Roger H. Hallowell - Faculty & Research - Harvard Business School
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Roger H. Hallowell

Senior Lecturer of Business Administration

Technology and Operations Management

Roger Hallowell teaches the HBS second-year elective, Service Management which replaces Managing Service Operations for the 2017-18 school year.  When not at HBS, he teaches at a variety of schools and institutes, primarily HEC Paris, where he holds the title Affiliate Professor.  There, he is the Academic Director of programs for executives in the fields of service management, strategy and leadership. Among other assignments, he is the Academic Director of "Leading Strategies for Outstanding Performance" and teaches regularly in the HEC Executive MBA, running the major “Service and Innovation” and the module “Leadership in the Organizational Context.”

Roger Hallowell was a managing partner at the Center for Executive Development which was founded and staffed by a number of former Harvard Business School professors; from 1991 through 2003 he was at Harvard Business School. Roger is an authority on strategic initiatives with the goal of simultaneous cost reduction and quality improvement. He has designed and delivered numerous customized executive education programs throughout North America, Central America, the Middle East, and Europe. He also facilitates strategy meetings and speaks at conferences. His work focuses on leadership of organizations wanting to increase the value they deliver to customers, often through service. His projects are designed to help executives and senior managers enhance their leadership abilities, including their ability to design and implement change. Organizations he has worked with include PNB Paribas Fortis (Belgium), Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts (Canada), IBM, ISS, Arla, and Jyske Bank (Denmark), Qatar Investment Authority (Qatar), Securitas (UAE), Merrill Lynch, The National Library Board of Singapore, etc.

Roger is the author of numerous papers, his work appearing in Academy of Management Executive, Human Resource Management, Human Resource Planning, and The International Journal of Service Industry Management. He is also the author of more than 60 case studies on organizations in North America, Europe, and Asia, including three HBS best-sellers.

Roger Hallowell's career began as a banker on Wall Street and includes two senior management positions in industry.  He holds an AB from Harvard College and an MBA and Doctorate from Harvard Business School.

Journal Articles
Book Chapters
  1. The Service Profit Chain: Intellectual Roots, Current Realities, and Future Prospects

    Roger Hallowell and Leonard A. Schlesinger

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger, and Leonard A. Schlesinger. "The Service Profit Chain: Intellectual Roots, Current Realities, and Future Prospects." In Handbook of Services Marketing and Management, edited by Dawn Iacobucci and Teresa A. Swartz. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1999.  View Details
  2. Aligning Environment and Technology with Quality at GTE

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger, and Nancy Burzon. "Aligning Environment and Technology with Quality at GTE." In Achieving Quality Performance: Lessons from British and American Industries. Vol. 2, edited by Richard Teare, Cyril Atkinson, and Clive Westwood. London: Cassell, 1996.  View Details
Cases and Teaching Materials
  1. Transforming Singapore's Public Libraries (Abridged)

    Lynda M. Applegate and Roger H. Hallowell

    The Singapore Public Library system was transformed from being mediocre at best to world class using information technology, progressive human-resources management, and marketing approaches unusual for government agencies.

    Keywords: Transformation; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Service Delivery; Marketing Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Human Resources; Information Technology; Nonprofit Organizations; Public Administration Industry; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Applegate, Lynda M., and Roger H. Hallowell. "Transforming Singapore's Public Libraries (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 805-028, October 2004. (Revised May 2006.)  View Details
  2. Shouldice Hospital Limited (Abridged)

    James L. Heskett and Roger H. Hallowell

    A hospital specializing in hernia operations is considering whether and how to expand the reach of its services.

    Keywords: Expansion; Service Delivery; Service Operations; Health Care and Treatment; Business Strategy; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Heskett, James L., and Roger H. Hallowell. "Shouldice Hospital Limited (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 805-002, July 2004. (Revised January 2005.)  View Details
  3. Merrill Lynch: Supernova

    Supernova is the name given to a new way to manage client relationships that originated in the Merrill Lynch Indianapolis offices. During a trial period, Supernova generated very good results among financial advisers and their customers, but challenged the traditional ways in which financial advisers were rewarded and the nature of the relationship with their clients. The case protagonist needs to decide whether to recommend a national rollout for Supernova.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Customer Relationship Management; Organizational Culture; Financial Services Industry; Indianapolis;

    Citation:

    Oliva, Rogelio, Roger H. Hallowell, and Gabriel R. Bitran. "Merrill Lynch: Supernova." Harvard Business School Case 604-053, October 2003.  View Details
  4. Four Seasons Goes to Paris: '53 Properties, 24 Countries, 1 Philosophy'

    Roger H. Hallowell, David Bowen and Carin-Isabel Knoop

    Illustrates how Four Seasons manages hotels in countries with strong and distinct national cultures. Focuses on how the chain meets its exacting service standards in a variety of settings worldwide, with special attention on France.

