Sandra J. Sucher

MBA Class of 1966 Professor of Management Practice, Joseph L. Rice, III Faculty Fellow

SANDRA J. SUCHER joined the Technology and Operations Management Unit faculty of Harvard Business School after 25 years in industry and nonprofit management. She has led and taught the required MBA course, “Leadership and Corporate Accountability” and has taught "The Moral Leader" – an elective in the MBA curriculum. She has also taught "Technology and Operations Management" and related courses in various Executive Education programs. Her current research focuses on the human costs of layoffs and their alternatives; she also studies moral leadership, learning through literature, and the management of differences. Professor Sucher has published two books on the Moral Leader course: an instructor’s guide, Teaching The Moral Leader: A Literature-Based Leadership Course (Routledge 2007), and a student textbook, The Moral Leader: Challenges, Tools, and Insights (Routledge 2008).

From 1986 until 1998, Sucher worked at Fidelity Investments. As Vice President of Corporate Quality, she focused the firm's division-level quality groups on customer loyalty research. As Vice President of Retail Service Quality, she set service strategy for the retail business and improved service and operations processes, introducing process management as a framework for cross-functional improvement. As Vice President of Human Resources for Fidelity's Service Company, she introduced statistical process control to improve the quality of operations performance in Fidelity's retail back office.

Prior to Fidelity, Sucher spent 10 years in fashion retailing at Filene's, a Boston-based department store chain. She wrote the proposal, approved by Federated Department Stores, to expand Filene's Basement from a single store to a national chain. She led a reorganization of the business, creating a separate career path for store management executives. In her last assignment, as Vice President of Customer Service, she improved customer service for Filene's then 14-unit regional business.

Sucher began her career as a Director of Education and Research for The Sanctuary, Inc., a non-profit drop-in drug treatment, education, and research facility.

Sucher's Board assignments include: Board of Governors - Harvard Business School Association of Boston (2000 - 2005); Director of Port Financial (2000 - 2003); Chairman of the Better Business Bureau (1994-1996); Director of The Eliot Bank (1986 -1990); Radcliffe Management Seminars Program Advisory Board (1980 - 2000); and Director of the National Coordinating Council on Drug Education (1972-74).

Sucher received her MBA from Harvard Business School in 1976 with first- and second-year honors; she also earned a Masters of Arts in Teaching from the Harvard Graduate School of Education and a BA from the University of Michigan. Sucher is a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

Books

  1. The Moral Leader: Challenges, Tools, and Insights

    Successful leaders—at any level and in any arena—are inevitably presented with moral and ethical choices. This unique and innovative textbook is designed to encourage students and managers to confront those fundamental moral challenges, to develop skills in moral analysis and judgment, and to come to terms with their own definition of moral leadership and how it can be translated into action. Drawing on the inspiration of major literary and historical figures such as Machiavelli, Conrad, Shackleton and Achebe, and based upon an impressive array of literary sources, including novels, plays, history and biography, the book centers on four questions implicitly asked of all leaders:

    • What is the nature of a moral challenge?
    • How do people "reason morally"?
    • How do leaders contend with the moral choices they face?
    • How is moral leadership different from leadership in general?

    The Moral Leader is based upon the renowned course of the same name taught at Harvard Business School for over two decades. With an emphasis on decision-making and action, students learn to identify moral problems, to address them systematically, and to develop skills that aid them throughout their studies and their professional lives. At times challenging, insightful, and always illuminating, this book is essential reading for all serious students of leadership, management, business ethics or policy.

    Keywords: Competency and Skills; Decision Choices and Conditions; Judgments; Moral Sensibility; Leadership;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. The Moral Leader: Challenges, Tools, and Insights. Routledge, 2007. View Details
  2. Teaching the Moral Leader: A Literature-Based Leadership Course

    This book is a comprehensive, practical manual to help instructors integrate moral leadership in their own courses, drawing from the experience and resources of the Harvard Business School course "The Moral Leader," an MBA elective taken by thousands of HBS students over nearly twenty years. Through the close study of literature—novels, plays, and historical accounts—followed by rigorous classroom discussion, this innovative course encourages students to confront fundamental moral challenges, to develop skills in moral analysis and judgment, and to come to terms with their own definition of moral leadership. Using this guide's background material and detailed teaching plans, instructors will be well prepared to lead their students in the study of this vital and important subject. Featuring a website to run alongside that links the manual with the textbook and provides a wealth of extra resources, including on-line links to Harvard Business School case studies and teaching notes this manual forms a perfect complement to The Moral Leader core text also by Sandra Sucher.

