John A. Quelch

Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration

John A. Quelch

John A. Quelch is the Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School . He also holds a joint appointment at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health as Professor in Health Policy and Management.  In addition, he is a Fellow of the Harvard China Fund, a Member of the Harvard China Advisory Board and Associate in Research at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

Between 2011 and 2013, Professor Quelch was Dean, Vice President and Distinguished Professor of International Management at CEIBS, China's leading business school. Between 2001 and 2011, he was the Lincoln Filene Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean at Harvard Business School, teaching Marketing in the Advanced Management Program. He served as Dean of London Business School from 1998 to 2001. Prior to 1998, he was the Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing and Co-Chair of the Marketing Unit at Harvard Business School.

Professor Quelch is known for his teaching materials and innovations in pedagogy.  Over the past thirty-five years, his case studies have sold over 4 million copies, third highest in HBS history.  In 1995, he developed the first HBS interactive CD-ROM exercise (on Intel's advertising budgeting process). In 1999, he developed and presented a series of twelve one hour programs on Marketing Management for the Public Broadcasting System. Professor Quelch currently teaches a new course, "Consumers, Corporations and Public Health" to both MBA and MPH students. He also chairs the executive education program “Customer-Driven Strategies for Health Care Professionals” and is co-chair of the conference "Building A Culture of Health: A New Imperative for Business."

John A. Quelch

John A. Quelch is the Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He also holds a joint appointment at Harvard School of Public Health as Professor in Health Policy and Management.  In addition, he is a Fellow of the Harvard China Fund, a Member of the Harvard China Advisory Board and Associate in Research at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

Between 2011 and 2013, Professor Quelch was Dean, Vice President and Distinguished Professor of International Management at CEIBS, China's leading business school. Between 2001 and 2011, he was the Lincoln Filene Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean at Harvard Business School, teaching Marketing in the Advanced Management Program. He served as Dean of London Business School from 1998 to 2001. Prior to 1998, he was the Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing and Co-Chair of the Marketing Unit at Harvard Business School. 

Professor Quelch is known for his teaching materials and innovations in pedagogy.  Over the past twenty-five years, his case studies have sold over 4 million copies, third highest in HBS history.  In 1995, he developed the first HBS interactive CD-ROM exercise (on Intel's advertising budgeting process). In 1999, he developed and presented a series of twelve one hour programs on Marketing Management for the Public Broadcasting System. Professor Quelch currently teaches a new course, "Consumers, Corporations and Public Health" to both MBA and MPH students. He also chairs the executive education program “Customer-Driven Strategies for Health Care Professionals” and is co-chair of the conference "Building A Culture of Health: A New Imperative for Business."

Professor Quelch is the author, co-author or editor of twenty-five books, including Consumers, Corporations and Public Health (2016),  All Business Is Local (2011), Greater Good:  How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy (2008), Business Solutions for the Global Poor: Creating Social and Economic Value (2007), The New Global Brands (2006), Global Marketing Management (5th edition, 2006), The Global Market (2005), Cases in Advertising and Promotion Management (4th Edition, 1996) and The Marketing Challenge of Europe 1992 (2nd edition, 1991). He has published eighteen articles on marketing strategy issues in the Harvard Business Review and many more in other leading management journals such as McKinsey Quarterly and Sloan Management Review.

Professor Quelch has served as an independent director of twelve publicly listed companies in the USA and UK.  He is currently a non-executive director of Alere, a health diagnostics company, Aramark, a food service and facilities management company, Luvo, an innovative food company, and Propel Media, a digital marketing services company. Professor Quelch has also served as a consultant, seminar leader and speaker for firms, industry associations and government agencies in more than sixty countries.  

In the area of public service, Professor Quelch served pro bono for eight years as Chairman of the Port Authority of Massachusetts. He is the Honorary Consul General of Morocco in New England and served previously as Chairman of the British-American Business Council of New England.  He is a member of the Trilateral Commission and the Council On Foreign Relations. He received the CBE for services to British business in 2011 and holds an honorary doctorate from Vietnam National University.

Professor Quelch was born in London, United Kingdom. He was educated at Exeter College, Oxford University (BA and MA), the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania (MBA), the Harvard School of Public Health (SM) and Harvard Business School (DBA). In addition to the UK and USA, he has lived in Australia, Canada and China.

Books

  1. Consumers, Corporations, and Public Health: A Case-Based Approach to Sustainable Business

    John A. Quelch

    The public health footprint associated with corporate behavior has come under increased scrutiny in the last decade, with an increased expectation that private profit not come at the expense of consumer welfare.

    Consumers, Corporations, and Public Health assembles 17 case studies at the intersection of business and public health to illustrate how each side can inform and benefit the other. Through contemporary examples from a variety of industries and geographies, this collection provides students with an appreciation for the importance of consumer empowerment and consumer behavior in shaping both health and corporate outcomes.

    Keywords: consumer; corporate culture; public health; Consumer Behavior; Marketing Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Health; Innovation and Invention; Innovation and Management; Supply Chain Management; Advertising Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Biotechnology Industry; Communications Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Distribution Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Health Industry; Information Industry; Information Technology Industry; Insurance Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; Retail Industry; Technology Industry; Tourism Industry; Transportation Industry; Travel Industry; Asia; Oceania; North and Central America; Middle East; Latin America; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. Consumers, Corporations, and Public Health: A Case-Based Approach to Sustainable Business. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016. View Details
  2. Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy

    John A. Quelch and Katherine E. Jocz

    Marketing has a greater purpose, and marketers, a higher calling, than simply selling more widgets, according to John Quelch and Katherine Jocz. In "Greater Good", the authors contend that marketing performs an essential societal function—and does so democratically. They maintain that people would benefit if the realms of politics and marketing were informed by one another's best principles and practices. Quelch and Jocz lay out the six fundamental characteristics that marketing and democracy share: (1) exchange of value, such as goods, services, and promises, (2) consumption of goods and services, (3) choice in all decisions, (4) free flow of information, (5) active engagement of a majority of individuals, and (6) inclusion of as many people as possible. Without these six traits, both marketing and democracy would fail, and with them, society. Drawing on current and historical examples from economies around the world, this landmark work illuminates marketing's critical role in the development, growth, and governance of societies. It reveals how good marketing practices improve the political process and—in turn—the practice of democracy itself.

    Keywords: Economic Systems; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Government and Politics; Marketing; Practice; Welfare or Wellbeing;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine E. Jocz. Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy. Boston: Harvard Business Press, 2008. View Details
  3. Multinational Marketing Management: Cases and Readings

    Robert D. Buzzell and John A. Quelch

    Citation:

    Buzzell, Robert D., and John A. Quelch. Multinational Marketing Management: Cases and Readings. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1988. (Second edition, Global Marketing Management with R. Buzzell and C. Bartlett, 1992. Third edition, Global Marketing Management with R. Buzzell and C. Bartlett, 1995. Fourth edition, Global Marketing Management with C. Bartlett, 1998.) View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Food Safety Economics: The Cost of a Sick Customer

    Dina Gerdeman and John A. Quelch

    Chipotle Mexican Grill’s ongoing struggle to win customers back months after a contaminated food crisis highlights the challenges companies face with keeping food safe.

    Chipotle has seen its shares tumble and recently reported its first-ever quarterly loss after the incident, which began in October when more than 50 people in 11 states were sickened by an initial E. coli outbreak.

    Keywords: Food Safety; organic food; supply chain management; globalization of food business; Mérieux NutriSciences: Marketing Food Safety Testing; Food Safety Modernization Act 2011; Plant-Based Agribusiness; Transition; Economic Systems; Food; Health; Supply and Industry; Logistics; Practice; Problems and Challenges; Quality; Safety; Business Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Customization and Personalization; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Insurance Industry; Public Administration Industry; Public Relations Industry; Retail Industry; Service Industry; Mexico; North America; United States; Canada;

    Citation:

    Gerdeman, Dina, and John A. Quelch. "Food Safety Economics: The Cost of a Sick Customer." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (May 16, 2016). View Details
  2. How to Market in a Downturn

    John A. Quelch and Katherine Jocz

    This article includes a one-page preview that quickly summarizes the key ideas and provides an overview of how the concepts work in practice along with suggestions for further reading. Because no two recessions are exactly alike, marketers find themselves in poorly charted waters every time one occurs. But guidance is available, say Quelch and Jocz, who have studied marketing successes (by Smucker, Procter & Gamble, Anheuser-Busch, and others) as well as failures throughout past recessions and identified patterns in consumer and company behavior that strongly affect performance. Understanding consumers' changing psychology and habits, the authors argue, will enable firms to hone their strategies so they can both survive the current downturn and prosper afterward. Consumers in a recession can be divided into four groups: The slam-on-the-brakes segment, which feels the hardest hit, reduces all types of spending. Pained-but-patient consumers, who constitute the largest segment, also economize in each area, though less aggressively. Comfortably well-off individuals consume at near-prerecession levels but become a little more selective (and less conspicuous) about their purchases. Live-for-today consumers pretty much carry on as usual, responding to the recession mainly by extending their timetables for making major purchases. People may switch segments if their economic situations change for the worse. All groups prioritize consumption by sorting products and services into the following categories: essentials (central to survival or well-being), treats (justifiable), postponables (can be put off), and expendables (unnecessary or unjustifiable). As firms manage their marketing investments, they must simultaneously assess their brands' opportunities, allocate resources for the long term, and balance their budgets. Many make the mistake of cutting costs indiscriminately, which can jeopardize long-term performance. Instead, firms should streamline their product portfolios, improve the affordability of their offerings, and bolster customers' trust.

