News & Highlights

  • April 2017
  • Alumni News

Transforming the "Misery Towns" of Buenos Aires

When economist Horacio Rodríguez Larreta (MBA 1993) was elected mayor of Argentina’s capital in 2015, he promised to address conditions in the city’s slums, which house about a quarter million of the city’s 3 million people.
  • April 2017
  • Alumni News

Harvard Business School Names Winners and Celebrates 20th New Venture Competition at Finale

Mexican talent agency, Apli (founded by Vera Makarov, MBA 2010) wins Alumni Track award during the 20th annual HBS New Venture Competition.

New Research on the Region

  • May 2017
  • Teaching Material

Hilti Fleet Management (B): Towards a New Business Model

By: Ramon Casadesus-Masanell, Oliver Gassmann and Roman Sauer

This case explores the introduction of fleet management in the construction industry by the premium power tools manufacturer Hilti in 2000. Following its customers’ needs, Hilti moved from selling power tools to leasing them as a service. The introduction of the new business model contributed significantly to the success of Hilti, since it sustainably differentiated the company from its competitors. For instance, the adoption of fleet management resulted in customer loyalty levels five times higher than under the dominant business model Hilti formerly employed, and over-proportioned profit contribution at Hilti. Hilti’s Chief Technology Officer described the importance of the innovation as follows: “Hilti developed many very innovative and successful products over the years, but they paled in comparison with the fleet management business model, which was the most important innovation in Hilti’s history.” All told, Hilti, which had about 22,000 employees and made about 4.5 billion Swiss Francs (or $4.589 billion USD) in sales in 2015, managed 1.5 million tools under fleet management contracts in 40 countries, resulting in a contract value of more than 1.2 billion Swiss Francs (approximately $1.4 billion USD). Case A describes the strategic decision-making process regarding the introduction of fleet management in its early planning stages. This case (Case B) tackles the implementation and scaling process of fleet management over the years. Finally, the case explores current challenges facing the BMI.

  • May 2017
  • Teaching Material

Hilti Fleet Management (A) and (B)

By: Ramon Casadesus-Masanell, Oliver Gassmann and Roman Sauer

These notes are meant to accompany Hilti Fleet Management (A): Turning a Successful Business Model on Its Head (717-427) and Hilti Fleet Management (B): Towards a New Business Model (717-465). This case explores the introduction of fleet management in the construction industry by the premium power tools manufacturer Hilti in 2000. Following its customers’ needs, Hilti moved from selling power tools to leasing them as a service. The introduction of the new business model contributed significantly to the success of Hilti, since it sustainably differentiated the company from its competitors. For instance, the adoption of fleet management resulted in customer loyalty levels five times higher than under the dominant business model Hilti formerly employed, and over-proportioned profit contribution at Hilti. Hilti’s Chief Technology Officer described the importance of the innovation as follows: “Hilti developed many very innovative and successful products over the years, but they paled in comparison with the fleet management business model, which was the most important innovation in Hilti’s history.” All told, Hilti, which had about 22,000 employees and made about 4.5 billion Swiss Francs (or $4.589 billion USD) in sales in 2015, managed 1.5 million tools under fleet management contracts in 40 countries, resulting in a contract value of more than 1.2 billion Swiss Francs (approximately $1.4 billion USD). Case A describes the strategic decision-making process regarding the introduction of fleet management in its early planning stages. Case B tackles the implementation and scaling process of fleet management over the years. Finally, the case explores current challenges facing the BMI.

  • Spring 2017
  • Article
  • ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America

Globalizing Latin American Beauty

This article discusses the growth over time of the beauty industry in Latin America and its bias towards celebrating whiter rather than darker skin. Although alleged Latin American fascination with beauty is regularly ascribed to culture, Latin sensuousness, and machismo attitudes, this article shows that the growth of the industry was historically contingent. It was shaped by corporations, especially Avon and Colgate, that transferred marketing capabilities from the United States and Europe. The industry also grew as the means out of poverty for many women who worked as sales consultants and in salons. Winning beauty contests became the equivalent to winning a lottery. In this respect, the impact of the beauty industry was positive. However it also, as elsewhere, imposed restrictive notions of beauty on generations of women and created cultures in which breast implants and buttocks injections became the societal norm. The industry intensified rather than challenged the deep racism of the region.

See more research

Buenos Aires Staff

Fernanda Miguel
Director
Mariana Cal
Research Associate
Maria Martha Ruiz Melo
Administrative Assistant
Laura Urdapilleta
Research Associate

São Paulo Staff

Priscilla Zogbi
Director
Ruth Costas
Senior Researcher
Vanise Andreasi
Office Manager

Mexico City Staff

Samantha Rullán Rosanis
Assistant Director