Shelle M. Santana

Assistant Professor of Business Administration

Shelle Santana is an assistant professor of business administration in the Marketing Unit at Harvard Business School, where she teaches the Marketing course to first-year MBA students. Before pursuing her academic career, she held a variety of senior marketing roles at American Express Company, ultimately as head of U.S. corporate card marketing and global product strategy.

In one stream of research, Professor Santana explores how consumers respond to various pricing strategies in the marketplace. In one of her current projects, she examines how “drip pricing,” where sellers gradually reveal individual price components for a product or service, affects consumers’ current choices and future behavior intentions. In another, she shows how individual and contextual factors influence prices paid by consumers in pay-what-you-want settings. Professor Santana’s work has been published in the Journal of Retailing, and she co-authored “Consumer Financial Protection Legislation” in Regulating Wall Street: The Dodd-Frank Act and the New Architecture of Global Finance.

A second stream of research looks at consumers’ subjective value of money—or how people tend to spend and save differently depending on the type and form of currency that they are using. Currently, she is examining how consumers value credit card loyalty points relative to cash as a form of currency.

Professor Santana earned her Ph.D. and M.Phil. in marketing from the Stern School of Business at New York University. She holds an M.B.A. from Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and a B.S. from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

 

Shelle Santana is an assistant professor of business administration in the Marketing Unit at Harvard Business School, where she teaches the Marketing course to first-year MBA students. Before pursuing her academic career, she held a variety of senior marketing roles at American Express Company, ultimately as head of U.S. corporate card marketing and global product strategy.

In one stream of research, Professor Santana explores how consumers respond to various pricing strategies in the marketplace. In one of her current projects, she examines how “drip pricing,” where sellers gradually reveal individual price components for a product or service, affects consumers’ current choices and future behavior intentions. In another, she shows how individual and contextual factors influence prices paid by consumers in pay-what-you-want settings. Professor Santana’s work has been published in the Journal of Retailing, and she co-authored “Consumer Financial Protection Legislation” in Regulating Wall Street: The Dodd-Frank Act and the New Architecture of Global Finance.

A second stream of research looks at consumers’ subjective value of money—or how people tend to spend and save differently depending on the type and form of currency that they are using. Currently, she is examining how consumers value credit card loyalty points relative to cash as a form of currency.

Professor Santana earned her Ph.D. and M.Phil. in marketing from the Stern School of Business at New York University. She holds an M.B.A. from Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and a B.S. from Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations.