Executive Education
in Asia-Pacific

Driving Corporate Performance - China

12-15 May 2015
(Harvard Center Shanghai)

Created for Chinese companies and multinationals, this new program shows you how to develop and implement winning competitive strategies. You will learn how to build stronger strategies through identification of your company's true competitive advantage and how to align your organization for strategy execution. The program is offered by HBS and Guanghua School of Management, Peking University.

Global CEO Program for China

12-17 April, 2015 - Module 1 (CEIBS, Shanghai, China);
17-22 May 2015 - Module 2 (IESE, Barcelona, Spain);
19-25 July 2015 - Module 3 (HBS, Boston, MA, USA)

Enhancing leadership skills and strategic vision, this program prepares Chinese CEOs to build world-class enterprises in a global environment. Jointly developed by Harvard Business School, China Europe International Business School, and IESE Business School, the curriculum explores factors influencing business performance and examines the CEO's role as it relates to strategic, governmental, investor, market, societal, and trade union issues.

Reinventing and Executing Strategy-China

1-5 June, 2015 (Harvard Center Shanghai)
Discover how to create strategic alignment by exploring the vital connections between company strategy, economics, and control systems. A collaboration between HBS and Guanghua School of Management, Peking University, this program helps executives design, implement, and manage systems that focus an organization on business goals and in turn, improve performance and enhance corporate value.

Growing and Leading a Professional Service Firm — China

July 12-17, 2014
(Harvard Center Shanghai)

To take advantage of opportunities in China, professional service firms must navigate many obstacles in a complex and unfamiliar environment. Offered jointly by the Harvard Business School and the School of Management, Fudan University in Shanghai, this program explores the difficult balancing act required for company leaders who must consistently maintain fiscal discipline while exceeding client expectations, motivating staff, and formulating and executing long-term strategy.

Marketing Strategies for Profitable Growth-China

16-19 August , 2015 (Harvard Center Shanghai)
Offering the latest thinking on China and the global marketplace, this leadership development program helps you build competitive advantage. Jointly developed by Harvard Business School; the School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University; and China Europe International Business School, the program helps executives renew their perspectives, rethink their role, and manage more effectively.

Senior Executive Program for China

16-22 August, 2015
Module 1 (Tsinghua-SEM, Beijing, China);
18-24 October, 2015
Module 2 (CEIBS, Shanghai, China);
6-18 December, 2015
Module 3 (HBS, Boston, MA, USA)

Offering the latest thinking on China and the global marketplace, this leadership development program helps you build competitive advantage. Jointly developed by Harvard Business School; the School of Economics and Management, Tsinghua University; and China Europe International Business School, the program helps executives renew their perspectives, rethink their role, and manage more effectively.

All Global Executive Education Programs

Asia-Pacific

Archives

China's Evolving Labor Laws (A)

Paine, Lynn S.
December 2008

The (A) case describes key provisions of the new labor contract law proposed by China's National People's Congress in 2006. The case invites students to consider how domestic and multinational companies should respond to the Chinese government's invitation to comment on the proposal. The case also describes the impetus for the new legislation and initial reaction to the draft by key business groups, legal scholars, and others.

China's Evolving Labor Laws (B)

Paine, Lynn S., and Aldo Sesia Jr.
December 2008

The (B) case describes how the various business groups responded to the Chinese government's invitation to submit comments on its draft labor contract law and details the ensuing global controversy. The (B) case also describes changes made to the working draft and provides an overview of the law as finally enacted in June 2007.

China's Financial Markets: 2007

Jin, Li, and Bingxing Huo
December 2008

Provides an overview of capital markets in mainland China in 2007, evaluating the up-to-date performance of key components of the markets, highlighting concerns as China strives to modernize its financial system to meet global competition and support its fast growing economy.

ASUSTek Computer Inc. Eee PC (A)

Shih, Willy, Chintay Shih, Hung-Chang Chiu, Yi-Ching Hsieh, and Ho Howard Yu
December 2008

ASUSTek Computer was the world's largest manufacture of PC motherboards, yet when it tried to launch its new sub-notebook Eee PC, the organization faced challenges in doing things outside of its established processes. Though many of the team members had worked together for years, they had to find new ways of working as they tried to launch the new mobile Internet device category without undermining its existing notebook PC business.

ASUSTek Computer Inc. Eee PC (B)

Shih, Willy and Ho Howard Yu
December 2008

Supplements the (A) case

The Hong Kong & China Gas Company Ltd.: Negotiating Joint Ventures in China

Sebenius, James K., Michael Shih-ta Chen, and Medha Samant
November 2008

To deliver 5-6 major new Chinese joint ventures annually, Hong Kong China Gas executives began extracting cross-border negotiating lessons from their 80 existing Chinese JVs. Chairman Alfred Chan and CEO Peter Wong knew that HKGC's growth strategy required significant mainland expansion through negotiating joint ventures to run gas and water distribution systems in diverse urban and rural locations throughout mainland China-often in the face of entrenched local interests who could have blocking power. Discussions with HKGC's negotiation teams revealed an increasingly sophisticated negotiating approach from target identification and party mapping, to "social mapping" and building guanxi, to creative deal design and tactics, in order to most effectively work out issues of equity, management control, territory, and exclusivity.

Consumer Payment Systems-Japan

Edelman, Benjamin, and Andrei Hagiu
November 2008

In 2008, the Japanese consumer payments landscape featured ongoing widespread use of cash, limited use of credit cards and rapid rise of e-money systems based on contactless technology embedded in cards and especially mobile phones. The case details the alliances that created new products, as well as the regulations that sometimes stood in the way. Throughout, the case identifies incentives for both consumers and merchants, including direct costs, efficiency benefits, rebates, and treatment in case of loss or fraud.

Chi Mei Optoelectronics

Shih, Willy, Chintay Shih, Jyun-Cheng Wang, and Ho Howard Yu
October 2008

Chi Mei is a Taiwanese industrial group that makes a major diversification into the technology intensive TFT-LCD flat panel display industry. Because the diversification is far away from its core competence in petrochemicals, it is an opportunity to examine how the firm was able to become a global leader in the relatively short span of ten years. Such organic diversifications are relatively unusual by Western standards, especially into technologies and markets that have relatively high entry barriers and where there is no deep-rooted national technological or scientific foundation. As such Chi Mei is an interesting vehicle to examine the rise of a major Asian industrial cluster with global scope which has no participants or competitors in the West. The case can also be used to expose students to the global supply chain for key information technology components. Taiwan and Korea are today the major world centers for the manufacture of semiconductors (in particular DRAMs and FLASH memory) and flat panel displays. Taiwan is also the center for notebook computer manufacturing, and Taiwanese companies, through their China-based manufacturing and assembly operations, drive 60% of the IT exports from China. Yet few students even know the identity of these major global players. Taiwan- and Korea-based TFT-LCD flat panels are the critical components in notebook computers, computer monitors, and flat panel televisions from essentially all well known global brands.

