Executive Education
in Europe

Intellectual Property Strategy

June 1-4, 2014
(London, England)

To succeed in a highly competitive global economy, companies must be able to safeguard and maximize their intellectual property. By examining recent trends in European and international IP law, this program provides a blueprint for integrating IP management with corporate strategy. You will gain the legal and strategic perspectives to manage, protect, and increase the value of your firm's IP assets.

Leading High-Performance Healthcare Organizations

June 23-27, 2014
(Paris, France)

With a focus on strategy, this program helps healthcare executives around the world enhance leadership skills while improving operations and clinical outcomes. You will examine best practices for optimizing medical advances and information technology, implementing new models of care delivery, and enhancing processes and budgetary controls. Cross-industry insight helps you overcome barriers to innovation and improve the performance of your organization.

Leading With Impact

June 30-July 4, 2014
(London, England)

Emphasizing introspection and personal discovery, this program enables you to fulfill and expand your emerging leadership potential. Through self-assessment tools and experiential learning, you examine your strengths and weaknesses while exploring best practices of extraordinary leaders. Delivering proven techniques and greater confidence, the program helps you manage your team more effectively and lead in the midst of adversity and change.

All Global Executive Education Programs

Europe

Archives

New Evidence on Cluster Organizations (pdf)

Preface to Automotive Clustering in Europe

Ketels, Christian H.M.
December 2008

Darmstadt, Germany: Europäischer Wirtschaftsverlag GmbH, 2008.

Capital Rules: The Construction of Global Finance

Abdelal, Rawi
May 2007

The rise of global financial markets in the last decades of the twentieth century was premised on one fundamental idea: that capital ought to flow across country borders with minimal restriction and regulation. Freedom for capital movements became the new orthodoxy. In an intellectual, legal, and political history of financial globalization, Rawi Abdelal shows that this was not always the case. Transactions routinely executed by bankers, managers, and investors during the 1990s--trading foreign stocks and bonds, borrowing in foreign currencies--had been illegal in many countries only decades, and sometimes just a year or two, earlier. How and why did the world shift from an orthodoxy of free capital movements in 1914 to an orthodoxy of capital controls in 1944 and then back again by 1994? How have such standards of appropriate behavior been codified and transmitted internationally? Contrary to conventional accounts, Abdelal argues that neither the U.S. Treasury nor Wall Street bankers have preferred or promoted multilateral, liberal rules for global finance. Instead, European policy makers conceived and promoted the liberal rules that compose the international financial architecture. Whereas U.S. policy makers have tended to embrace unilateral, ad hoc globalization, French and European policy makers have promoted a rule-based, "managed" globalization. This contest over the character of globalization continues today.

Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2007

The Empire in One City? Liverpool's Inconvenient Imperial Past

Book chapter in Return to Imperial Trade? John Holt & Co (Liverpool) Ltd. as a Contemporary Free-Standing Company, 1945-2006

Decker, Stephanie
September 2007

John Holt & Co is one of a group of unlikely survivors from the imperial era: medium-sized firms that continue to trade between Europe and Africa and whose continued existence is only rarely commented upon. The Liverpool-based John Holt & Co with its Nigerian subsidiary John Holt PLC is an interesting case for a pilot study because the company returned in 2001 to an organizational form that is known as free-standing company in the historical literature on imperial business. These companies only had a small head office in the metropolitan country, often in major port cities or the capital, which supervised the operations in another, normally less developed, country, where all business and investment took place. Although frequently associated with imperialism, there is reason to believe that John Holt is not an isolated case of a company assuming this form. Holt and others function as intermediaries between global business, which rarely invests in small African markets and where commercial practices are often complicated, heavily based on personal contacts, and incompatible with the structures of large multinationals.

Manchester: Manchester University Press, forthcoming

UK Competitiveness - Old Labour Market Institutions, New Collaborative Roles

Book chapter in Productive Partnerships: The Role of Employment Relations in Growing the UK Economy, edited by Tony Pilch, 12-23
Ketels, Christian H.M.
August 2006

London: The Smith Institute, 2006

Consumer Capitalism: Politics, Product Markets, and Firm Strategy in France and Germany

Trumbull, Gunnar
May 2006
Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2006

Die vernachlässigte macht der altmodischen face-to-face Kommunikation in Unternehmen und Betrieb: BMW im Gespräch (The Neglected Power of Old-Fashioned Face-to-Face Communication in the Firm and Factory)

Book chapter in Ferrum: Nachrichten aus der Eisenbibliothek
Fear, Jeffrey
May 2006

Ferrum : Nachrichten aus der Eisenbibliothek