    Keywords: Service Delivery; Organizational Culture; Global Range; Global Strategy; Standards; Accommodations Industry; Paris;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., David Bowen, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Four Seasons Goes to Paris: '53 Properties, 24 Countries, 1 Philosophy'." Harvard Business School Case 803-069, December 2002. (Revised January 2003.)  View Details
  5. Putnam Investments: Work@Home

    Putnam Investments uses technology to enable many of its frontline service providers to work routinely and permanently from their homes. This case explores issues related to this strategy, from conceptualization to implementation and highlighting continuous improvement.

    Keywords: Information Technology; Service Delivery; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Putnam Investments: Work@Home." Harvard Business School Case 803-011, December 2002.  View Details
  6. Service on the Internet: The Effect of Physical Service on Scalability

    Develops a framework for exploring the idea of, how service affects the economics of Internet organizations. Development of the framework requires an understanding of the different forms service takes in organizations that conduct business through the Internet. These forms are described as "virtual" (either pure information or automated) and "physical" (requiring some degree of human intervention). Because the nature and quantity of physical service necessary to deliver value to customers influence the quantity of human intervention required, they also influence a firm's ratio of variable to fixed costs, which alters its "scalability." A paradox occurs: many venture capitalists and proponents of Internet business view reduced scalability negatively; yet the cause of that reduction in scalability, human intervention, often helps a firm to differentiate its offering to customers, thus providing a source of competitive advantage. Also illustrates that scalability alone is insufficient to generate profit.

    Keywords: Internet; Service Delivery; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Service on the Internet: The Effect of Physical Service on Scalability." Harvard Business School Background Note 802-146, March 2002. (Revised October 2002.)  View Details
  7. Sears, Roebuck and Company (A): Turnaround

    The CEO of Sears faces issues involving the company's recent turnaround and ongoing transformation, including change management and the use of leading (U.S. lagging) indicators or measures.

    Keywords: Change Management; Transformation; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Sears, Roebuck and Company (A): Turnaround." Harvard Business School Case 898-007, November 1997. (Revised May 2002.)  View Details
  8. WWWW - Who Will Win Wireless?

    This case discusses different players in the wireless Internet industry and asks readers to evaluate the likelihood that they will create and capture value.

    Keywords: Internet; Success; Wireless Technology;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., Sherry W. Fairbank, Rosina L Giuliante, and Jennifer L. Jacobs. "WWWW - Who Will Win Wireless?" Harvard Business School Case 802-012, July 2001. (Revised May 2002.)  View Details
  9. Word-of-Mouth Referral Module Note

    Describes the power of word-of-mouth referral for service organizations. Illustrates a process to help students and/or managers calculate the value of word-of-mouth and develop ways to influence (i.e. increase) it.

    Keywords: Marketing Reference Programs; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Word-of-Mouth Referral Module Note." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-332, March 2001. (Revised April 2002.)  View Details
  10. Consolidation of Highly Fragmented Service Industries, The

    Designed to familiarize students with the consolidation of highly fragmented labor-dependent service industries, offering insights into service firm growth and the ways services can, and cannot, increase their efficiency and effectiveness. Two frameworks are presented illustrating the sources of benefits and disadvantages of size in consolidations and the important decisions managers must make in designing and executing a consolidation strategy. Intended to give managers insights into the consolidation phenomenon, illustrating the problems plaguing large, labor-dependent service consolidations. These problems explain why so few labor-dependent service consolidations have been successful. A rewritten version of an earlier note.