    Keywords: Customers; Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Spending; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Segmentation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine Jocz. "How to Market in a Downturn." Harvard Business Review 87, no. 4 (April 2009): 52–62. View Details
  3. Milestones in Marketing

    John A. Quelch and Katherine Jocz

    Marketing flourished in U.S. business schools in the prosperous years following World War II. Students preparing for assistant-product-manager positions at the likes of Procter & Gamble, Lever, and General Foods enrolled in courses in marketing management, management of promotion, marketing research, sales management, distribution, and cost accounting. As the marketing field matured in the 1950s and 1960s, it articulated a set of foundational concepts. As early as 1900, some firms chose to differentiate their products in order to do a better job of satisfying customers' diverse needs. In subsequent years, the marketing discipline developed increasingly sophisticated tools for competitive positioning, target-market segmentation, and product-line strategy. Within firms, the boundaries of marketing proved to be fuzzy, in large part because customer issues cut across many different aspects of a firm's activities. The concepts of Smith, Borden, Kotler, Green, and Levitt continue to inform marketing education and research. Their ideas about market segmentation, the marketing mix, marketing for nonbusinesses, market research, and globalization are embedded in business practice.

    Keywords: Education; Business History; Marketing; Practice;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine Jocz. "Milestones in Marketing." Business History Review 82, no. 4 (Winter 2008): 827–838. View Details
  4. Holding a Mirror up to Marketing

    John A. Quelch and Katherine Jocz

    The Dove campaign addressed a common concern that crossed cultural boundaries. Confronted by standard visual stereotypes of beauty in the global media, many young women develop self-image and self-esteem problems. The Dove Real Beauty campaign rejected these narrow stereotypes in favor of celebrating the diversity of beauty, supplementing functional benefit claims with an important emotional appeal that was inclusive rather than elitist. Inclusiveness is one of six key benefits that good marketing delivers to consumers, the others being information, choice, engagement, exchange, and consumption. Here we show how political democracies aim to deliver these same six benefits to citizens. Marketing campaigns that focus on delivering all six "democratic" benefits, such as the Dove campaign, achieve a higher standard and more substantial, sustainable results.

    Keywords: Marketing; Advertising Campaigns; Welfare or Wellbeing; Diversity; Emotions; Government and Politics;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine Jocz. "Holding a Mirror up to Marketing." Marketing Management 17, no. 6 (November–December 2008): 16–21. View Details
  5. An Exploration of Marketing's Impact on Society: A Perspective Linked to Democracy

    John A. Quelch and Katherine Jocz

    The authors propose a political theory perspective for examining the impact of the modern aggregate marketing system on consumer welfare and society. Specifically, they suggest that the benefits marketing delivers to consumers are similar to the conditions required for representative democracy. This perspective encompasses a broader range of benefits than is usually considered in the marketing literature and could provide a possible template for evaluating marketing actions. Viewing marketing as democratic is consistent with the historical evolution of marketing and with existing definitions of marketing. Linking marketing to political science begins to connect individual-level outcomes with societal outcomes. The approach also lends itself to policy discussions and further research on the relationships among the three primary actors in the marketing system: consumers, marketers, and government. It raises several questions about optimal marketing systems.

    Keywords: Government and Politics; Marketing; Demand and Consumers; Welfare or Wellbeing;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine Jocz. "An Exploration of Marketing's Impact on Society: A Perspective Linked to Democracy." Journal of Public Policy & Marketing 27, no. 2 (Fall 2008): 202–206. View Details
  6. Which Levers Boost ROI?

    Margeaux Cvar and John A. Quelch

    The article refers to ROI, or return on investment, and focuses on a rational strategy for financial markets that uses outside industry comparisons. The first step is to identify parallel businesses that have similar characteristics such as growth, capital, and market concentration. This can be researched on industrial databases that profile companies. High performance firms and low performing companies are separated by their ROI. Regression analysis can determine the effect of variables such as vertical integration and employee compensation levels on ROI. An example is given for a golf ball manufacturer.

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods; Financial Markets; Investment Return;

    Citation:

    Cvar, Margeaux, and John A. Quelch. "Which Levers Boost ROI?" Harvard Business Review 85, no. 6 (June 2007): 21–24. View Details
  7. Positioning The Nation State

    John A. Quelch and Katherine E. Jocz

    Having a clear, differentiated positioning gives a country an advantage in attracting investment, business and tourism, and in building markets for its exports. Countries like Greece, Spain and Chile are successfully repositioning themselves using coordinated marketing and highly visible events like the Olympics. Positioning and national image also matter greatly in public diplomacy and cannot be taken for granted. Recommendations are given for positioning a nation-state based on a frank appraisal of perceptions and realities.

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine E. Jocz. "Positioning The Nation State." Place Branding 1, no. 3 (2005): 229–237. View Details

Book Chapters, Reports and Conference Proceedings

  1. Managing the Global Brand: A Typology of Consumer Perceptions

    Douglas B. Holt, J. A. Quelch and Earl Taylor

    Citation:

    Holt, Douglas B., J. A. Quelch, and Earl Taylor. "Managing the Global Brand: A Typology of Consumer Perceptions." In The Global Market: Developing a Strategy to Manage Across Borders, edited by John A. Quelch and Rohit Deshpandé, 180–201. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2004. View Details
  2. Consumer Promotions and the Acceleration of Product Purchases

    Scott A. Neslin, Caroline Henderson and John A. Quelch

    Citation:

    Neslin, Scott A., Caroline Henderson, and John A. Quelch. "Consumer Promotions and the Acceleration of Product Purchases." In Research on Sales Promotion: Collected Papers. no. 84-104, edited by Katherine E. Jocz, 22–46. Marketing Science Institute Report. Cambridge, MA: Marketing Science Institute, 1984. View Details
  3. Structural Determinants of Ratios of Promotion and Advertising to Sales

    John A. Quelch, Cheri T. Marshall and Dae R. Chang

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Cheri T. Marshall, and Dae R. Chang. "Structural Determinants of Ratios of Promotion and Advertising to Sales." In Research on Sales Promotion: Collected Papers. no. 84-104, edited by Katherine E. Jocz, 83–105. Marketing Science Institute Report. Cambridge, MA: Marketing Science Institute, 1984. View Details
  4. Behavioral Measurement of the Relative Importance of Attribute-Related Information Cues: The Case of Cold Breakfast Cereals

    S. Ash, C. Duhaime and J. Quelch

    Citation:

    Ash, S., C. Duhaime, and J. Quelch. "Behavioral Measurement of the Relative Importance of Attribute-Related Information Cues: The Case of Cold Breakfast Cereals." In Marketing: Towards Excellence in the Eighties, edited by V. Jones, 263–279. Montreal: Administrative Sciences Association of Canada, 1980. View Details
  5. Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, and Complaining Behavior: A Comprehensive Study of Rentals, Public Transportation and Utilities

    S. Ash and J. Quelch

    Citation:

    Ash, S., and J. Quelch. "Consumer Satisfaction, Dissatisfaction, and Complaining Behavior: A Comprehensive Study of Rentals, Public Transportation and Utilities." In Refining the Conceptualization and Measurement of Consumer Satisfaction and Complaining Behavior, edited by H. Hunt and R. Day, 120–130. Bloomington: Indiana University, School of Business, 1980. View Details
  6. The Marketing Factor for Nonconventional-Protein Products

    James E. Austin, J. A. Quelch, Joe R. D'Cruz and Edward T. Popper

    Keywords: Food; Product Marketing; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Austin, James E., J. A. Quelch, Joe R. D'Cruz, and Edward T. Popper. "The Marketing Factor for Nonconventional-Protein Products." Chap. 9 in Protein Resources and Technology, edited by Max Milner, Nevin S. Scrimshaw, and Daniel I.C. Wang, 111–135. Westport, CT: AVI Publishing Company, 1978. View Details

Opinion and Commentary

  1. Why Brexit Is a Big Deal

    John A. Quelch

    The consequences of yesterday's vote by the British people to leave the European Union will be far-reaching, but there is no reason for global markets to panic.
    Brexit is a vote against the European Union. Once heralded as the engine of a one-for-all and all-for-one economic growth, the EU is now seen by many Britons as an expensive, interfering and sclerotic bureaucracy.

    Keywords: British Vote; Brexit; European Union; Impact; Historical Result; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Disruption; Transition; Volatility; Decision Making; Globalization; Government and Politics; History; Leadership; Outcome or Result; Risk and Uncertainty; Strategy; European Union; Republic of Ireland; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Why Brexit Is a Big Deal." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (June 24, 2016). (Republished by Forbes.com on June 24, 2016 at: http://www.forbes.com/sites/hbsworkingknowledge/2016/06/24/why-brexit-is-a-big-deal/#2c5e5c587297.) View Details
  2. The Hill: Health Insurance Mergers Put Consumers Last

    John A. Quelch

    Cigna's chief executive recently admitted what many have expected: the health insurance mega-mergers are running into regulatory resistance and approvals may not be forthcoming, if at all, until next year. Rightly so. The Justice Department should reject these mergers that would result in three $100 billion companies controlling the U.S. health insurance industry.

    Keywords: mergers and acquisitions; health insurance; Affordable care act; U.S. Congress; Interests of Consumers; Change; Human Resources; Innovation and Invention; Government and Politics; Health; Law; Leadership; Problems and Challenges; Strategy; Health Industry; Insurance Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Health Insurance Mergers Put Consumers Last." The Hill. June 24, 2016. http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/healthcare/284730-health-insurance-mergers-put-consumers-lastView Details
  3. Companies Need to Start Marketing Security to Customers

    John A. Quelch

    Recent events in Orlando underscore an important marketing truth: consumer safety and security are mission critical. A popular nightclub, Pulse, known as a safe place for the LGBT community, is put out of business at least temporarily by a terrorist act. Not far away at a Walt Disney World resort, the reputation of one of the greatest global brands is sullied by a tragic alligator attack on a small child.

    The marketer has no greater responsibility than to ensure the safety of the consumer. So why do we not hear more about safety? The ugly truth is safety doesn't sell.