Wyoff and China-LuQuan: Negotiating a Joint Venture (B)

Sebenius, James K., and Jason Cheng Qian
October 2008

Through stalled joint venture talks between Pennsylvania-based Wyoff Corp. and Jinan-based China-LuQuan, strategic and cross-cultural negotiation challenges are explored both from American and Chinese perspectives. Wyoff, a leading U.S. chemical company, has been seeking ways to secure the company's foothold in China's emerging market since the late 90s. When approached by China-LuQuan, a major Chinese state-owned chemical producer, in 2000 for a joint-venture opportunity to make a popular chemical catalyst in China, Wyoff, leveraging its superior technology, demanded one-sided terms and played hardball, ruining both the deal and the relationship with China-LuQuan. Seven years later in 2007, Wyoff faced market pressure to again seek a joint venture with China-LuQuan on two other types of products. Both parties had to overcome past distrust to work things out on a series of strategic issues: investment, product slate, marketing, technology, management organization, staffing, etc. In the negotiations, cross-cultural themes (e.g., trust, relationships, communication, time, autonomy, face, etc.) and different negotiation styles created challenges along with the business and strategic issues. The (A) case sets up the negotiations, highlights issue impasses, explores cross-cultural frictions, and poses tactical challenges. The (B) case describes the strategies, tactics, and results of these negotiations.

Tong Lung Metal Industry Co., Ltd.

Shih, Willy, Chintay Shih, Chen-Fu Chien, Ho Howard Yu, and Yu-Shian Chiang
October 2008

Develop its own branded line, or continue as an original design manufacturer (ODM)? Tung Lung Metal Industries Co. Ltd. is a Taiwanese maker of door lock hardware that is faced with the question of whether to continue to focus on its ODM business or start placing more emphasis on its own brand development and growth in global markets. The case explores the bumpy history of the company and raises questions around the downstream consequences of global outsourcing strategies.

System on a Chip 2008: Ardentec Corporation

Shih, Willy C., Chen-Fu Chien, Chintay Shih, and Ting-Chen Chen.
October 2008

Ardentec Corporation is a specialist in "wafer probing," a highly specialized niche sandwiched between the "front-end" and the "back-end" of semiconductor manufacturing. Because the semiconductor industry uses modular processes and has standard containers for the interchange of work-in-progress, it has evolved to a highly horizontal structure where specialists like Ardentec can carve out unique market opportunities that are less attractive to integrated manufacturers. The company has grown rapidly, but as it starts to occupy a significant percentage of the total available market, its founders are faced with the challenge of how to maintain growth. Do they vertically integrate more into the back-end, or should they try to do acquisitions in adjacent markets? The case is intended to be used in conjunction with the Technical Note, "Horizontal Specialization and Modularity in the Semiconductor Industry" (608-001)

Global Talent Management at Novartis

Siegel, Jordan
September 2008

This case tackles the topic of global talent management. It can be used to analyze the performance measurement, incentive, and talent development system used at a major multinational company. This case can also be used to analyze the extent to which this system should or should not be adapted for China and other emerging economies.

World Wildlife Fund US

Wei-Skillern, Jane, and Kerry Herman
September 2008

World Wildlife Fund US is a leading international conservation nonprofit that operates within a global network of WWF organizations. This case examines WWF US's strategy to achieve its mission of protecting natural wildlife and resources. In contrast to traditional approaches in which WWF country programs operated relatively independently, the new strategy involves integrating WWF US more fully within the global WWF network, and fostering longer-term, trust-based relationships among all partner organizations toward their shared conservation goals. The case highlights the Tesso Nilo conservation project, which brought together various WWF partners to stop illegal logging in Sumatra and revive its wildlife environment to illustrate a network approach within a global multisite nonprofit.

Leading Citigroup (A)

Paine, Lynn Sharp, Aldo Sesia Jr., and Carin-Isabel Knoop
September 2008

The (A) case describes a series of controversial events and alleged misdeeds that placed Citigroup in the public spotlight and launched investigations into the company's business practices by regulators in Japan and Europe in the fall of 2004. CEO Chuck Prince must decide what to do to right the company and restore its reputation.

Leading Citigroup (B)

Paine, Lynn Sharp, Aldo Sesia Jr., and Carin-Isabel Knoop
September 2008

The (B) case describes the actions taken by Citigroup CEO Chuck Prince and his management team to right the company in the wake of the controversies and alleged misdeeds described in the (A) case.

Mattel's Long Hot Summer

Wei-Skillern, Jane, Sonia Marciano, and Barbara Passy
September 2008

In the summer of 2007, Mattel performed three major recalls of toys, mostly due to lead paint and other manufacturing issues in China. This case examines specifically how those recalls were perceived by consumers and responded to by Mattel, as well as what effect they had on the toy industry, consumer safety, and manufacturing in China in general.

mixi

Piskorski, Mikolaj Jan, Masaru Nomura, and Kanako Miyoshi
September 2008

Kasahara, the founder and CEO of mixi, the most successful Japanese on-line social network, is deciding between two strategic options: (i) B2C or (ii) C2C to leverage the power of the social network. In the B2C option, mixi would become a portal for on-line shopping for both digital content and tangible goods and charge the business sellers a fee. In the C2C option, mixi would facilitate exchanges between mixi's members through on-line flea markets or auctions and charge the members for successful transactions. In choosing between the two options he has to consider other upstart networks, particularly in the field of mobile social networking.

Given Imaging Ltd. - First We Take Manhattan, Then We Take Berlin?

Isenberg, Daniel J
August 2008

GI has developed a revolutionary video pill for imaging the small bowel in the gastro-intestinal tract. The development has required the integration of a wide variety of technologies. GI founder and CEO Gabriel Meron must determine GI's marketing strategy and prioritize GI's initial target markets: either the United States, Europe, or Japan, or any combination. He is also faced with the immediate decision if to make offers to U.S. and European regional managers. Cash resources are scarce, and GI hopes to raise additional capital soon.

Carlyle Japan (A)

Godes, David, Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki
August 2008

Tamotsu Adachi, Managing Director of Carlyle Japan, wants to formulate a strategy to improve his firm's ability to source high-quality deals at competitive valuations, or prices. Buyout funds like Carlyle typically have two deal phases: sourcing and monitoring. These correspond to (i) "selling" the benefits to a business owner of going with Carlyle as a buyout partner, and then (ii) increasing the value of that business following the buyout. Since the profitability of a buyout depends on finding high-quality deals, the firm has focused to date on leveraging its contacts in the banking business, which has been a powerful institution in Japan for many years. These contacts have brought to Carlyle a number of good quality companies, but the volume of buyouts done by Carlyle in Japan has not been what they hoped it would be. Students are asked how the firm can improve on this deal sourcing approach.

Carlyle Japan (B)

Godes, David, Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki
August 2008

Supplements the (A) case

Carlyle Japan (C)

Godes, David, Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki
August 2008

Supplements the (A) case

PCCW now

Hagiu, Andrei, and Waishun Lo
August 2008

In 2007, PCCW had to formulate a strategy for growth of its successful NOW TV platform and its quadruple play implementation outside of Hong Kong. Launched in September 2003 by PCCW (Hong Kong's largest telecommunications operator), NOW TV had swiftly become the world's most successful commercial IPTV deployment. By the end of June 2007, the service had an installed subscriber base of almost 820,000 and offered a choice of 143 TV channels, 71 of which were exclusive. However, opportunities for growth were inherently limited to Hong Kong (7 million inhabitants), which meant PCCW had to find ways to expand its NOW platform or seek to license parts of it internationally.

