Executive Education
in Europe

Leading With Impact

6-10 July, 2014
(London, England)

Emphasizing introspection and personal discovery, this program enables you to fulfill and expand your emerging leadership potential. Through self-assessment tools and experiential learning, you examine your strengths and weaknesses while exploring best practices of extraordinary leaders. Delivering proven techniques and greater confidence, the program helps you manage your team more effectively and lead in the midst of adversity and change.

All Global Executive Education Programs

Europe

Archives

Gazprom (B): Energy and Strategy in a New Era

Abdelal, Rawi, Sogomon Tarontsi, and Alexander Jorov
October 2008

President Putin publicly stated that Gazprom, the largest natural gas producer in the world, was a powerful political lever of the Russian state in the world and a keystone in the foundation of the country's energy security. Thus the top leadership of Russia has charted the course of the company's future away from the seemingly imminent dismemberment, privatization, and, by implication, de-monopolization toward a challenging combination of strengthened state control, professional, transparent management, and a major expansion. The case explores how in 2000-2008 Gazprom's management has pursued the strategy defined by the politicians. Gazprom's impressive expansion strategy envisioned diversification of markets, products, transportation routes, and modes of delivery. The challenges were equally formidable: massive investment needs, a possibility of a production shortfall, and a chronic problem with the transit state of Ukraine, to name a few. In fact, Gazprom's ambitiousness fully reflected the ambitiousness of Russia as a whole, characteristic of the Putin era.

Gazprom (C): The Ukrainian Crisis and Its Aftermath

Abdelal, Rawi, Sogomon Tarontsi, and Alexander Jorov
October 2008

The case describes the resolution to the January 2006 gas crisis, precipitated by the decision of Gazprom, the largest natural gas producer in the world, to cut off gas supply to Ukraine because of disagreement on the terms of future trade. The case also narrates the events that have followed: the adoption by Gazprom of a comprehensive policy to renegotiate prices with the rest of the former Soviet states; the erratic relationship with Ukraine, dependent on the internal political configuration in the latter at any given time; and a persistence of Gazprom's negative image in the world.

Supergrid

Vietor, Richard H.K.
October 2008

Supergrid is a mammoth wind-power development scheme for Europe, recently proposed by Airtricity. This firm, founded in 1997, is a fast-growing power-development company focused on wind. Already having built about 600 megawatts of wind turbines in Scotland and Ireland, Airtricity has now expanded to the United States. But its "Supergrid" proposal, to build offshore wind turbines with capacity of 30,000 megawatts of power, would change the face of European energy networks, use new technology, and help several European countries meet their Kyoto targets for reducing CO2. The issues are whether a small company like Airtricity has the human and capital resources to pull this off, and whether the U.K., Germany, the Netherlands, and the EU can be made to cooperate on such a project.

Global Talent Management at Novartis

Siegel, Jordan
September 2008

This case tackles the topic of global talent management. It can be used to analyze the performance measurement, incentive, and talent development system used at a major multinational company. This case can also be used to analyze the extent to which this system should or should not be adapted for China and other emerging economies.

Leading Citigroup (A)

Paine, Lynn Sharp, Aldo Sesia Jr., and Carin-Isabel Knoop
September 2008

The (A) case describes a series of controversial events and alleged misdeeds that placed Citigroup in the public spotlight and launched investigations into the company's business practices by regulators in Japan and Europe in the fall of 2004. CEO Chuck Prince must decide what to do to right the company and restore its reputation.

Leading Citigroup (B)

Paine, Lynn Sharp, Aldo Sesia Jr., and Carin-Isabel Knoop
September 2008

The (B) case describes the actions taken by Citigroup CEO Chuck Prince and his management team to right the company in the wake of the controversies and alleged misdeeds described in the (A) case.

North Goes East

Retsinas, Nicolas P., Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Elena Corsi
September 2008

In August 2006, Magnus Lofgren and Robert Provine, managing directors and co-founders of the "North Real Estate Opportunities Fund," need to decide which real estate investment the Fund should pursue as its first project. The Fund's target region, Central and Eastern Europe, was changing rapidly and returns in some of the more developed regions started to resemble those generated in Western Europe. Yet, the two partners had managed to identify several projects in different countries that promised to generate the Fund's targeted Internal Rates of Return at or above 20% annually. They now had to decide which opportunity was the best match to the Fund's investment profile and showed the highest economic promise.

Arcelik Home Appliances: International Expansion Strategy

Ghemawat, Pankaj, and Catherine Thomas
September 2008

The Turkish home appliances firm Arcelik is revisiting its growth strategy. Options for growth include continuing to promote currently owned brands in international markets, acquiring new brands, expanding OEM or private-label contracts, and/or diversifying into other businesses within Turkey. Details Arcelik's position within various markets and relevant features of the home appliances industry.

Launching Telmore (A)

Casadesus-Masanell, Ramon, Celso Fernandez, and Moritz Jobke
September 2008

When the Danish mobile phone service provider Telmore entered the market in October 2000, few people took notice. Its business model was not perceived as particularly aggressive or threatening to the industry. Less than three years later, Telmore's creative adaptation of the well-known, no-frills model of the airline industry had taken the Danish market by storm. With a combination of rock-bottom prices, simplicity, and a focus on customer satisfaction backed by a unique low-cost infrastructure, Telmore's business model, with its powerful virtuous cycles, proved to be the most successful innovation the industry had seen in many years.

Launching Telmore (B)

Shih, Willy
September 2008

Supplement to the (A) case

Launching Telmore (C)

Shih, Willy
September 2008

Supplement to the (A) case

elBulli: The Taste of Innovation

Norton, Michael, Julian Villanueva, and Luc Wathieu
September 2008

Ferran Adriá, chef at elBulli, the highest-ranked restaurant in the world for two consecutive years, faces two related decisions. First, Adriá and his team must continue to develop new and different dishes for the ground-breaking cuisine at elBulli to guarantee a continuous stream of innovation, the cornerstone of the restaurant's success. In addition, they are also faced with the challenge of growing the business, exploring whether the core concepts from elBulli- this "taste of innovation"-can be applied to domains ranging from consulting to fast food. The case walks readers through an evening at elBulli by using the rave reviews of former patrons to capture the full experience, from the long trip required to get to the restaurant, to the tour, to descriptions of the meal itself.

AREVA T&D

Raman, Ananth, Vincent Marie Dessain, Ane Damgaard Jensen, and Gudrun Urfalino Kristinsdottir
September 2008

The case explores the rapid and highly effective turnaround at AREVA's transmission and distribution (T&D) business by focusing on the division's operations. The division was struggling in 2004 when newly-appointed CEO Philippe Guillemot and his team improved performance substantially by focusing on four levers- industrial footprint realignment, competitive sourcing, process efficiency, and a competitive product offering. In 2008, the case challenges students to identify the best path forward. How can the progress achieved from 2004 to 2007 be sustained? AREVA T&D hopes to surpass ABB and Siemens in sales and profitability by focusing on superior product offerings, through "customer intimacy" (e.g., involving customers in new product development) and developing a reputation for environmentally friendly behavior. What is the role of operations management in this context?