    Keywords: Consumer Safety; public safety; brand attraction; risk management; safe environment benefit; marketing safety; global brands; Advertising; Change Management; Disruption; Volatility; Crime and Corruption; Customers; Music Entertainment; Animation Entertainment; Film Entertainment; Brands and Branding; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Product Marketing; Consumer Behavior; Problems and Challenges; Safety; Corporate Strategy; Business Strategy; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Tourism Industry; Travel Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Companies Need to Start Marketing Security to Customers." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (June 17, 2016). (Republished by Fortune.com as "What the Orlando Tragedies Can Teach Businesses" on June 20, 2016.) View Details
  4. Can Brand Trump Win a Presidency?

    John A. Quelch

    In the marketplace, Brand Trump is authentic. It stands for aspiration and success, but more the ostentatious and flashy success that appeals to the newly wealthy, the entrepreneur, the outsider. For these consumers, brand Trump clearly delivers; Trump hotels, and resorts average a 4.5 rating on TripAdvisor.

    Brand Trump has been extended to other categories, from steaks, to education, to apparel. Not all of these ventures have succeeded. Few guests see the competencies of a good hotelier as relevant to designing distinctive quality suits. But, for a minority of consumers who embrace the Trump lifestyle, these other products can add brand value and, being produced by others under license, they deliver some extra profit to the Trump organization.

    Keywords: brand; Umbrella Brands; political brands; political campaigns; Successful brands; personal brand; Demographics; History; Information; Innovation and Invention; Leadership; Management; Marketing; Outcome or Result; Problems and Challenges; Strategy; Value; Public Administration Industry; Public Relations Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Can Brand Trump Win a Presidency?" Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (June 7, 2016). (Republished by Forbes.com on June 7, 2016.) View Details
  5. How Consumers and Businesses are Reshaping Public Health

    John A. Quelch

    Healthcare and education are two issues in which citizens around the world, rich and poor, are passionately interested. It has long been appreciated that the way that a society treats its youngest and oldest members says much about its moral maturity. Economic development specialists also attest to the importance of health care in determining productivity. The connection between child health and nutrition and readiness to learn in schools is also well established. Forthcoming revisions to the Millennium Development Goals are expected to again highlight the importance of disease prevention and health care to the global community.

    Keywords: healthcare; Consumer Power; Innovation in healthcare delivery; Mobile Healthcare; Transition; Transformation; Trends; Customer Satisfaction; Customer Value and Value Chain; Health Care and Treatment; Information; Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Independent Innovation and Invention; Innovation and Management; Innovation Leadership; Management; Marketing; Markets; Planning; Problems and Challenges; Biotechnology Industry; Chemical Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Distribution Industry; Fashion Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Green Technology Industry; Health Industry; Insurance Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; Public Administration Industry; South America; North and Central America; Middle East; Europe; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "How Consumers and Businesses are Reshaping Public Health." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (May 25, 2016). View Details
  6. Build a Culture of Health

    John A. Quelch

    Every company, large and small, has an impact on health. It does so in four ways. First, through the healthfulness and safety of the products and services it sells. Second, through its attention to employee health and well-being in its work practices and benefits. Third, through contributions to the broader communities in which it operates. Fourth, through the environmental impact of its operations.

    Keywords: public health; Four Pillars; Public Health Footprint; Culture of Health Plan of Action; Change; Education; Health; Human Resources; Knowledge; Labor; Leadership; Management; Operations; Outcome or Result; Personal Development and Career; Programs; Risk and Uncertainty; Strategy; Value; Consumer Products Industry; Chemical Industry; Health Industry; United States; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Build a Culture of Health." Huffington Post: What's Working: Purpose + Profit (May 24, 2016). View Details
  7. World Health Organization Lacks Leadership to Combat Pandemics

    John A. Quelch

    When it comes to emergency preparedness for pandemics, the World Health Organization is falling short. It has not provided prompt and clear leadership to the world in combating either the Ebola or Zika viruses. Its leadership has been low energy, its representatives contradict each other in their public advisories, and it is regarded as more of a policeman than a partner by national governments. Its many dedicated scientists produce useful reports on the global state of public health, but the WHO's bureaucracy impedes the decisive action necessary to get out in front of emerging pandemics.

    Keywords: Global health; World Health Organization; World Bank; Pandemics; Emergency preparedness; Experience and Expertise; Decisions; Forecasting and Prediction; Communication Strategy; Nonverbal Communication; Framework; Governance; Government and Politics; Health; Management; Practice; Problems and Challenges; Projects; Risk and Uncertainty; Human Needs; Civil Society or Community; Social Issues; Welfare or Wellbeing; Biotechnology Industry; Health Industry; Journalism and News Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Public Administration Industry; Tourism Industry; Transportation Industry; Travel Industry; Africa; Asia; Europe; Latin America; North and Central America; South America; West Indies;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "World Health Organization Lacks Leadership to Combat Pandemics." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (May 20, 2016). View Details
  8. In Praise of Marketing

    John A. Quelch

    Many dismiss marketing as manipulative, deceptive, and intrusive. Marketing, they argue, focuses too much of our attention on material consumption. More recently, Benjamin Barber, in his 2007 book Consumed, claims that marketing is "sucking up the air from every other domain to sustain the sector devoted to consumption." He is correct. Coca-Cola, Nike, and Starbucks command more loyalty among many consumers than any political party, trade union, church, or mosque. Indeed, Starbucks founder Howard Schultz sought to make his coffee shops the "third place" in our lives, after home and work. Marketing is an American success story. No country on earth is better at marketing than the United States. The latest Interbrand listing of the most valuable global brands reveals seven American brands in the top ten and sixty in the top hundred, more than twice the expected numbers based on the United States' command of 28 percent of the world economy.

    Keywords: marketing; Consumer Loyalty; Local vs. Global Branding; Multi-national brands; Misleading and Fraudulent Advertising; Customer Value and Value Chain; Customer Satisfaction; Globalized Economies and Regions; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Multinational Firms and Management; Globalized Markets and Industries; Brands and Branding; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Product Positioning;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "In Praise of Marketing." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (February 5, 2009). View Details
  9. Where Cash for Clunkers Ran Off the Road

    John A. Quelch

    Today, let us celebrate the end of an unjustifiable drain on the U.S. taxpayer: the Cash for Clunkers (C4C) program.

    True, C4C greatly boosted the number of consumers visiting car dealers. Doubtless, some new cars were sold to consumers who thought they had a clunker to trade in but, on discovering it didn't qualify, bought a new car regardless.

    Keywords: Government programs; Environmental Impact; Government Waste; customer behavior; Economic Growth; Economy; Financial Crisis; Government and Politics; Leadership; Marketing; Programs; Value; Auto Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Public Administration Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Where Cash for Clunkers Ran Off the Road." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (August 26, 2009). View Details
  10. Marketing Your Way Through a Recession

    John A. Quelch

    The signs of an imminent recession are all around us. The spillover from the subprime mortgage crisis is weakening both consumer confidence and the consumer spending—much of it on credit—that has been buoying the U.S. economy.

    Keywords: marketing; recession; products and sales; core values; Fluctuation; Volatility; Economic Growth; Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Growth and Development; Marketing Strategy; Product Marketing; Risk and Uncertainty; Salesforce Management; Asia; Europe; Latin America; North and Central America;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Marketing Your Way Through a Recession." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (March 8, 2008). View Details
  11. How Consumers Value Global Brands

    Douglas Holt, John A. Quelch and Earl L. Taylor

    In 2002, we carried out a two-stage research project in partnership with the market research company Research International/USA to find out how consumers in different countries value global brands. First, we conducted a qualitative study in forty-one countries to identify the key characteristics that people associate with global brands. Then we surveyed 1,800 people in twelve nations to measure the relative importance of those dimensions when consumers buy products. A detailed analysis revealed that consumers all over the world associate global brands with three characteristics and evaluate them on those dimensions while making purchase decisions. We found that one factor—American values—didn't matter much to consumers, although many companies have assumed it is critical.

    Keywords: global brands; Brand Value; Multi-national brands; social responsibility; Global Range; Multinational Firms and Management; Globalized Markets and Industries; Brands and Branding; Social Marketing; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact;

    Citation:

    Holt, Douglas, John A. Quelch, and Earl L. Taylor. "How Consumers Value Global Brands." Harvard Business School Working Knowledge (September 20, 2004). View Details

HBS Blog Posts

  1. Building A Culture of Health - John A. Quelch: Creating A Culture of Health

    John A. Quelch

    All American companies are in the health business whether they like it or not. The private sector directly pays for one-fifth of the whopping 17.5% of GDP spent on healthcare in the United States. Rather than viewing health merely as an insurance expense to be controlled, every company needs to embrace building a culture of health as a business opportunity.

    Keywords: Building A Culture of Health; Intersection of Healthcare and Business; Impact of Healthcare on Business; Population Health Footprint; Healthcare as an Investment; Change; Education; Health; Human Resources; Labor; Leadership; Management; Marketing; Operations; Performance; Personal Development and Career; Problems and Challenges; Risk and Uncertainty; Strategy; Value; Health Industry; Insurance Industry; Canada; North America; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Creating A Culture of Health." Building A Culture of Health - John A. Quelch (blog). May 31, 2016. http://johnquelch.org/creating-a-culture-of-health/View Details
  2. Building A Culture of Health - John A. Quelch: The Marketing of Prevention

    John A. Quelch

    The US will devote 17.5% of GDP to health care this year, around $3 trillion. Yet only 3 percent of that will be spent on prevention, including both primary prevention (preventing illness in the first place) and secondary prevention (preventing sick people getting sicker or having a relapse). Medicine saves lives, doctors are heroes and the best earn Nobel prizes. Prevention, by contrast, is mundane, measurement of effectiveness is difficult, rewards and recognition pale by comparison.

    Keywords: healthcare; healthcare marketing; prevention; wellbeing; Health; Marketing; Health Industry; Insurance Industry; Public Administration Industry; Europe; North and Central America;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "The Marketing of Prevention." Building A Culture of Health - John A. Quelch (blog). May 12, 2016. http://johnquelch.org/the-marketing-of-prevention/View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. AIP Healthcare Japan: Investing in Japan's Retirement Home Market

    John A. Quelch and Qing Xia

    The CEO of a health care-based REIT is considering alternative nursing home investment strategies. Students must consider macro-industry trends, scale and scope issues and consumer segmentation data in making their recommendations.

    Keywords: health care; health care services; marketing; segmentation; REIT; Health Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Qing Xia. "AIP Healthcare Japan: Investing in Japan's Retirement Home Market." Harvard Business School Case 515-102, May 2015. (Revised September 2015.) View Details
  2. Carolinas HealthCare System: Consumer Analytics

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In 2014, Dr. Michael Dulin, chief clinical officer for analytics and outcomes research and head of the Dickson Advanced Analytics (DA2) group at Carolinas HealthCare System (CHS), successfully unified all analytics talent and resources into one group over a three year period. Rapid increases in computing power and decreases in data storage costs had enabled DA2's data architects to build predictive models incorporating complex clinical, financial, demographic, and claims data that would have been impossible to create only a few years before. However, in 2014, both Apple and Google announced features in their new mobile operating systems that collected and displayed output from various health-wearables (like heart-rate monitors or step-counters), as well as electronic medical record (EMR) data. Their expertise in analytics, access to demographic and location data, as well as large consumer bases, led Dulin to consider which players consumers would trust to integrate their healthcare data in the future and what role DA2 could play.

    Keywords: Consumer segmentation; big data; management information systems; hospital management; Health Care and Treatment; Marketing; Segmentation; Data and Data Sets; Information Management; Information Technology; Health; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Carolinas HealthCare System: Consumer Analytics." Harvard Business School Case 515-060, April 2015. (Revised September 2015.) View Details
  3. Colgate-Palmolive Company: Marketing Anti-Cavity Toothpaste

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In October 2013, Colgate-Palmolive Company, the world's leading oral care company, was about to launch its new Colgate® Maximum Cavity Protection™ plus Sugar Acid Neutralizer™ toothpaste in Brazil. Oral care category accounted for 46 percent of Colgate's $17.4 billion sales worldwide in 2013. The new toothpaste was clinically proven to reduce and prevent cavities more effectively than toothpaste with the same level of fluoride alone. All major industry players, including Procter & Gamble, GlaxoSmithKline and Colgate itself, had long ago launched products with the maximum amount of fluoride allowed by Health authorities. Yet cavities remained a significant threat to public health in many countries, both developing and developed. As Suzan Harrison, Colgate's president of Oral Care, prepared to launch CMCP+SAN in Brazil, the world's third largest oral care market, her executive team was divided over the product's positioning and pricing. Should it be positioned as a basic product to maximize reach for its health benefits or as a premium product for consumers who sought superior cavity protection?

    Keywords: marketing; new product management; Consumer segmentation; global marketing; corporate social responsibility; healthcare; sustainability; Health Care and Treatment; Environmental Sustainability; Marketing; Segmentation; Product Development; Product Launch; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Consumer Products Industry; Brazil; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Colgate-Palmolive Company: Marketing Anti-Cavity Toothpaste." Harvard Business School Case 515-050, May 2015. (Revised September 2015.) View Details
  4. DPDHL Group: Employee Safety and Wellbeing

    John A. Quelch and Carin-Isabel Knoop

    Management at Deutsche Post DHL Group is designing a three-country test of investment in a new health and wellbeing strategy.

    Keywords: health; wellbeing; wellness; safety; risk; employees; Human Resources; Risk Management; Service Industry; China; Mexico; Middle East;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "DPDHL Group: Employee Safety and Wellbeing." Harvard Business School Case 516-049, October 2015. View Details
  5. Eco7: Launching a New Motor Oil

    John Quelch and Sunru Yong

    Aaron Jonnerson, vice president of marketing at the automotive division of Avellin, must make marketing mix decisions for the launch of Eco7, a new environmentally-friendly motor oil. The company's performance has been mediocre, shareholder pressure is increasing, and expectations are high for Eco7. However, Jonnerson faces significant challenges in ensuring a successful launch. The market for passenger car motor oil (PCMO) is mature and consumers are price-sensitive. Furthermore, the independent oil change outlets that are Avellin's core customers have declined relative to other channels. Jonnerson must design the best pricing strategy to ensure a successful launch. The Eco7 case asks students to examine consumer behavior and channel conflict and factor them into a product launch. The launch comes at a time when the company may need to adapt to changes in a market that is increasingly commoditized and in which the relative importance of different distribution channels is changing. Students are asked to make recommendations on pricing and distribution and to consider which trade-offs the company should make.

    Citation:

    Quelch, John, and Sunru Yong. "Eco7: Launching a New Motor Oil." Harvard Business School Brief Case 916-507, September 2015. View Details
  6. Ethiopia: An Emerging Market Opportunity?

    John A. Quelch and Sunru Yong

    This case centers on the potential and challenges of entering an emerging market. It provides a brief overview of the Ethiopian market, market reforms and policies, and the business environment faced by foreign companies. Three multinational businesses, CareCo, ShoeCo, and MedCo, must decide whether and how to enter the Ethiopian market. Students are asked to make a recommendation for each company based on the attractiveness of the market, the factors that matter most for success, and an assessment of how this applies to the companies.

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Sunru Yong. "Ethiopia: An Emerging Market Opportunity?" Harvard Business School Brief Case 915-501, June 2015. View Details
  7. Philips Healthcare: Marketing the HealthSuite Digital Platform

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In June 2014, leading healthcare and consumer technology company, Royal Philips ("Philips"), announced its HealthSuite Digital Platform to house healthcare data and enable applications used by physicians and patients. Philips had strong equity in the healthcare technology space, due to its extensive portfolio of medical devices and related software sold primarily to hospitals. Philips designed the first two apps for the platform (eCareCoordinator and eCareCompanion) in-house, but it planned to open it up to third-party developers who would create an array of health-focused apps. Healthcare had long lagged behind other industries in adoption of technology as well as patient-relationship management. However, many health players had recently increased investment in new infrastructure and data analytics. Would the new Philips HealthSuite Digital Platform find success in the rapidly evolving industry?

    Keywords: health; healthcare; digital; platform; ecosystem; Health Care and Treatment; Technological Innovation; Technology; Product Development; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Netherlands; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Philips Healthcare: Marketing the HealthSuite Digital Platform." Harvard Business School Case 515-052, May 2015. (Revised September 2015.) View Details
  8. Rana Plaza (C): Primark and Victim Compensation

    John A. Quelch

    Keywords: corporate social responsibility; Business ethics; supply chain management; human resource management; workplace safety; Safety; Working Conditions; Supply Chain Management; Ethics; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Human Resources;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Rana Plaza (C): Primark and Victim Compensation." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 516-019, August 2015. View Details
  9. 23andMe: Genetic Testing for Consumers (A)

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    On November 22, 2013, the direct-to-consumer genetic testing provider, 23andMe, received a letter from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ordering the company to halt the sale and promotion of its genetic testing kit. The FDA stated that the product was marketed as a diagnostic and preventative tool and that it was subject to the agency's regulations for medical devices. Company co-founder Anne Wojcicki and chairman Andy Page carefully considered the potential impact of the FDA's letter on 23andMe's position in the industry and the sustainability of its operations.

    Keywords: marketing; public health; strategy; genome testing; health care; genetics; ancestry; 23andMe; Marketing; Product Launch; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Health Testing and Trials; Genetics; Strategy; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "23andMe: Genetic Testing for Consumers (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-086, January 2014. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  10. 23andMe: Genetic Testing for Consumers (B)

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    Following the FDA's letter in November 2013, which ordered 23andMe to cease sales of its DNA test kits, observers wondered how co-founder and CEO, Anne Wojcicki, would guide the company in the presence of uncertainty.

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Genetics; Crisis Management; Health Care and Treatment; Product Development; Business and Government Relations; Biotechnology Industry; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "23andMe: Genetic Testing for Consumers (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-095, January 2014. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  11. Access Health CT: Marketing Affordable Care

    John A. Quelch and Michael Norris

    At the close of open-enrollment in March of 2014, Kevin Counihan, CEO of Access Health CT, Connecticut's state health insurance exchange, stops to consider the success it has experienced so far and think about how to ensure its long-term sustainability.

    Keywords: health care; health care industry; health care policy; public health insurance exchange; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; Connecticut;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Michael Norris. "Access Health CT: Marketing Affordable Care." Harvard Business School Case 514-119, June 2014. (Revised January 2015.) View Details
  12. Cancer Screening in Japan: Market Research and Segmentation

    John A. Quelch

    Keywords: Market research; Market segmentation; health care industry; Health Care and Treatment; Innovation and Invention; Marketing Strategy; Health Industry; Public Administration Industry; Communications Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Cancer Screening in Japan: Market Research and Segmentation." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-100, January 2014. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  13. Cancer Screening in Japan: Market Research and Segmentation

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    Since founding CancerScan in 2008, Jun Fukuyoshi and Yoshiki Ishikawa had helped to improve cancer screening rates in Japan. Between 2005 and 2007, awareness of breast cancer in Japan rose from 55% to 70%, but the incidence of breast cancer screenings remained constant. Jun and Yoshiki applied marketing research techniques to increase the screening rate for breast cancer, a disease which killed over 12,000 Japanese women in 2011. Cancer screening initiatives accounted for 60% of the company's 2013 sales of $2.5 million.

