Andy Zelleke - Faculty & Research - Harvard Business School
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Andy Zelleke

MBA Class of 1962 Senior Lecturer of Business Administration

General Management

Andy Zelleke is the MBA Class of 1962 Senior Lecturer of Business Administration.  A member of HBS' General Management unit, he has taught the Field Immersion Experiences for Leadership Development (“FIELD”) course since its inception in the Required Curriculum in 2011, including teaching FIELD Foundations and serving in the section faculty chair role in each of the past seven academic years.  Dr. Zelleke has led five FIELD Global Immersion MBA cohorts, in Mumbai, Chennai, Beijing, Jakarta and Manila; and served as that course's Module Head for 2015-16.  He has also taught in HBS Executive Education programs on corporate goverrnance/boards of directors. Dr. Zelleke developed a new Corporate Governance course, which he launched at Harvard Kennedy School in Spring 2017.

Prior to joining the HBS faculty, Dr. Zelleke was Lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School, teaching “Strategy, Structure and Leadership in Public Service Organizations” and “Introduction to Negotiation Analysis.”   He also served as Co-Director of the Kennedy School’s Center for Public Leadership for two years, and taught negotiation, leadership and management in several Executive Education programs. Prior to joining the Kennedy School faculty, Dr. Zelleke taught negotiation in the MBA and undergraduate programs at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School, where he also led the development of an executive education program for newly appointed members of public company boards of directors.  At both the Kennedy School and Wharton, Dr. Zelleke was recognized on multiple occasions for teaching distinction.

While at Wharton, Dr. Zelleke was Project Director and a Steering Committee member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences' Corporate Responsibility initiative, and coeditor of Restoring Trust in American Business (MIT Press, 2005).  His articles on corporate governance have appeared in Sloan Management Review, Harvard Business Review, Directors & Boards, and Corporate Governance: An International Review.  His op-eds on topics in leadership, corporate governance and foreign affairs have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, International Herald Tribune, Boston Globe, Christian Science Monitor, The Diplomat, and ForeignPolicy.com.  Dr. Zelleke has given talks and facilitated discussions on these topics and on negotiation, at venues in Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America; and he has served as a consultant to several leading law firms on corporate governance issues.

Formerly a practicing business lawyer, Dr. Zelleke received an A.B. in Government magna cum laude from Harvard College, where he was elected to Phi Beta Kappa; and a J.D. cum laude from Harvard Law School.  He also received an A.M. in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior from Harvard University.   Dr. Zelleke is a member of the State Bar of New York, the National Association of Corporate Directors, and the Council on Foreign Relations.  He is also a member of the board of directors of Innodata, Inc., a NASDAQ-traded public company; and of the advisory board of Indenseo, a privately held company.  Dr. Zelleke lives in Cambridge with his wife, Dina Zelleke, and daughter, Zoe.

In 2016, Dr. Zelleke received the Greenhill Award for outstanding service to the Harvard Business School community.

Books
Journal Articles
Op-eds
Cases and Teaching Materials
  1. Merck CEO Ken Frazier Quits President Trump's Advisory Council

    Andy Zelleke and Brian Tilley

    In the first six months of Donald Trump’s presidency, Merck CEO Kenneth Frazier appeared alongside Trump at least three times at press events, one of which commemorated the first and only meeting of the president’s Manufacturing Job Initiative (better known at the president’s “Manufacturing Council”). Then by August 2017, after tragic events surrounding a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and a press event in which Trump condemned violence “on many sides,” Frazier became the first CEO to resign from the Council in response. His action immediately elicited an angry tweet from the president that disparaged the CEO and his company. Two days later, the Council disbanded completely. This short case describes a CEO’s act of conscience, and suggests some of the potential risks of such outspokenness.

    Keywords: corporate governance; CEO role; politics; Corporate Governance; Moral Sensibility; Managerial Roles; United States;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Brian Tilley. "Merck CEO Ken Frazier Quits President Trump's Advisory Council." Harvard Business School Case 318-105, January 2018.  View Details
  2. In the Eye of a Geopolitical Storm: South Korea's Lotte Group, China and the U.S. THAAD Missile Defense System (B)

    Andy Zelleke and Brian Tilley

    This case explores Lotte Group’s challenge of how to respond to Chinese government pressure in 2017, following the Group’s February decision to transfer land to the South Korean government, on which Seoul intended to deploy the U.S.-built THAAD missile defense system. Within a week of the deal’s announcement, the Chinese government had effectively caused 23 Lotte supermarket stores in China to shut down. Concurrently, however, South Korea’s political crisis climaxed with President Park’s replacement by the less hawkish Moon Jae-in. This “B” case chronicles the mounting losses in Lotte’s China business between March and September 2017, also a period in which bilateral relations between China and South Korea began to warm under President Moon, leaving South Korea’s commitment to a full THAAD deployment in some doubt. Against this uncertain backdrop, Lotte’s senior-most executives and board members had to reevaluate Lotte’s previously strong commitment to the China market.