AMD Dresden: Copy Inexactly!

Shih, Willy
September 2008

The establishment and growth of AMD's Dresden, Germany manufacturing site illustrates how processes develop in an organization and how those processes get institutionalized into a unique culture. Located in the Free State of Saxony in the eastern part of Germany (the former GDR), AMD's investment in the region leverages a historic and rather unique skill base in engineering and the sciences and catalyzes the rebirth and growth of one of the largest semiconductor clusters in Europe. Contrary to conventional wisdom in the semiconductor industry, the Dresden team only copied from its home corporate locations in the United States those processes and practices that it felt would work in Germany rather than follow a "copy exactly" strategy. Dresden becomes AMD's sole worldwide manufacturing location for microprocessors, but now the company is faced with the question of whether it can successfully transplant the highly successful culture to other global locations because of favorable investment incentives.

Philipp Justus at eBay Germany (C)

Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker
September 2008

This case traces the development of eBay Germany, eBay Inc., and the career of eBay Germany's first country manager, Philipp Justus. The case covers from 2000 through the fall of 2007. This case details how eBay Germany, once a small start-up, became one of eBay's most successful locations. The case reveals how Justus added seasoned leaders and structure to the group, while allowing for improvisation. The case also traces Justus's career, as he moved to running eBay Europe and ultimately, the auctions group, which took him to headquarters. Like eBay Germany, eBay itself grew tremendously, in part from acquisitions like PayPal and Skype. But, growth in core areas, like auctions, had slowed. This case explains how eBay Inc. and eBay Germany tried to keep their "secret sauce."

Greg James at Sun Microsystems, Inc.: Managing a Global Team

Beyene, Tsedal, Thomas J. DeLong, and Alison Comings
September 2008

Greg James, a global manager at Sun Microsystems, Inc., sets out to meet with his entire 43-member customer implementation team spread across India, France, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States of America to resolve a dire customer system outage as required by a service agreement. Rather than finding a swift resolution to the rapidly escalating customer situation that motivated his trip, he finds himself facing distributed work, global collaboration, conflict, and management issues that are threatening to unravel his team.

Given Imaging Ltd. - First We Take Manhattan, Then We Take Berlin?

Isenberg, Daniel J
August 2008

GI has developed a revolutionary video pill for imaging the small bowel in the gastro-intestinal tract. The development has required the integration of a wide variety of technologies. GI founder and CEO Gabriel Meron must determine GI's marketing strategy and prioritize GI's initial target markets: either the United States, Europe, or Japan, or any combination. He is also faced with the immediate decision if to make offers to U.S. and European regional managers. Cash resources are scarce, and GI hopes to raise additional capital soon.

Corruption in Germany

Abdelal, Rawi, Rafael Di Tella, and Jonathan Schlefer
August 2008

Why do managers become corrupt? Does corruption ever pay? When do friendly relations cross into bribery? How can CEOs manage and prevent outbreaks of corruption? These and other questions are raised by three short case studies of corruption in Germany: at the global engineering firm Siemens, the automaker VW, and the chemical giant BASF. While German law not only permitted overseas bribery but even made it tax deductible until 1999, it was not welcomed in some nations where Siemens did business such as the United States-or in Germany after 2000-but old practices continued. Cooperative management-labor relations, often seen as key to the post-World War II German industrial powerhouse, went sour at VW, as a top manager secured key concessions by paying for union leaders' lavish foreign travel and visits to prostitutes. After vitamin prices sagged in the late 1980s, BASF and the Swiss chemical firm Hoffmann-La Roche plotted a global cartel that lasted a decade and raised the prices of many vitamins 50 percent or more. In the end, even after record criminal fines and jail time for some executives, some observers argued, such practices were likely to recur.

Università Bocconi: Transformation in the New Millennium

Gavetti, Giovanni, and Anna Canato
August 2008

Since its foundation in 1902, Bocconi has been a teaching institution with a dominant domestic presence. The case examines the currently unfolding attempt at transforming Bocconi University into a research powerhouse with the ambition to build a strong position among Europe's leading business schools. The case offers a detailed analysis of Bocconi's transformational journey and illustrates the challenges of changing the mindset of a large portion of the faculty.

Bernd Beetz: Creating the New Coty

Jones, Geoffrey G., and David Kiron
August 2008

Considers the creation of the world's largest fragrance company by Bernd Beetz, appointed chief executive of Coty Inc. in 2001. In 1990 the German consumer goods company Benkiser began acquiring fragrance and cosmetics brands with the intent of developing a beauty business. These included the long-established, but relatively small, U.S. fragrance company Coty. In 1996 the beauty business was spun off under the name Coty. When Beetz was hired as chief executive, it was still a fragmented collection of recently acquired brands. The case describes how Beetz re-ignited the dormant celebrity fragrance business with the successful launch of a new Jennifer Lopez fragrance line. Fashioning a new entrepreneurial culture based on the principles of "faster, further, freer," Coty hired longstanding executives from other firms and liberated their entrepreneurial capabilities, refreshing brands which had been tarnished into a global mass color cosmetics brand. In 2005 the acquisition of Calvin Klein from Unilever, and its renewal, catapulted Coty into the position of the world's largest fragrance company. The case provides an opportunity to examine the entrepreneurial, cultural, and organizational factors which enable acquired brands and employees to be re-invigorated and molded into a dynamic new global business. It asks if the cultural and other factors behind its rapid growth can sustain the company as it seeks growth much further as a top-five beauty company.

The Coartem Challenge (A)

Spar, Debora L., and Brian DeLacey
July 2008

In November 2005, Novartis, a major global pharmaceutical firm, is reviewing its Coartem program, an ambitious attempt to deliver life-saving malaria drugs, at cost, to millions of poor Africans. The company is deeply committed to the project, but it is also struggling with the organizational issues involved in dealing with international institutions like the World Health Organization and fitting nonprofit objectives into a for-profit structure.

The Coartem Challenge (B)

Spar, Debora L., and Brian DeLacey
July 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

The European Union in the 21st Century

Trumbull, Gunnar
July 2008

Focuses on the challenges facing the European Union in 2006. Following the French and Dutch referendums in 2005, the fate of the European Constitution is in jeopardy. Ten new accession countries have just joined the EU, with Turkey in the beginning stages of the accession process. New member states and additional future members have provoked widespread debate on financial, political, and social issues. Growth within the EU has been sluggish, with high unemployment and low investment in R&D. The EU has launched a set of reforms to create a "single passport" system of mutual recognition within the EU for capital, services, and people. Still, terrorist attacks, an upsurge in domestic violence, budgetary problems, and foreign policy, enlargement, and immigration issues plague the EU. In light of these problems, what will be the future of the EU and its constitution?

Tad O'Malley: The Investment Conundrum

Hardymon, G. Felda, Josh Lerner, and Ann Leamon
July 2008

Tad O'Malley has just started as an associate with Empire Investment Group. He must evaluate three investment opportunities facing the big leveraged buyout firm. All are global, but each pertains to different offices and each deal has different strengths and weaknesses. Which should he recommend to the partners for additional resources and what does a recommendation mean for his career?

Corruption at Siemens (A)

Healy, Paul M., and Maria Loumioti
July 2008

No description.

Corruption at Siemens (B)

Healy, Paul M., and Maria Loumioti
July 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

Corruption at Siemens (C)

Healy, Paul M., and Maria Loumioti
July 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

Corruption at Siemens (D)

Healy, Paul M., and Maria Loumioti
July 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

Thomas J. Watson, IBM and Nazi Germany

Jones, Geoffrey G., and Adrian Brown
July 2008

Considers the strategy of U.S.-owned IBM, then a manufacturer of punch cards, in Nazi Germany before 1937. Opens with IBM CEO Thomas J. Watson meeting Adolf Hitler in his capacity as President of the International Chamber of Commerce. IBM had acquired a German company in 1922 and, like other American companies, found itself operating after 1933 in a country whose government violently suppressed political dissent and engaged in intimidation and discrimination against Jews. Explores the tensions between IBM's German affiliate and its parent and provides an opportunity to explore the options and responsibilities of multinationals with investments in politically reprehensible regimes.

House of Tata: Acquiring a Global Footprint

Khanna, Tarun, Krishna G. Palepu, and Richard J. Bullock
July 2008

Chronicles the globalization of the Tata Group, one of India's largest business groups. Since 2000, many Tata Group operating companies have aggressively built international businesses, particularly through overseas acquisitions. After describing the globalization rationales and approaches of the major Tata Group companies, the case asks students to consider whether Tata Motors should pursue the acquisition of the Jaguar and Land Rover brands owned by US-based Ford Motor company.

Radiohead: Music at Your Own Price (A)

Elberse, Anita, and Jason Bergsman
June 2008

In October 2007, the British band Radiohead caused a stir when it announced it would allow customers to decide how much to pay for its new album, released exclusively as a digital download and available only from the band's own website. The pricing plan represented a significant break from the industry standard of fixed prices for music, typically 99 cents for individual songs and upward of $9.99 for complete albums. How viable is such a "name-your-own-pricing" plan? And what does Radiohead's move say about the future of the music industry?

Ra diohead: Music at Your Own Price (B)

Elberse, Anita, and Jason Bergsman
June 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

Note on the Bus Industry

Casadesus-Masanell, Ramon, and Jordan Mitchell
June 2008

Supplements the "Irizar in 2005" case. Briefly documents key points in the motor coach industry such as market size, categories of buses, reasons for purchasing, and the basis for competition amongst motor coach manufacturers.

Finansbank 2006

Foley, C. Fritz, and Linnea Meyer
June 2008

How do financial policy requirements and benefits of ownership concentration affect the need for and process of corporate restructuring? This case provides students with an opportunity to analyze the restructuring of a Turkish multinational business group by way of a merger. Finansbank A? is a bank headquartered in Turkey with additional operations in Holland, Switzerland, Russia, Romania, and Ukraine. It was founded by Hüsnü Özye?in in 1987 and in April 2006, the National Bank of Greece (NBG) offered to buy part of the bank. Students can consider which factors contributed to Finansbank's growth and success. In order to then assess the terms of NBG's offer, they can evaluate given valuations of the bank and analyze why the proposed deal is structured so the Özye?in retains a stake and buys back the non-Turkish operations. Students can also consider the offer from the perspective of minority shareholders.

Can PACIV (Puerto Rico) Serve European Customers?

Isenberg, Daniel
May 2008

Jorge Rodriguez-Gonzalez, PACIV's (Puerto Rico) founding CEO, is considering expanding PACIV's pharmaceutical manufacturing compliance services company to the U.K. and Europe. He has to decide whether to hire Wayne Snelgrove and how to define the scope of his responsibilities.

Global Climate Change and BP

Reinhardt, Forest, and Mikell Hyman
May 2008

Following the sudden resignation of Sir John Browne, Tony Hayward, BP CEO, must decide how global climate change management will figure into BP's corporate strategy. Climate change management was a major part of BP's strategy under Browne: In 1997 Browne broke from his colleagues, publicly declaring that global climate change was a serious problem and pledging BP to play a significant role in the search for solutions. BP successfully reduced its own carbon emissions, and championed cap-and-trade style regulation over taxation or command-and-control. Despite this progress, as the climate issue gains in political prominence and the Kyoto Protocol nears expiration, Hayward must consider what actions to take in BP's business strategy and in the political arena to manage ongoing climate risk.

Indesit Company: Does Global Matter?

Bower, Joseph L.
April 2008

In 2007, the leadership of the Indesit Company is focused on long-term corporate strategy. After three decades, the company has emerged as the number two home appliance producer in greater Europe. Should they invest further to be number one, or should they now focus on the global market, and if so, which part of the world? A subordinate issue is what to do with their multiple brands. Should they consolidate? This case has extensive data on global markets.

Novartis AG: Science-Based Business

Bowen, H. Kent, and Courtney Purrington
April 2008

Novartis is a science-based drug company, which has important implications for its business strategy. It is one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world with over $38B in sales in 2007. Pharmaceuticals account for slightly over $24B of that total. In 2007, corporate R&D spending was $6.43B, or almost 17% of net sales. Novartis executive leaders believe in scientific progress and that large-scale investments in science will therefore result in long-term pay-offs in terms of profits and discoveries that benefit mankind. Novartis' business strategy is closely tied to its research strategy, which emphasizes extensive internal discovery and development capabilities leading to organic growth along with explicit external alliances and collaborations to supplement its core capabilities. Like its competitors, Novartis faces many challenges in terms of moving research from the bench to the bedside. Five years after undertaking the restructuring of the discovery research organization, CEO Daniel Vasella is pleased with its progress, including many more development projects in the pipeline and new molecular entities. Nevertheless, the company faces a number of challenges, including generic drugs, patent infringements in developing countries, and pricing pressure from governments and health insurers in the United States. Given these challenges, Novartis must decide how much to spend on R&D overall, how to arrive at the right mix between organic growth and external collaboration and in-licensing, and how to measure success when it takes so many years to develop and launch a successful drug.

Opening Dot EU (A)

Edelman, Benjamin
April 2008

EURid considers possible market mechanisms to allocate initial domain names within the Internet's newly-created "dot EU." European Union regulations and community norms substantially constrain EURid's approach, preventing the use of the most natural economic mechanisms (such as auctions).

Opening Dot EU (B)

Edelman, Benjamin
April 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

Spiegel-Verlag Rudolf Augstein GmbH & Co. KG.

Villalonga, Belen, Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Vincent Dessain
April 2008

Der Spiegel is Germany's most influential political news magazine. In the 1970s, its founder Rudolf Augstein gave a 50% ownership stake to his employees and sold another 25% to rival publisher Gruner+Jahr, but retained significant control during his lifetime by stipulating in the bylaws that every important business decision would require a 76% shareholder approval. When Augstein died in 2002, however, his co-owners exercised the option the same bylaws gave them to buy a 0.5% stake each from Augstein's heirs, who thus lost their veto rights. In September 2007, the benefits and costs of sharing ownership with employees became particularly salient when the employees block the CEO's proposal to acquire 50% of the Financial Times Deutschland. Faced with the new balance of power, Rudolf's eldest son Jakob Augstein is forced to rethink the role that his family can play in Spiegel going forward. Should he try to buy back the pivotal stake? Sell the family stake altogether? But to whom, and at what price?