Chunghwa Telecom Co., Ltd. (A)

Marshall, Paul W., Michael Shih-ta Chen, and Keith Chi-ho Wong
August 2008

In late November 2000, Chunghwa Telecom Co., Ltd., the once-monopolized telecom operator owned by the Taiwanese government, was on its way to privatization. Mr. C.K. Mao, Chairman of the company, who headed the job only three months earlier, after its prior chairman resigned unexpectedly in the midst of chaos brought by the resistance of its staff who feared losing their civil servant status after privatization. Also facing Mao was the forthcoming deregulation of the telecommunication industry on the island which would bring about new competitors on fixed-line services, in addition to the already competitive mobile communication segment where the company's once dominant market share was heavily eroded. Mao had to decide on the pricing strategies for the company's various product lines, including fixed line, mobile services, as well as data communication. He also needed to ponder on how to revise the company's compensation system to better motivate its staff in a deregulated market and communicate all these changes to the unionized labor force.

Glass Egg Digital Media

Godes, David B.
July 2008

Glass Egg is an outsource games development firm in Vietnam. They are able to offer brand-name publishers-Microsoft EA, Atari-significant cost savings in the development of art assets for their video games. However, the firm's management find themselves at a point at which they feel they need to make a strategic decision that will enable Glass Egg to grow more substantially and more quickly. They are evaluating three possible directions including expanding the sales force, expanding the scope of art development services they offer and, more radically, going into the games publishing business themselves. Besides offering a picture of an interesting firm in a growing, dynamic country and business, the case allows for an exploration of two important general themes: (1) Assessing alternative growth strategies. When should one pursue "more of the same" business vs. offering another product vs. looking for new customers? When is it better to develop an entirely different line of business with different customers and different products? (2) What are the differences between marketing to businesses vs. marketing to consumers? Since one of the options the firm is considering involves a consumer product-online game development-the case supports a discussion about the important differences, not only in terms of the nature of the buying process and buying center but also in terms of the vastly different organizational resources and structures that are needed in each.

Vignettes on Governance of Private Equity Firms

Hardymon, G. Felda, Ann Leamon, and Eugenia Adofo
July 2008

In a series of vignettes, Nigella Hardy-Smyth of an international development agency that invests partners in emerging markets private equity firms must decide how to handle various situations that arise. As a member of the Limited Partner Advisory Board of each of the five firms, she must contend with a fund manager with an indistinct mandate, a manager who wants to exceed the concentration limit in an investment, tension between a star investor and her other partners, a founding partner who wants to fire the rest of his senior team, and a limited partner seeking preferential treatment that might benefit his fund to the detriment of the other limited partners. The process of discussing these helps the class explore the nuanced role of a limited partner in a private equity firm.

Malaysia: Halfway to 2020

Vietor, Richard H.K.
July 2008

This country case on Malaysia extends forward by seven years the case "Malaysia: Capital and Control" (702-040). It is based on Malaysia's ninth plan, which took effect in 2006. The ninth plan proposed five thrusts-moving the economy to higher value-added goods and services, raising the capacity for knowledge, addressing socioeconomic inequalities, improving the quality of life, and strengthening institutions and the civil service-to achieve 6% growth annually. All of this is to achieve "Vision 2020," a long-range plan for becoming developed. Considers the difficulties Malaysia faces, stuck between China and India on the low (value-added) side, and Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore on the high (value-added) end.

Peoplepower, Inc.: The Republic of the Philippines

Maurer, Noel
July 2008

In 2006, the Philippines faces a difficult choice. Japan has offered the country a trade agreement that includes access to the Japanese labor market for Philippine nurses and other professionals. The same trade agreement, however, means opening the country's manufacturing enterprises to Japanese exports, which is bitterly opposed by some of the nation's largest foreign investors. President Gloria Arroyo-embattled by coup attempts and political scandals-must decide whether to advance the nation's three-decade-old strategy of encouraging the export of its labor resources or whether to attenuate that strategy to meet the demands of large foreign investors.

System on a Chip 2008: Global Unichip Corp

Shih, Willy C., Chintay Shih, Chen-Fu Chien, and Yuan-Chieh Chang
July 2008

Though much of the semiconductor industry has shifted to a horizontal model, complexity driven by technological evolution is driving a shift in the perceived boundaries in the value chain. Global Unichip sees itself as a "virtual integrated device manufacturer," a throwback to the vertically integrated model that fell out of favor for most chips. The case offers an opportunity to examine a highly modular industry and the impact of technology shifts on those boundaries, with significant implications for the incumbents.

The Offshoring of America

Vietor, Richard H.K., Jan W. Rivkin, and Juliana Seminerio
July 2008

The movement from jobs in the United States to developing countries, in a process known as offshoring, has become quite a controversial topic. Managers not only need to decide which activities, if any, to move offshore, but where to move them. This case describes the nature of offshoring and its effect on developing countries.

The Xiamen PX Project: The Rule of Contract or Citizens in China Today

Abrami, Regina, and Richard Zhang
July 2008

This case examines the effect of environmental activism on China's investment climate, focusing on the petrochemical sector. It shows how tensions between a country's national economic development goals and political constraints make for a more unpredictable investment climate, despite considerable improvements in the rule of law within China. This case is suitable for courses in international business, business and society, and doing business in China and/or the developing world.

Myths and Lessons of Modern Chinese History

Kirby, William C., and Brittany Crow
June 2008

China is an ancient civilization, but it is really a very young country. How we understand modern China is rooted in our understanding of history. Thus, the authors examine several myths surrounding important historical themes, including unity, economic and political isolation, the growth and development of capitalism, internationalization, and governance. Following the dispelling of these myths, the authors then examine several lessons of more recent Chinese history, exploring where this young country has been in its first century.

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Limited: A Global Company's China Strategy

Kirby, William C., Michael Shih-Ta Chen, and Keith Wong
June 2008

After fifty-five years in the semiconductor industry, Morris Chang, founder and Chairman of Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC), was seeing a change. After four decades of regular double-digit growth the industry was still growing-but now at a much slower pace. In 2004, TSMC entered the China market, the world's second largest for semiconductors, by building a fabrication plant in Shanghai. Was China the market opportunity in which TSMC could bet on for expansion, or should its strategy be to focus on new product development and innovation?

Wanxiang Group: A Chinese Company's Global Strategy

Abrami, Regina, William C. Kirby, F. Warren McFarlan, Keith Chi-ho Wong and Tracy Yuen Manty
June 2008

With an almost forty-year history as a business in China, the Wanxiang Group has navigated through the significantly different political and economic changes in China to succeed as a global leader in the auto parts industry and to develop into a broad business conglomerate. Beginning in 1994, when it first began its operations in the United States, Wanxiang started to expand its role as a parts supplier into a discerning acquirer of distressed companies in the U.S. While it saw acquisition as an exciting means for growth, company strategy at its Hangzhou, China headquarters also included vertical integration with a goal of developing a full-on electric car. Were these two goals divergent or complementary: mutually supportive or exclusive?

Note on the Bus Industry

Casadesus-Masanell, Ramon, and Jordan Mitchell
June 2008

Supplements the "Irizar in 2005" case. Briefly documents key points in the motor coach industry such as market size, categories of buses, reasons for purchasing, and the basis for competition amongst motor coach manufacturers.

Heidrick & Struggles International, Inc

Eccles, Robert G., and David Lane
June 2008

As CEO of leading executive search firm Heidrick & Struggles for the past 18 months, Kevin Kelly was pleased with his accomplishments so far but concerned about threats he perceived to Heidrick's position at the highest levels of the executive search business. In response, Kelly had begun making strategic investments in firms offering technology-based solutions, but had not yet made significant progress convincing Heidrick's search consultants about the significance of the threats, or the risks and opportunities being created by information technology and the Internet. The increased emphasis Kelly placed on building leadership consulting services was itself a big change. The case asks what levers Kelly can use, from culture to compensation, to make the challenges to Heidrick's traditional business model understood and how to implement the strategic initiatives he has launched.