    Keywords: corporate governance; leadership; multinational corporation; Corporate Governance; Leadership; International Relations; Decision Making; South Korea; China; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Brian Tilley. "In the Eye of a Geopolitical Storm: South Korea's Lotte Group, China and the U.S. THAAD Missile Defense System (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 318-023, January 2018.  View Details
  3. In the Eye of a Geopolitical Storm: South Korea's Lotte Group, China and the U.S. THAAD Missile Defense System (A)

    Andy Zelleke and Brian Tilley

    By late 2016 and early 2017, Lotte Group, a South Korean chaebol (large family-controlled business group) had become embroiled not only in the domestic political turmoil surrounding President Park Geun-hye, but also—uncomfortably—in a four-country geopolitical storm. Amid rising tensions with North Korea, the South Korean government had agreed to deploy a U.S.-built anti-missile defense system known as THAAD (Terminal High Altitude Area Defense). The THAAD deployment had been strongly advocated for by Washington, Seoul’s treaty ally, and equally vehemently opposed by China—South Korea’s giant neighbor, with which Seoul had developed close economic ties and, in recent years, much improved political relations. In late 2016, the Park government decided that THAAD should initially be deployed on a particular property then in use as a privately owned golf course. The golf course’s owner happened to be Lotte Group. The case highlights the multifaceted, complex decision facing Lotte Group’s leadership: how to respond to the Park government’s national security-based request to transfer the land, while also taking into account China’s outspoken opposition to THAAD—seen in Beijing as impairing China’s own national security. As of 2016, Lotte Group had extensive operations, and even bigger aspirations, in the massive China market. As Lotte Group’s leadership grappled with its imminent decision at the end of 2016 and into 2017, the costs of defying Beijing were becoming more apparent, with the Group’s Chinese supermarkets hit by consumer boycotts and a raft of citations by Chinese authorities for fire code and other infractions.

    Keywords: corporate social responsibility; leadership; decision making; politics; national security; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; National Security; International Relations; Decision Making; Government and Politics; Leadership; South Korea; China; Japan;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Brian Tilley. "In the Eye of a Geopolitical Storm: South Korea's Lotte Group, China and the U.S. THAAD Missile Defense System (A)." Harvard Business School Case 318-022, December 2017.  View Details
  4. Passion and Strategy: Novozymes' Embrace of the UN Sustainable Development Goals

    Andy Zelleke and Emilie Billaud

    This case explores the sustainability efforts at Novozymes, the world's largest and oldest producer of industrial enzymes. In 2015, the Danish company became the world’s first company known to have crafted a new corporate strategy based on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Since then, the company used the SDGs as a lens to screen products, business models and partnerships, and prioritized innovation decisions that could deliver extraordinary societal and business impact. This case study asks students to evaluate the success of those efforts and to outline what the company should do going forward.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Transformation; Environmental Sustainability; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Mission and Purpose; Business and Shareholder Relations; Business and Stakeholder Relations; Business Strategy; Organizational Culture; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Biotechnology Industry; Europe; Denmark;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Emilie Billaud. "Passion and Strategy: Novozymes' Embrace of the UN Sustainable Development Goals." Harvard Business School Case 318-088, November 2017.  View Details
  5. Donald Trump Calls Carrier Corporation

    Andy Zelleke and Brian Tilley

    This case examines the influence of political pressure on corporate decision-making. It questions whether fidelity to domestic operations ought to be a corporate social responsibility, and thus it challenges the limits of “social responsibility” as a corporate ideal. Specifically, the case focuses on Donald Trump’s effort to encourage U.S. companies’ domestic operations, through a study of one company’s decision to backtrack on a factory relocation plan. In February 2016, the Carrier Corporation (a maker of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning equipment and a division of United Technologies Corporation) announced a plan to relocate operations of a furnace factory from the United States to Mexico. The case notes that Carrier began to outsource and offshore operations, in an effort to reduce costs, around 1921. While Carrier’s previous United States factory closures had garnered major press coverage, the 2016 announcement ramified differently. Days later, then-presidential candidate Donald Trump referenced the relocation in a Facebook post. Soon, Carrier’s plan became a touchtone to Trump’s anti-globalization and anti-free trade campaign messaging. The case documents that he was not the only candidate or politician to reference Carrier during the 2016 campaign. Still his declaration to “call up the head of Carrier” upon winning the presidency became a stump-speech refrain popular with his audiences and contrasted with other political figures’ more measured language. Ultimately, the case outlines the events set in motion after Trump kept his campaign promise and called Carrier’s parent company’s CEO one week after his surprise presidential election victory.

    Keywords: corporate social responsibility; corporate governance; board decisions; political influence; layoffs; offshoring and outsourcing; manufacturing; United States; Mexico; Governing and Advisory Boards; Decision Making; Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Political Elections; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Corporate Governance; Technology Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Connecticut; Indiana; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Brian Tilley. "Donald Trump Calls Carrier Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 318-030, July 2017. (Revised September 2017.)  View Details
  6. Doing Business in the Philippines

    Andy Zelleke and Dawn H. Lau

    This case provides an overview of some of the opportunities as well as challenges that those who plan to do business in the Philippines may face. It includes a summary of the current economic, political, and social situation in the country, and offers up-to-date perspectives and insight from individuals who are familiar with the region.

    Keywords: Philippines; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Philippines;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Dawn H. Lau. "Doing Business in the Philippines." Harvard Business School Case 316-073, September 2015.  View Details
  7. Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: The Riva Team Perspective

    Andy Zelleke, Joshua D. Margolis and Anthony J. Mayo

    Keywords: Negotiation Deal;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, Joshua D. Margolis, and Anthony J. Mayo. "Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: The Riva Team Perspective." Harvard Business School Exercise 312-065, October 2011. (Revised September 2012.)  View Details
  8. Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: The Charlton Team Perspective

    Andy Zelleke, Joshua D. Margolis and Anthony J. Mayo

    Keywords: Negotiation Deal;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, Joshua D. Margolis, and Anthony J. Mayo. "Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: The Charlton Team Perspective." Harvard Business School Exercise 312-066, October 2011. (Revised September 2012.)  View Details