Doctoral Student

Paul Isaac Green

In 2006 Paul joined The Morning Star Company, a California based integrated food processing company, where he co-founded the Morning Star Self-Management Institute.  Paul was principally responsible for advancing Morning Star through their unique and innovative organizational system.  Morning Star, which has been called, "the world's most creatively managed company" and was named one of Inc. Magazine's most audacious companies because of their organizational system, is widely considered one of the world's leading organizational innovators.  Paul's leadership in advancing their philosophy and systems, combined with his drive to better understand human nature and motivation through research and experimentation, were instrumental in enabling Morning Star's organizational system to scale as Morning Star experienced significant growth.
In 2006, after five years as an entrepreneur, Paul joined The Morning Star Company, a California based integrated food processing company, where he co-founded the Morning Star Self-Management Institute.  Paul was principally responsible for advancing Morning Star through their unique and innovative organizational system.  Morning Star, which has been called, "the world's most creatively managed company" and was named one of Inc. Magazine's most audacious companies because of their organizational system, is widely considered one of the world's leading organizational innovators.  Paul's leadership in advancing their philosophy and systems, combined with his drive to better understand human nature and motivation through research and experimentation, were instrumental in enabling Morning Star's organizational system to scale as Morning Star experienced significant growth.

During his time at Morning Star and with the Self-Management Institute, Paul partnered with dozens of organizations on applied organizational research projects, all aimed at exploring the fundamental principles that yield an environment where people flourish.  Paul worked with the Institute technical team to design technological systems to support Morning Star's unique organizational system--like the award-winning CLOU web application and the proprietary Steppingstone & Colleague Review performance management system.  Paul also helped develop numerous internal and external educational programs, including the Institute's Mini-MBA program, designed to help factory and farm employees cultivate basic business skills enabling better front-line decision-making.  

Paul has spoken to audiences in the U.S. and around the World, and won the 2012 Harvard Business Review/McKinsey M-Prize for his work advancing Self-Management.
  1. Overview

    by Paul Isaac Green

    How can we build organizational environments that maximize human potential? What environments and organizational policies or norms promote effective decision-making and what mechanisms of control, paradoxically, diminish decision-making effectiveness? These core questions provide a theme common to all of my research. My research builds on motivation and decision-making theory to explore innovative ways of answering those questions, leveraging laboratory and field experiments to advance theory and provide insight to practitioners. Motivation My current research in this area explores the ways in which organizations and leaders inspire a sense of meaning in employees' work. I'm particularly interested in the ways that employees performing work low in task significance find meaning in their work--and I explore the ways that organizations can leverage team processes and dynamics to activate a lasting sense of meaning for those workers performing routine tasks. Decision-Making My current decision-making research explores the ways in which our organizational systems inadvertently promote employees making organizationally detrimental decisions that are inconsistent with their personal ethical principles. I am particularly interested in exploring the ways in which team interactions—both within teams, and across interdependent or complimentary teams—affect individual's decision-making.