    Keywords: cancer; Public Health Projects; Japan; Japan;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Cancer Screening in Japan: Market Research and Segmentation." Harvard Business School Case 514-057, January 2014. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  14. CleanSpritz

    John A. Quelch and Alisa Zalosh

    Sales of CleanSpritz all-purpose cleaning spray have been steadily declining for the past five years, and management believes the decline correlates to a growing environmental concern among U.S. consumers. CleanSpritz's management is considering several options to address the environmental concerns in hopes of reversing the decline in revenue: re-launching the current product; adding a new product that includes stronger concentrate in a recyclable pouch; adding a new stronger concentrate in a dissolvable packet; or keeping the business status-quo. Students must present their recommendations for the most effective strategy, keeping in mind the potential risks of each alternative. Students learn to demonstrate the importance of packaging in the marketing mix, analyze the costs and benefits of being a first mover, and learn about the decision-making process for a product extension that represents a creative attempt to rejuvenate a mature brand. This case can be used in courses on marketing management, product management or new product development, or marketing and social responsibility.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Competition; Marketing Strategy; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Performance Improvement; Environmental Sustainability; Product Launch; Product Development; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Alisa Zalosh. "CleanSpritz." Harvard Business School Brief Case 914-537, January 2014. View Details
  15. Crescent Pure

    John A. Quelch and Alisa Zalosh

    Executives from Portland Drake Beverages (PDB) are meeting to determine the appropriate product positioning and advertising campaign for the launch of Crescent Pure, a specialty organic beverage. They have 3 options for positioning: should Crescent Pure be positioned as an energy drink, a sports drink, or should it adopt broader positioning as an "organic health and wellness" beverage? Students studying this case explore customer segmentation, product differentiation analysis, and the evaluation of perceptual maps as a market research technique.

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Alisa Zalosh. "Crescent Pure." Harvard Business School Brief Case 915-539, September 2014. View Details
  16. Demarketing Soda in New York City

    John A. Quelch

    In 2013, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg tried and failed to institute a ban on serving sizes of large sugary beverages. Obesity posed a large public health risk to the city. Mayor Bloomberg's proposed ban was one of many attempts to combat the rising threat of obesity. The case discusses the efficacy of the proposed ban on large soda serving sizes in the context of the other anti-obesity initiatives crafted by Bloomberg's administration.

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Demarketing Soda in New York City." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-052, March 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  17. Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (A)

    John Quelch

    The case series focuses on Melbourne Trains' viral advertising campaign to improve safe behaviors around trains among young people. This iconic, low budget campaign swept the Cannes Lions advertising awards in 2013 and became a social media sensation.

    Keywords: advertising; digital marketing; Viral Marketing; Advertising; Marketing Communications; Social Marketing; Advertising Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Public Administration Industry; Oceania; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John. "Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-079, January 2014. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  18. Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (A), (B) & (C)

    John Quelch

    Keywords: advertising; advertising media; digital marketing; viral advertising; Viral Marketing; public safety; Advertising; Marketing; Marketing Strategy; Web; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Public Administration Industry; Oceania; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John. "Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (A), (B) & (C)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-082, January 2014. View Details
  19. Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (B)

    John Quelch

    The case series focuses on Melbourne Trains' viral advertising campaign to improve safe behaviors around trains among young people. This iconic, low budget campaign swept the Cannes Lions advertising awards in 2013 and became a social media sensation.

    Keywords: Marketing channels; marketing communication; digital marketing; viral advertising; Advertising; Advertising Campaigns; Public Sector; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Advertising Industry; Public Administration Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Oceania; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John. "Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-080, January 2014. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  20. Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (C)

    John Quelch

    The case series focuses on Melbourne Trains' viral advertising campaign to improve safe behaviors around trains among young people. This iconic, low budget campaign swept the Cannes Lions advertising awards in 2013 and became a social media sensation.

    Keywords: marketing; marketing communication; advertising; viral advertising; Advertising; Advertising Campaigns; Marketing Strategy; Advertising Industry; Public Administration Industry; Transportation Industry; Oceania; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John. "Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-081, January 2014. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  21. E-Cigarettes: Marketing Versus Public Health

    John A. Quelch

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were heralded by some as a healthcare game changer, enabling smokers to switch to a new product which carried lower risk of cancer. However, there were concerns about the public health risk of e-cigarettes, particularly the chance that teens would easily develop nicotine addictions from smoking the fruit-flavored products. Manufacturers argued that current smokers, not teens were the target market, but laws regulating e-cigarettes were far less stringent than those governing tobacco products.

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "E-Cigarettes: Marketing Versus Public Health." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-108, March 2014. View Details
  22. Fresno's Social Impact Bond for Asthma

    John A. Quelch

    The case desccribes a social impact bond (SIB) to fund home-based remediation programs designed to reduce asthma attacks among Fresno residents (especially children) and thereby save on health care costs (ambulance callouts, emergency room visits etc.). The case permits a broader evaluation of SIBs that can reward investors according to outcome metrics and thereby reduce the cost of social programs, especially those typically funded by government agencies.

    Keywords: Programs; Social Issues; Investment Return; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Fresno's Social Impact Bond for Asthma." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 515-031, November 2014. View Details
  23. Fresno's Social Impact Bond for Asthma

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In 2014, Social Impact Bonds (SIBs) were quickly gaining popularity as an investment vehicle which joined together private investors and nonprofits to tackle social issues. Although numerous SIB projects and proposals had cropped up across the U.S. following the launch of the first SIB in the UK in 2010, none were explicitly focused on healthcare. Fresno, California announced the first healthcare SIB in 2013 to fund home-based programs to reduce asthma attacks. If successful, the Fresno SIB model would help solve the challenge of delivering preventative care efficiently in at-risk communities.

    Keywords: social enterprise; health care; marketing; bonds; financing; asthma; air pollution; air quality; chronic disease; public health; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Finance; Health Industry; Financial Services Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Fresno's Social Impact Bond for Asthma." Harvard Business School Case 515-028, September 2014. View Details
  24. GlaxoSmithKline in China (C)

    John Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    Keywords: ethics; pharmaceutical industry; China; healthcare; pharmaceutical sales; Ethics; Multinational Firms and Management; Pharmaceutical Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John, and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "GlaxoSmithKline in China (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-092, January 2014. (Revised January 2014.) (This case is a follow up to GlaxoSmithKline (A), 514049 and GlaxoSmithKline (B), 514050.) View Details
  25. Johnson & Johnson: The Promotion of Wellness

    John A. Quelch

    The chief medical officer of Johnson & Johnson (J & J) is reflecting on forty years of sustained efforts by the company to improve employee wellness. The case reviews J & J's multiple wellness initiatives and efforts to measure their effectiveness. It also invites discussion of what more still remains to be done.

    Keywords: empoylee wellness programs; human resource management; corporate management strategy; employee engagement; Human Resources; Management; Organizations; Performance; Personal Development and Career; Programs; Strategy; Health Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; North and Central America; Europe; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Johnson & Johnson: The Promotion of Wellness." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 515-021, July 2014. (Revised February 2015.) View Details
  26. Johnson & Johnson: The Promotion of Wellness

    John A. Quelch and Carin-Isabel Knoop

    To create the world's healthiest workforce, diversified health care giant Johnson & Johnson (J&J) mandated participation in its "Culture of Health" program globally, customized by location, culture, and specific health needs to offer prevention-focused education, rewards for healthy behavior, and workplace environments that encouraged healthy employee behavior. By 2015, 90% of J&J's 128,000 employees would participate in Culture of Health programs; 80% would know their key health indicators (e.g., blood pressure, body-mass index, blood sugar, cholesterol); and 80% would have a "low risk" health profile. To hit these goals, J&J managers in 2014 sought to: 1) reduce national variation in program adoption and popularity, 2) do more to help employees ensure their overall—physical, mental, and spiritual—health, and 3) accurately measure the investments in and return on the program.

    Keywords: healthcare; human resources; employee motivation; Transformation; Ethics; Health; Human Resources; Leadership; Management; Personal Development and Career; Problems and Challenges; Strategy; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; North and Central America; Middle East; Latin America; Europe; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Johnson & Johnson: The Promotion of Wellness." Harvard Business School Case 514-112, June 2014. (Revised September 2014.) View Details
  27. Marketing Marijuana in Colorado

    John A. Quelch

    The case, set in the middle of 2014, reviews the first six months of marketplace activity in Colorado, following the legalization of marijuana for recreational use and the expansion of marijuana retailing from medical dispensaries to recreational stores. The case permits an assessment of marijuana regulatory initiatives, at both the state and federal levels, and invites an appraisal of the current and prospective evolution of the marijuana market, in Colorado and nationally.

    Keywords: marketing; marketing innovations; retail government services; public health; Agribusiness; Customers; Goods and Commodities; Government and Politics; Health; Marketing; Society; Consumer Products Industry; Distribution Industry; Health Industry; Public Administration Industry; North and Central America;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Marketing Marijuana in Colorado." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 515-048, November 2014. View Details
  28. Marketing Marijuana in Colorado

    John A. Quelch and David Lane

    Colorado's 2014 legalization of marijuana for adult recreational (not just medical) use created a new market that entrepreneurs rushed to enter, channeled by regulations that aimed to minimize marijuana's access to minors while not stifling the emergent new industry. The case describes Colorado's initial experience with marijuana legalization and asks students to assess the resulting business opportunities, regulatory efficacy, and public health implications.

    Keywords: public health; regulation; entrepreneurship; marijuana; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and David Lane. "Marketing Marijuana in Colorado." Harvard Business School Case 515-009, September 2014. (Revised November 2014.) View Details
  29. Mental Health and the American Workplace

    John A. Quelch and Carin-Isabel Knoop

    Mental illness has been described as an epidemic affecting nearly a quarter of all Americans in their lifetimes, often during their most productive working years. Managers who can design organizations that maximize mental health can minimize these risks and boost productivity. This note serves as a guide to understanding mental health in the American workplace. It provides an overview of the most prevalent mental health conditions among employees and the aspects of the work environment that can exacerbate the issues. It also looks at the costs, both to individuals and to companies, of treating or not treating mental health conditions, and outlines the legal framework, insurance plans, and managerial responses to accommodating employees who struggle with mental health issues. To engage students in a role play, the note includes a vignette featuring a struggling CEO.

