acquisitions." Harvard Business School Background Note 903-111, February 2003. (Revised August 2004.)  View Details
  18. Compensation in Professional Service Firms

    Discusses the compensation of professionals--partners and nonpartners--in a professional services firm. Discusses the considerations that determine the choice of compensation systems and the interrelationship between compensation and other human resources management systems in professional services firms.

    Keywords: Compensation and Benefits; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Lauren Prusiner. "Compensation in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Background Note 905-039, October 2004. (Revised March 2006.)  View Details
  19. Developing Professionals-The BCG Way (A)

    This case provides a brief history of Boston Consulting Group (BCG) and the firm's approach to development and mentorship of its consultants. It also discusses the challenges facing three consultants who are nearing the two-year mark of working at BCG.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kelley Elizabeth Morrell. "Developing Professionals-The BCG Way (A)." Harvard Business School Case 903-113, April 2003. (Revised April 2006.)  View Details
  20. Ecolab, Inc.

    Addresses the importance of protecting against and managing employee defections. The (A) case, distributed in advance of the class, describes Ecolab's solid position in the institutional cleaning business. Faint rumblings of internal dissension at the end of the case are qualified by a five-minute video that emphasizes the loyalty and esprit-de-corps that pervade the company generally. The (B) case comes as a shock in the wake of the (A) case and video. Several of Ecolab's trusted senior executives have approached its principal competitor, Diversey, with a proposal to switch loyalties in return for monetary rewards. The (C) case shifts the perspective to Ecolab president Al Schuman, who is wondering how to react to the defections. Discussion of proposed action plans is followed by distributing the (D) case, which describes how Ecolab responded to the challenge. A two-minute video excerpt from Schuman's field visit highlights his personal response to the challenge. The (E) case recounts other instances of poaching by rival firms and defections by key employees, and the (F) case discusses the legal standing of noncompete agreements. A condensed version of earlier cases.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Retention; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Ecolab, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 396-371, May 1996. (Revised October 2005.)  View Details
  21. Family Feud (A): Andersen v. Andersen

    Traces the history and development of consulting within Andersen and the history of the schism between Arthur Andersen and Andersen Consulting. Ends with the two units seeking external arbitration of their dispute.

    Keywords: Organizational Design; Corporate Governance; Conflict and Resolution; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Scot H. Landry. "Family Feud (A): Andersen v. Andersen." Harvard Business School Case 800-064, November 1999. (Revised February 2002.)  View Details
  22. Family Feud (B): Andersen versus Andersen

    Arbitration proceedings have been initiated between Andersen Consulting and Arthur Andersen. The case details developments during 1999 and 2000, as the arbitration nears a decision.

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Service Industry; Consulting Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Scott D Landry. "Family Feud (B): Andersen versus Andersen." Harvard Business School Case 800-210, April 2000. (Revised July 2000.)  View Details
  23. Infosys Technologies

    Ashish Nanda and Thomas J. DeLong

    Creating and sustaining a third-world-based technology company to compete globally (i.e. in the first-world) poses many challenges. Such challenges are examined through the genesis and progression of Infosys Technologies Ltd. Key decisions made by Chairman N.R. Narayana Murthy are particularly highlighted.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business or Company Management; Management Practices and Processes; Business Strategy; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Global Strategy; Growth and Development Strategy; Planning; Technological Innovation; Emerging Markets; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Thomas J. DeLong. "Infosys Technologies." Harvard Business School Case 801-445, May 2001. (Revised May 2002.)  View Details
  24. International Profit Associates

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Monica Mullick

    Describes the work environment, systems, and processes that allow International Profit Associates (IPA) to follow a systematic four-step approach to providing advisory service to small business owners.

    Keywords: Organizational Structure; Business Processes; Business Model; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Monica Mullick. "International Profit Associates." Harvard Business School Case 801-397, March 2001. (Revised February 2004.)  View Details
  25. Jill Greenthal at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (A): The TCI/AT&T Deal

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Sarah S. Khetani

    Jill Greenthal, managing director at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, is leading her team of investment bankers to negotiate on behalf of Tele-Communications, Inc. (TCI) on a potential landmark deal with AT&T. Representing TCI in the negotiations is the culmination of relationships that Greenthal has nurtured over the course of a decade. Despite the best efforts of her team, negotiations appear poised on the edge of an impasse. Greenthal wonders what, if anything, her team can do to help find a better alternative.

    Keywords: Leadership; Negotiation Process; Service Delivery; Groups and Teams; Entrepreneurship; Negotiation Deal; Gender; Banking Industry; Service Industry; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Sarah S. Khetani. "Jill Greenthal at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (A): The TCI/AT&T Deal." Harvard Business School Case 800-213, March 2000. (Revised May 2001.)  View Details
  26. Jill Greenthal at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (B): The TCI/AT&T Deal

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Sarah S. Khetani

    Documents the hectic and grueling work done by Jill Greenthal's team at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette in an attempt to execute a landmark deal on behalf of a key client.