The Deutsche Bank (A)

Moss, David
April 2008

Founded in 1870 to help finance surging German exports and imports, the Deutsche Bank soon moved into domestic banking. In fact, its founders aimed to create both a commercial bank and an investment bank under one roof-that is, a "universal bank." By the end of the nineteenth century, the Deutsche Bank was not only the largest bank in Germany, but also a strategic actor in the broader European market and, indeed, in the world economy. Over the first half of the twentieth century, however, the bank faced a series of national crises: defeat in WWI (1914-1918), revolution in 1919, hyperinflation in 1923, economic depression in the early 1930s, the rise of Hitler in 1933, another world war in 1939, and then total defeat in 1945. At the end of WWII, the Soviets closed the Berlin headquarters of the Deutsche Bank as part of their denazification effort. Meanwhile, the United States, Britain, and France, occupying the western portion of Germany, attempted to implement a policy of economic decentralization and broke what remained of the bank into small pieces. By 1950, facing a proposal from leading German bankers to allow the big banks to begin reconstituting themselves, the Allied powers and the new German legislature had to decide whether to accept this proposal or reject it.

Capital Field: A Room with a View

Retsinas, Nicolas P., and Joshua Wyatt
April 2008

Jerzy Peters, Managing Director of Patron Capital Partners, must decide the best investment option on the development of the Odra Polish theater chain and the associated real estate. Capital Field was a company formed by U.S.-educated Polish natives involved in real estate and cinema who worked to privatize Odra. There is potential in reinvigorating the former state-owned and operated Odra theater chain and also redeveloping portions of the associated real estate to retail, office, or residential.

Moët Hennessy España

Casciaro, Tiziana, Vincent Dessain, and Elena Corsi
April 2008

Since being appointed CEO of Moët Hennessy España (MHE), the Spanish subsidiary of the wine & spirits business of Louis Vuitton Moet Hennessy (LVMH), the world's leading luxury products group, Ramiro Otano had overseen a spectacularly successful run at the company by any financial measure. Despite the company's growth, some of the employees who had been at the company for years were complaining that the company had lost its "human touch" in the process of professionalizing and modernizing to capitalize on the fantastic market opportunities that had opened up in Spain. Some felt that the work was now too structured and interpersonal relationships too dry. Otano acknowledged that the financial success had happened on the expense of the informal and relational atmosphere that used to characterize the company. But did it matter, Otano wondered? How should he go forward?

INSEAD

Datar, Srikant, David Garvin, and Carin-Isabel Knoop
March 2008

In the spring of 2008, INSEAD offered a one-year MBA, PhD, executive MBA, and non-degree management education programs to nearly 900 MBA students, 64 PhD candidates, and over 8,500 executive education students. With two campuses, one in Europe and one in Asia, INSEAD had been a pioneer in setting up a secondary campus as a way to push the internationalization of its faculty and curriculum. The case explores INSEAD's approach to business education in a global context and how it functions with a dual-campus setting.

Italy: If Not Now, When?

Vietor, Richard H.K., and Julia Galef
March 2008

Describes Italy's main macroeconomic problems: low productivity growth, stagnant GDP growth, and high public debt. As of early 2007, the country's global competitiveness has plummeted and its debt remains well above the level allowed by the EU's Maastricht treaty. Historical and structural reasons for the current situation are explored, and Italy's possible strategies are discussed in the context of the country's challenging political climate. A replacement of an earlier case done in 2003.

Studio Moderna--A Venture in Eastern Europe

Isenberg, Daniel
March 2008

Sandi Cesko, CEO, has built Studio Moderna to be the leading electronic retailer in 20 countries in and around Central and Eastern Europe, evolving an unusual multi-channel strategy, organizational structure, and IT systems. Serious conflicts cause Cesko to question his in-sourcing strategy.

Subprime Meltdown: American Housing and Global Financial Turmoil

Rotemberg, Julio J.
March 2008

This case focuses on the financial difficulties faced in the U.S. from August to December 2006 as well as their roots in subprime lending. After briefly discussing how mortgages were structured and traded in the pre-1990 period, it describes subprime mortgage lending, as well as other innovative mortgages issued in the 1990s. It also discusses how these mortgages were packaged into securities, and who ultimately came to own these claims and their attendant risk. The case then describes the pain inflicted by raising foreclosures, as well as the financial market ramifications of the rise in mortgage delinquencies. It also chronicles the response of the U.S. and European central banks to the unfolding financial difficulties. Lastly, the case lays policies that have been proposed to deal with either the consequences or the causes of the crisis. These include policies for reforming the supervision of the financial system, changing bankruptcy rules and regulating mortgage finance. Some attention is paid to the role of credit rating agencies in the crisis, and in the financial system as a whole.

Metro International S.A.

Khanna, Tarun, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Vincent Dessain, Ane Damgaard Jensen, and Anders Sjøman
February 2008

Explores the business model of Metro International, a company publishing 70 editions of its free newspaper in 20 countries. Metro had been a pioneer in the free newspaper market, fighting incumbent publishers distributing traditional paid-for newspapers. Looks at the decision facing top management of Metro International in 2007 regarding the future strategy of the company. The company had become profitable after years of losses, but other problems had surfaced; competition had increased heavily in many markets and advertising-the free newspaper's only source of income-was quickly shifting from newspapers to the Internet. Spain was a particular case in point. What had Metro International learned from experiences elsewhere on the globe and would they allow the company to make the Spanish unit profitable? What strategy should the Spanish country manager adopt?

The South Sea Company (A)

Moss, David A., Eugene Kintgen, and Agnieszka Rafalska
February 2008

In early 1720, the South Sea Company and the Bank of England were competing for the right to issue new shares and to exchange those shares for government bonds that were then in the hands of the public. The British government had already executed two such debt conversions with the South Sea Company. Most individuals who had converted bonds for shares in 1711 and 1719 had seen their South Sea shares appreciate in the meantime, and the government had lowered its debt-servicing costs as a result of these two conversions. The conversion under consideration in 1720, however, would be on a much larger scale. In time, the South Sea Company won the bidding war, and the House of Commons approved its debt conversion plan. Now it was up to the House of Lords to approve or reject the deal.

Vegpro Group: Growing in Harmony

Bell, David E., Brian Milder, and Mary L. Shelman
February 2008

Vegpro, a horticulture company, is Kenya's largest exporter of fresh vegetables and flowers to top supermarkets in the U.K. and Europe. In 2007, Vegpro's business is threatened by growing consumer concern about the environmental impact of food production and transport, including "food miles". The case describes the company's growth, which includes the use of owned land and outgrowers for production, the addition of value-added processing to obtain premium prices, and the introduction of global certification to ensure food safety and meet retailer and consumer requirements. The case also discusses the potential impact of increased consumer awareness of ethical sourcing and introduces the potential trade-off between local production and economic development.

