Jeffrey F. Rayport - Faculty & Research - Harvard Business School
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Jeffrey F. Rayport

Senior Lecturer of Business Administration

Entrepreneurial Management

Jeffrey F. Rayport is a strategic advisor in marketing services, online media, and e-commerce, with a focus on new business opportunities enabled by emerging digital technologies.

Rayport currently serves on the Faculty of the Harvard Business School in the Entrepreneurial Management Unit, where he teaches in both MBA and Executive Education programs.

Prior to his affiliation with HBS, Rayport was as an Operating Partner at Castanea Partners, a mid-size private equity firm specializing in retail, consumer brands, and marketing services, and a Special Advisor to Bain Capital Ventures. He was also Founder and Managing Partner of Marketspace LLC, a digital strategy and advisory firm. As a spin-off of that business, he co-founded and grew a custom executive development and e-learning business, which he established as an affiliate of Monitor Deloitte, where he was a Senior Partner. In related pursuits, Rayport was a co-founder and faculty member of several corporate universities, including at Omnicom Group (NYSE:OMC); Bertelsmann AG; and Amgen (NASDAQ:AMGN). As a keynote speaker, he is represented exclusively by Washington Speakers Bureau.

Previously, Rayport was a Faculty member at HBS for nearly a decade, teaching and doing research in Marketing and Service Management. While at HBS, he developed and delivered the first graduate-level e-commerce course in the nation, enrolling nearly 2,000 MBA students. In building the course, Rayport authored nearly a hundred case studies and related materials. Business plans written by students gave rise to dozens of start-ups, including Yahoo! Prior to his taking a leave from HBS, Rayport coined the term “viral marketing.” He was also voted Outstanding Professor for three years in a row by the HBS Students Association.

Rayport has published a series of leading MBA-level textbooks on strategy in the networked economy with McGraw-Hill/Irwin (e-Commerce, Cases in e-Commerce, and Introduction to e-Commerce) with co-author Bernard J. Jaworski. He and Jaworski also published a bestselling trade book for Harvard Business Review Press on reinventing service businesses, Best Face Forward: Why Companies Must Improve Their Service Interfaces with Customers.

Rayport has written as a blogger for Harvard Business Review Online and a columnist for Bloomberg BusinessWeek Online. He has contributed to other publications, including Bloomberg BusinessWeek, CIO Magazine, Financial Times, Fast Company, Forbes.com, Harvard Business Review, MarketWatch, McKinsey Quarterly, Strategy & Business, and MIT Technology Review.

He has served as a director of both public and private corporations. These include International Data Group; Hanley Wood; MediaMath; Monster Worldwide (NYSE:MWW); and Shoprunner. Past directorships include Conversant (NASDAQ:CNVR); GSI Commerce (NASDAQ:GSIC), now eBay Enterprise, where he was a founding director; iCrossing; CBS MarketWatch (NASDAQ: MKTW); Agency.com (NASDAQ:ACOM); and Be Free (NASDAQ:BFRE). He is a Trustee of the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA; an Overseer of Beth Isreal Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA; and Chairman of the Board of From the Top (the #1 U.S. classical music radio and TV program, distributed through National Public Radio and PBS) also based in Boston, MA.

Rayport earned an A.B. at Harvard College; an M.Phil. in International Relations at the University of Cambridge (U.K.); and an A.M. and Ph.D. in Business History at Harvard University

Books
Journal Articles
  1. Advertising's New Medium: Human Experience

    Jeffrey F. Rayport

    Standard ad messaging and conventional creative executions and placements are rapidly becoming outmoded. To win consumers' attention and trust, marketers must think less about what advertising says to its targets and more about what it does for them. Rather than conceive ad campaigns with a beginning, a middle, and an end that hammer home a point, they must think about advertising—as well as the offerings it promotes—as a sustained and rewarding presence in consumers' lives.