The Blackstone Group's IPO

Hardymon, G. Felda, Josh Lerner, and Ann Leamon
June 2008

Steven Schwarzman, Chairman of the Blackstone Group, has just learned that an investment group associated with the government of China wants to buy the majority of Blackstone's leveraged IPO. As he considers how to respond to this offer, Schwarzman reviews the firm's proposed structure as a public entity and assesses how he might retain the delicate balance among stakeholders while still maintaining liquidity in the market.

Quanta Computer and the One Laptop Per Child Initiative

Shih, Willy, Chintay Shih, and Jyun-Chen Wang
May 2008

When Quanta Computer, Inc., the world's largest manufacturer of laptop computers, first joined the One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) initiative, it faced a challenge trying to balance the cost objectives of a laptop computer targeted at children of the developing world with the escalating content demands from the marketplace and the non-profit OLPC Foundation. It also had to fit the project into its company business model which served global lead PC brands like Apple as a high volume, low cost ODM provider. The case is a vehicle for discussing new market disruption and the impact of modularity and the evolution of the value network in the global PC supply chain.

China in Africa: The Case of Sudan

Abrami, Regina, and Eunice Ajambo
May 2008

This case examines the relation between China's demand for resources and political risk.

Inner Mongolia Yili Group: China's Pioneering Dairy Brand

Abrami, Regina, William C. Kirby, F. Warren McFarlan, and Tracy Yuen Manty
May 2008

Setting up the goal to become one of the top 20 enterprises in the world dairy industry by 2010, the Inner Mongolia Yili Group had ambitious plans. As one of China's biggest national dairy companies, its main challenge was competing as a local company against joint-venture rivals who benefited from perks granted to "foreign" companies. To set itself apart, Yili focused on research and development and innovative ways to improve the industry. Proving that it could shift industry standards and lead a country not accustomed to dairy consumption, to a point where demand is outpacing supply, the Yili Group is making its mark to go global. As an Official Sponsor of the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing and the Official dairy supplier of the games, it is betting that the brand can go further beyond China. Will the day that tykes from Topeka have a bottle of Yili milk in their hands be coming soon?

Sony PlayStation 3: Game Over?

Ofek, Elie
May 2008

Outlines the challenges faced by Sony with the launch of its PlayStation 3. Information based on the 2006 and 2007 holiday seasons and the success of rival consoles is outlined. In addition, the case allows examining the costs and revenues associated with a business model based on the sale of the hardware and game titles. Can be used with "Home Video Games: Generation Seven" (505-072), which provides supplementary information on the industry.

Monitor's Opportunities in India (B): Grail Research

Alcacer, Juan, and Jan W. Rivkin
May 2008

Supplements the (A) case. Describes the decision by leaders of a strategy consulting firm to build a business research subsidiary in India. Permits a discussion of how high-end knowledge production can be conducted in an emerging economy, at a distance from buyers of the knowledge.

China Resources Corporation (B): China Resources Microelectronics

Campbell, Dennis, David Lane
May 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

Sinopec: Refining Its Strategy

Vietor, Richard, and Julia Galef
May 2008

China's oil industry, with majority ownership vested in the government, had engaged in an "equity oil" strategy for the past few years-acquiring equity interests in oil producing nations including Sudan, Angola, and Iran. Outside critics, however, suggested that the Chinese companies could buy oil in the highly fungible global marketplace. But Sinopec, the nation's largest refiner, was one of the three companies (together with PetroChina and CNOOC) engaged in the equity oil play. With China's energy demands swelling-especially petroleum of which it had limited reserves-Sinopec was struggling to increase output rapidly enough to keep pace with the rapid growth of their automobile sector. And it had to make money soon.

Sony Digital Entertainment, Japan

Elberse, Anita
April 2008

It is late 2007. So-called cell phone ("keitai") novels have turned into an extremely popular form of entertainment-on-the-go in Japan, in particular among young, female readers. In fact, consisting mostly of love stories written by amateurs in short sentences and containing little plot or character development, cell phone novels republished in book form and even remade as movies have come to dominate mainstream media content. At media giant Sony, Ken Munekata, CEO of Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE), and Atsushi Fukuda, President of Sony Digital Entertainment (SDE), are attempting to craft an adequate response. After establishing SDE as a 100% subsidiary of Sony Japan, they now develop a wide range of digital content offerings for mobile phone users, mostly original content "made in Japan"-including keitai novels. But can SDE's subscription model compete in a market dominated by free keitai novel offerings? And, more generally, do Sony's current keitai initiatives move the company in the right strategic direction? Allows for an in-depth examination of viable business models for established media companies competing in digital markets dominated by user-generated, advertising-supported content. Also enables an assessment of the economics of producing and distributing traditional films and books versus digital (cell phone) content.

Terumo (A)

Godes, David, Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki
April 2008

Terumo faces two challenges: how to sell its catheter products in the U.S. and its new "Solution Pack" in its domestic market, Japan. The case provides rich detail on the firm's evolution from a manufacturer of thermometers to a seller of commodity products like syringes to a diversified firm offering a range of advanced products--catheters and grafts, for example--in addition to commodity products. It describes how the firm's sales strategy-including changes in structure and compensation-changed as its overall product line evolve. The case also offers an interesting contrast for students studying sales forces, in terms of how this Japanese model differs in the way, for example, the firm compensates-and views-salespeople

Terumo (B)

Godes, David, Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki
April 2008

Supplements the (A) case

Terumo (C)

Godes, David, Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki
April 2008

Supplements the (A) case

Shinhan Financial Group (B)

Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew J. Morgan
April 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

China Netcom: Corporate Governance in China (A)

Abrami, Regina, William C. Kirby, F. Warren McFarlan, and Tracy Yuen Manty
April 2008

With its dual listings on the Hong Kong stock market and New York Stock Exchange, state-owned enterprise China Netcom was mandated to meet the listing requirements of these exchanges. From this initial step, China Netcom's Chairman, Zhang Chunjiang, began a program that sought to further develop the company's corporate governance practices to meet international corporate governance standards. The company hoped that its commitment in developing a globally-accepted governance structure would help the capital markets and potential investors understand that the company was a true, modern corporation, even with the state as a majority owner.

China Netcom: Corporate Governance in China (B)

Abrami, Regina, William C. Kirby, F. Warren McFarlan, and Tracy Yuen Manty
April 2008

Supplements the (A) case.

Enterprise Culture in Chinese History: Zhang Jian and the Dasheng Cotton Mills

Koll, Elisabeth
April 2008

This case focuses on the legal and managerial evolution of limited-liability firms in China, using the example of the Dasheng cotton mills in Nantong near Shanghai. Dasheng, one of the earliest and most successful industrial enterprises in pre-war China, was founded by the famous entrepreneur Zhang Jian (1853-1926). Having survived various economic and political crises, the Dasheng cotton mills became a state-owned enterprise in 1953. In the wake of the economic reforms, the successor to the original Dasheng Enterprise was restructured as the Jiangsu Dasheng Co. Ltd. in 1996. Issues of corporate governance, legal environment, government relations and the role of family business structures are discussed in the context of how they shaped the business environment in pre-war China and continue to influence Chinese enterprise culture in 2008.

