Shelle M. Santana

Assistant Professor of Business Administration

Shelle Santana is an assistant professor of business administration in the Marketing Unit, where she teaches the Marketing course to first-year MBA students. Before pursuing her academic career, she held a variety of senior marketing roles at American Express Company, ultimately as head of U.S. corporate card marketing and global product strategy.

In her research, Professor Santana explores how consumers respond to various pricing strategies in the marketplace. In one of her current projects, she examines how “drip pricing,” where sellers gradually reveal individual price components for a product or service, affects consumers’ current choices and future behavior intentions. In another, she shows how individual and contextual factors influence prices paid by consumers in pay-what-you-want settings. Professor Santana’s work has been published in the Journal of Retailing, and she co-authored “Consumer Financial Protection Legislation” in Regulating Wall Street: The Dodd-Frank Act and the New Architecture of Global Finance. 

Professor Santana earned her Ph.D. and M.Phil. in marketing from the Stern School of Business at New York University. She holds an MBA from Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and a BS from the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

Shelle Santana is an assistant professor of business administration in the Marketing Unit, where she teaches the Marketing course to first-year MBA students. Before pursuing her academic career, she held a variety of senior marketing roles at American Express Company, ultimately as head of U.S. corporate card marketing and global product strategy.

In her research, Professor Santana explores how consumers respond to various pricing strategies in the marketplace. In one of her current projects, she examines how “drip pricing,” where sellers gradually reveal individual price components for a product or service, affects consumers’ current choices and future behavior intentions. In another, she shows how individual and contextual factors influence prices paid by consumers in pay-what-you-want settings. Professor Santana’s work has been published in the Journal of Retailing, and she co-authored “Consumer Financial Protection Legislation” in Regulating Wall Street: The Dodd-Frank Act and the New Architecture of Global Finance.

Professor Santana earned her Ph.D. and M.Phil. in marketing from the Stern School of Business at New York University. She holds an MBA from Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and a BS from the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations.

  1. Overview

    by Shelle M. Santana

    Professor Santana studies consumer judgment and decision making within the domain of behavioral pricing. Her current projects are focused on how consumers think, feel, and behave in response to select pricing strategies that they encounter in the marketplace.
  2. Drip Pricing

    by Shelle M. Santana

    Anyone who has shopped for an airline ticket online has experienced drip pricing, as each successive screen seems to reveal another fee throughout the purchasing process. This practice is becoming prevalent in a variety of industries, but its effect on consumers is not well understood. Through a series of experiments, Professor Santana has shown that while drip pricing often increases consumer demand in the short term, it can also create negative feelings among consumers and lower their repeat purchase intentions with the seller in the long run. How then do firms that practice drip pricing stay in business? One answer may be a continual supply of so-called naïve consumers entering the market. Another aspect of Professor Santana’s work in this area involves exploring the efficacy of regulatory measures taken to curb the effects of drip pricing on consumers.

  3. Pay-What-You-Want

    by Shelle M. Santana

    In pay-what-you-want settings, typical marketplace dynamics are inverted: buyers, not sellers, determine the price. According to classic economic theory, the rational response of consumers in such situations is to pay nothing, but that is not what happens in actual retail environments. Professor Santana has found that while consumers may vary in their propensity to pay higher or lower prices in general, the context created by sellers can also influence how much consumers will pay. The secret lies in getting consumers who are inclined to pay lower prices to behave in ways that reflect communal (or social) norms versus exchange (or economic) norms when they are making their pricing decisions. Interestingly, even subtle strategies, such as promotional messaging, can affect consumer payments.