    Keywords: Leadership; Negotiation Process; Service Delivery; Groups and Teams; Entrepreneurship; Negotiation Deal; Gender; Banking Industry; Service Industry; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Sarah S. Khetani. "Jill Greenthal at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (B): The TCI/AT&T Deal." Harvard Business School Case 800-242, March 2000. (Revised April 2001.)  View Details
  27. Leading Public Professional Service Organizations

    Public professional service organizations (PPSOs) are professional service organizations that serve the public. This case describes the unique challenges facing PPSO leaders.

    Keywords: Leadership; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Leading Public Professional Service Organizations." Harvard Business School Background Note 903-123, April 2003. (Revised October 2003.)  View Details
  28. Lehman Brothers (A): Rise of the Equity Research Department

    Ashish Nanda, Boris Groysberg and Lauren Prusiner

    Under Jack Rivkin's leadership, Shearson Lehman's research department rose from relative obscurity to the highest ranking research department on Wall Street within three years. When Rivkin is promoted to head of equity, he wonders how to succeed in his new position. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Talent and Talent Management; Leadership; Service Operations; Organizational Culture; Research; Alignment;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Boris Groysberg, and Lauren Prusiner. "Lehman Brothers (A): Rise of the Equity Research Department." Harvard Business School Case 906-034, January 2006. (Revised June 2008.)  View Details
  29. Lehman Brothers (C): Decline of the Equity Research Department

    Ashish Nanda and Boris Groysberg

    This case tracks the rapid decline of Lehman Brothers' equity research department from August 1992, when, beset by declining ranking, low morale, and high turnover, firm management decides to clean house and reinvest in building the department.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Business or Company Management; Leadership; Human Resources; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Boris Groysberg. "Lehman Brothers (C): Decline of the Equity Research Department." Harvard Business School Case 902-003, July 2001. (Revised January 2007.)  View Details
  30. Managing the Client Portfolio

    Nitin Nohria and Ashish Nanda

    The German country managing partner of a global law firm must decide how to respond to a corporate mandate to restructure its client portfolio. The case enables a discussion of different types of clients in a global professional service firm in terms of relative revenues, profitability, and strategic significance. It also highlights the tensions between local subsidiaries and corporate headquarters with respect to managing client portfolios.

    Keywords: Attorney and Client Relationships; Management Style; Corporate Governance; Business Subsidiaries; Business Headquarters; Conflict and Resolution;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, and Ashish Nanda. "Managing the Client Portfolio." Harvard Business School Case 410-139, June 2010.  View Details
  31. McKinsey and Company: An Institution at a Crossroads

    This case tracks McKinsey's evolution from its origin in 1926 to 2002, emphasizing the institutional heritage of the firm. It closes with a description of the challenges facing the firm's leadership in 2002.

    Keywords: Leadership; Growth Management; Organizational Culture; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kelley Elizabeth Morrell. "McKinsey and Company: An Institution at a Crossroads." Harvard Business School Case 903-080, December 2002. (Revised February 2005.)  View Details
  32. Ownership Structure in Professional Service Firms: Partnership versus Public Corporation

    This case reviews the relative merits of partnership and public ownership structures in professional services firms. It also evaluates the various rationales for converting partnership professional services firms to publicly owned firms. Finally, the case highlights the leadership challenges associated with making conversions from partnership to public structure successful.

    Keywords: Private Ownership; Transition; Partners and Partnerships; Public Ownership; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Lauren Prusiner. "Ownership Structure in Professional Service Firms: Partnership versus Public Corporation." Harvard Business School Background Note 905-038, October 2004. (Revised July 2006.)  View Details
  33. Planning in Professional Service Firms

    In this case, four consultants discuss business planning issues that they are each having within their respective consulting firms. The case addresses how professional compensation, project staffing, hours worked, overhead costs, and billing rates impact profitability.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Strategic Planning; Profit; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kelley Elizabeth Morrell. "Planning in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Case 903-085, January 2003. (Revised March 2005.)  View Details
  34. Profitability Drivers in Professional Service Firms

    This csae presents a simple model of the drivers of profitability in a professional service partnership and conducts an empirical exploration of the determinants of profitability among AmLaw 100 firms over the period 1994 to 1999.

    Keywords: For-Profit Firms; Profit; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Profitability Drivers in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Background Note 904-064, February 2004. (Revised March 2004.)  View Details
  35. Overview of the Professional Services Course, An

    Thomas J. DeLong and Ashish Nanda

    Provides an overview of the HBS MBA Professional Services Course. Presents a structure and an outline intended to serve as a reference and provide orientation to students as the course progresses.

    Keywords: Business Education; Curriculum and Courses; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Ashish Nanda. "Overview of the Professional Services Course, An." Harvard Business School Background Note 800-229, November 1999. (Revised November 2000.)  View Details
  36. Professional Services Module One: Introduction to the Challenges Facing PSFs

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scot H. Landry

    This initial module was meant to clarify how the course would be useful to students who would be starting PSFs, working for them as an employee or contractor, managing them, or hiring them from the client side.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Selection and Staffing; Management; Service Delivery; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module One: Introduction to the Challenges Facing PSFs." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-007, September 2000.  View Details
  37. Professional Services Module Two: External Strategy for Sustained Competitive Advantage

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scot H. Landry

    Concerns itself with the strategic dynamics which influence organizations externally.