Fiyta-The Case of a Chinese Watch Company

Abrami, Regina, William C. Kirby, F. Warren McFarlan, Luc Wathieu, Gao Wang, Fei Li, and Tracy Yuen Manty
April 2008

Fiyta had long been one of China's foremost watch brands. However, as China's economy began to improve and the livelihood of many Chinese rose with it, their tastes began to change. Exposed to more luxurious foreign brands, many Chinese strived to purchase a Swiss or Japanese watch. How could Fiyta build up its brand image to a more sophisticated Chinese consumer? What marketing activities should it undertake to reinvigorate its brand? Is it meeting the needs of all segments of Chinese consumers? Should it?

Esquel Group: Integrating Business Strategy with Society to Create Competitive Advantage

McFarlan, F. Warren, William C. Kirby, and Tracy Yuen Manty
April 2008

Focuses on the experience of China's largest shirt manufacturer in managing various aspects of government relations in China. Identifies a wide variety of social initiatives it has undertaken.

Marketing the $100 Laptop (C)

Quelch, John, and David Chen
April 2008

Supplements the (A) case

Sealed Air China

Abrami, Regina, William C. Kirby, F. Warren McFarlan, and Tracy Yuen Manty
April 2008

With a 10-year history of doing business in China, Sealed Air was now betting on the country to help propel its growth as a global company. The company identified China as one of the initial investments in the company's Global Manufacturing Strategy that aimed to create efficiencies in its operations across the globe. As Sealed Air's new Shanghai plant starts production in 2008, will its almost $50 million investment pay off? Is 10 years of experience in China enough to know how China works?

Shangri-La Hotels

Campbell, Dennis, and Brent Kazan
April 2008

In November 2006, Symon Bridle, the newly appointed chief operating officer of Shangri-La Hotels and Resorts, was thinking about a number of organizational issues that presented challenges to Shangri-La's rapid expansion strategy. There were three major issues at hand: (1) the company was expanding into high-wage economies in Europe and North America; (2) the company was expanding its presence in China-a country where front-line employees were not used to exercising decision-making authority; and (3) newcomers in the Chinese hotel market were poaching Shangri-La's staff and driving up wages in historically low-waged markets. As a COO, Bridle needed to ensure that Shangri-La's signature standards of "Asian Hospitality" were maintained during this expansion.

Innovation at Timberland: Thinking Outside the Shoe Box

Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ryan Leo Raffaelli
April 2008

Innovation was linked to Timberland's heritage. In 2005, CEO Jeff Swartz and COO Ken Pucker hoped the Invention Factory, an advanced concept lab, would develop new breakthrough products and reinvigorate the company's culture of innovation. Since the 1960s, Timberland had relied on innovation, developing the world's first waterproof boot and, in the 1980s, category-defining boat shoes and day hiking boots. Creating variations of these core products, along with expansion into apparel, had sustained Timberland's business for more than 30 years. Timberland's growth in the past six years was due to increased international sales and new customer segments. As Timberland's leaders looked to the future, they hoped Doug Clark, a biomechanist, and his Invention Factory team would bring a scientific approach toward building the next generation of Timberland products and ideas. The team had to convince those in the mainstream business to accept their new ideas and integrate them back into the product line.

Wyoff and China-LuQuan: Negotiating a Joint Venture (A)

Sebenius, James, and Cheng Qian
April 2008

Through stalled joint venture talks between Pennsylvania-based Wyoff Corp. and China-based China-LuQuan, strategic and cross-cultural negotiation challenges are explored both from American and Chinese perspectives. Wyoff, a leading US chemical company has been seeking ways to secure the company's foothold in China's emerging market since the late '90s. When approached by China-LuQuan in 2000, a major Chinese state-owned chemical producer for a joint-venture opportunity to make a popular chemical catalyst in China, Wyoff, leveraging its superior technology, demanded one-sided terms and played hardball, ruining both the deal and the relationship with China-LuQuan. Seven years later in 2007, Wyoff faced market pressure to again seek a joint venture with China-LuQuan on two other types of products. Both parties had to overcome past distrust to work things out on a series of strategic issues: investment, product slate, marketing, technology, management, organization, staffing, etc. In the negotiations, cross-cultural themes (e.g. trust, relationships, communication, time, autonomy, face, etc.) and different negotiation styles created challenges along with the business and strategic issues. The (A) case sets up the negotiations, highlights issue impasses, explores cross-cultural frictions, and poses tactical challenges. The (B) case describes the strategies, tactics, and results of these negotiations.

Kinyuseisaku: Monetary Policy in Japan.

Alfaro, Laura, and Akiko Kanno
March 2008

Toshihiko Fukui, Government of the Bank of Japan, faced a complex situation in the fall of 2007. An economic recovery had allowed the central bank to abandon its zero interest rate policy, which had been in place for years, and raise rates to 0.5%. The Bank of Japan was eager to increase them to more "normal" levels to exert effective monetary policy. Yet the appropriate timing and approach was a controversial issue, especially as the government did not want a rate hike that could potentially hinder economic growth and increase its already large fiscal debt burden.

Transforming Korea Inc: Financial Crisis and Institutional Reform

Alfaro, Laura, and Renee Kim
March 2008

South Korea, as one of the Asian "tiger" economies, transformed itself into the world's 11th largest economy and major exporter by 1996, emerging from being one of the lowest income countries in the region back in the 1960s. Yet one year later in 1997, Korea was swept up in the Asian financial crisis and sought a record $58 billion bailout from the International Monetary Fund. The crisis exposed fundamental weaknesses in the Korean economy, from bad loans to reckless growth policies pursued by large conglomerates. Sweeping reforms took place and the Korean economy rebounded quickly. Yet as Korea approached the 10-year anniversary of the crisis, the nation found itself pondering whether it had implemented enough institutional and structural reforms, or whether more had to be done, such as searching for a new economic development model to ensure its future.

Queensland Sugar Limited

Bell, David E., and Mary L. Shelman
March 2008

Until industry deregulation in 2006, Queensland Sugar ran Australia's single-desk marketing system for raw sugar exports. Since deregulation, eight of the ten Queensland sugar millers have elected to continue collective marketing through QSL. However, several millers are threatening to leave the group and market on their own. Their primary objection is to QSL's board structure, which is currently divided equally between millers, growers, and independent directors. The case describes the evolution of Australia's sugar industry; the differing interests of growers, millers, and customers; and the impact of changes in global supply (e.g., the rise of Brazil as a major sugarcane and sugar producer) and demand (e.g., the increased use of sugarcane for ethanol production).

Kazuo Inamori, A Japanese Entrepreneur

Mayo, Anthony J., Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki
March 2008

The case provides insight into a business leader whose cognizance of contextual forces (social, economic, and political) allowed him to drive significant change in an industry and Japanese society in the second half of the twentieth century.

Roppongi Hills: City Within a City

Elberse, Anita, Andrei Hagiu, and and Masako Egawa
February 2008

Minoru Mori is the CEO of Mori Building, which has built Roppongi Hills, an ambitious large-scale, mixed-use development in Tokyo, Japan that includes high-end retail, restaurants, hotel, office, library, and art museum. A destination site for tourists and local people, the performance of the development was strong, with the exception of the art museum, which posted losses. Also, the branding efforts by Mori were at odds with other tenants and he needed to manage "the town." Lastly, another competing development was in the works just blocks away, and Mori needed to determine how to address this new competitor.

