News & Highlights

  • June 2017
  • Events

HBS European Club Leadership Meeting in Paris

The European Club Leadership Meeting (ECLM) is an interactive conference where alumni club leaders engage with fellow officers, brainstorm key strategies, exchange on the highlights and challenges of running a club, and share best practices. This year’s meeting was held at the ERC in Paris and gathered representatives of eight HBS and Harvard University Associations. Among others, this year’s meeting featured presentations by ERC Executive Director Vincent Dessain, who gave an update of the ERC activities, and Prof. Sophus Reinert, BGIE, who gave a talk on “The State of Global Capitalism”.
  • April-May 2017
  • Events

Off-Campus Information Sessions on the HBS Doctoral Program

Throughout the spring 2017, Marais Young (Doctoral Program) and Jan Pianca (ERC) visited universities and school fairs in Amsterdam, Munich, Paris, and Hamburg to share more information about the doctoral programs, student life, and admissions. The 8 HBS doctoral programs train students to produce innovative, rigorous, and relevant research and encourage students to become exemplary teachers at top-tier institutions of higher learning. The application for fall 2018 will open in September 2017.
  • March-May-June 2017
  • Events

Off-Campus Information Sessions on the HBS MBA Program

In the first half of 2017, the ERC co-organized MBA Admissions Events in Lisbon, Budapest, Kiev, Warsaw, Moscow, Paris, Zurich, Sofia, Berlin, Dublin, London, and Prague. These sessions were designed for prospective applicants to learn more about the MBA Program, curriculum, admission process, and funding. The events included an admissions presentation and the opportunity to meet local alumni.
  • January 2017
  • Events

Workshops on Digital Disruption in London, Munich, and Paris

In January 2017, Prof. Thales S. Teixeira, MKT, came to London, Munich, and Paris to speak about Digital Disruption. Having studied disruption patterns across industries, Prof. Teixeira identified an emerging new wave of technology-enabled disruption called “decoupling.” It is characterized by business models focusing on the separation of consumption activities that traditionally went together such as content and advertising, or browsing and purchasing products. In these keynote talks, Prof. Teixeira explored this new concept and discussed how businesses of all sizes were using digital technologies to disrupt their industries – for example in media, retail, transportation, food, cosmetics, or finance.

New Research on the Region

  • June 2017
  • Teaching Material

Hilti Fleet Management Video Supplements

By: Ramon Casadesus-Masanell, Oliver Gassmann and Roman Sauer

This case explores the introduction of fleet management in the construction industry by the premium power tools manufacturer Hilti in 2000. Following its customers’ needs, Hilti moved from selling power tools to leasing them as a service. The introduction of the new business model contributed significantly to the success of Hilti, since it sustainably differentiated the company from its competitors. For instance, the adoption of fleet management resulted in customer loyalty levels five times higher than under the dominant business model Hilti had formerly employed, and over-proportioned profit contribution at Hilti. Hilti’s Chief Technology Officer described the importance of the innovation as follows: “Hilti developed many very innovative and successful products over the years, but they paled in comparison with the fleet management business model, which was the most important innovation in Hilti’s history.” All told, Hilti, which had about 22,000 employees and made about 4.5 billion Swiss Francs (or $4.589 billion USD) in sales in 2015, managed 1.5 million tools under fleet management contracts in 40 countries, resulting in a contract value of more than 1.2 billion Swiss Francs (approximately $1.4 billion USD). Case A describes the strategic decision-making process regarding the introduction of fleet management in its early planning stages.

  • 2017
  • Working Paper

Expressive Voting and Its Cost: Evidence from Runoffs with Two or Three Candidates

By: Vincent Pons and Clémence Tricaud

In French parliamentary and local elections, candidates ranked first and second in the first round automatically qualify for the second round, while a third candidate qualifies only when selected by more than 12.5% of registered citizens. Using a fuzzy RDD around this threshold, we find that the third candidate attracts both “switchers,” who would have voted for one of the top two candidates if she were not present, and “loyal” voters, who would have abstained. Switchers vote for the third candidate even when she is very unlikely to win. This disproportionately harms the candidate ideologically closest to her and causes his defeat in one fifth of the races. These results suggest that a large fraction of voters value voting expressively over behaving strategically to ensure the victory of their second best. We rationalize our findings by a model in which different types of voters trade off expressive and strategic motives.

  • May 2017
  • Case

Hilti Fleet Management (A): Turning a Successful Business Model on Its Head

By: Ramon Casadesus-Masanell, Oliver Gassmann and Roman Sauer

This case explores the introduction of fleet management in the construction industry by the premium power tools manufacturer Hilti in 2000. Following its customers’ needs, Hilti moved from selling power tools to leasing them as a service. The introduction of the new business model contributed significantly to the success of Hilti, since it sustainably differentiated the company from its competitors. For instance, the adoption of fleet management resulted in customer loyalty levels five times higher than under the dominant business model Hilti had formerly employed, and over-proportioned profit contribution at Hilti. Hilti’s Chief Technology Officer described the importance of the innovation as follows: “Hilti developed many very innovative and successful products over the years, but they paled in comparison with the fleet management business model, which was the most important innovation in Hilti’s history.” All told, Hilti, which had about 22,000 employees and made about 4.5 billion Swiss Francs (or $4.589 billion USD) in sales in 2015, managed 1.5 million tools under fleet management contracts in 40 countries, resulting in a contract value of more than 1.2 billion Swiss Francs (approximately $1.4 billion USD). Case A describes the strategic decision-making process regarding the introduction of fleet management in its early planning stages. Case B (separate) tackles the implementation and scaling process of fleet management over the years and explores current challenges facing the BMI.

See more research

Paris Staff

Vincent Dessain
Executive Director, Harvard Business School Europe Research Center
Daniela Beyersdorfer
Associate Director, Research and Administration
Emilie Billaud
Research Associate and Manager, Reporting and Special Projects
Elena Corsi
Assistant Director
Pietro De Agostini
Executive Assistant
Federica Gabrieli
Research Assistant
Tonia Labruyere
Research Associate
Jerome Lenhardt
Research Associate
Kristina Maslauskaite
Research Associate
Emer Moloney
Research Associate
Jan Pianca
Assistant Director, Educational Programs
Oksana Sichi
Manager of Administration