    Keywords: Competitive Advantage; Competitive Strategy; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Business Plan; Service Operations; For-Profit Firms; Power and Influence; Measurement and Metrics; Business Processes; Management Practices and Processes; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Two: External Strategy for Sustained Competitive Advantage." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-008, September 2000.  View Details
  38. Professional Services Module Three: Internal Strategy of Organizational Design

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scot H. Landry

    The way in which PSFs organize themselves to leverage strategic capabilities is imperative in achieving high performance.

    Keywords: Organizational Design; Strategy; Performance Capacity; Competency and Skills; Business Startups;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Three: Internal Strategy of Organizational Design." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-009, September 2000.  View Details
  39. Professional Services Module Four: Managing the Organization Through Processes

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scot H. Landry

    Focuses on how the internal processes connect strategy with implementation.

    Keywords: Economics; Human Capital; Business or Company Management; Business Processes;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Four: Managing the Organization Through Processes." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-010, September 2000.  View Details
  40. Professional Services Module Five: Serving Clients Effectively

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scot H. Landry

    It is imperative for the internal systems and processes to be connected to the external processes of client management, competitive adaptation, and service delivery.

    Keywords: Competency and Skills; Customer Relationship Management; Knowledge Acquisition; Service Delivery; Performance Effectiveness; Adaptation; Competitive Strategy;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Five: Serving Clients Effectively." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-011, September 2000.  View Details
  41. Professional Services Module Six: Succeeding in PSFs

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scot H. Landry

    Emphasizes the skills and values that we believe successful professionals possess: change management and leadership skills, a proactive career management approach, effective processes of giving and receiving feedback, a clear ethical perspective, balance between private and professional lives, and the ability to cope with ever increasing demands on one's time.

    Keywords: Management Skills; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Six: Succeeding in PSFs." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-012, September 2000.  View Details
  42. Professional Services Module Seven: Becoming a Professional

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scot H. Landry

    Discusses strategies for balancing private and professional life.

    Keywords: Experience and Expertise; Success; Work-Life Balance;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Seven: Becoming a Professional." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-013, September 2000. (Revised October 2002.)  View Details
  43. Scale and Scope in Professional Service Firms

    This case discusses why economies (and diseconomies) of scale and scope exist in professional service firms (PSFs) and how they influence the amount and range of services that PSFs offer. It is distributed with a case that focuses on determining the optimal scale/scope of a PSF.

    Keywords: Cost Management; Operations; Microeconomics; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Scale and Scope in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Background Note 903-117, March 2003. (Revised April 2006.)  View Details
  44. Staffing in Professional Service Firms

    This case discusses the problem of balancing demand and supply of professionals over time using a fictional scenario.

    Keywords: Selection and Staffing; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Kelley Elizabeth Morrell, and Lauren Prusiner. "Staffing in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Case 905-026, October 2004. (Revised February 2006.)  View Details
  45. Note on Staffing in Professional Service Firms

    This case discusses the problem of balancing demand and supply of professionals within a professional services firm (PSF). It emphasizes how human resources management policies impact supply conditions and how market opportunities determine demand conditions. The case identifies the levers that can be used to bring the demand and supply in balance.

    Keywords: Demand and Consumers; Balance and Stability; Supply and Industry; Employees; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Note on Staffing in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Background Note 903-110, February 2003. (Revised April 2003.)  View Details
  46. Strategic Review at Egon Zehnder International (A)

    The case describes the history of the executive search firm Egon Zehnder International (EZI) from its inception through 2000. Internal and environmental changes lead EZI leaders to question whether the firm might be at an inflection point in its history. The EZI executive committee contemplates whether and how to engage in a strategy review process.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Business Growth and Maturation; Business Strategy; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kelley Elizabeth Morrell. "Strategic Review at Egon Zehnder International (A)." Harvard Business School Case 904-071, March 2004. (Revised August 2004.)  View Details
  47. Strategy and Positioning in Professional Service Firms

    This case provides a definition of strategy, distinguishes between corporate and practice strategy, and discusses how and why developing and implementing strategy for professional service firms is different from developing and implementing strategy for commercial firms. The case discusses how practice strategy involves positioning the practice on a spectrum of services and aligning the organization and its professionals to the position. Practices are subjected continuously to forces that move their positioning. To be successful, practices must dynamically reposition or realign themselves. The csae concludes with a discussion of the corporate strategy challenges facing multipractice professional service firms.

    Keywords: Corporate Strategy; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Strategy and Positioning in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Background Note 904-060, January 2004. (Revised May 2004.)  View Details
  48. The Credit Suisse Group

    Ashish Nanda and Kelley Elizabeth Morrell

    On September 19, 2002, Lukas Muhlemann announced that he would step down as chairman and CEO of the Credit Suisse Group, effective January 1, 2003. The bank had progressed from a small Swiss start-up 150 years ago to a global banking powerhouse. Over the past 5 years, it had grown rapidly in pursuit of Muhlemann's Allfinanz vision. However, 2002 had been a very difficult year. Its investment banking arm had been tarnished by scandal in a difficult business environment, the insurance arm had suffered considerable losses, and the stock price had dropped inexorably. Credit Suisse's new leadership was musing over the changes required to rejuvenate the group.

    Keywords: Change Management; Business Growth and Maturation; Management Succession; Problems and Challenges; Business Startups; Banks and Banking; Banking Industry; Switzerland;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Kelley Elizabeth Morrell. "The Credit Suisse Group." Harvard Business School Case 903-087, January 2003. (Revised February 2004.)  View Details
  49. The First Six Months: Launching a PSF Career

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Scot H. Landry

    Presents two situations: 1) two graduating MBAs from Harvard Business School compare and contrast their strategies for getting off to a good start in consulting, and 2) a junior consultant has to deal with difficult feedback in his very first performance review.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Planning; Practice; Strategy; Performance Evaluation; Adaptation; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "The First Six Months: Launching a PSF Career." Harvard Business School Case 800-373, April 2000. (Revised March 2015.)  View Details
  50. Career Strategies and Tactics in Professional Service Firms

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Scot H. Landry

    Presents suggestions for ensuring a good start in a professional services career.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Performance Expectations; Performance Effectiveness; Customization and Personalization; Practice; Valuation; Performance Evaluation; Business Startups; Competency and Skills; Learning; Talent and Talent Management; Management Skills; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Career Strategies and Tactics in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Background Note 800-375, April 2000. (Revised October 2002.)  View Details
  51. The Goldman Sachs IPO

    Ashish Nanda, Malcolm S. Salter, Boris Groysberg and Sarah Matthews

    Addresses the proposed IPO and raises questions regarding how agency costs may rise or fall as Goldman converts from a private partnership to a public limited corporation.

    Keywords: Initial Public Offering; Going Public; Corporate Governance; Agency Theory; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Malcolm S. Salter, Boris Groysberg, and Sarah Matthews. "The Goldman Sachs IPO." Harvard Business School Case 800-016, September 1999. (Revised April 2006.)  View Details
  52. The HBS California Research Center

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong and Scott D Landry

    Harvard Business School's (HBS) California Research Center, a three-year experiment initiated in July 1997 to facilitate research, case-writing, and course development centered in the Silicon Valley Region, has been a "phenomenal success." In June 1999, HBS Dean Kim Clark and faculty are contemplating whether to modify or retain the current mission and scope of the California Research Center.

    Keywords: Business Education; Growth and Development Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Success; Education Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scott D Landry. "The HBS California Research Center." Harvard Business School Case 800-189, January 2000. (Revised February 2000.)  View Details
  53. The Rise and Decline of e-Consulting

    Ashish Nanda and M. Julia Prats

    E-consulting began as a specialized consulting service in the late 1990s. In January 2000, more than 100 firms were characterized as e-consultants. By December 2001, more than 50% of these firms had disappeared. This case tracks the rapid rise and sharp decline of e-consulting.

    Keywords: Online Technology; Internet; Market Participation; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and M. Julia Prats. "The Rise and Decline of e-Consulting." Harvard Business School Background Note 902-175, January 2002. (Revised June 2002.)  View Details
  54. Thomas Weisel Partners (A)

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda, Boris Groysberg, Matthew C. Lieb and Scott D Landry

    Thomas Weisel, longtime leader of Montgomery Securities, realizes that the sale of Montgomery to NationsBank was the biggest mistake of his life. After his exit from NationsBanc Montgomery Securities, Weisel develops a business plan for a new merchant bank, Thomas Weisel Partners.

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Business Plan; Financial Institutions; Management Teams; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, Boris Groysberg, Matthew C. Lieb, and Scott D Landry. "Thomas Weisel Partners (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-215, March 2000. (Revised February 2005.)  View Details
  55. Thomas Weisel Partners (B): Year One

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scott D Landry

    After its launch in February 1999, Thomas Weisel Partners experiences rapid growth in its first year. This case details the inaugural year's development and probes what steps the firm should take to continue the momentum.

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Financial Institutions; Management Teams; Growth Management; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scott D Landry. "Thomas Weisel Partners (B): Year One." Harvard Business School Case 800-331, March 2000. (Revised February 2005.)  View Details
  56. Tom Tierney at Bain & Company (A)

    Bain managing director Tom Tierney is contemplating how best to rotate the office head position between two partners at one of the firm's offices. The case provides background information on Bain's governance structure and Tierney's management style.

    Keywords: Management Style; Governance Controls; Management Succession; Personal Development and Career; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Perry Fagan. "Tom Tierney at Bain & Company (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-253, December 1999. (Revised August 2004.)  View Details
  57. Tom Tierney's Reflections

    The case writers began taking notes on Thomas (Tom) Tierney's life experiences and the lessons that he has derived from them based on his presentations at several Harvard Business School MBA and executive education seminars during 2000 through 2002. This was followed by a series of interviews with Tierney. This case presents a compilation of Tom Tierney's reflections.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Kelley Elizabeth Morrell, and Monica Mullick. "Tom Tierney's Reflections." Harvard Business School Case 903-127, April 2003. (Revised November 2003.)  View Details
  58. Tradeoffs: Juggling Careers in Professional Services Firms with Private Life

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda, Scot Landry and Scott M O'Neil