Indonesia: Attracting Foreign Investment

Porter, Michael E., and Christian H.M. Ketels
January 2008

Describes the economic development of Indonesia from independence after World War II to 2006 and the post-Suharto period. The coverage of the post-Suharto period provides evidence of how political and economic conditions are intertwined after a change in the political regime. Profiles the business environment in 2006, including a documentation of past and present policies that shaped the current situation. A particular focus is Indonesia's stance towards attracting foreign direct investment (FDI). The country has a checkered history of oscillating between seeking and fighting foreign investors. Provides a perspective on the relative importance of FDI policies, general economic policies and business environment conditions, and the nature of competition from other locations on FDI flows.

Microsoft in China and India, 1993-2007

Khanna, Tarun, and Prithwiraj Choudhury
January 2008

Relates to Microsoft's expansion in China and India in the period 1993-2007and the strategic issues faced by multinationals in emerging markets.

Haier Hefei Electronics Co. (A)

Paine, Lynn S.
January 2008

The Haier Group, the first mainland Chinese company to make the Financial Times list of Asia's "most admired companies," attributes its success in large measure to the new value system it has sought to instill throughout the organization. However, when Haier takes over the Yellow Mountain television factory in the distant Hefei province at the behest of Hefei's government, workers strike against the Haier culture and what it stands for. The immediate catalyst is the labor contract Haier has asked them to sign. Haier's management must decide what's fair and how to respond to the workers' demands in the face of local government pressure to compromise.

Haier Hefei Electronics Co. (B)

Paine, Lynn S.
January 2008

Supplements the (A) case

Haier Hefei Electronics Co. (C)

Paine, Lynn S.
January 2008

Supplements the (A) case

The Beijing Dream

Segel, Arthur I., Voon Siang Lee, Jialei Tian, and Ying Laura Wang
December 2007

The purchase of a single-family home is generally the major investment for most young couples in China. Shows in detail the process that a young couple goes through in late April 2007 to find, finance, and close on an apartment in Beijing within what they believe to be their financial capabilities. Takes place in the context of the rapidly developing Chinese real estate market and introduces issues concerning the search and property acquisition that are specific to Beijing. Also deals with the direct and indirect cost involved in home acquisition, and compares these costs to the rental alternative. Also explores the role that the Internet can play in the home-buying process in China.

Will RacingThePlanet Ltd. Reach the Finish Line?

Isenberg, Dan
November 2007

Mary Gadams, founder and CEO of RacingThePlanet is facing one of the many logistical crises that her young Hong Kong-based venture faces as it stages its popular 4Deserts(tm) adventure marathon series in Atacama Chile, Gobi Desert Mongolia, Sahara Desert Egypt, and Antarctica. How can a small company in Hong Kong continue to effectively coordinate such a far-flung, complex, global operation?

Fu Ji Food and Catering

Jin, Li, Li Liao, Jielun Zhu, and Wenkai Sun
November 2007

Fu Ji, the largest corporate caterer in China, is thinking about how its financing strategy accommodates the overall corporate strategy. Fu Ji has enjoyed phenomenal growth as the corporate catering market in China develops. But that growth in the business also entails a transition from a single restaurant to a restaurant chain, then to a catering business. Is Fu Ji well equipped for the new business model? What does it need to do on the financing side to accommodate the transition of its business model? The company is listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and is thinking about issuing additional convertible bonds to finance its growth. What is the funding need? What are the alternative sources of funding that it has? How would the choice of financial instrument affect and be affected by the business strategy, and how is the instrument choice influenced by the general development of the financial markets in China?

Colgate Max Fresh: Global Brand Roll-Out

Quelch, John A, and Jacquie Labatt-Randle
November 2007

In February 2005, Nigel Burton, in his third year as president of global oral care at Colgate-Palmolive Company (CP), had every reason to feel optimistic. Worldwide market shares were strong and Colgate Max Fresh (CMF), a new toothpaste that had helped drive Colgate to a record value share in the important U.S. market, was in the global pipeline for 2005. Burton had on his desk the proposed marketing launch plans for CMF in China and Mexico. Each plan sought to maximize the business potential in the local market. Burton had to assess the plans from a global perspective.

A Note on Private Equity in Developing Countries

Lerner, Josh, and Ann Leamon
November 2007

Provides the background and high-level situation of private equity in emerging markets as of the end of 2006.

Gome: Bidding for China Paradise

Jin, Li, Li Liao, Ruoran Guo, and Jielun Zhu
November 2007

Gome, China's largest electronics retailer, has the opportunity to acquire China Paradise, the number three player in the Chinese electronic retailer industry. This happened in the general context of a great market development and potential consolidation of the household electronic appliance retailing sector. Gome, Suning, and China Paradise, the three largest players in the market, all experienced phenomenal growth, but Gome is slowly losing steam and risks being overtaken by the current number two, Suning. In addition, following China's entry into the WTO and the end of its five-year protection period, foreign competition, such as Best Buy, has entered the market and is bound to change the competitive landscape. Gome needs to decide what to do, and if it proceeds, it needs to move very fast. The decision will hinge on answering a few important questions. Why did China Paradise want to sell? If China Paradise failed, how could Gome guarantee that it would not follow suit? Is this the best time to snap up China Paradise? Should it focus on fixing its per-store performance measure or should it still rely on the growth of the total size of the operation in terms of the total number of stores? Does the acquisition of China Paradise put Gome in a position that it would again be very high in total number of stores but falling behind in the per store performance? This might be a big concern, especially if the acquired operation has a different culture than its existing operation. How can Gome remedy that? How does the acquisition, if it happens, fit the overall corporate strategy of relying on thin margin and volume? How would this strengthen or hurt Gome in its positioning when competition with both domestic and international players is expected to intensify?

Gome: Going Public

Jin, Li, Li Liao, Ruoran Guo, and Jielun Zhu
November 2007

Gome, China's largest electronics retailer, is plotting the best course to go public. Unlike many high-growth businesses in China, Gome has only moderate financing needs. Its charismatic and ambitious chairman Wong Kwongyu has built an expansive retail network in China and successfully used trade credits by suppliers and banks to make Gome a highly cash-generative business. The decision to go public has three inseparable components: why, where, and how. Does Gome really face substantial funding shortages for its operations? If so, are there any alternatives other than going public? If not, what are the other potential motivations to go public? Given these considerations, financial and otherwise, which stock market is the best one to list Gome's shares on? And between an IPO and a backdoor listing, which option suits Gome the best in terms of timing, costs, feasibility, and risks? Assuming Gome chooses to go public via a backdoor listing, what is the process

Gome Electronics: Evolving the Business Model

Abrami, Regina, William C. Kirby, McFarlan, F. Warren, Cao Wang, Fei Li, Tracy Manty, and Wai Shun Lo
September 2007

After 20 years of expansion, Gome Electronics has become China's largest consumer electronics retailer. It has opened stores in almost every province in China, acquired some of its competitors, and went public in Hong Kong. However, it has begun to experience a slowdown in growth as sales per-square-meter have declined. The company is now being challenged to develop new ideas for growth, including experimenting with its product mix, renegotiating its relationships with suppliers, and developing new business models to maximize profitability.

Secom: Managing Information Security in a Risky World

McFarlan, F. Warren, Robert D. Austin, Junko Usuba, and Masako Egawa
September 2007

Examines the type of security that is appropriate for an Internet company to have on its site. Focuses on a 20-person electronic e-commerce company trying to decide what parts of the information security product line they should acquire from the largest security service company in Japan, Secom. The services include everything from server hosting, advanced housing, firewall intrusion detection, etc. Introduces the wide range of products that can be used to ensure secure operations.