    Keywords: advertising; Customers; Advertising;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F. "Advertising's New Medium: Human Experience." Harvard Business Review 91, no. 3 (March 2013): 76–84.  View Details
  2. Seven Social Transformations Unleashed by Mobile Devices

    Jeffrey F. Rayport

    Keywords: marketing; technology; Digital Services; strategy; Strategy; Online Technology; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F. "Seven Social Transformations Unleashed by Mobile Devices." MIT Technology Review (website) (November 30, 2010). (Lead Article for November 2010: Technology Review’s month of articles focused on business impacts of mobile computing and mobile social networking.)  View Details
  3. Technology Will Make Collaboration Your Next Competitive Advantage

    Jeffrey F. Rayport

    Keywords: marketing; technology; Digital Services; strategy; Strategy; Online Technology; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F. "Technology Will Make Collaboration Your Next Competitive Advantage." MIT Technology Review (website) (March 1, 2011). (Lead Article: Guest Editor for March 2011, Technology Review’s month of articles on theme of Technology-Enabled Collaboration.)  View Details
Working Papers
Cases and Teaching Materials
  1. King Digital Entertainment

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Davide Sola, Federica Gabrieli and Elena Corsi

    Riccardo Zacconi was the co-founder and CEO of King Digital Entertainment, the video game company that had quickly established itself as the world’s leading maker of casual games for mobile devices after the sensational success of its game “Candy Crush Saga.” Zacconi had only a few days left to decide what to reply to Activision Blizzard, one of the largest video game publishers in the world, which had offered to acquire King for almost $6 billion. King had already managed to successfully adapt to disruptive technological changes in the course of its history. Could it continue to go solo? Or would an acquisition by a complementary video game maker like Activision be the best choice for King to continue to thrive? The clock was ticking, but Zacconi knew that whatever the final decision, it had to satisfy one condition: Player was King.

    Keywords: Organizational Structure; Technology; Business Ventures; Acquisition; Decision Choices and Conditions; Video Game Industry; Europe; Sweden;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Davide Sola, Federica Gabrieli, and Elena Corsi. "King Digital Entertainment." Harvard Business School Case 817-117, April 2017.  View Details
  2. Swagbucks

    Jeffrey F. Rayport and Matthew G. Preble

    In early 2016, Chuck Davis, chairman and CEO of Prodege LLC, parent company of the brand promotion business Swagbucks, and Josef Gorowitz, Prodege’s founder and president, must decide whether to acquire MyPoints, a competitor to Swagbucks, after the company’s significant cultural transformation. Over the preceding two years, Davis and Gorowitz had grown Swagbucks from a relatively small venture staffed by people from Gorowitz’s personal and professional networks into a professionally managed and rapidly scaling business. This had been no easy task because Davis had to be careful not to destabilize Prodege’s strong culture, which was built around the deeply held religious beliefs of the company’s founding employees, many of whom were devout ultra-Orthodox Hasidic Jews, as he introduced change. The culture had resulted in some unique challenges for a growing technology company, such as a requirement that the company shutter its office on Jewish holidays and every week for observance of Shabbat. By 2016, the company was thriving both financially and operationally. Considering the opportunity to acquire MyPoints, which was an established competitor with millions of members, Davis and Gorowitz must determine whether the company’s culture is sufficiently robust to integrate another business and its employees.

    Keywords: loyalty management; scaling; Scale; Entrepreneurship; Human Resources; Employees; Employee Relationship Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Organizational Design; Leading Change; Growth Management; Religion; Technology; Online Technology; Internet; Transition; Leadership; Web Services Industry; Technology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Matthew G. Preble. "Swagbucks." Harvard Business School Case 817-068, March 2017.  View Details
  3. OpenNotes

    Jeffrey Rayport and Annelena Lobb

    In 2017, executives at OpenNotes, a national movement to improve the relationship between doctors and patients by sharing doctors’ visit notes about patients with patients, were considering options in efforts to achieve scale. The movement hoped to reach 50 million patients by 2020. One opportunity was building an OpenNotes app for smartphones, in which patients could access their visit notes on their phones through an app compatible with Apple CareKit. But OpenNotes had other options, including partnerships with consumer groups and insurers. In addition, they would always have a role in encouraging doctors and institutions to share notes more readily. What was the best way to scale OpenNotes? Was it the app route or some other way to pursue the group’s ambitions?

    Keywords: health care and treatment; Health Care and Treatment; Technology Adoption; Growth and Development Strategy; Technology Industry; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey, and Annelena Lobb. "OpenNotes." Harvard Business School Case 817-080, March 2017. (Revised March 2017.)  View Details
  4. Amazon.com (C)

    At the end of 1998, Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos ponders the next moves for his company. Having secured the leadership position as the leading online book seller in the United States, Amazon.com has now moved into the product categories of CDs and videos by year's end. Having expanded into the United Kingdom and Germany and having 6.2 million members, what new product categories should Amazon.com expand into during 1999? Consumer electronics? Travel? Toys? Software? The possibilities are endless, but Bezos knows the company needs to focus on choosing a few categories and performing well in those picked.

    Keywords: Expansion; Internet; Business Growth and Maturation; Books; Growth and Development Strategy; Retail Industry; Germany; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Dickson Louie. "Amazon.com (C)." Harvard Business School Case 901-021, February 2001. (Revised November 2009.)  View Details
  5. Amazon.com (D)

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Dickson Louie and William A. Sahlman

    At the end of 1999, Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos--just named Time Magazine's Man of the Year--ponders the next moves for his company. Having expanded into numerous categories in 1999, ranging from Z-shops to Auctions to E-cards as well as increasing the number of distribution sites to seven, Amazon.com is quickly transforming itself as an electronic retailer. But does Amazon.com's strategy make sense? Critics worry that Bezos may be stretching the Amazon.com brand too far instead of focusing on a few retail categories. Bezos sees the opportunity to dominate various retail categories online--leveraging off its base of 16.9 million customers--before the brick-and-mortar retailers do.

    Keywords: Growth and Development Strategy; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Competitive Advantage; Expansion; Online Technology; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Dickson Louie, and William A. Sahlman. "Amazon.com (D)." Harvard Business School Case 901-022, February 2001. (Revised November 2009.)  View Details
  6. (TN) Amazon.com (A), (B), (C), and (D)

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Dickson Louie and William A. Sahlman

    Teaching Note for (9-897-128), (9-898-084), (9-901-021), and (9-901-022). For book only.

    Keywords: Retail Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Dickson Louie, and William A. Sahlman. "(TN) Amazon.com (A), (B), (C), and (D)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 901-025, April 2001. (Revised November 2009.)  View Details
  7. Virtual Vineyards

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Alvin J. Silk, Lisa Klein Pearo and Thomas A. Gerace

    Virtual Vineyards markets wine from small California vineyards directly to consumers through its site on the World Wide Web. It also facilitates fulfillment of customer orders. The case focuses on the ways in which Virtual Vineyards provides value to end consumers through cofounder Peter Granoff's accessible but informal evaluations of individual wines and through its electronic Internet with the customer.

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Technological Innovation; Management; Service Operations; Internet; Web Sites;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Alvin J. Silk, Lisa Klein Pearo, and Thomas A. Gerace. "Virtual Vineyards." Harvard Business School Case 396-264, April 1996. (Revised April 2004.)  View Details
  8. Motive Communications

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Marco Iansiti, Myra M. Hart, William W Chan and Find Findsen

    The founders of Motive Communications, Inc., a recent start-up dedicated to reinventing the support chain involved in the delivery of information technology support services, put in place a development process hinged on extensive customer feedback. As part of this, a select group of "lighthouse customers" agreed to pay $50,000 to participate in beta testing--but as a deadline approached, none had sent in their checks. The founders therefore reevaluate the lighthouse policy and its rationale.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Customer Relationship Management; Risk and Uncertainty; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Marco Iansiti, Myra M. Hart, William W Chan, and Find Findsen. "Motive Communications." Harvard Business School Case 699-157, April 1999. (Revised October 2001.)  View Details
  9. Barnesandnoble.com (A), (B), and (C) TN

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Goutam Challagalla and William A. Sahlman

    Teaching Note for (9-898-082), (9-901-023), and (9-901-024). For book only.

    Keywords: Retail Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Goutam Challagalla, and William A. Sahlman. "Barnesandnoble.com (A), (B), and (C) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 901-026, April 2001.  View Details
  10. Microsoft Carpoint

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Steven Silverman and William A. Sahlman

    Teaching Note for (9-898-280). For book only - not listed on case.

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Internet; Service Delivery; Partners and Partnerships; Change; Customers; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Steven Silverman, and William A. Sahlman. "Microsoft Carpoint." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 901-028, April 2001.  View Details
  11. first direct (A) TN

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Michelle Toth and William A. Sahlman

    Teaching Note for (9-897-079). For book only - not listed on case.

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Technology; Customer Satisfaction; Business Model; Banking Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Michelle Toth, and William A. Sahlman. "first direct (A) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 901-033, April 2001.  View Details
  12. Marshall Industries TN

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Elliot N. Maltz and William A. Sahlman

    Teaching Note for (9-899-239). For book only - not listed on case.