    Balancing professional and private lives continues to challenge single and committed partners alike. Professionals are expected to work long hours. It is simply part of the ethos of professional service firms. This case focuses on the lives of three couples connected to professional service firms and their ensuing challenges in balancing professional and private life. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Work-Life Balance; Family and Family Relationships; Problems and Challenges; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, Scot Landry, and Scott M O'Neil. "Tradeoffs: Juggling Careers in Professional Services Firms with Private Life." Harvard Business School Case 801-463, June 2001. (Revised May 2002.)  View Details
  59. Venture Law Group (A)

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Scott D Landry

    Craig Johnson, Venture Law Group's (VLG) chairman, founded VLG in 1993 with a goal of "zero voluntary turnover." In late 1998, Johnson faces the departure of three important partners, prompting himself to ask what VLG can do in the midst of an "economic hurricane" that is luring VLG attorneys to leave and enter dot.com companies.

    Keywords: Business Model; Customer Relationship Management; Partners and Partnerships; Retention; Legal Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scott D Landry. "Venture Law Group (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-065, February 2000. (Revised March 2004.)  View Details
  60. Woodland Partners: Field of Dreams?

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Theodore D. Seides

    Elizabeth Lilly, Richard Rinkett, and Richard Jensen are pondering whether to launch a new investment management firm and, if so, what growth strategy to chart for the potential firm.

    Keywords: Goals and Objectives; Decision Making; Problems and Challenges; Business Startups; Business Processes; Growth and Development Strategy; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Theodore D. Seides. "Woodland Partners: Field of Dreams?" Harvard Business School Case 800-070, November 1999. (Revised February 2000.)  View Details
  61. &Samhoud Service Management

    Thomas J. DeLong, Ashish Nanda and Monica Mullick

    &Samhoud, a small service management consulting firm in the Netherlands, grapples with the dilemma of firing its largest client while introducing Heskett's theory of the service profit chain.

    Keywords: Mission and Purpose; Management Practices and Processes; Customer Focus and Relationships; Customer Relationship Management; Consulting Industry; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Monica Mullick. "&Samhoud Service Management." Harvard Business School Case 801-398, March 2001. (Revised May 2001.)  View Details
  62. Ecolab, Inc. (G): Institutional Sales Conference

    Supplements the (A) case. Includes excerpts from speeches by Ecolab president Al Schuman, CEO Sandy Grieve, and three senior sales executives, and highlights the camaraderie and goodwill among senior executives of Ecolab's Institutional Division. May be used in place of the video.

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Sales;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Ecolab, Inc. (G): Institutional Sales Conference." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 397-105, May 1997. (Revised October 2005.)  View Details
  63. Ecolab, Inc. (H): Al Schuman's Visit to a Regional Office

    Supplements the (A) case. In the weeks following the employee defections, Al Schuman toured Ecolab's offices extensively. The case excerpts from one of the speeches he made during his tour. May be used in place of the video.

    Keywords: Employees;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Ecolab, Inc. (H): Al Schuman's Visit to a Regional Office". Harvard Business School Video Supplement 397-106, May 1997. (Revised October 2005.)  View Details
  64. Interactive Minds (B)

    Ashish Nanda, Thomas J. DeLong, Christina L. Darwall and Scot H. Landry

    Two recent Harvard Business School graduates start a venture capital/consulting firm focused on opportunities related to the Internet.

    Keywords: History; Venture Capital; Internet; Capital Structure; Entrepreneurship; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, Christina L. Darwall, and Scot H. Landry. "Interactive Minds (B)." Harvard Business School Case 800-114, November 1999.  View Details
Cases and Notes Related to Managing Human Capital
  1. A User's Guide to the General Management Course

    Offered at the beginning of a twenty-five session course on general management, this note presents a structure and an outline intended to serve as a reference and provide orientation to the students as the course progresses.

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Ed Zschau. "A User's Guide to the General Management Course." Harvard Business School Background Note 899-006, July 1998. (Revised December 1998.)  View Details
  2. Emmet Stephenson: Profile of an Entrepreneur

    Profiles the career of a Emmet Stephenson, the founder of over a dozen successful companies, as a model of entrepreneurship and management.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Ed Zschau, and Georgia Levenson. "Emmet Stephenson: Profile of an Entrepreneur." Harvard Business School Case 898-049, September 1997. (Revised October 1997.)  View Details
  3. General Management: A Conceptual Introduction

    Christopher A. Bartlett and Ashish Nanda

    Addresses the following issues at a conceptual level: 1) Who is a general manager? 2) To whom is the general manager responsible? and 3) How do general managers add value?

    Keywords: Leadership; Management; Management Skills; Managerial Roles;

    Citation:

    Bartlett, Christopher A., and Ashish Nanda. "General Management: A Conceptual Introduction." Harvard Business School Background Note 396-161, May 1996.  View Details
  4. The GM's Operational Challenge: Managing Through People

    Christopher A. Bartlett and Ashish Nanda

    Highlights and explores how a general manager adds value to the firm at the operational level by managing through people. Discusses how assumptions about human motivation influence the employment contract that the general manager implicitly enters into with the workers and ends with speculation on how the employment contract is fundamentally changing.