    Keywords: Consolidation; Acquisition; Growth and Development Strategy; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Consolidation of Highly Fragmented Service Industries, The." Harvard Business School Background Note 802-192, April 2002.  View Details
  11. Virtuous Cycles: Improving Service and Lowering Costs in E-Commerce

    Illustrates how various elements in a customer's encounter with Internet services relying on physical service (labor-intensive customer support and/or logistics) affect one another. Presents a framework that suggests: 1) that improving service quality in specific elements results in cost reductions in others creating a virtuous cycle and 2) that some elements of the service encounter provide superior sources of competitive advantage than others because of the difficulty competitors have replicating them. Both findings have implications for managers of organizations involved in the provision of most services over the Internet because they illustrate how those managers can simultaneously increase organizational efficiency and customer effectiveness.

    Keywords: Internet; Service Delivery; Performance Efficiency; Performance Effectiveness; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Virtuous Cycles: Improving Service and Lowering Costs in E-Commerce." Harvard Business School Background Note 802-155, March 2002.  View Details
  12. Service Recovery

    Discusses the value of service recovery to service organizations working to enhance customer loyalty. Also provides practical advice to managers and examines strategies proven helpful to service organizations in their recovery objectives.

    Keywords: Management Practices and Processes; Operations; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Service Recovery." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-342, March 2001. (Revised March 2002.)  View Details
  13. Enspire Learning

    An MBA student founds an e-education business and must decide which customers to target and which products/services to produce.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Internet; Service Delivery; Education; Business Startups; Planning; Web Services Industry; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., Frank J Andrasco, Hans ten Cate, and Bjorn Billhardt. "Enspire Learning." Harvard Business School Case 802-001, July 2001. (Revised February 2002.)  View Details
  14. Votia Empowerment AB (A)

    The founder of a Swedish company specializing in e-democracy examines the economics of her business and the value proposition it delivers to customers, including municipalities, unions, and companies.

    Keywords: Internet; Communication; Entrepreneurship; Government and Politics; Sweden;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Cate Reavis. "Votia Empowerment AB (A)." Harvard Business School Case 802-002, August 2001. (Revised January 2002.)  View Details
  15. Monster.com: Success Beyond the Bubble

    In 2001, Monster.com was an Internet site that, among other things, connected individuals seeking jobs with organizations wanting to hire. Its substitutes included help wanted classified advertising in newspapers. Monster was one of the few Internet companies that had weathered the bursting of the dot-com bubble and continued to grow both its revenues and profits at rates above 50% per year in 2001. This case examines why the company was able to prosper and discusses options for future growth. Also explores the question of how important focus is to an Internet company, asking how far from its core business Monster could diversify.

    Keywords: Internet; Business Growth and Maturation; Service Operations; Service Delivery; Price Bubble; Growth and Development Strategy; Employment Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Cate Reavis. "Monster.com: Success Beyond the Bubble." Harvard Business School Case 802-024, November 2001. (Revised January 2002.)  View Details
  16. WeServeHomes.com

    ServiceMaster, a Fortune 500 supplier of home services such as Terminex, Trugreen (lawn care), and MerryMaids, has a 50% interest in an Internet start-up designed to attract new customers to its services and help service providers improve quality and lower costs. Should ServiceMaster buy the remaining 20% from VC Kleiner Perkins, or should ServiceMaster make WeServHomes.com even more independent?

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Internet; Information Technology; Service Operations; Service Delivery; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and David Kiron. "WeServeHomes.com." Harvard Business School Case 802-004, July 2001. (Revised December 2001.)  View Details
  17. Sothebys.com

    Sotheby's has taken 50% of its business by volume to the Internet. How do the economics change? How do logistics and customer support needs change? What leverage does the Internet provide this established bricks-and-mortar auction house?

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Internet; Auctions;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Abby J. Hansen PHD. "Sothebys.com." Harvard Business School Case 800-387, May 2000. (Revised November 2001.)  View Details
  18. Rosenbluth International and Biztravel.com

    Rosenbluth, the third largest U.S. travel agency, uses the Internet to serve new customers with a high-service strategy. Rosenbluth acquires Biztravel.com and integrates the customer support and logistics aspects of service delivery.

    Keywords: Horizontal Integration; Internet; Service Delivery; Acquisition; Travel Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Rosenbluth International and Biztravel.com." Harvard Business School Case 800-356, March 2000. (Revised November 2001.)  View Details
  19. Transforming Singapore's Public Libraries

    Roger H. Hallowell, Neo Boon Siong and Carin-Isabel Knoop

    The Singapore Public Library system was transformed from being mediocre at best to world class using information technology, progressive human resources management, and marketing approaches unusual for governmental agencies.

