Casey M. Lurtz

Harvard-Newcomen Fellow

Casey M. Lurtz is the Newcomen Fellow in Business History. She received her PhD in Latin American History from the University of Chicago in 2014, where her research focused on the history of rural economies in Mexico. She uses the history of institutions, theories of development, and fine-grained work in local archives to explain the varied outcomes of Latin America's agricultural engagement with world markets and the ways in which those interactions were mediated and experienced locally. 
Casey M. Lurtz is the Newcomen Fellow in Business History. She received her PhD in Latin American History from the University of Chicago in 2014, where her research focused on the history of rural economies in Mexico. She uses the history of institutions, theories of development, and fine-grained work in local archives to explain the varied outcomes of Latin America's agricultural engagement with world markets and the ways in which those interactions were mediated and experienced locally. 

Dr. Lurtz is currently working on a manuscript entitled Markets of Progress: Coffee, Commerce, and Community in the Soconusco, Chiapas, 1867-1920. The book argues that the interplay of resilient local structures and adaptable imported institutions was essential to the growth and endurance of the coffee economy of southern Mexico. The work also engages the history of global migrations and provides a picture of localized international commerce in the hands of Mexican and foreign planters, merchants, and politicians. Her next project looks more broadly at the shifts in rural economies across nineteenth and twentieth century Mexico, focusing on the manner in which land reform, national modernization projects, and increased connections to global trade alternately reinforced and reshaped local socioeconomic structures. 

Book Chapters

  1. El restablecimiento del órden: La negociación de poder local en el Soconusco después de la Revolución de Tuxtepec

    This chapter examines local experiences of the Tuxtepec Rebellion that brought Porfirio Díaz to power in 1876. Following the rise and fall of Sebastián Escobar, a local political and military boss from the Soconusco region of Chiapas, Mexico, it argues that the period of transition around the rebellion allowed for the reassertion of local autonomy and the reestablishment of regional power structures that had been undermined by the growth of the coffee economy.

    Keywords: political turmoil; institutions; local government; coffee production; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Lurtz, Casey M. "El restablecimiento del órden: La negociación de poder local en el Soconusco después de la Revolución de Tuxtepec." In Historia de Chiapas, edited by Justus Fenner and María Dolores Palomo Infante. Mexico: Biblioteca Milenio, forthcoming, Spanish ed. View Details