    Keywords: Employee Relationship Management; Selection and Staffing; Contracts; Managerial Roles; Operations; Problems and Challenges; Labor and Management Relations; Motivation and Incentives; Value;

    Citation:

    Bartlett, Christopher A., and Ashish Nanda. "The GM's Operational Challenge: Managing Through People." Harvard Business School Background Note 396-400, May 1996.  View Details
  5. The GM's Organizational Challenge: Embedding and Leveraging Capability

    Christopher A. Bartlett and Ashish Nanda

    Describes how general managers can build organizational capability in their firms.

    Keywords: Management Skills; Managerial Roles; Management Teams; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Growth and Development Strategy;

    Citation:

    Bartlett, Christopher A., and Ashish Nanda. "The GM's Organizational Challenge: Embedding and Leveraging Capability." Harvard Business School Background Note 397-011, July 1996.  View Details
  6. The GM's Leadership Challenge: Building a Self-Renewing Institution

    Christopher A. Bartlett and Ashish Nanda

    Highlights the general manager's role in building a self-renewing organization.

    Keywords: Management Skills; Leadership Development; Managerial Roles; Management Teams; Organizational Structure;

    Citation:

    Bartlett, Christopher A., and Ashish Nanda. "The GM's Leadership Challenge: Building a Self-Renewing Institution." Harvard Business School Background Note 397-023, July 1996.  View Details
  7. Ingvar Kamprad and IKEA

    Christopher A. Bartlett and Ashish Nanda

    Traces the development of a Swedish furniture retailer under the leadership of an innovative and unconventional entrepreneur whose approaches redefine the nature and structure of the industry. Traces IKEA's growth from a tiny mail order business to the world's largest furniture dealership. Describes the innovative strategic and organizational changes Kamprad made to achieve success. In particular, focuses on his unique vision and values and the way they have become institutionalized as IKEA's binding corporate culture. The trigger issue revolves around whether this vital "corporate glue" can survive massive expansion into the United States and the Eastern Bloc and Kamprad's replacement as CEO by a "professional manager."

    Keywords: Restructuring; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Growth and Development; Innovation Strategy; Leadership; Management Succession; Distribution; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Expansion; Value; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Bartlett, Christopher A., and Ashish Nanda. "Ingvar Kamprad and IKEA." Harvard Business School Case 390-132, May 1990. (Revised July 1996.)  View Details
  8. Intel Corp.: Leveraging Capabilities for Strategic Renewal

    Christopher A. Bartlett and Ashish Nanda

    Traces the history of Intel from its earliest days as a technology-driven memory company to its emergence as an increasingly market-focused microprocessor company with emerging systems capabilities. The focus is on the strategic, organizational, and management adaptation that was required to ensure the company's survival in a highly volatile industry. Under the leadership of Andy Grove and Gordon Moore, Intel is able to overlay its R&D base with manufacturing and marketing capabilities that allow it to continually adapt to changes and renew itself.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Adaptation; Management Skills; Management Practices and Processes; Strategy; Organizations; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bartlett, Christopher A., and Ashish Nanda. "Intel Corp.: Leveraging Capabilities for Strategic Renewal." Harvard Business School Case 394-141, March 1994.  View Details
  9. Vermeer Technologies (A): A Company Is Born

    Charles Ferguson has just heard from a venture capital (VC) consortium that it is willing to finance Vermeer Technologies, a company he has cofounded for developing Internet software. The funds are sorely needed, but the VCs have imposed some onerous conditions, including a request that Vermeer's first CEO be an outsider.

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Selection and Staffing; Software; Entrepreneurship; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Takia Mahmood. "Vermeer Technologies (A): A Company Is Born." Harvard Business School Case 397-078, February 1997. (Revised July 1997.)  View Details
  10. Vermeer Technologies (B): Realizing the Dream

    The Vermeer team works day and night to develop its software offering, unforeseen difficulties and internal tensions notwithstanding. In less than a year, the product is ready. The Vermeer team waits anxiously for the market to pronounce its verdict.

    Keywords: Internet; Software; Business Startups; Product Development; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Georgia Levenson. "Vermeer Technologies (B): Realizing the Dream." Harvard Business School Case 397-080, May 1997. (Revised July 1997.)  View Details
  11. Vermeer Technologies (C): Negotiating the Future

    The success of the Vermeer software offering suddenly transforms the start-up into a sought after company. After arduous negotiations, Vermeer management is faced with the choice of continuing as an independent company or being acquired by Microsoft or Netscape.

    Keywords: Negotiation; Software; Decision Making; Acquisition; Business Startups; Business Strategy; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Georgia Levenson. "Vermeer Technologies (C): Negotiating the Future." Harvard Business School Case 397-081, May 1997. (Revised July 1997.)  View Details
  12. Vermeer Technologies (D): Making Transitions

    Microsoft has acquired Vermeer, and Vermeer executives are both excited and concerned as they prepare to move to Redmond. Even though the acquisition has been financially rewarding, the Vermeer engineers worry how well they will adapt to their new home. Meanwhile, Chris Peters, their new boss, is trying to ensure a smooth integration of the Vermeer team into the Microsoft organization.