    Keywords: Internet; Transformation; Service Delivery; Technological Innovation; Compensation and Benefits; Distribution Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Elliot N. Maltz, and William A. Sahlman. "Marshall Industries TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 901-038, April 2001.  View Details
  13. MindSpring TN

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Steven Silverman and William A. Sahlman

    Teaching Note for (9-899-178). For book only - not listed on case.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Growth and Development Strategy; Mergers and Acquisitions; Organizational Culture; Competitive Strategy; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Steven Silverman, and William A. Sahlman. "MindSpring TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 901-039, April 2001.  View Details
  14. MindSpring

    In a business environment where Internet Service Providers (ISP) has become increasingly commodity-like, Charles Brewer, founder and CEO of MindSpring, the nation's sixth largest ISP and the recognized leader in customer satisfaction, ponders a proposed merger with Earthlink Network, Inc., the nation's fifth largest ISP. Competitors are offering a rich variety of products and services (AOL), ease-of-use and ease-of-access (MSN), and even free access (NetZero). MindSpring's annual revenues grew over 600% from 1996 to 1999, and Brewer knows it is important to maintain momentum. The issue of growth raises a number of strategic and tactical questions: How should MindSpring achieve growth and with what trade-offs? How should MindSpring and Earthlink merge its two cultures in the newly proposed merger? Was MindSpring's retaining of customers through superior service still the best strategy? Brewer would need to find ways to grow the number of subscribers but also new ways to differentiate the products of the newly combined MindSpring and Earthlink from other ISPs.

    Keywords: Internet; Entrepreneurship; Mergers and Acquisitions; Customer Satisfaction; Growth and Development Strategy; Web Services Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Joseph Keough, and Cathy Olofson. "MindSpring." Harvard Business School Case 899-178, January 1999. (Revised March 2001.)  View Details
  15. Marshall Industries

    Confounding predictions that the Internet would "disintermediate" commerce, making "middle man" companies all but obsolete, Marshall Industries, a leading electronics distributor, used the Internet and digital technologies to reinvent itself. Marshall continued to sell electronics components, but the company abandoned the traditional sales-driven strategy for a more customer-focused, service-driven strategy. At the heart of its transformation was a complete restructuring of the compensation and incentive system and heavy investments in information technologies. Several years into its first foray into the digital realm, Marshall faced growing pressures: shrinking margins, increasingly demanding customers, restrictive supplier practices, and competitors rapidly introducing me-too Internet and virtual services. Marshall continued to look for ways to use its innovative spirit and digital expertise to differentiate itself and to create and deliver a whole new set of virtual supply chain services.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Market Platforms; Internet; Supply Chain; Emerging Markets; Customer Focus and Relationships; Distribution Industry; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Cathy Olofson. "Marshall Industries." Harvard Business School Case 899-239, May 1999. (Revised March 2001.)  View Details
  16. barnesandnoble.com (A)

    Examines the on-line division of Barnes & Noble, barnesandnoble.com. The on-line bookselling industry is examined, with emphasis on its biggest competitor, Amazon.com.

    Keywords: Competition; Internet; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Dickson Louie. "barnesandnoble.com (A)." Harvard Business School Case 898-082, March 1998. (Revised February 2001.)  View Details
  17. CBS Evening News

    The CBS Evening News looks for options for growth of the franchise. This case discusses CBS's main competitors and their positioning in the evening news market, as well as the history and operations of the CBS Evening News.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Competition; Business Growth and Maturation; Media; Media and Broadcasting Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Dickson Louie, Michelle Toth, and Carrie Ardito. "CBS Evening News." Harvard Business School Case 898-086, April 1998. (Revised February 2001.)  View Details
  18. PlanetAll

    PlanetAll is a Web-based contact manager that automatically updates users' contact information. In early 1998, the young company must decide whether to compete with large Web sites and become a destination site or to become an enabling technology for other contact management businesses.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Marketing Strategy; Internet; Information Technology; Business Startups; Web Services Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Michelle Toth, and Carrie Ardito. "PlanetAll." Harvard Business School Case 898-105, March 1998. (Revised February 2001.)  View Details
  19. CBS MarketWatch

    Larry Kramer, the chairman and CEO of MarketWatch.com, is faced with a dilemma. In April 2000, his company--a joint venture of CBS and Data Broadcasting Corp.--has emerged as the leading financial information and data provider online. Yet, because of the downturn in Internet stocks, he has to choose between getting "big" fast or become "profitable" fast to please Wall Street. What should he do? Over the horizon is the threat of other media players (CNNfn, CNBC) entering his space.