European Integration: Meeting the Competitiveness Challenge

Ketels, Christian H.M. and Michael E. Porter
February 2008

The case discusses the origins and development of the European Integration process up to 2004, focusing in particular on the Lisbon Agenda for upgrading Europe's competitiveness. It discusses the different policy areas that have been approached at the European level over time, and provides background on the architecture of European institutions. The case enables students to understand how European integration has affected competitiveness across the continent's regions. It provides a platform to discuss why the Lisbon Agenda has up to 2004 failed to achieve its goals and what European integration experience can serve as a model for other world regions.

"Uria Menendez (A)"

Eccles, Robert G., and Partha P. Bose
February 2008

Uria Menendez, the pre-eminent law firm in Iberia, is at a critical point in its long and distinguished history. Its newly appointed second generation co-managing partners are facing some critical strategic decisions concerning how the firm should position itself in Iberia, geographical expansion to serve the needs of its clients, and its "Best Friends Network" with leading law firms in other countries. The firm must also address critical issues regarding the hiring, development per in work/life balance, and compensation of the top law school graduates the firm needs to maintain its position and reputation.

Global Knowledge Management at Danone

Edmondson, Amy C., Bertrand Moingeon, Vincent Dessain, and Ane Damgaard Jensen
February 2008

The case explores French consumer goods company Danone's novel approach to knowledge management. Through informal knowledge marketplaces and sharing networks, Danone had helped managers connect with each other and share good practices peer-to-peer, rather than relying on traditional hierarchical lines of communication or IT repositories. From 2004 to 2007, the president of human resources and his team had found that 5,000 Danone managers around the world had shared about 640 now-documented good practices. In 2007, the strategic importance of saving time in a decentralized organization through adoption of colleagues' good practices was put to a test. The case illustrates Danone's options on taking knowledge management into the future of Danone.

Differences at Work: Will (A)

Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon
January 2008

A colleague makes a stereotypical remark about gays that Will, an out gay man, knows to be wrong. He struggles with how to correct the senior colleague.

Differences at Work: Jenny (A)

Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon
January 2008

Accompanied by her boss, Jenny is pitching a marketing engagement, but the prospective client keeps making comments about how attractive he finds her. She wonders how she should handle the situation.

Differences at Work: Jenny (B)

Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon
January 2008

Supplements the (A) case

ISS A/S (A)

Rose, Clayton S
January 2008

An offer to buy ISS A/S is contemplated by two leading private equity firms, and their financing plan calls for the addition to the company's balance sheet of a significant amount of new debt. The increased leverage will negatively affect the rating and value of ISS's investment grade debt, and the private equity firms need to anticipate the reaction of bondholders and decide how best to respond. The case provides an opportunity to examine the nature and extent of a company's responsibilities to its bondholders, to develop an enhanced understanding of the challenges of managing contractual obligations, and circumstances under which business leaders might agree to terms outside of the contract.

ISS A/S (B)

Rose, Clayton S
January 2008

Supplements the (A) case

ISS A/S (C)

Rose, Clayton S
January 2008

Supplements the (A) case

Real Madrid Club de Fútbol in 2007: Beyond the Galácticos

Elberse, Anita, and John Quelch
January 2008

Supplements the (A) case

Russian Standard

Deshpandé, Rohit, and Seth Schulman
January 2008

In September 2006, Russian billionaire Roustam Tariko, founder and owner of Russian Standard, needed to develop a strategy for introducing Russia's most popular brand of premium vodka (RSO) to American consumers. In the past year, he had introduced Imperia, the firm's flagship ultra-premium vodka, in the U.S. market; lined up American importation and distribution partners for Russian Standard; and had worked hard to build excitement for the brand. Beyond establishing RSO's stylishness, Tariko needed to carve out a space for the brand in the crowded American market. Imperia's marketing had emphasized two attributes, superior quality and Russian-ness. In articulating RSO's advertising strategy and tagline, Tariko would need to decide once and for all which attribute to emphasize. He would also need to decide how to articulate this attribute so as to develop discrete identities for each of the two brands. Would Americans respond better to a claim of authenticity, or to a claim of unparalleled purity? And which were RSO and Imperia best equipped to exploit?

TH!NK: The Norwegian Electric Car Company

Lassiter, Joseph B., and David Kiron
January 2008

On August 1, 2007, 61-year-old Jan-Olaf Willums' plane was flying along the Greenland coastline on his way back to Norway after intense discussions with several prominent U.S. venture capital investors, among them Kleiner Perkins and Rockport Capital Partners, about investing in a plan to accelerate his company's entry into the North American market. A successful engineer, entrepreneur, and sustainable development champion, Willums was CEO of Think Global AS (TH!NK), a privately held Norwegian maker of electric vehicles (EVs). Having already raised $85 million in venture backing, TH!NK was just a few months away from the broad European launch of its line of EVs, the first commercially available, highway-safe cars in the world that produced zero greenhouse emissions.

Iceland: Small Fish in a Global Pond

Porter, Michael E., and Christian H.M. Ketels
December 2007

Describes the economic development of Iceland since 1945, focusing in particular on the years since 2000, when Iceland experienced strong growth and Icelandic companies aggressively internationalized.

British Land

White, Lucy
December 2007

British Land's shares traded below NAV. Laxey investments tried to force British Land into share buybacks and criticized its corporate governance. Laxey voted borrowed shares at the AGM.

Millions of Customers and the Search for a Business: The Challenge of IRC-Hispano

Martínez-Jerez, Francisco de Asís, Fernando Barrajo, and Joshua Bellin
December 2007

Like many online services, IRC-Hispano, the world's largest Spanish-language chat organization, has many customers but sees few revenues. As an association, its structure presents many limitations and hurdles to overcome involving investing in technology platform updates and generating ideas and initiatives to monetize the use community

Allianz AG: Becoming a European Company

Lorsch, Jay W., and Alexis Chernak
November 2007

Focuses on the decision made by leadership at Allianz AG, the German insurance and financial services company, to complete a cross-border merger with the Italian insurance and financial services company, RAS. Allianz, however, could not complete the cross-border merger by remaining a German corporation under the current German statutes. Allianz, however, could conduct the cross-border merger as a European company according to the Statute of the European Community (Societas Europaea, or SE), which was recently passed by the European Union and adopted into German law. Examines the rationale for the decision made by the Allianz supervisory board and the board of management in addition to the process of becoming an SE, including the change in the composition of the supervisory board as a result of the merger and the conversion to an SE.

PlaNet Finance: Broad Scope in Microfinance

Hagiu, Andrei, and Elena Corsi
November 2007

PlaNet Finance was a French NGO providing technical support and training services to microfinance institutions (i.e., institutions providing financial services to the poor) and other microfinance actors, rating of microfinance institutions and management, and advisory services to microfinance investors and investment funds. Furthermore, it was creating a network of microfinance banks through a microfinance holding company. However, in a context of rapid change and explosive growth of the microfinance sector, Jacques Attali, the founder and president, wondered whether PlaNet Finance's scope was sufficiently broad to fulfill its mission or, on the contrary, whether it needed to be narrowed in order to eliminate organizational challenges and external perceptions of conflicts of interest.