    Keywords: Horizontal Integration; Value Creation; Software; Acquisition; Product Development; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Georgia Levenson. "Vermeer Technologies (D): Making Transitions." Harvard Business School Case 397-082, May 1997. (Revised July 1997.)  View Details
  13. Vermeer Technologies (E): New Beginning

    The Vermeer team is pleasantly surprised by the benefits and hospitality that their new surroundings offer. Their happiness is tempered, however, by discomfort with some elements of the "Microsoft Way." As the Vermeer engineers embark on a punishing schedule for the next release of their product, the Microsoft executives wonder whether the Vermeer team will be able to deliver on its promise.

    Keywords: Performance Expectations; Horizontal Integration; Organizational Design; Organizational Culture; Product Development; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Georgia Levenson. "Vermeer Technologies (E): New Beginning." Harvard Business School Case 397-085, May 1997. (Revised July 1997.)  View Details
  14. Vermeer Technologies (F): FrontPage 97

    Vermeer engineers work at the breakneck pace of "Internet time" to develop the next version of their software product, winning accolades from Microsoft management. Even before this version ships, however, they are faced with another punishing development schedule for the next release, leading some to question the development process and the pressure it imposes on the developers.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Software; Business Startups; Product Development; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Georgia Levenson. "Vermeer Technologies (F): FrontPage 97." Harvard Business School Case 397-110, May 1997. (Revised July 1997.)  View Details
  15. Vermeer Technologies (A): A Company Is Born

    The founding team of Vermeer Technologies, an entrepreneurial software start-up, discusses the opportunities and challenges confronting the company.

    Keywords: Software; Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Vermeer Technologies (A): A Company Is Born." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 899-505, December 1998.  View Details
  16. Walt Disney's Dennis Hightower-- Taking Charge

    In 1987, Dennis Hightower, was recruited from outside for a newly created position as head of Disney Consumer Products European operations. Hightower has to win initial acceptance of entrenched country managers, integrate the company's diverse subsidiaries closer together, and revitalize European operations.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Leadership; Change Management; Corporate Strategy; Personal Development and Career; Consumer Products Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Walt Disney's Dennis Hightower-- Taking Charge." Harvard Business School Case 395-055, November 1994. (Revised May 1996.)  View Details
  17. Dennis Hightower: Walt Disney's Transnational Manager

    Describes the actions taken by Dennis Hightower as president of Disney Consumer Products in Europe and the Middle East from 1988 to 1994. Focuses on how he has established a regional office and knit local operations closer together, the benefits that the process has generated, but also the tensions it has created within the organization. The case ends with Hightower contemplating whether he should be changing directions, given the emerging strategic and organizational challenges.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Leadership; Change Management; Corporate Strategy; Personal Development and Career; Consumer Products Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Dennis Hightower: Walt Disney's Transnational Manager." Harvard Business School Case 395-056, November 1994. (Revised June 1996.)  View Details
  18. Walt Disney's Dennis Hightower: Weaving Together the European Operations

    The case describes the actions taken by Dennis Hightower as president of Disney Consumer Products in Europe and the Middle East from 1988 to 1994. It focuses on how he has gone about establishing a regional office and knitting local operations closer together, the benefits that the process has generated, but also the tensions it has created within the organization. It ends with Hightower contemplating whether he should be changing directions, given the emerging strategic and organizational challenges.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Business or Company Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Middle East; Europe;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Walt Disney's Dennis Hightower: Weaving Together the European Operations." Harvard Business School Case 898-026, July 1997.  View Details
  19. Dennis Hightower: New Horizons

    Named president of Disney TV and Telecommunications, Dennis Hightower has to yet again come in as an outsider and take charge. The magnitude of challenge is much larger than in 1987, and the situation facing him is subtly different.

    Keywords: Leadership; Personal Development and Career; Telecommunications Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Dennis Hightower: New Horizons." Harvard Business School Case 396-316, May 1996. (Revised June 1996.)  View Details
  20. Dennis Hightower in Conversation with MBA Students, November 21, 1994 (Supplement)

    Supplements Walt Disney's Dennis Hightower: Taking Charge & Dennis Hightower: Walt Disney's Transnational Manager.

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish. "Dennis Hightower in Conversation with MBA Students, November 21, 1994 (Supplement)." Harvard Business School Supplement 395-149, March 1995. (Revised May 1996.)  View Details
Cases and Notes Related to Managing Across Organizational Boundaries
  1. Corning, Inc.: A Network of Alliances

    Christopher A. Bartlett and Ashish Nanda

    Describes James Houghton's actions in assuming the role of CEO at Corning in the midst of a recession. Not only must he turn around operating performance, he must also revitalize a demoralized organization and set a new, clear strategic direction. In doing so, the case focuses on the changing role of alliances and partnerships in Corning operations. Increasingly, they are moving from a peripheral role in providing market access interchange for technology, to a more central role at the core of Corning's business. The strategic and organizational challenges this presents are highlighted through some specific decision issues facing Houghton.