    Keywords: Joint Ventures; Decision Choices and Conditions; Media and Broadcasting Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Dickson Louie. "CBS MarketWatch." Harvard Business School Case 801-175, September 2000. (Revised February 2001.)  View Details
  20. BarnesandNoble.com (B)

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Dickson Louie and William A. Sahlman

    At the end of 1998, Jonathan Bulkeley, the newly-named CEO of barnesandnoble.com, is faced with a challenge. As the second leading online bookseller behind Amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com must build its market share. With Forrester Research predicting that the online bookselling market would grow to $3 billion in 2003, how could barnesandnoble.com attract more of the "newbies" coming onto the web to its site and become the leading online bookseller--as it was in the bricks-and-mortar world--over the long run?

    Keywords: Internet; Marketing Strategy; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Dickson Louie, and William A. Sahlman. "BarnesandNoble.com (B)." Harvard Business School Case 901-023, February 2001.  View Details
  21. BarnesandNoble.com (C)

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Dickson Louie and William A. Sahlman

    At the end of 1999, Steve Riggio, the vice chairman and acting CEO of barnesandnoble.com, wonders what his company should do next against Amazon.com, the online retailer who is the leading online book seller in the United States. While barnesandnoble.com has been careful to expand into new categories related to media--such as magazines, CDs, and posters--Amazon.com has expanded into a variety of seemingly unrelated categories--such as Z-shops, auctions, and power tools. While some see this expansion as a weakness in Amazon.com's branding strategy, how could Riggio and barnesandnoble.com best exploit this so that they become the leading online bookseller over the long run in terms of market share and mind share?

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Internet; Diversification; Brands and Branding; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Dickson Louie, and William A. Sahlman. "BarnesandNoble.com (C)." Harvard Business School Case 901-024, February 2001.  View Details
  22. Microsoft CarPoint

    CarPoint.com was Microsoft's Web-based entry into on-line automobile retailing. While it could not, in fact, "sell" or deliver any cars, it could shift much of consumer search, comparison, and decision-making, including pricing, the traditional car dealer to the Web. This shift in buying behavior from marketplace to marketspace was significant in its implications for consumers and dealers, CarPoint and its competitor firms face a double challenge in creating effective e-commerce businesses and in influencing their channel partners to provide effective service experiences. CarPoint, however, was a late entrant, and it faced competition from category first-movers AutoByTel.com, AutoWeb.com, and AutoVantage.com. As a result, the case deals with larger issues of channel and consumer behavior change as well as tactical issues pertaining to competitive positioning in a competitive market both on-line and off-line.

    Keywords: Internet; Service Operations; Market Entry and Exit; Consumer Behavior; Auto Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Avnish S. Bajaj, Steffan Haithcox, and Michael V. Kadyan. "Microsoft CarPoint." Harvard Business School Case 898-280, June 1998. (Revised August 2000.)  View Details
  23. Monster.com

    Jeff Taylor, founder and CEO of Monster.com, ponders how his online site, the leading career site on the web, can continue its dominance (60% share in 1999) and growth on the Internet. Monster.com had just launched a nationwide branding campaign on television and entered a four-year deal with AOL. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Internet; Entrepreneurship; Brands and Branding; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Dickson Louie. "Monster.com." Harvard Business School Case 801-145, August 2000.  View Details
  24. Wildfire Communications, Inc. (A)

    Founder and CEO Bill Warner is faced with critical decisions regarding the product lines, target markets, and technology platforms that his start-up, Wildfire Communications, Inc., will pursue. In addition to the question of strategic focus across these lines of business, Warner must decide whether changes in the organizational process will increase his company's effectiveness.