The Hertz Corporation (A)

Luehrman, Timothy A., and Douglas C. Scott
November 2007

Examines the leveraged buyout of Hertz in 2005, a complex, high-profile deal and a good example of cutting-edge practice in private equity. The first of a two-part series on the Hertz LBO, adopts the perspective of Clayton, Dubilier & Rice, the leader of a private equity consortium bidding to buy Hertz from Ford in an auction. Set at the final round of the auction, the immediate problem for the consortium is how much to raise its previous bid. A reasonable bid must be based upon how much value the private equity consortium can create through improvements in Hertz's global operations on the one hand, and a more efficient capital structure on the other. Presents detailed descriptive information on both topics, but does not include detailed financial projections, which must be formulated by students or supplied, for discussion purposes, by the instructor.

The Hertz Corporation (B)

Luehrman, Timothy A., and Douglas C. Scott
November 2007

Supplement to the (A) case

The Transformation of Thomson

Collis, David J., and Troy Smith
November2007

Thomson, a French multinational, went through a decade of dramatic change in the early years of the 21st century. From a state-owned enterprise earning 97% of its revenue from television sets and other analog consumer electronics, Thomson had become a publicly traded company providing digital video services and equipment to major movie studios, broadcast networks, and retailers, as well as satellite, cable, and telecom operators. The Group had just met its financial targets for 2006 and had achieved organic growth of 6% in the first half of 2007. Yet even as he reflected on these successes, CEO Frank Dangeard knew that much remained to be done to secure the company's leadership position against aggressive competition in a rapidly shifting and uncertain technological environment. Traces the evolution and transformation of the company and highlights the difficult choices Thomson faces in an ever-evolving high-tech industry.

Dove: Evolution of a Brand

Deighton, John A.
November 2007

Examines the evolution of Dove from functional brand to a brand with a point of view after Unilever designated it as a masterbrand and expanded its portfolio to cover entries into a number of sectors beyond the original bath soap category. The development causes the brand team to take a fresh look at the clichés of the beauty industry. The result is the controversial Real Beauty campaign. As the campaign unfolds, Unilever learns to use the Internet, and particularly social network media like YouTube, to manage controversy.

Norway Sells Wal-Mart

Pozen, Robert C., and Aldo Sesia Jr
November 2007

In June 2006, Norway's Pension Fund decided to divest its position in Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. after an investigation by the Fund's Ethics Council. According to a spokesperson of Norway's Finance Ministry, "The recommendation to exclude Wal-Mart cites serious and systematic violations of human rights and labor rights." Before making its recommendation to the Ministry to divest Wal-Mart, the Council sent its findings to the retailer for comment, but received no response. While Wal-Mart did not respond, the company had taken several steps to strengthen its ethical standards worldwide in recent years.

Gianna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki and the 2004 Athens Olympic Games (A)

Marquis, Christopher, Doug Guthrie, and Yannis Katsarakis
October 2007

Gianna Angelopoulous-Daskalaki led the bidding organization that secured the 2004 Olympics for Athens and then later the preparations for those Games. Tracks her leadership style and how she and her team won the bid. After substantial planning problems threatened to cost Greece the Olympics, Angelopoulos was asked to take over the preparations, with only 4 of the 7 years remaining. Ends with the question of what she needs to consider in making the decision to take over the Games' preparations, what role she should play, and where she should start.

Gi anna Angelopoulos-Daskalaki and the 2004 Athens Olympic Games (B)

Marquis, Christopher, Doug Guthrie, and Yannis Katsarakis
October 2007

Supplements the (A) case.

Unilever as a 'multi-local multinational' 1945-1979

Jones, Geoffrey G., and Stephanie Decker
October 2007

Explores the opportunities and threats to Unilever's global business in 1978 based on the commercial and political challenges faced by three of its subsidiaries, Lever Brothers in the United States, Hindustan Lever in India, and United Africa Company in West Africa. Management faced several problems: criticism of multinational companies, anti-trust legislation, expropriations, and rising competition from international and local rivals. Focuses on developing a new global strategy for a company that placed a premium on a consensual management style and local autonomy.

Silic (A): Choosing Cost or Fair Value on Adoption of IFRS

Hawkins, David F., Vincent Dessain, and Andrew Barron
September 2007

This case addresses the implementation of International Reporting Standards (IFRS) at Silic, a publicly-listed real-estate company in France. The A case focuses on how Silic should implement International Accounting Standard 40 (IAS 40, Investment Properties). Students assume the role of CEO Dominique Schlissinger and must decide whether the company should report its primary asset (investment property) using either the historical cost or fair-value accounting method. The B case exposes the accounting methods eventually chosen by Silic and other publicly-quoted real-estate companies in France. It gives Silic the opportunity to explain the reasons behind and effects of it choice, and encourages students to reflect on whether Silic made the right decision.

Silic (B): Choosing Cost or Fair Value on Adoption of IFRS

Hawkins, David F., Vincent Dessain, and Andrew Barron
September 2007

Supplements the (A) case.

Moulin Rouge (A)

Edmondson, Amy C., Bertrand Moingeon, Vincent Dessain, and Ane Damgaard Jensen
September 2007

The case explores the Parisian cabaret following its bankruptcy in 1998. Under court supervision, the family-owned cabaret was forced to let an outside person step in to supervise the company. Set in 2004, the A case follows the new CEO in his attempts to turn the company around and asks participants to consider how leaders can effectively motivate employees to create a successful business in an old, well-known entertainment company. The B case brings the Moulin Rouge turnaround story up to the year 2007 and illustrates the collaboration between external managers and the family and describes the continuous empowerment of the employees.

Moulin Rouge (B)

Edmondson, Amy C., Bertrand Moingeon, Vincent Dessain, and Ane Damgaard Jensen
September 2007

Supplements the (A) case.

Metro International

Khanna, Tarun, Feliz Oberholzer-Gee, Anders Sjoman, Ane Damgaard Jensen, and Vincent Dessain
September 2007

The case explores the business model of Metro International, a company publishing 70 editions of its free newspaper in 20 countries. Set in 2007, the case looks at the decision facing top management regarding the company's future strategy. A pioneer in the free newspaper market, Metro had fought incumbent publishers distributing traditional paid-for newspapers, but while the company had also generated profits, new challenges had surfaced; competition had increased and advertising-the free newspaper's only source of income-was shifting from newspapers to the internet.

E.ON Corporate Strategy

Reinhardt, Forest L., and Sebastian Frankenberger
September 2007

Examines the corporate strategy of German energy giant E.ON. The firm is vertically integrated, horizontally diversified across electricity and natural gas, and active in numerous countries in Europe as well as in the United States. Explores the costs and benefits of the company's choices about its vertical, horizontal, and geographical scope. Considers the risks of economic regulation, increasing concerns about environmental externalities from carbon emissions and nuclear power, and political and price risks in upstream markets for fossil fuels.