    Keywords: Business Cycles; Policy; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Performance Expectations; Partners and Partnerships; Business Strategy;

    Citation:

    Bartlett, Christopher A., and Ashish Nanda. "Corning, Inc.: A Network of Alliances." Harvard Business School Case 391-102, November 1990. (Revised August 1992.)  View Details
  2. Honda-Rover (A): Crafting an Alliance

    Ashish Nanda, James K. Sebenius and Ron Fortgang

    Faced with vexing financial challenges in 1993, British Aerospace (BAe) is determined to shed its loss-making automaker, Rover. It offers to sell its stake in Rover to Honda, Rover's partner since 1979, but Honda is reluctant to raise its stake in Rover. Meanwhile, BMW approaches BAe with a confidential bid to buy out Rover. This case places these developments within the context of the history of the British auto industry, Rover's heritage, evolution of the Honda-Rover partnership, and the rationale for BMW's interest in Rover. The case series describes subsequent developments.

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Joint Ventures; Alliances; Knowledge Sharing; Strategy; Contracts; Negotiation Process; Change Management; Negotiation Tactics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Auto Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, James K. Sebenius, and Ron Fortgang. "Honda-Rover (A): Crafting an Alliance." Harvard Business School Case 899-223, March 1999. (Revised November 2001.)  View Details
  3. Honda-Rover (B): Honda Draws the Line

    Ashish Nanda, James K. Sebenius and Ron Fortgang

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Joint Ventures; Alliances; Knowledge Sharing; Strategy; Contracts; Negotiation Process; Change Management; Negotiation Tactics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Auto Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, James K. Sebenius, and Ron Fortgang. "Honda-Rover (B): Honda Draws the Line." Harvard Business School Case 899-224, March 1999. (Revised November 2001.)  View Details
  4. Honda-Rover (C): "The Sting"

    Ashish Nanda, James K. Sebenius and Ron Fortgang

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Joint Ventures; Alliances; Knowledge Sharing; Strategy; Contracts; Negotiation Process; Negotiation Tactics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Auto Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, James K. Sebenius, and Ron Fortgang. Honda-Rover (C): "The Sting". Harvard Business School Case 899-225, March 1999. (Revised November 2001.)  View Details
  5. Honda-Rover (D): The Changing Tide of the BMW-Rover Alliance

    Ashish Nanda, James K. Sebenius and Ron Fortgang

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Joint Ventures; Alliances; Knowledge Sharing; Strategy; Contracts; Negotiation Process; Negotiation Tactics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Auto Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, James K. Sebenius, and Ron Fortgang. "Honda-Rover (D): The Changing Tide of the BMW-Rover Alliance." Harvard Business School Case 899-226, March 1999. (Revised November 2001.)  View Details
  6. IBM and Siemens: Revitalizing the Rolm Division (A)

    Ashish Nanda, Antonio Davila and Georgia Levenson

    The case opens with a discussion of the evolution of the private branch exchange industry in the 1970s and 1980s. It follows the path of Rolm from an independent company to an IBM acquisition and its problem as an IBM division. Then describes Siemens' growing interest in the U.S. PBX market. At the end IBM and Siemens are negotiating over Rolm's future.

    Keywords: Communication Technology; Restructuring; Joint Ventures; Negotiation Participants; Business Divisions; Problems and Challenges; Acquisition; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Antonio Davila, and Georgia Levenson. "IBM and Siemens: Revitalizing the Rolm Division (A)." Harvard Business School Case 397-058, January 1997. (Revised November 1997.)  View Details
  7. Komatsu and Dresser: Putting Two Plus Two Together

    In 1987, Komatsu Ltd., looking to expand its presence in the U.S. earth-moving equipment (EME) industry, enters into a 50-50 joint venture with Dresser. The management of the Komatsu Dresser joint venture faces difficulty in bringing the two halves together. The rift between the dealership networks of the two parent companies reflects dissension within the organization. Even as management is trying to come to grips with the internal problems, the industry confronts a severe recession. A rewritten version of earlier cases.

    Keywords: Integration; Machinery and Machining; Restructuring; Joint Ventures; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Construction Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Georgia Levenson. "Komatsu and Dresser: Putting Two Plus Two Together." Harvard Business School Case 898-269, May 1998. (Revised October 1998.)  View Details
  8. PDVSA & Citgo (A): Seeking Stability in an Uncertain World

    In order to secure demand for its heavy oil, PDVSA buys 50% of the U.S. refining and retail company Citgo. In 1990, it buys the remaining 50% ownership of Citgo. The case describes the challenges faced by PDVSA and Citgo managements as they try to make their relationship work effectively.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Business Subsidiaries; Mergers and Acquisitions; Energy Sources; Mining Industry; Energy Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Leopoldo E. Lopez Mendoza. "PDVSA & Citgo (A): Seeking Stability in an Uncertain World." Harvard Business School Case 899-220, February 1999.  View Details
  9. PDVSA & Citgo (B): Fully Integrated?

    Concerned that Citgo investments are not yielding sufficient returns, PDVSA constrains Citgo management's autonomy, leading to Citgo senior management turnover. The case closes with Citgo's new CEO reflecting on what he needs to do to align Citgo's strategy and operations with PDVSA's strategy and organizational needs.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Mergers and Acquisitions; Alignment; Energy Sources; Energy Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Leopoldo E. Lopez Mendoza. "PDVSA & Citgo (B): Fully Integrated?" Harvard Business School Case 899-221, February 1999.  View Details
Other Publications