    Keywords: Technology; Resource Allocation; Organizational Culture; Business Startups; Business Strategy; Communications Industry; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Mary Connor. "Wildfire Communications, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 396-305, March 1996. (Revised August 2000.)  View Details
  25. Egghead.com

    Egghead Software, an entrenched traditional chain retailer specializing in computer software and peripherals, had established a nationwide chain of mall and shopping center stores and a well-organized national brand. In early 1998, management made a highly unusual, and perhaps unprecedented, decision: the company closed down all its stores in North America and moved its retail operations exclusively to the Web. This rejection of marketplace in favor of marketspace illustrated the differences in managing retail operations for "information products," such as software, and "physical products," such as home furnishings or tools. The fact that software could be examined, sampled, purchased, and even distributed on-line indicated to Egghead management the high costs in PPE and labor represented by physical retailing were no longer justified by the category. The brand promise of Egghead could be realized as effectively at lower cost of operations on the Web, and the Web could begin to provide new sources of consumer value as the Egghead site harnessed the unique attributes and advantages of the digital environment.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Market Platforms; Internet; Software; Information Technology Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Jeremy Dann, and Robert C Schmults. "Egghead.com." Harvard Business School Case 898-283, June 1998. (Revised January 2000.)  View Details
  26. RCA Records: The Digital Revolution

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Cate Reavis

    In 1995, Bertelsmann-owned RCA Records was considered a "tired and old" record label. By 1999, the company represented a number of the "hottest" acts in the music industry. Nevertheless, the company's position (as well as that of the entire music industry) was under attack. Retail and radio consolidation, an escalating number of product releases, increasing marketing costs, and new technology (that enabled musicians to market and sell music direct to consumers via the Internet) were reducing margins generated by physical product. With the new technology came new competitors that appeared to offer artists more creative and financial freedom. While this case highlights the turnaround of RCA Records, it focuses more on the challenges CEO Bob Jamieson and general manager Jack Rovner faced amidst these industry threats. They needed to decide whether their current business model would provide them with continued growth or if the company needed to change its strategy.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Business Model; Competition; Corporate Strategy; Internet; Change Management; Marketing Strategy; Music Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. "RCA Records: The Digital Revolution." Harvard Business School Case 800-014, August 1999. (Revised October 1999.)  View Details
  27. Disney's "The Lion King" (A): The $2 Billion Movie

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Cate Reavis

    In 1994, just 10 years after its filmed entertainment division lost $33 million, Disney's animated creation "The Lion King" became the second highest grossing film ever. In addition to drawing $740 million in worldwide box office sales, its merchandise sales exceeded $1.5 billion. This case describes Disney CEO Michael Eisner's strategy in rebuilding the filmed entertainment division, the making of "The Lion King," and the design and execution of a mini-Lion King retail industry. Along with the movie's achievements, Disney was experiencing internal chaos.

    Keywords: Value Creation; Marketing Strategy; Expansion; Creativity; Film Entertainment; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. Disney's "The Lion King" (A): The $2 Billion Movie. Harvard Business School Case 899-041, August 1998. (Revised October 1998.)  View Details
  28. Disney's "The Lion King" (B): The Synergy Group

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Cate Reavis

    In the late 1980s, Disney CEO Michael Eisner introduced a synergy group to the company's organizational structure. The synergy group was responsible for keeping all of Disney's divisions informed and updated on company projects and marketing strategies.

    Keywords: Entertainment; Creativity; Value; Organizational Structure; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. Disney's "The Lion King" (B): The Synergy Group. Harvard Business School Case 899-042, August 1998. (Revised October 1998.)  View Details
  29. Disney's "The Lion King" (C): Repeat Performance?

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Cate Reavis

    Three of Disney's animated films that followed "The Lion King"--"Pocahontas," "Toy Story," and "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"--were significantly less successful at the box office and in retail sales. Meanwhile, Disney was focusing on developing live-action blockbusters.

    Keywords: Organizational Structure; Animation Entertainment; Success; Failure; Film Entertainment; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. Disney's "The Lion King" (C): Repeat Performance? Harvard Business School Case 899-043, August 1998. (Revised October 1998.)  View Details
  30. Selling Books Online in Mid-1998

    Jeffrey F. Rayport, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Cate Reavis

    Provides an overview of the trends and predictions for the online book retail industry as of August 1998 and the current status of Amazon.com, BarnesandNoble.com, and other main players' online ventures.

    Keywords: Online Technology; Books; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. "Selling Books Online in Mid-1998." Harvard Business School Background Note 899-038, August 1998.  View Details
  31. first direct (A)

    Describes the operations and strategy of the world's largest, fastest growing branchless bank. Using a person-to-person interface over conventional phone lines, First Direct provides standard banking and related financial products to nearly 700,000 customers throughout the United Kingdom. By employing a sophisticated customer information system and a highly educated workforce on the frontline, the bank has achieved customer satisfaction and retention levels that are roughly twice those of its nearest competitor in either direct or traditional retail banking services. This outcome was achieved through the use of information infrastructure to personalize services, model preference profiles, and cross-sell relevant products in the course of over-the-phone banking interactions. This breakthrough service model has demonstrated that banks may deliver greater quality of service at significantly lower costs by exploiting virtual or "marketspace" channels for service delivery and customer relationship management. The question facing the bank, a unit of Midland plc (which was, in turn, owned by HSBC), was how fast, in what manner, and in what market segments the organization should grow.