Marie Trellu-Kane at Unis-Cite (A)

Anteby, Michel J., Julie Battilana, and Anne-Claire Pache
September 2007

Marie Trellu-Kane is trying to decide how Unis-Cite should respond to French President Jacques Chirac's announcement in 2005 of a new national voluntary civil service program. Since 1994, Trellu-Kane and her co-founders had been creating and overseeing a civil service program called Unis-Cite, in which youth, particularly from the disadvantaged immigrant population, volunteered nine months of their time to work on community projects. Based in Paris, France, Unis-Cite had begun to expand to other areas. With the announcement that the government would provide funding to mobilize thousands of youth volunteers, Trellu-Kane needed to decide how Unis-Cite would proceed.

BT Plc: The Broadband Revolution (B)

Tushman, Michael L., David Kiron, and Adam M. Kleinbaum
September 2007

Supplements the (A) case

Royal DSM N.V.: Information Technology Enabling Business Transformation

Applegate, Lynda M., Edward Watson, and Mara E. Vatz
August 2007

Describes how Royal DSM NV, an $8 billion dollar global corporation, leveraged information technology to enable a major corporate portfolio transformation between 2000 and 2006.

Nordic Telephone Company's Bid for TDC

El-Hage, Nabil, Mark Lurie, and Leslie Pierson
August 2007

Nordic Telephone Company, formed by a consortium of private equity firms, has made a public tender offer for Denmark's leading telecommunications company, TDC. TDC's board of directors approved the take-private transaction, and 88% of shareholders have accepted the offer. Nordic Telephone must gain 90% of TDC's shares to force compulsory redemption under Denmark law. However, a pension fund that held 5.5% of the outstanding stock has rejected the offer. Should Nordic Telephone lower its 90% acceptance threshold and purchase TDC without a guarantee of full ownership, or should TDC walk away from the table?

BBC Worldwide: Global Strategy

Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop
August 2007

In January 2007, John Smith, chief executive officer of BBC Worldwide (BBC WW), the commercial arm of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), was preparing to meet with his senior managers to discuss BBC WW's global strategy options. BBC WW exploited and exported BBC-branded content around the globe through all formats, including magazines, television, books, DVDs, audio books, merchandise, mobile phones, downloads, and other emerging digital media (such as Internet Protocol TV). BBC WW delivered its profits back to the BBC. Since 2004, BBC WW profits had more than doubled.

Grosvenor Group Ltd

Perold, André F., Arthur I. Segel, Oliver Corlette, and Soyoun Song
August 2007

A global real estate investment firm is trying to decide whether to enter into a property-derivative transaction to help it effect a change in asset allocation. The market for real estate derivatives is beginning to grow quite rapidly and the firm is trying to understand how to use these instruments in managing its business.

Ericsson: Leading in Times of Change

Narayandas, Das, Vincent Dessain, Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Anders Sjøman
August 2007

After its dramatic corporate turnaround, the Swedish telecom infrastructure company Ericsson hires a new CEO to bring the former Swedish flagship company back on track. Puts students in the shoes of Carl-Henric Svanberg, an industry outsider and CEO of locks group Assy Abloy, who does not hesitate a moment when he gets the call in early 2003. Looks back on the reasons for Ericsson's current situation and the recent restructuring programs that cut the company's staff and operating expenses in half. Presents Svanberg's vision for how to re-energize the ailing company and reach profitability once again, and gives students the opportunity to debate these issues.

Reinventing Ericsson

Narayandas, Das, Vincent Dessain, Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Anders Sjøman
August 2007

Carl-Henric Svanberg, CEO of the Swedish telecom infrastructure company Ericsson, has to reorganize the recovering company in late 2003 after a major industry downturn. He is convinced that only a more market-orientated and customer-focused organization will be able to remain competitive in this maturing, high-technology-focused industry. Presents his change project, in which the sales and marketing structure play a central role. Will his ideas allow the company to keep its customers and successfully go after new markets?

Bert Twaalfhoven: The Successes and Failures of a Global Entrepreneur

Alfaro, Laura, Rafael M. Di Tella, Ane Damgaard Jensen, and Vincent Dessain
July 2007

Bert Twaalfhoven (HBS '54) is faced with two offers to acquire the manufacturing holding company he had built up over 40 years. Despite the attractive price, which would net Twaalfhoven and his family $70 million, he is reluctant to sell the company because his original vision was to create a family-owned conglomerate which would last for generations. Of his eight children, two are appropriate successors, but neither shows much interest in following in their father's footsteps.

Rovná Dan: The Flat Tax in Slovakia

Alfaro, Laura, Rafael M. Di Tella, Ane Damgaard Jensen, and Vincent Dessain
July 2007

Explores the tax policy choices made by Slovakia and the impact of reforms. Set in 2006, looks at the decision facing new Prime Minister Robert Fico as he faces the public's "reform fatigue." Traces the development of tax and fiscal policies since Slovakia's independence in 1993, focusing on the 2004 implementation of the rovna dan, or "equal tax," a drastic simplification of the tax system. A major theme is the impact of labor market and welfare reform, as well as the effective tax rates of both investors and workers. Another important theme relates to Slovakia's desire to join the EU and adopt the Euro.

SAP: Industry Transformation

Hagiu, Andrei, Pai-Ling Yin, Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Vincent Dessain
June 2007

SAP seeks growth in the small- and medium-sized enterprise market. To do so, it has created a platform strategy with SAP Netweaver. What are the advantages and challenges for an incumbent entering a new market? What are the benefits and challenges of implementing a platform strategy?

Bancaja: Developing Customer Intelligence (A)

Martínez-Jerez, Francisco de Asís, and Katherine Miller
June 2007

In 1996, CEO Fernando Garcia Checa wanted to make customer analytics a part of Bancaja's new strategy. Bancaja, a savings bank based in Valencia, Spain, was expanding and wanted to exploit customer information to increase commercial effectiveness. At the same time, it was pushing for innovation in the nascent Spanish credit card market. To avoid the considerable investments of time and money that a large-scale customer relationship management (CRM) project would require, the bank decided to explore its benefits with a smaller pilot project. It appointed a CRM project team to design and implement a project focused on credit cards. Describes the challenges of the Spanish credit card market at the time, the methods for profiling credit card customers, and the variables involved in designing an optimal credit card. Concludes with a consideration of the decisions the CRM team had to make in designing the project, including whether to use conjoint analysis or implement a mini campaign.

Bancaja: Developing Customer Intelligence (B)

Martínez-Jerez, Francisco de Asís , and Katherine Miller
June 2007

Supplements the (A) case.

Academia Barilla

Bell, David E., and Mary Shelman
June 2007

Barilla, the world's largest pasta company, has introduced a new high-quality, high-priced product line that features a range of authentic Italian food products sourced from artisan producers. Management believes the line will appeal to consumers seeking healthier foods and convenience, and will help extend Barilla's brand identification beyond pasta. However, the new line is a bold departure from Barilla's core competencies of high-volume production and sales of fast moving, low-priced goods. Provides an opportunity to discuss trends in consumer eating habits, supply chains for locally-produced goods, and changes in retail formats. In addition, provides an opportunity to discuss the difference in investment philosophy between a family-owned company and a publicly-traded company.

Wal-Mart in Europe

Trumbull, Gunnar, and Louisa Neissa
June 2007

Presents challenges facing Wal-Mart during its move into Germany. Explores the dynamics of the German retail market.