    Keywords: public health; productivity; competitiveness; stress management; depression; work-life balance; absenteeism; presenteeism; work culture; Business or Company Management; Work-Life Balance; Performance Productivity; Organizational Culture; Medical Specialties; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Mental Health and the American Workplace." Harvard Business School Background Note 515-062, November 2014. (Revised March 2016.) View Details
  30. Note on Mobile Healthcare

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    Delivering health care to the global population was a challenge. Health care costs accounted for ten percent of world GDP by 2013. In the U.S., health care costs were expected to top $3.1 trillion in 2014. New technologies, shortages of trained personnel and lengthening life expectancies were accelerating the growth of health care costs. Physicians often failed to engage patients in preventative care, which many believed would help combat the rising costs of treating chronic conditions. Diabetes and hypertension, in particular, afflicted many developed nations and were a growing threat in the developing world. Mobile health (mHealth) used networked devices to distribute or collect medical information from patients and/or medical personnel. Given its low cost and broad reach, many wondered if and how mHealth could help solve the global health care crisis.

    Keywords: health care; mobile; mobile app; public health; Startups; hardware; software; telemedicine; global; medical devices; medical services; medical solutions; entrepreneurs; government and business; technological change; Health Care and Treatment; Entrepreneurship; Government and Politics; Technological Innovation; Health Industry; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Note on Mobile Healthcare." Harvard Business School Background Note 514-122, April 2014. (Revised January 2015.) View Details
  31. Pfizer and AstraZeneca: Marketing an Acquisition (A)

    John A. Quelch and James Weber

    In 2014, Pfizer proposed a friendly acquisition of AstraZeneca, but the AstraZeneca board resisted over price and strategy concerns. Was this good for pharmaceutical consumers? Pfizer, like pharmaceutical companies in general, faced difficulties in growing sales due to the challenges of developing new drugs. Over the previous decade or more, Pfizer had pursued acquisitions as a way to acquire new drugs, increase sales, and to reduce costs by combining operations and cutting staff. Pfizer, a U.S. company, was also interested in AstraZeneca, a U.K. company, as a way to reduce its corporate taxes. In recent years, AstraZeneca had significantly strengthened its pipeline of potential new drugs and its board felt it was in a strong position to go it alone. The company's CEO also indicated that an acquisition would be disruptive to its drug development efforts and delay new drugs coming to market. U.K. politicians expressed concerns over downsizing and job losses in the economically important pharmaceutical sector. The case allows readers to explore who benefits from a potential acquisition (shareholders, employees, drug consumers) and which of these stakeholders should be considered when deciding on an acquisition.

    Keywords: health care policy; pharmaceutical industry; mergers and acquisitions; marketing; government relations; crisis management; Decision Making; Growth and Development; Management; Markets; Strategy; Pharmaceutical Industry; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and James Weber. "Pfizer and AstraZeneca: Marketing an Acquisition (A)." Harvard Business School Case 515-007, September 2014. (Revised February 2015.) View Details
  32. Pfizer and AstraZeneca: Marketing an Acquisition (A) & (B)

    John A. Quelch

    Keywords: Mergers & Acquisitions; Pharmaceutical Companies; marketing; Economic Impact of Mergers; Mergers Impact on International Economies; Impact on Consumers of Mergers; Customers; Economics; Marketing; Planning; Strategy; Pharmaceutical Industry; Europe; North and Central America;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Pfizer and AstraZeneca: Marketing an Acquisition (A) & (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 515-047, October 2014. View Details
  33. Pfizer and AstraZeneca: Marketing an Acquisition (B)

    John A. Quelch and James Weber

    This (B) case provides a brief description of the outcome of the (A) case.

    Keywords: health care policy; pharmaceutical sales; mergers and acquisitions; marketing; Pharmaceutical Industry; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and James Weber. "Pfizer and AstraZeneca: Marketing an Acquisition (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 515-008, September 2014. View Details
  34. Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety In Bangladesh (A) and (B)

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    On April 24, 2013 the Rana Plaza factory building collapsed in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. Over 1,100 people were killed in the worst industrial accident since the Union Carbide plant gas leak in Bhopal, India. Most of the victims worked for garment factories, whose primary clients were European, US and Canadian firms. Export contracts to such firms had helped Bangladesh become the world's second largest clothing exporter. Rana Plaza was not the first tragedy to occur in Bangladesh's garment industry, and without intervention, more might follow. International brand owners, domestic and foreign governments, labor unions and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), stepped up to discuss their responsibilities for improving conditions for Bangladeshi garment workers.

    Keywords: Apparel and Accessories Industry; Bangladesh;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety In Bangladesh (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-062, January 2014. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  35. Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.: Safety, Environment and Health

    John A. Quelch

    In January 2014, Gary Bald, senior vice president of Safety, Environment and Health at Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines (RCL), prepared for a review meeting with the company's chief executive, Adam Goldstein, and chairman, Richard Fain. Prior to joining RCL in 2006, Bald had spent 28 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. After seven years of upgrading security for the cruise line, Bald stated, "We've come a long way, but what keeps me up at night is what I don't know." As he prepared for his meeting with Fain and Goldstein, Bald considered whether his department's current initiatives would be sufficient to maintain RCL's position at the cutting edge of cruise industry best practice, and whether RCL could and should differentiate itself in marketing from its competitors in the areas of safety, environment and health.

    Keywords: health care; public health; cruising; cruise lines; Royal Caribbean; safety; Security; biodefense; epidemic; norovirus; fire safety; crew; environmental protection; innovation; ship design; vacation; recreation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.: Safety, Environment and Health." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-101, March 2014. View Details
  36. Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.: Safety, Environment and Health

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In January 2014, Gary Bald, senior vice president of Safety, Environment and Health at Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines (RCL), prepared for a review meeting with the company's chief executive, Adam Goldstein, and chairman, Richard Fain. Prior to joining RCL in 2006, Bald had spent 28 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. After seven years of upgrading security for the cruise line, Bald stated, "We've come a long way, but what keeps me up at night is what I don't know." As he prepared for his meeting with Fain and Goldstein, Bald considered whether his department's current initiatives would be sufficient to maintain RCL's position at the cutting edge of cruise industry best practice, and whether RCL could and should differentiate itself in marketing from its competitors in the areas of safety, environment and health.

    Keywords: marketing; Market segmentation; operations; shipbuilding; travel industry; cruising; cruise lines; Royal Caribbean; Carnival; environmental and social sustainability; environment; safety; Security; health; public health; environmental protection; health care; International; Safety; Environmental Sustainability; Travel Industry; Health Industry; Europe; West Indies; Mexico; United States; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.: Safety, Environment and Health." Harvard Business School Case 514-069, February 2014. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  37. The Slingshot: Improving Water Access

    John A. Quelch

    Entrepreneur Dean Kamen has inked a multimillion dollar partnership with Coca-Cola (CC) to mass produce and distribute the Slingshot, a low energy device that can convert raw sewage into potable water for poor people and communities in developing economies.

    Keywords: Innovation Strategy; DEKA; Dean Kamen; Coca-Cola; Technological Innovation; Innovation Strategy; Commercialization; Marketing; Marketing Strategy; Food and Beverage Industry; Health Industry; North Africa; South Africa; Asia; South America;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "The Slingshot: Improving Water Access." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-109, February 2014. View Details
  38. Vaxess Technologies, Inc.

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In February 2014, Michael Schrader, chief executive of Vaxess Technologies, Inc., was assessing the startup health care company's 2014 marketing plan. On December 31st, 2013, Vaxess had obtained an exclusive license to a series of patents for a silk protein technology that, when added to vaccines, reduced or removed the need for refrigeration between manufacturing and delivery to the end patient. Schrader and his colleagues had to decide on which vaccines to focus and whether and how to target the drug companies that manufactured the vaccines or the quasi-government organizations (such as UNICEF and PAHO) and nongovernment organizations (such as GAVI) that purchased large quantities of vaccines for the developing world.

    Keywords: vaccine; cold chain; antigen; temperature controlled; developing markets; immunization; Health Care and Treatment; Health Pandemics; Global Strategy; Supply Chain; Health; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Vaxess Technologies, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 514-107, May 2014. (Revised January 2015.) View Details
  39. Vision 2020: Takeda and the Vaccine Business

    John A. Quelch

    Keywords: Asia; healthcare; Pharmaceuticals; Change; Innovation and Management; Health; Innovation and Invention; Strategy; Leadership; Growth and Development; Change; Health Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Vision 2020: Takeda and the Vaccine Business." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-105, June 2014. View Details
  40. Vision 2020: Takeda and the Vaccine Business

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In 2014, Yasuchika Hasegawa was orchestrating the transformation of Takeda from a Japanese pharmaceutical company with a global footprint into a global company with a Japanese heritage. A 33-year veteran of Takeda, Hasegawa-san was appointed president of Takeda in 2003 and chief executive in 2009. By 2013, Takeda was in the midst of implementing its new Vision 2020 plan, a strategic plan for the evolving global corporation, which included developing a global vaccine business.

    Keywords: health care; global; NGO; public health; pharmaceutical industry; Japan; GSK; vaccine; supply chain; Market entry; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Trade; Market Entry and Exit; Global Strategy; Health Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Vision 2020: Takeda and the Vaccine Business." Harvard Business School Case 514-084, March 2014. (Revised December 2014.) View Details
  41. Brannigan Foods: Strategic Marketing Planning

    John A. Quelch and James T. Kindley

    The soup division at Brannigan Foods contributes over 40% of the firm's revenue. The general manager is concerned that the soup industry is declining and that the soup division shows declining profits and market share, especially among the important baby boomer segment. Hoping to reverse these trends, he asks four key managers to review a consultant's analysis of the soup industry and recommend a turnaround strategy. Each manager presents a different plan, from investing in core market segments and products to acquiring new product lines and customers. Students must perform a quantitative analysis of each proposal while considering the feasibility and risks associated with each option before making a final recommendation.