    Keywords: Service Delivery; Customer Satisfaction; Banks and Banking; Innovation and Invention; Banking Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Dickson Louie. "first direct (A)." Harvard Business School Case 897-079, February 1997. (Revised April 1998.)  View Details
  32. Amazon.com (A)

    Jeff Bezos, the founder and CEO of Amazon.com, an Internet-based bookseller, has created one of the most successful ventures for electronic commerce on the Web. With revenue growing at a pace of 30% per month, Bezos attributes the success of Amazon.com to its value proposition--selectivity, availability, price, and service. Even so, Bezos is faced with new challenges in early 1997--competition from the mainstream bookstores Borders, Inc. and Barnes & Noble.

    Keywords: Competition; Internet; Entrepreneurship; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Dickson Louie. "Amazon.com (A)." Harvard Business School Case 897-128, March 1997. (Revised April 1998.)  View Details
  33. Geffen Records

    Geffen Records faces new challenges due to emerging technologies, namely, streaming audio and CD-recordable drives. These technologies have the ability to reshape the foundation on which the music industry is founded. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Change Management; Distribution Channels; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F. "Geffen Records." Harvard Business School Case 898-234, April 1998.  View Details
  34. E! Online (A): www.eonline.com

    E! Online is the on-line brand extension of the cable-TV channel dedicated to entertainment news. E! Online must compete with other entertainment sites on the web, as well as create synergy between E! Online and E! Entertainment Television in order to build a mega-brand on the web.

    Keywords: Competition; Online Technology; Service Operations; Television Entertainment; Brands and Branding; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Carrie Ardito, and Dickson Louie. "E! Online (A): www.eonline.com." Harvard Business School Case 898-010, April 1998.  View Details
  35. Launch

    Launch has developed an entertainment publication on CD-ROM with 240,000 subscribers and has recently introduced an on-line entertainment product (www.mylaunch.com) to complement the CD-ROM. Deals with multiple-channel delivery and platform selection and branding on the Web.

    Keywords: Market Platforms; Online Technology; Distribution Channels; Information Publishing; Brands and Branding; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Michelle Toth. "Launch." Harvard Business School Case 898-079, March 1998.  View Details
  36. Frontgate Catalog

    Frontgate is a high-end, Lebanon, Ohio-based catalog business. The decision makers are trying to determine how much financial and personnel resources to invest in the development of a Web site. The decision is being made in light of branding issues and competitor's Web efforts.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Competition; Web Sites; Brands and Branding; Retail Industry; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Carrie Ardito. "Frontgate Catalog." Harvard Business School Case 898-080, January 1998.  View Details
  37. Encyclopaedia Britannica (A)

    Examines the growth of the CD-ROM publishing industry and its impact on the Encyclopaedia Britannica Co., which chose to ignore it.

    Keywords: Technology; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Information Publishing; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Thomas A. Gerace. "Encyclopaedia Britannica (A)." Harvard Business School Case 396-051, August 1995. (Revised December 1997.)  View Details
  38. TV Guide (B)

    TV Guide, the nation's most profitable and largest magazine, attempts entry into the world of electronic publishing. The crux of TV Guide's strategy is to transform the magazine's content into a centralized database that can be accessed by new businesses, like on-screen programming guides for television, online service companies, and cutting-edge Internet applications developers. The case covers the development issues TV Guide faced in each business and the problems it foresaw trying to manage such disparate businesses under one umbrella.

    Keywords: Market Entry and Exit; Service Delivery; Information Technology; Marketing; Information Publishing; Service Industry; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Steven M. Salzinger. "TV Guide (B)." Harvard Business School Case 395-032, January 1995. (Revised September 1997.)  View Details
  39. TV Guide (A)

    TV Guide is the largest magazine in the United States and is attaining record profitability. This case details the economics of TV Guide's success by studying its advertiser and reader relationships. Presents a detailed look at how a large magazine manages all aspects of its business in the face of emerging competition.