    Keywords: Nonprofit Organizations; Marketing Strategy; Information Technology; Transformation; Books; Human Resources; Government and Politics; Public Administration Industry; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., Neo Boon Siong, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Transforming Singapore's Public Libraries." Harvard Business School Case 802-009, October 2001.  View Details
  20. Netonomy

    A new software product enables wireless telcos to offer a self-service customer service solution, lowering costs and improving service levels. Discusses the definition of good self-service. Examines how the company should prioritize its growth opportunities and what its capabilities should be. Explores how these decisions will affect its shareholders?

    Keywords: Internet; Service Delivery; Software; Globalization; Customer Focus and Relationships; Growth and Development Strategy; Information Technology Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Helen E Clement. "Netonomy." Harvard Business School Case 801-462, June 2001. (Revised October 2001.)  View Details
  21. Wit Capital: Evolution of the Online Investment Bank (B)

    Describes the evolution of Wit Capital from its origins as a small brewery to an online investment bank advising both small technology-based companies seeking to raise capital and large companies seeking to acquire Internet companies, as well as offering retail brokerage services to individual investors seeking access to initial public offerings. Discusses Wit's continuing evolution in 2000, when it sold its retail brokerage unit and refocused on traditional corporate clients. Provides details of Wit's value propositions to its target clientele and some data regarding the value provided and service quality delivered. Written for a second-year MBA course in Service Management. Can also be used in courses focusing on the Internet, General Management, Entrepreneurship, Service Management, and Service Operations.

    Keywords: Online Technology; Internet; Disruptive Innovation; Service Delivery; Investment Banking; Entrepreneurship;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Charles Ruberto. "Wit Capital: Evolution of the Online Investment Bank (B)." Harvard Business School Case 801-265, November 2000.  View Details
  22. Service and Value in e-Commerce

    This collection of readings illustrates the importance of service and logistics in e-commerce, focusing on e-Toys' disastrous 1999 holiday season.

    Keywords: Valuation; Internet; Service Operations; Logistics; Consumer Products Industry; Retail Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Service and Value in e-Commerce." Harvard Business School Case 800-384, May 2000. (Revised August 2000.)  View Details
  23. Central Parking

    The president of Central Parking must decide how to grow the company with options including continued consolidation of the parking industry and/or growth through related diversification. Initiates discussion of a successful consolidation strategy.

    Keywords: Consolidation; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Central Parking." Harvard Business School Case 800-005, August 1999. (Revised August 2000.)  View Details
  24. A Conversation with Dirk McMahon: Head of Ground Operations at Northwest Airlines, March 16, 2000

    A classroom appearance dated March 16, 2000, at Harvard Business School, by Dirk McMahon, head of Ground Operations at Northwest Airlines.

    Keywords: Operations; Air Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "A Conversation with Dirk McMahon: Head of Ground Operations at Northwest Airlines, March 16, 2000." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 801-802, August 2000.  View Details
  25. Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts

    Four Seasons has a love/hate relationship with technology, including the best Web site in the industry. This case examines how a leading service delivers high-tech/high-touch, and looks at its progressive human resource strategy.

    Keywords: Technology; Service Operations; Accommodations Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts." Harvard Business School Case 800-385, June 2000.  View Details
  26. Everdream

    Silicon Valley start-up Everdream wants to turn the provision of PCs to small business into a turnkey service including excellent 24/7 support. This case explores what this will take by focusing on the question of what, if anything, Everdream can guarantee.

    Keywords: Service Delivery; Hardware; Business Startups; Computer Industry; Service Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Christina L. Darwall. "Everdream." Harvard Business School Case 800-251, April 2000. (Revised June 2000.)  View Details
  27. Alaska Airlines: For the same price, you just get more...

    Alaska Airlines grapples with the issue of whether or not advanced use of technology to enable its customers to serve themselves (self-service) in certain airport functions will help it to achieve competitive advantage.

    Keywords: Technology; Service Delivery; Competitive Advantage; Air Transportation Industry; Alaska;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Alaska Airlines: For the same price, you just get more..." Harvard Business School Case 800-004, October 1999. (Revised January 2000.)  View Details
  28. Wit Capital: Evolution of the Online Investment Bank

    Wit Capital brings democracy to the IPO process via the World Wide Web. This case encourages debate about the role service will play in this technology-intermediated investment bank and the sources and sustainability of its competitive advantage.