    Keywords: United States; Consumer marketing; Acquisitions; Forecasting; Quantitative analysis; strategic planning; risk management; decision making; product development; Budgeting; Supermarkets; food; Strategic Planning; Demand and Consumers; Marketing Strategy; Food; Resource Allocation; Acquisition; Product Development; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and James T. Kindley. "Brannigan Foods: Strategic Marketing Planning." Harvard Business School Brief Case 913-545, January 2013. View Details
  42. Demarketing Soda in New York City

    John A. Quelch, Margaret L. Rodriguez, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Christine Snively

    In 2013, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg tried and failed to institute a ban on serving sizes of large sugary beverages. Obesity posed a large public health risk to the city. Mayor Bloomberg's proposed ban was one of many attempts to combat the rising threat of obesity. The case discusses the efficacy of the proposed ban on large soda serving sizes in the context of the other anti-obesity initiatives crafted by Bloomberg's administration.

    Keywords: marketing; soda; public health; business and public policy; obesity; Business and Government Relations; Public Sector; Strategy; Marketing Strategy; Marketing; Health; City; Food and Beverage Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Margaret L. Rodriguez, Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Christine Snively. "Demarketing Soda in New York City." Harvard Business School Case 514-003, October 2013. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  43. E-Cigarettes: Marketing Versus Public Health

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were heralded by some as a healthcare game changer, enabling smokers to switch to a new product which carried lower risk of cancer. However, there were concerns about the public health risk of e-cigarettes, particularly the chance that teens would easily develop nicotine addictions from smoking the fruit-flavored products. Manufacturers argued that current smokers, not teens were the target market, but laws regulating e-cigarettes were far less stringent than those governing tobacco products.

    Keywords: marketing; public health; tobacco; smoking; cigarettes; electronic cigarettes; cancer; lung; lorillard; Philip Morris; Safety; Technological Innovation; Conflict of Interests; Market Entry and Exit; Marketing; Health; Advertising; Consumer Products Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "E-Cigarettes: Marketing Versus Public Health." Harvard Business School Case 514-059, November 2013. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  44. GlaxoSmithKline in China (A)

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    Four GlaxoSmithKline employees were accused of bribing Chinese health care workers to prescribe the company's drugs. The accusations brought to light the questionable incentive structures of the Chinese health care system and the pressure on companies to adhere to local customs while still observing local laws.

    Keywords: marketing; public health; Pharmaceuticals; China; bribery; CSR; hong bao; health care; drug; GlaxoSmithKline; GSK; Witty; ethics; government; Marketing; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Corporate Strategy; Corporate Governance; Business and Government Relations; Ethics; Pharmaceutical Industry; China; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "GlaxoSmithKline in China (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-049, November 2013. View Details
  45. GlaxoSmithKline in China (B)

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In 2013, Chinese investigators detained four GSK employees for allegedly bribing health care staff to sell GSK pharmaceuticals. A month later, GSK's Asia Pacific regional president, Abbas Hussain, said the company would help identify corrupt practices. Two days later, GSK's CEO, Andrew Witty, called the allegations "shameful" and said the company would use the opportunity to "make changes."

    Keywords: marketing; public health; Pharmaceuticals; China; bribery; CSR; hong bao; health care; drug; GlaxoSmithKline; GSK; Witty; ethics; government; Marketing; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Corporate Strategy; Corporate Governance; Business and Government Relations; Ethics; Pharmaceutical Industry; China; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "GlaxoSmithKline in China (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-050, November 2013. (Revised September 2015.) View Details
  46. Montreaux Chocolate USA: Are Americans Ready for Healthy Dark Chocolate?

    John A. Quelch and Diane Badame

    Andrea Torres, director of new product development at a high-end chocolate confectionery company, leads her team through a carefully sequenced program of market research to support the development and launch of a new product, healthy dark chocolate with fruit. This is the first time Montreaux USA, an offshoot of a Swiss confectioner, has created a product specifically for U.S. chocolate consumers. The case explains the steps Torres and her NPD team have completed and describes the decisions that lie ahead, a few months in advance of the anticipated launch. A challenging situation is intensified by a competitor also having tested a dark-chocolate-with-fruit product that was likely to be introduced into the U.S. marketplace in the near future. Students must perform a quantitative analysis as part of their work.

    Keywords: Competition; Food; Consumer Behavior; Nutrition; Product Launch; Product Development; Food and Beverage Industry; Switzerland; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Diane Badame. "Montreaux Chocolate USA: Are Americans Ready for Healthy Dark Chocolate?" Harvard Business School Brief Case 914-501, July 2013. View Details
  47. Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety In Bangladesh (A)

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    On April 24, 2013 the Rana Plaza factory building collapsed in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. Over 1,100 people were killed in the worst industrial accident since the Union Carbide plant gas leak in Bhopal, India. Most of the victims worked for garment factories, whose primary clients were European, US and Canadian firms. Export contracts to such firms had helped Bangladesh become the world's second largest clothing exporter. Rana Plaza was not the first tragedy to occur in Bangladesh's garment industry, and without intervention, more might follow. International brand owners, domestic and foreign governments, labor unions and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), stepped up to discuss their responsibilities for improving conditions for Bangladeshi garment workers.

    Keywords: marketing; public health; safety; workplace; human rights; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Bangladesh;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety In Bangladesh (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-034, September 2013. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  48. Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety in Bangladesh (B)

    John A. Quelch and Margaret L. Rodriguez

    In the aftermath of the Rana Plaza building collapse, a group of international retailers and labor unions partnered to create a proposal for more stringent inspections and enforcement of safety standards in Bangladesh garment factories. The proposal was met by opposition from several U.S. firms, which claimed the proposal carried too a high a risk of litigation for them to sign. Neither proposal relied on legislation, but options for government involvement are also discussed in the case.

    Keywords: retail trade; corporate social responsibility; Apparel; Bangladesh; worker safety; government and business; international business; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Bangladesh;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety in Bangladesh (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-035, September 2013. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  49. The Slingshot: Improving Water Access

    John A. Quelch, Margaret L. Rodriguez and Carin-Isabel Knoop

    In 2012, over 750 million people around the globe lacked access to safe drinking water. Dean Kamen, inventor of the Segway, sought to bring fresh water to poor and rural areas with the Slingshot, a water purification device. Kamen's challenge was to identify ways to distribute the Slingshot to areas where it was most needed. A partnership with the Coca-Cola Company helped Kamen to pilot distribution of the Slingshot in low-access regions.

    Keywords: Water; public health; health care; Slingshot; Dean Kamen; DEKA; Coca-Cola; developing markets; Freestyle; Safety; Natural Environment; Pollution and Pollutants; Health; Distribution Channels; Developing Countries and Economies; Innovation and Invention; Africa; Latin America; South America; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Margaret L. Rodriguez, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "The Slingshot: Improving Water Access." Harvard Business School Case 514-007, October 2013. (Revised January 2015.) View Details
  50. Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning

    John A. Quelch and Heather Beckham

    After three years of development, Paramount Health and Beauty Company is preparing to launch a new technologically advanced vibrating razor called Clean Edge. The innovative new design of Clean Edge provides superior performance by stimulating the hair follicles to lift the hair from the skin, allowing for a closer shave. The company has already decided to introduce Clean Edge into the men's market where it has a strong presence. Jackson Randall, the product manager for Clean Edge, struggles with how best to position the product for the launch. One strategy is to release Clean Edge as a "niche" product, targeting the high-end market of fastidious groomers looking for superior skin care products. Another strategy is to release the product into the highly competitive mainstream razor market where the product can be positioned as the most effective razor available. Randall meets internal resistance to the mainstream strategy from the product manager for the company's current, but aging, mainstream razor products and he must consider the effects of cannibalization in his plan. Randall must recommend an optimal strategy and provide supporting economic analysis of his decision--not just for Clean Edge, but for its effect on the entire company.

    Keywords: leadership; project management; conflict management; Interdepartmental relations; product development; Organizational change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Leadership; Conflict Management; Product Positioning; Marketing Strategy; Relationships; Product Development; Consumer Products Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning." Harvard Business School Brief Case 114-249, January 2011. View Details
  51. Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Heather Beckham

    Teaching Note for 4249

    Keywords: leadership; project management; conflict management; Interdepartmental relations; product development; Organizational change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Management; Leadership; Organizational Structure; Projects; Conflict and Resolution; Product Development;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 114-250, January 2011. View Details
  52. Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning, Faculty Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Heather Beckham

    Keywords: product marketing; Product Marketing;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning, Faculty Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 114-253, January 2011. View Details
  53. Cottle-Taylor: Expanding the Oral Care Group in India, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Alisa Zalosh

    Keywords: Forecasting; Budgeting; emerging markets; international marketing; Product planning & policy; consumer behavior; Sales promotions; Marketing plans; Products; Consumer Behavior; Marketing; Product Design; Emerging Markets; Forecasting and Prediction; Budgets and Budgeting;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Alisa Zalosh. "Cottle-Taylor: Expanding the Oral Care Group in India, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 114-352, October 2011. (Revised March 2012.) View Details
  54. Cottle-Taylor: Expanding the Oral Care Group in India, Student Spreadsheet (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Alisa Zalosh

    Keywords: Forecasting; Budgeting; emerging markets; international marketing; Product planning & policy; consumer behavior; Sales promotions; Marketing plans; Products; Consumer Behavior; Marketing; Product Design; Emerging Markets; Forecasting and Prediction; Budgets and Budgeting;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Alisa Zalosh. "Cottle-Taylor: Expanding the Oral Care Group in India, Student Spreadsheet (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 114-356, October 2011. (Revised March 2012.) View Details
  55. Interview with John Smith, CEO, BBC Worldwide

    In an interview conducted by Professor John Quelch, Harvard Business School, October, 2007, BBC Worldwide CEO, John Smith, discusses formation of BBC Worldwide's Global Strategy Plans.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Global Strategy; Media and Broadcasting Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Interview with John Smith, CEO, BBC Worldwide." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 511-704, January 2011. View Details
  56. John Smith, CEO BBC Worldwide, Remarks to AMP, October 2007

    BBC Worldwide CEO, John Smith addresses AMP participants in October 2007.