Manila Water Company

Rangan, V. Kasturi, David Wheeler, and Jane Comeault
September 2007

In 1997, the Philippines government privatized its water utility in the metropolitan Manila area. The East Zone concession was won by Manila Water Company and the West Zone concession by Maynilad Water Services. Over the next decade, Manila Water turned in an impressive and profitable performance, while Maynilad failed. Describes the management actions of Manila Water and poses the question of whether, and how much, they should bid for the vacated West Zone concession.

China Merchants Bank

McFarlan, F. Warren, GuoQing Chen, Heng Yuan Zhu, Yan Yang, Michael Shih-Ta Chen, Wai Shun Lo, and Bin Yang
August 2007

Founded in 1987, China Merchants Bank (CMB) is a pioneer in the use of technical innovation and IT as a competitive tool in the rapidly evolving Chinese banking sector. With a relatively small branch network when compared to its larger competitors, CMB uses an IT-driven strategy to introduce an "all-in-one" card, which integrates a suite of financial products to drive its personal banking business enabling CMB to be ranked 6th among China's commercial banks and 2nd among the other national commercial banks in terms of total assets as of June 2006. Underlying its excellence in personal banking is CMB's leadership in developing its credit card business. By April 2006, CMB had issued a total of over 5 million credit cards, capturing one-third of the Chinese credit card market. In September 2006, CMB's IPO in Hong Kong fetched about $2.4 billion and, given deregulation in the banking sector in China, CMB's President was presented with new challenges and opportunities concerning how such funds should be productively allocated to ensure CMB's competitiveness.

WuXi PharmaTech

Hamermesh, Richard G., and Simin Zhou
August 2007

WuXi Pharmatech has gone from zero to $21 million in sales in three years. The company must decide its growth strategy and how best to finance and organize for rapid growth.

Shinsei Bank: Developing an Integrated Firm (B)

DeLong, Thomas J., and Terry Heymann
August 2007

Supplements the (A) case

China Resources Corporation (A): 6S Management

Campbell, Dennis, and David Lane
July 2007

N/A

BYD Company, Ltd

Huckman, Robert S., and Alan D. MacCormack
July 2007

Considers whether BYD Co., Ltd., the largest Chinese maker of rechargeable batteries, should enter the Chinese automobile industry by acquiring Qinchuan Auto, a state-owned car manufacturer. Set just after BYD's initial public offering on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange in 2002, it describes the development of BYD's labor-intensive approach to battery manufacturing-an approach decidedly different from its more capital-intensive Japanese competitors and one that took advantage of the abundant supply of low-cost labor in China. Highlights the unique benefits and challenges created by BYD's operations strategy and asks students to determine whether the capabilities developed by the company in battery manufacturing can productively be applied to the automobile sector. Asks students to consider which, if any, aspects of BYD's operations constitute sources of sustainable competitive advantage for the company.

Digital China Holdings Ltd.: Managing the Transition from a Product-Oriented towards a Service-Oriented Company

McFarlan, F. Warren, Guoqing Chen, Kai Reimers, and Xunhua Guo
July 2007

Digital China is the largest Chinese independent systems integrator (IBM and HP are larger). Describes their history and their current strategy and invites the student to advise them as to how they should continue to grow in the future. This is the closest China currently has to Infosys and their 7,700-person company is a very interesting, and today, a largely unknown organization outside of China.

Vivaldi Food Concepts--The Start-up of an Asian Venture (A)

Isenberg, Daniel J.
June 2007

Joel Silverstein needs to raise an additional $1.5 million from private investors to round out the equity financing for his new Quick Service Restaurant venture in China, Korea, and Japan. How should he pitch the opportunity? What should be the terms?

Beijing Hualian

Bell, David E., and Mary Shelman
May 2007

China's fifth largest domestic retailer faced intensifying competition from Wal-Mart and Carrefour with the opening of China's fast-growing retail market in January 2005. In response, Beijing Hualian developed a new "Family Store" format targeted at the nation's growing middle class, made up of younger consumers with more fashionable tastes. Like hypermarkets, Hualian Family Stores include both food and nonfood lines, but differ in design and in the product and brand mix that would be carried. Results from the pilot store (a remodeled hypermarket in Beijing) were encouraging, with revenues and profits up and customers spending more on each visit. The company must decide how quickly to roll out Family Stores in China. Strategic issues include preempting competition by moving quickly into new cities, balancing the buying power of multinational retailers who were also purchasing merchandise for export, leveraging Beijing Hualian's understanding of the rapidly changing domestic market, accessing capital for expansion, and training and retaining Chinese management talent.

Korea: After the 1997 Financial Crisis

Alfaro, Laura, Rafael Di Tella, and Renee Kim
April 2007

Examines what happened to Korea after the 1997 financial crisis and the implementation of the IMF-mandated reforms imposed on Korea as conditionalities to the country's emergency loan package.

AmorePacific

Ofek, Elie, and Kerry Herman
April 2007

Describes the dominant firm in the Korean cosmetics market up to the mid-2000s. Gives background on AmorePacific's historical evolution, its current brands, and the competition it faces from local and international players. Also provides information on the market structure and prominent channels of distribution.
HBS Note

Chiaphua Group Vietnam

Retsinas, Nicolas P., and Michael Shih-ta Chen
April 2007

As part of its expansion and diversification strategy, the Chiaphua Group explored real estate investments in emerging markets. The Group was one of the largest privately held company groups based in Hong Kong, with international investments in a variety of manufacturing and property development. A family member, Raymond Cheng, had narrowed the list of potential markets to Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Vietnam. Notwithstanding a history of instability and conflict and substantial government control of markets, Raymond concluded that Vietnam was the best option. Revolves around how to assess the market in the absence of hard data, and what would be the appropriate entry points. Illuminates how relationship-driven investments can be the foundation of a long-term investment strategy. Issues also involve how, by working with government through a structured forum (along with personal relations), laws and regulations can evolve to facilitate real estate investments.

Fujifilm: A Second Foundation

Gavetti, Giovanni, Mary Tripsas, and Yaichi Aoshima
April 2007

N/A

Production I.G: Challenging the Status Quo

Hagiu, Andrei, Tarun Khanna, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Masako Egawa, and Chisato Toyama
April 2007

N/A

The Nikkei 225 Reconstitution

Greenwood, Robin M.
April 2007

Taka Haneda, a proprietary trader at the Tokyo office of Goldman Sachs, has just learned that the Nikkei 225 will undergo a significant redefinition over the coming week. He faces several billion dollars of customer orders, as well as the opportunity to commit the firm's capital to provide liquidity for the event. He must decide what positions to establish, and at what price he is willing to get out.

WildChina (A)

Isenberg, Daniel J., and Shirley Spence
April 2007

WildChina (A) tells the story of Mei Zhang, a Chinese-born HBS alumna, and her pursuit of a dream: to share her passion for travel, her appreciation of China's beauty and culture, and her desire to start her own business. Describes the startup of WildChina, a tour company targeting a high-end clientele with unusual and high-quality products, and its survival of two business crises. The focus is on Zhang's decision to bring in a COO, transition him to CEO, and assume the position of Chairperson. Also describes communication and control challenges faced when Zhang moves to Los Angeles with her family, and tries to remain involved in her Beijing-based business. The decision Zhang faces is how to proceed when, in the midst of sales and operational problems and financial pressures, her CEO announces that he will be leaving the company in a matter of months.

Chongqing Tiandi

Segel, Arthur I., Nicolas P. Retsinas, Joshua A. Katzin, Nadeem Meghji, and Cindy Yan
April 2007

In late 2000, Vincent Lo, a prominent Hong Kong developer was invited by the Deputy Mayor of Chongqing, China to undertake a major redevelopment of the urban core. Lo had previously successfully developed the landmark Xintiandi retail and entertainment district in Shanghai. Lo must decide if the opportunity is the right fit in terms of place, timing, government support, and market demand.

Li Ning--Anything Is Possible

Wathieu, Luc, Gao Wang, and Medha Samant
April 2007

A leading sporting goods company in China competes aggressively against global brands Nike and Adidas, with marketing strategies adapted to geographic segments. In the main cities, where competition takes place at a very conceptual level, Li Ning has chosen to adopt a very controversial "oriental theme" for its brand, while becoming at the same time a major sponsor of international athletes of the highest caliber.

The Challenges of Launching a Start-up in China: Dorm99.com

Kirby, William C., F. Warren McFarlan, and Tracy Yuen Manty
March 2007

After graduating from Harvard Business School in June 2006, Ken Pao and Bill Li were ready to fully commit to the Internet start-up they had been working on since they first stepped foot on the business school campus. They moved to Beijing, rounded out their management team, received venture capital investment, developed joint-venture partnerships, and set key milestones to create a full-impact product launch for their social networking Web site catering to the college market. On the day of their launch, they faced a setback from China's Ministry of Education and were forced back to square one. Discusses the pluses and minuses of partnering with China's government ministries, the highs and lows of entrepreneurship, and the numerous opportunities available to entrepreneurship in China today.

Gobi Partners: Raising Fund II

Hardymon, Felda G., and Ann Leamon
March 2007

The three founding partners of Gobi Partners, a venture capital fund investing in early start IT and digital media companies in China, are planning to raise a second fund. The first $51.75 million fund is close to being entirely invested and the portfolio companies are doing well, with two having raised subsequent financings at significantly increased valuations. The firm itself has increased its headcount and opened a second office, but it has not, however, exited any of its companies. How much money should the partners hope to raise, and from whom? The stakes are high, as none of them has taken a paycheck in three years.

Li Ka-Shing

Nohria, Nitin, and Bridget Gurtler
March 2007

From his humble beginnings in China as a teacher's son, a refugee, and later as a salesman, Li provides a lesson in integrity and adaptability. Through hard work, and a reputation for remaining true to his internal moral compass, he was able to build a business empire that includes: banking, construction, real estate, plastics, cellular phones, satellite television, cement production, retail outlets (pharmacies and supermarkets), hotels, domestic transportation (sky train), airports, electric power, steel production, ports, and shipping. Teaching Purpose: To examine leadership.

Li Ka-Shing and the Growth of Cheung Kong

Nohria, Nitin, Anthony J. Mayo, and Mark Benson
March 2007

Events in the history of Cheung Kong's growth reveal how Li Ka-Shing applied his skills as a "first-class noticer" to complex political and socioeconomic environments. While Li's determination to succeed is legendary, so are his skills in reading and responding to the policies and norms of the People's Republic of China, British colonial Hong Kong, and the post-World War II international system. Since Li became the taipan of Hutchison Whampoa in the late 1970s, he has adjusted his ownership shares in a vast portfolio of businesses--including ports, energy, real estate, retail, telecommunications, and new media. Illustrates how Li applied his business acumen and his ability as a first-class noticer to decisions about raising or lowering his stake in these businesses, and whether to acquire new ones. After starting Cheung Kong Inc. in 1950, at age 21, Li built upon his knowledge and contacts in the plastics industry to become Hong Kong's King of Plastic Flowers. In the 1960s, amid political turmoil and labor unrest on both the mainland and in colonial Hong Kong, Li purchased rights to properties on Hong Kong island that were selling at distressed rates. Li's successes in industry and real estate continued, and he cultivated contacts and built a strong reputation that set the stage for his purchase of the hong Hutchinson Whampoa, thereby becoming the first Chinese taipan. As taipan, Li reorganized and reallocated his various financial holdings in the 1980s and 1990s as conditions were in flux due to the Westernization of China after Deng Xiaoping succeeded Mao Zedong, and amid concerns about the transfer of Hong Kong from Britain back to China in 1997.

China and the WTO: What Price Membership?

Vietor, Richard H.K., and Julia Galef
March 2007

China has been a member of the WTO for more than five years. Its implementation of requirements has been a mixed bag. While China's growth is still spectacular, many institutional problems remain. And there is a new problem--a spectacular trade asymmetry with the United States.

Haier's U.S. Refrigerator Strategy 2005

Ghamawat, Pankaj, and Thomas M. Hout
January 2007

Haier, the first Chinese consumer durable brand in the United States, succeeded in the compact refrigerator, freezer, and air conditioner markets and then built a U.S. factory to enter the full-size market. Issues include the value of a local entrepreneur to the Asian manufacturer entering the United States; brand building and price positioning; the sourcing location decision trade-off between production costs and logistics costs; the role of change in the U.S. appliance distribution channels; global and regional competitive analysis; the response of U.S. competitors to the global sourcing evolution; and the time horizons of Chinese company management.

China: "To Get Rich Is Glorious"

Vietor, Richard H.K., and Julia Galef
January 2007

In 1978, Deng Xiaoping assumed the leadership of an impoverished China, after Mao Zedong's disastrous Cultural Revolution. During the next 17 years, Deng applied pragmatic policies to liberalize the Chinese economy gradually while maintaining the power of the Communist state. In hindsight, this strategy was among the most successful development strategies ever. Reviews Chinese political history and explores in detail eight parts of Deng's development strategy. Concludes by looking at the problems facing Jiang Zemin in 1997 as he takes control of China for the next leg of economic development.

Framedia (A)

Jin, Li, Huabing Li, Li Liao, and Jielun Zhu
December 2006

Examines an acquisition in the highly competitive new media advertising industry in China in late 2005. The transaction leads to eventual consolidation of the industry and a positive stock market reaction. Discusses valuation in the context of an M&A transaction in an emerging economy and the role of private equity and venture capital in the development and the eventual consolidation of the new media advertising industry. Provides a context in which to discuss antitrust regulation, or lack there of, on an industrial organization in China.

Framedia (B)

Jin, Li, Huabing Li, Li Liao, and Jielun Zhu
December 2006

Supplements the (A) case

Ayala Corp

Villalonga, Belen, Raphael Amit, and Chris Hartman
December 2006

Ayala Corporation is the oldest conglomerate in the Philippines and has been controlled by the Zobel de Ayala family for seven generations. Over the past 25 years, Ayala has evolved from a real estate family business into a highly diversified and professionally managed business group, with a significant number of non-family shareholders. Between the holding company and its four largest subsidiaries, the Ayala group accounts for a quarter of the market capitalization of the Philippines Stock Exchange. Provides data to assess the value created for Ayala's stockholders in the ten years leading up to 2006, when the transition to the seventh generation of the Zobel de Ayala family culminated.

Crisis at Japan Communications, Inc

Isenberg, Daniel J.
September 2006

In 2001, Seiji Frank Sanda is facing his worst crisis since founding Japan Communications Inc. (JCI) in 1996. His planned IPO was stopped, leaving JCI with a large organization and strong revenues, but losses and a dwindling balance sheet. He is seriously considering severe personnel cuts, however, layoffs in Japan may cause severe damage to his reputation and make it difficult to hire people in the future. Furthermore, JCI is facing decisions regarding implementation of its business strategy, wondering if now is the time to diversify its service offerings.