    Keywords: Journals and Magazines; Customers; Marketing Strategy; Advertising; Publishing Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Steven M. Salzinger. "TV Guide (A)." Harvard Business School Case 395-031, November 1994. (Revised August 1997.)  View Details
  40. QVC, Inc.

    Illustrates the "Service Profit Chain" in action. QVC, whose initials stand for Quality, Value,, and Convenience, demonstrates clearly how a strong customer focus can lead to establishing a strong franchise in the retail sector and a highly profitable business whose revenue has grown 14% per year for 1992-96--usually at the expense of the rival Home Shopping Network and through higher customer retention.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Service Delivery; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., and Dickson Louie. "QVC, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 897-050, September 1996. (Revised June 1997.)  View Details
  41. The National Information Infrastructure (A): The United States in Perspective

    George C. Lodge, Jeffrey F. Rayport, Thomas A. Gerace and Afroze A Mohammed

    Keywords: Information; Infrastructure; United States;

    Citation:

    Lodge, George C., Jeffrey F. Rayport, Thomas A. Gerace, and Afroze A Mohammed. "The National Information Infrastructure (A): The United States in Perspective." Harvard Business School Background Note 396-111, October 1995. (Revised March 1997.)  View Details
  42. Steamboat Ski & Resort Corporation

    The largest ski resort in Colorado must determine how to select customer segments to focus its promotional and service-delivery efforts. Making segmentation work depends on reordering its pricing policy and "service packages."

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Service Delivery; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Colorado;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Mary E. Callahan, Don Bramley, Katie King, and Hilary Nicholas. "Steamboat Ski & Resort Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 395-019, July 1994. (Revised January 1997.)  View Details
  43. National Information Infrastructure (B): A Comparison of Public Policy in Japan and the United States

    George C. Lodge, Jeffrey F. Rayport, Thomas A. Gerace and Afroze A Mohammed

    Keywords: Information; Infrastructure; Policy; United States; Japan;

    Citation:

    Lodge, George C., Jeffrey F. Rayport, Thomas A. Gerace, and Afroze A Mohammed. "National Information Infrastructure (B): A Comparison of Public Policy in Japan and the United States." Harvard Business School Background Note 396-175, November 1995.  View Details
  44. Green Marketing at Rank Xerox

    Xerox Corp. is on the verge of launching a new line of photocopiers made largely from refurbished or recycled parts. In spite of this reclaimed content, the company intends to position the machines as "new." The move is a response to growing environmental pressures in Western Europe and throughout the world. The challenge is how to bring the new line to market, especially with respect to pricing and promotion.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Machinery and Machining; Environmental Sustainability; Manufacturing Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F. "Green Marketing at Rank Xerox." Harvard Business School Case 594-047, June 1994.  View Details
  45. European Bank for Reconstruction and Development: Marketing Strategy for the Debut Bond Offering

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the first supranational financial institution of the post-Cold War era, is planning its debut in the international capital markets through a bond issuance of $500 million. The bank must determine its marketing strategy for the offering on two levels--positioning of the institution and of the bond offering itself. Integral to the marketing task is the selection of a lead manager, who will determine the marketing mix. The mix decisions involve determining product (currency, maturity, coupon), pricing (yield), promotion (road shows and media relations), and distribution (formation of the syndicate). In addition, the lead manager will need to select appropriate target markets (retail and institutional investors), along with overall positioning for the institution.

    Keywords: Bonds; Marketing Strategy; Capital Markets; Banks and Banking; Banking Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F. "European Bank for Reconstruction and Development: Marketing Strategy for the Debut Bond Offering." Harvard Business School Case 594-005, July 1993. (Revised November 1993.)  View Details
  46. Responsible Care

    George C. Lodge and Jeffrey F. Rayport

    Describes a 1989 initiative of the Chemical Manufacturer's Association (CMA) to secure chemical industry support for and implementation of a series of codes of conduct in the field of environmental health and safety. Called "Responsible Care", the program makes implementation of the codes a condition of membership in CMA. The case raises issues of due process, fairness, legitimacy, relations with EPA, and fears of small companies.

    Keywords: Business and Government Relations; Fairness; Ethics; Environmental Sustainability; Safety; Chemical Industry;

    Citation:

    Lodge, George C., and Jeffrey F. Rayport. "Responsible Care." Harvard Business School Case 391-135, January 1991. (Revised March 1991.)  View Details