    Keywords: Initial Public Offering; Service Delivery; Competitive Advantage; Investment Banking; Web; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Tonicia C. Hampton. "Wit Capital: Evolution of the Online Investment Bank." Harvard Business School Case 800-145, October 1999. (Revised November 1999.)  View Details
  29. Northwest Airlines and the Detroit Snowstorm (A)

    Northwest Airlines forced hundreds of passengers to wait up to 8 1/2 hours on aircraft after reaching their destination in an unusually horrible service disaster. The case explores what occurred, why it occurred, and the feelings of those involved.

    Keywords: Service Delivery; Failure; Air Transportation Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Northwest Airlines and the Detroit Snowstorm (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-053, July 1999. (Revised November 1999.)  View Details
  30. VITAS: Innovative Hospice Care

    VITAS, a for-profit hospice, has grown through acquisitions and start-ups. The company considers a rollup strategy, and Deirdre Lawe must decide whether to make a particular acquisition.

    Keywords: Value Creation; For-Profit Firms; Service Delivery; Health Care and Treatment; Acquisition; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Tonicia C. Hampton. "VITAS: Innovative Hospice Care." Harvard Business School Case 800-031, October 1999. (Revised November 1999.)  View Details
  31. Auto Collection: Ford's Better Idea for Selling Cars and Trucks

    Ford encourages its independent dealers to consolidate, showing them the benefits size can bring both to themselves and their customers. Now, consolidated dealerships improve customer service and reduce costs.

    Keywords: Consolidation; Customer Focus and Relationships; Sales; Auto Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Auto Collection: Ford's Better Idea for Selling Cars and Trucks." Harvard Business School Case 800-030, September 1999. (Revised October 1999.)  View Details
  32. Taste of Frankenmuth, A: A Tourist Town in Michigan Thinks About Word-of-Mouth Referral

    A town, "Michigan's little Bavaria," discusses word-of-mouth referral. Enables students to calculate the value of word-of-mouth and understand how to increase it.

    Keywords: Marketing Reference Programs; Michigan;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H., and Abby J. Hansen PHD. "Taste of Frankenmuth, A: A Tourist Town in Michigan Thinks About Word-of-Mouth Referral." Harvard Business School Case 800-029, September 1999.  View Details
  33. US Office Products (A)

    Growth by acquisition (rolling up or consolidating an industry) results in questions about integrating operations, corporate form, financial structure, and management for this company.

    Keywords: Integration; Business or Company Management; Acquisition;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "US Office Products (A)." Harvard Business School Case 799-029, October 1998. (Revised March 1999.)  View Details
  34. Davis, Lloyd, Young, & Donovan

    Tom Roberts, director of audit operations, is responsible for assigning individual accountants to projects. Describes the current scheduling and assignment system, and the specific concerns of two staff members. Are any changes required in the system?

    Keywords: Management Practices and Processes; Accounting Audits;

    Citation:

    Hallowell, Roger H. "Davis, Lloyd, Young, & Donovan." Harvard Business School Case 898-005, September 1997.  View Details
  35. Southwest Airlines: 1993 (A)

    James L. Heskett and Roger H. Hallowell

    Southwest Airlines, the only major U.S. airline to be profitable in 1992, makes a decision as to which of two new cities to open, or to add a new long-haul route. Provides windows into Southwest's strategy, operations, marketing, and culture.

    Keywords: Decisions; Cost Management; Profit; Marketing; Service Operations; Organizational Culture; Corporate Strategy; Expansion; Air Transportation Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Heskett, James L., and Roger H. Hallowell. "Southwest Airlines: 1993 (A)." Harvard Business School Case 694-023, August 1993. (Revised April 1997.)  View Details
  36. Royal Automobile Club Rescue Services Division: Transformation Through Technology

    W. Earl Sasser and Roger H. Hallowell

    The Royal Automobile Club uses a new computer and telephone system to improve its service standards and profitability. After the initial impact of changes from technology, the organization faces a need to choose between future technological development or organizational change.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Decision Choices and Conditions; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Information Technology; Corporate Strategy; Service Industry; Auto Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Sasser, W. Earl, and Roger H. Hallowell. "Royal Automobile Club Rescue Services Division: Transformation Through Technology." Harvard Business School Case 693-029, September 1992. (Revised November 1996.)  View Details
  37. Taco Bell Corp.