    Keywords: Global Strategy; Globalized Markets and Industries; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Media and Broadcasting Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "John Smith, CEO BBC Worldwide, Remarks to AMP, October 2007." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 511-705, January 2011. View Details
  57. Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors

    John A. Quelch and Carole Carlson

    Reed Supermarkets is a high-end supermarket chain with operations in several Midwestern states. Meredith Collins, vice president of marketing, visits stores located in Columbus, Ohio, an important region with the largest market and the greatest impact on revenue growth. She is concerned about increased competition from dollar stores and limited-assortment stores offering very low, appealing price points. Reed's market research shows that as a result of the economic downturn, customer loyalty is dwindling and consumers are willing to go to multiple stores to get the best deals. Collins must decide whether to change the current marketing and positioning plan in an effort to increase market share to meet challenging corporate targets. Her options include retreating from price competition and focusing on quality or embracing more private-label brands and competing more aggressively on price. She can also maintain the current positioning and appeal to customers looking for a quality shopping experience. The case contains an implicit quantitative assignment that instructors can emphasize to the degree they choose.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Marketing Strategy; Business Growth and Maturation; Competitive Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Brands and Branding; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carole Carlson. "Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors." Harvard Business School Brief Case 114-296, June 2011. View Details
  58. Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Carole Carlson

    Teaching note for brief case 4296.

    Keywords: competitive strategy; Consumer marketing; marketing strategy; market positioning; Market segmentation; Demand and Consumers; Marketing Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Segmentation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carole Carlson. "Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 114-297, June 2011. View Details
  59. CEIBS: A Global Business School Made in China

    In 2009, just 15 years after it was founded, the China Europe International Business School (CEIBS) has achieved the remarkable 8th position in the Financial Times Global MBA rankings. The case describes the short history of the school and the reasons for its success. It also describes the difficult challenges the school faces to maintain its position of leadership in Asia: stiff competition from schools in Greater China, South East Asia and South Asia; recruitment of high-quality faculty members; generating new knowledge that contributes to management practice not just in China but globally; and maintaining a robust economic model to ensure long term financial sustainability.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Quality; Business History; Competitive Advantage; Business Education; Global Strategy; Growth and Development Strategy; Education Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., S. Ramakrishna Velamuri, and Shengjun Liu. "CEIBS: A Global Business School Made in China." Harvard Business School Case 510-088, May 2010. View Details
  60. Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Lisa D. Donovan

    Teaching note to case #4550

    Keywords: Quantitative analysis; Distribution; Product positioning; Market segmentation; Product introduction; New product marketing; Product lines; Product Positioning; Distribution; Mathematical Methods; Product Launch; Segmentation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Lisa D. Donovan. "Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 104-551, May 2010. View Details
  61. Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities, Instructor Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Lisa D. Donovan

    Keywords: Quantitative analysis; Distribution; Product positioning; Market segmentation; Product introduction; New product marketing; Product lines; Product Positioning; Distribution; Analysis; Product Launch;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Lisa D. Donovan. "Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities, Instructor Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 104-553, May 2010. View Details
  62. Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Lisa D. Donovan

    Keywords: Quantitative analysis; Distribution; Product positioning; Market segmentation; Product introduction; New product marketing; Product lines; Product Positioning; Distribution; Analysis; Product Launch;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Lisa D. Donovan. "Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 104-554, May 2010. View Details
  63. Flare Fragrances Company, Inc: Analyzing Growth Opportunities

    John A. Quelch and Lisa D. Donovan

    Flare Fragrances, a manufacturer of perfumes for women, faces a growth challenge in a difficult economic environment. CEO Joely Patterson outlines two growth opportunities for her marketing staff to evaluate. One involves launching a new scent -- and possibly separating it from the trusty "umbrella brand" that comprises Flare's other scents; the other involves deepening Flare's penetration into the drugstore channel. In Patterson's view, the firm can pursue the first opportunity, the second, or both -- but it must do something. In helping Patterson to assess the opportunities, the marketing team must consider a wide range of factors, including brand management, consumer demographics, and positioning and pricing issues. The case requires students to complete a quantitative assignment as part of case analysis. Key topics include product line management, product positioning, and new product launch.

    Keywords: Quantitative analysis; Distribution; Product positioning; Market segmentation; Product introduction; New product marketing; Product lines; Product Positioning; Distribution; Product Launch; Segmentation; Growth and Development Strategy; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Lisa D. Donovan. "Flare Fragrances Company, Inc: Analyzing Growth Opportunities." Harvard Business School Brief Case 104-550, May 2010. View Details
  64. Google in China (A)

    In January 2010, Google threatened in a public statement to stop censoring its search results on its google.cn website, as required by Chinese authorities. Should Google exit China? Or attempt a compromise with the Chinese government?

    Keywords: Crisis Management; Market Entry and Exit; Business and Government Relations; Internet; Search Technology; Information Technology Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine Jocz. "Google in China (A)." Harvard Business School Case 510-071, January 2010. (Revised April 2010.) View Details
  65. Google in China (B)

    In a January 2010 public statement, Google threatened to stop censoring its search results on its Google.cn website, as required by Chinese authorities. Should Google exit China? Or attempt a compromise with the Chinese government?

    Keywords: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Crisis Management; Market Entry and Exit; Business and Government Relations; Internet; Search Technology; Information Technology Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Google in China (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 510-110, April 2010. (Revised March 2011.) View Details
  66. Hikma Pharmaceuticals (B)

    By 2009, Hikma Pharmaceuticals operated 13 manufacturing plants in 8 countries of which 5 were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Hikma tracked its sales revenues over the period to show where the largest contributors were from.

    Keywords: Strategy; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Sales; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Hikma Pharmaceuticals (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 511-075, November 2010. View Details
  67. Metabical: Positioning and Communications Strategy for a New Weight Loss Drug

    John A. Quelch and Heather Beckham

    Cambridge Sciences Pharmaceuticals (CSP) expects final approval for its revolutionary weight loss drug, Metabical. Metabical will be the only weight loss drug with FDA approval that is also clinically proven to be effective for moderately overweight people. Barbara Printup, Senior Marketing Director for CSP, must develop the positioning strategy and marketing communications plan in preparation for the launch of the new drug. Printup must consider the consumer decision-making process and the interaction between the consumer who purchases the drug and the health care provider who prescribes the medication. Despite promising medical studies and consumer research, poor positioning of the drug in the highly competitive market for weight-loss solutions could spell disaster. Students analyze market research data and consider the optimal positioning strategy and marketing communications program.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Marketing Communications; Product Launch; Consumer Behavior; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Positioning and Communications Strategy for a New Weight Loss Drug." Harvard Business School Brief Case 104-240, July 2010. View Details
  68. Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug

    John A. Quelch and Heather Beckham

    Metabical is a new weight loss drug from Cambridge Sciences Pharmaceuticals intended for moderately overweight individuals. In anticipation of final FDA approval, the senior director of marketing, Barbara Printup, prepares for the product launch and must make several critical decisions. First, she must select the optimal packaging size for the drug which typically requires a 12-week course of treatment. Next, she must determine the appropriate pricing. Since most insurance companies do not cover weight-loss medications, price has a direct impact on the sales forecast. To establish the initial demand forecast, Printup considers three approaches based on different assumptions. Her final recommendations must consider long term profitability and meet the company's desired return on investment.The case includes a quantitative assignment for students.

    Keywords: Return on investment; Forecasting; Pricing policies; demand planning; Marketing Strategy; Price; Consumer Behavior; Investment Return; Forecasting and Prediction; Product Launch; Planning; Brands and Branding; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug." Harvard Business School Brief Case 104-183, April 2010. View Details
  69. Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Heather Beckham

    Teaching Note to 4183

    Keywords: Return on investment; Forecasting; Pricing policies; demand planning; Price; Investment Return; Forecasting and Prediction;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 104-184, April 2010. View Details
  70. Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Heather Beckham

    Keywords: Return on investment; Forecasting; Pricing policies; demand planning; Demand and Consumers; Price; Forecasting and Prediction; Investment Return;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 104-187, April 2010. View Details
  71. Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    John A. Quelch and Heather Beckham

    Keywords: Return on investment; Forecasting; Pricing policies; demand planning; Demand and Consumers; Price; Forecasting and Prediction; Investment Return;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 104-186, April 2010. View Details
  72. Tesco PLC: Fresh & Easy in the United States

    Tesco, the world's third largest retailer, is facing problems with its launch of a new retail chain in the U.S.

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Marketing; Market Entry and Exit; Retail Industry; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Tesco PLC: Fresh & Easy in the United States." Harvard Business School Case 511-009, August 2010. (Revised November 2010.) View Details
  73. Toyota Recalls (A): Hitting the Skids

    John A. Quelch, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Ryan Johnson

    In the fall of 2009, Toyota Motor Corporation, once revered for its commitment to quality and reliability, faced a highly publicized series of recalls in the United States representing approximately a year's worth of sales in one of its most important markets. While the first Toyota recall was met with widespread disbelief but continuing support for the brand, subsequent revelations and recalls tested the brand's resilience in the U.S. The firm's initial public response to the problems - a mixture of silence from top executives and vague, misleading public statements - frustrated U.S. government officials and the public. Not until weeks after the news first broke did Toyota organize a clear message around its commitment to return to quality. In late February 2010 Toyota President Akio Toyoda reluctantly accepts an invitation to testify to the U.S. Congress, 148 days after the first recall announcement. He has to decide what to say.

    Keywords: Communication Strategy; Crisis Management; Brands and Branding; Quality; Public Opinion; Auto Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Ryan Johnson. "Toyota Recalls (A): Hitting the Skids." Harvard Business School Case 511-016, October 2010. (Revised January 2011.) View Details