Bankinter: Deploying the Mortgage Simulator to the Branches

Martínez-Jerez, F. Asís, and Katherine Miller
May 2007

Describes how Bankinter, a mid-sized Spanish bank, altered the information set available to its customer-facing employees. In the spring of 2003, Bankinter introduced an Excel-based program called the Mortgage Simulator that helped branch managers calculate the price of a mortgage and estimate the customer lifetime value (CLV). Facilitates a discussion of the impact of such a change in the information set for employees when the incentives and decision rights remain unchanged. Also examines the tradeoffs front-line employees face as they divide their efforts between reaching new customers and increasing the amount of cross-selling to existing customers.

French Unemployment: The Crisis Continues

Alfaro, Laura, Vincent Dessain, and Patrick Vachey
May 2007

Supplements the (A) case

Latvia: Economic Strategy after EU Accession

Porter, Michael E., and Christian H.M. Ketels
May 2007

Describes the economic development of Latvia, a small eastern European country on the shores of the Baltic Sea, from regaining independence in 1991 to European Union (EU) accession in 2004 and is set on May 1st, 2004, the day Latvia became an EU member. Latvia had achieved strong growth since regaining independence from the Soviet Union in 1990. Describes Latvia's economic development over this period, discussing the economic policy efforts that have taken place and includes general information on the country, its history and politics, and the business environment that companies faced in 2004. A special focus is the influence that the EU accession process has on the Latvian economy and on economic policy choices in the country. Challenges students to discuss how the environment changes as EU membership is achieved, and which new priorities the country might need to define for its economic policy.

Actigall: Managing the Divestement of Mature Drugs

Gilson, Stuart C., and David Kiron
May 2007

A company must decide whether to divest itself of a mature drug brand.

The West German Headache Center: Integrated Migraine Care

Porter, Michael E., Clemens Guth, and Elisa Dannemiller
May 2007

Describes the joint efforts of the German health plan KKH and Essen University Hospital to develop an integrated practice unit (IPU), and the West German Headache Center's efforts to improve the quality of migraine care. Provides an overview of the German health care system detailing its provider, health plan, and reimbursement structure. Following new legislation in 2004, which allowed health plans and selected providers to contract outside of the regular group purchasing scheme, KKH and Dr. Deiner of Essen University Hospital developed a novel delivery structure for migraine care. Challenges and hurdles to implementation are described for both the health plan and the IPU. Provides detailed data to allow students to evaluate success, identify current challenges, and recommend improvements to the integrated care system.

Schibsted

Anand, Bharat N., and Sophie Hood
May 2007

In 2006, newspaper firms in developed markets were severely threatened on three fronts: the growth of online news, online classified advertising, and free newspapers. Schibsted, however, had managed to cope with these challenges successfully, and had become something of a legend in the newspaper community. The case describes the evolution of Schibsted's strategy from print media towards electronic media starting in 1995, including their choices around the internal structuring of new ventures. In September 2006, the management team confronted a few salient questions: first, should Schibsted allow Google to crawl its online news sites in Scandinavia? Second, were Schibsted's successes within Scandinavia repeatable outside it? Indeed, how far could Schibsted's competitive advantage travel?

Fritidsresor Under Pressure (A): The First 10 Hours

Margolis, Joshua D., Vincent Dessain, and Anders Sjøman
May 2007

When a tsunami hit Southeast Asia on December 26, 2004, the leadership team at a Swedish tour company must manage a devastating crisis affecting thousands of its customers and employees in Thailand. Documents the challenges the company faced in the first ten hours of the crisis. Amid the uncertainty of those first hours, the leadership team must make a range of decisions to orchestrate the company's response and manage the rest of its business. Describes the chaotic environment of a crisis, especially when the normal course of business is interrupted, and puts students in the shoes of a range of managers, each having to make decisions on his/her own, while coordinating with one another to enable the company to respond effectively.

Fritidsresor Under Pressure (B): The First Week

Margolis, Joshua D., Vincent Marie Dessain, and Anders Sjøman
May 2007

Supplements the (A) case.

Fritidsresor Under Pressure (C): After the Tsunami

Margolis, Joshua D., Vincent Marie Dessain, and Anders Sjøman
May 2007

Supplements the (A) case.

NCH Capital and Univermag Ukraina

Lerner, Josh, and John Didiuk
April 2007

NCH Capital is considering whether to sell its Ukrainian company Univermag Ukraina, which it has held and built up over the past decade.

Common Agricultural Policy and the Future of French Farming

Trumbull, Gunnar, Vincent Dessain, and Elena Corsi
March 2007

Presents the history and evolution of the EU Common Agricultural Policy, from early price supports to the 2003 decision to "decouple" payments to European farmers. Explores the logic behind agricultural supports, with a focus on the economic, political, and cultural context of French farming. Discusses efforts to reform the CAP in the context of the Doha Round of WTO negotiations against the backdrop of European enlargement.

Navigating Turbulent Waters: Glitnir Bank's Communication Challenge During a Macroeconomic Crisis

Kimbrough, Michael D., Gregory S. Miller, Vincent Dessain, and Ane Damgaard Jensen
March 2007

Glitnir Bank is an Icelandic company following an aggressive growth strategy that relies heavily on foreign debt. Access to such debt is suddenly curtailed when there is a downturn in market sentiment regarding the Icelandic economy as a whole. Students will reflect on the essential elements of a communications strategy, including the role of the media and analysts. Class discussion will focus on creating infrastructure that will increase the bank's ability to communicate effectively in an environment of macroeconomic uncertainty.

Ice-Fili (Abridged)

Wells, John R., Pai-Ling Yin, and Michael G. Rukstad
March 2007

Designed as an overview of all aspects of the strategy process: industry analysis, positioning, dynamics and sustainability, and scope issues of corporate strategy, including vertical integration, horizontal diversification, and location issues. Ice-Fili is the largest ice cream producer in Russia in 2002, but is facing strong competition from Nestle despite its success over other multinational competitors. Contains detailed exhibits, allowing deeper analyses. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

Tiberg Co

Beer, Michael, and Isenberg, Daniel J.
February 2007

Describes the efforts of a vice president of purchasing to coordinate and centralize purchasing procedures in a multinational company. He encounters a lack of active cooperation. A rewritten version of an earlier case by G. Lombard.

Vipp A/S

Austin, Robert D., and Daniela Beyersdorfer
February 2007

Rapidly growing Vipp sells highly differentiated (and expensive) "designer" versions of a product that most buyers think about in purely functional terms: Trash bins. Examines how the company successfully produces and positions a trash bin so that it is regarded as an "art object" (and which has been displayed as such as the Paris Louvre). Though it is a tangible product, a Vipp bin's price cannot be even remotely justified by its functional features; customers, rather, pay dearly for the intangible aspects of the product, which the firm works very hard to keep integrated with the physical product. Deals with a range of issues confronting creative economy companies, such as how to produce products with very important intangible components, how to assure and manage the design integrity of a family of products, how far to extend a brand, how to manage creative employees, and where to source creative work.