    Leonard A. Schlesinger and Roger H. Hallowell

    John Martin, Taco Bell CEO, brings the company into line with its competitors through incremental change during the 1980s. In the early 1990s, he adopts breakthrough approaches to improve service levels while reducing prices, providing a distinct competitive advantage. Illustrates the power of breakthrough thinking in a service industry and demonstrates the importance of a coordinated, holistic approach to implementation.

    Keywords: Change Management; Food; Competitive Advantage; Innovation and Management; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Schlesinger, Leonard A., and Roger H. Hallowell. "Taco Bell Corp." Harvard Business School Case 692-058, November 1991. (Revised April 1994.)  View Details
  38. Coopers & Lybrand in Hungary (A)

    Multinational professional services firm Coopers & Lybrand has decided to enter the Hungarian market and weighs its strategic options in light of the environment in which it will operate and its resources.

    Keywords: Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Market Entry and Exit; Service Industry; Hungary;

    Citation:

    Loveman, Gary W., and Roger H. Hallowell. "Coopers & Lybrand in Hungary (A)." Harvard Business School Case 692-112, June 1992. (Revised January 1994.)  View Details
  39. Au Bon Pain: The French Bakery Cafe, The Partner/Manager Program, Teaching Note

    Leonard A. Schlesinger and Roger H. Hallowell

    Teaching Note for (9-687-063).

    Citation:

    Schlesinger, Leonard A., and Roger H. Hallowell. "Au Bon Pain: The French Bakery Cafe, The Partner/Manager Program, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 692-090, March 1992. (Revised December 1993.)  View Details
  40. USAA: Business Process Review for the Great Lakes Region

    James L. Heskett and Roger H. Hallowell

    USAA proposes to develop a new set of processes for its property and casualty division. The case focuses on processes used in automobile claims.

    Keywords: Business Processes; Insurance Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Heskett, James L., and Roger H. Hallowell. "USAA: Business Process Review for the Great Lakes Region." Harvard Business School Case 694-024, August 1993.  View Details
  41. Air Miles Canada

    Thomas O. Jones, Leonard A. Schlesinger and Roger H. Hallowell

    Air Miles Canada both increases customer loyalty by rewarding shopping frequency at specified merchants, and enables its sponsors to develop a new, more complex understanding of their customers' (and potential customers') shopping habits, thus making future customer acquisition more efficient.

    Keywords: Programs; Customer Relationship Management; Information Management; Air Transportation Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Jones, Thomas O., Leonard A. Schlesinger, and Roger H. Hallowell. "Air Miles Canada." Harvard Business School Case 694-008, July 1993.  View Details
  42. American Nursing Services, Inc.

    Leonard A. Schlesinger and Roger H. Hallowell

    P.K. Scherle, R.N., founder, president, and owner, struggles with her successful business and focuses on either growth or enhanced profitability.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Business Growth and Maturation; Service Delivery; Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Growth and Development Strategy; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Schlesinger, Leonard A., and Roger H. Hallowell. "American Nursing Services, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 692-102, April 1992. (Revised June 1993.)  View Details
  43. Bidwell Training Center, Inc. and Manchester Craftsmen's Guild: Preparation in Pittsburgh

    James L. Heskett and Roger H. Hallowell

    Bill Strickland, executive director of both Bidwell Training Center and Manchester Craftsmen's Guild, has built a highly successful training organization to enable underprivileged minorities in Pittsburgh to escape the cycle of poverty. His success has led to questions of expansion, focus, and core competencies.

    Keywords: Training; Non-Governmental Organizations; Leadership; Society; Competency and Skills; Pittsburgh;

    Citation:

    Heskett, James L., and Roger H. Hallowell. "Bidwell Training Center, Inc. and Manchester Craftsmen's Guild: Preparation in Pittsburgh." Harvard Business School Case 693-087, February 1993. (Revised June 1993.)  View Details
  44. Courtyard by Marriott

    James L. Heskett and Roger H. Hallowell

    Courtyard by Marriott, a chain of modestly priced hotels, weighs its future options regarding human resources, its service delivery system, and management structure. Fairfield Inn, another Marriott product, is discussed for contrast.

    Keywords: Human Resources; Service Operations; Brands and Branding; Management Systems; Decision Making; Service Industry; Accommodations Industry;

    Citation:

    Heskett, James L., and Roger H. Hallowell. "Courtyard by Marriott." Harvard Business School Case 693-036, September 1992. (Revised January 1993.)  View Details