    The detailed and hands-on nature of the guide makes it possible for instructors, with or without a specialized background, to replicate the 13-session Harvard Business School course, or to integrate moral leadership into an existing course, or as a module, or as stand-alone sessions. The manual presents flexible class plans, easily adaptable to a wide variety of business and academic topics. It suggests how to adapt the course to other settings, provides supporting materials, and reviews the approach to teaching "The Moral Leader," differentiating it from other literature-based courses. The author, a Harvard Business School professor with a successful record in teaching this course, also brings into the text the kind of real world understanding of effective leadership development that comes from decades of experience as a high level corporate executive.

    An accompanying student book, focused on class preparation and the context of each work, helps students address questions like: What is the nature of a moral challenge? How do people "reason morally"? How do leaders—formal and informal—contend with the moral choices they face? How is moral leadership different from leadership of any other kind? Struggling with these questions, both individually and as members of a vibrant learning community, students internalize moral leadership concepts and choices, and develop the skills to pursue it in their careers and personal lives.

    Keywords: Competency and Skills; Curriculum and Courses; Moral Sensibility; Body of Literature; Books; Leadership; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. Teaching the Moral Leader: A Literature-Based Leadership Course. Routledge, 2007. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Furloughs: An Alternative to Layoffs for Economic Downturns

    This technical note describes the practice of employee furloughs (also known as work sharing or short time work) including their regulatory frameworks in different countries and the business and ethical implications of their use.

    Keywords: work sharing; furloughs; temporary layoff; short time work; Employee Relationship Management; Job Cuts and Outsourcing;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Susan J. Winterberg. "Furloughs: An Alternative to Layoffs for Economic Downturns." Harvard Business School Background Note 314-097, February 2014. View Details
  2. Business and Government: Campaign Contributions and Lobbying in the United States

    This module note on business-government relations introduces students to the state of campaign contributions and lobbying by corporations in the United States. The note develops two hypotheses as to the impact of corporate political engagement: (i) a vehicle to facilitate good government; and (ii) an instrument of special-interest capture. The note can be used to generate a discussion on the following issues: (1) In a democratic capitalist society, what is the appropriate role of business in government? (2) When it comes to political contributions, should corporations have the same rights and responsibilities as individuals? The note also describes the various practical choices businesses face on political engagement, including disclosure options and options to engage through trade or ideological associations. This description can be used to encourage business students to develop an aspiration for their companies' political engagement strategies.

    Keywords: political economy; Business and Government Relations; Business and Government Relations; Government and Politics; Public Administration Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Ramanna, Karthik, Sandra J. Sucher, and Ian McKown Cornell. "Business and Government: Campaign Contributions and Lobbying in the United States." Harvard Business School Module Note 113-037, March 2013. View Details
  3. Business and Government: Campaign Contributions and Lobbying in the United States

    Citation:

    Ramanna, Karthik, and Sandra J. Sucher. "Business and Government: Campaign Contributions and Lobbying in the United States." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 113-138, June 2013. View Details
  4. A Brief History of the U.S. Tobacco Industry Controversy

    This history of the U.S. tobacco controversy is a reading for a class on "The Insider," a film about whistleblowing in the U.S. tobacco industry, taught in the course, The Moral Leader.

    Keywords: leadership; ethics; United States;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Henry McGee. "A Brief History of the U.S. Tobacco Industry Controversy." Harvard Business School Background Note 613-044, September 2012. (Revised August 2013.) View Details
  5. Introduction to LCA Reflections

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Sandra J. Sucher. "Introduction to LCA Reflections." Harvard Business School Technical Note 613-077, January 2013. View Details
  6. On Weldon's Watch: Recalls at Johnson & Johnson from 2009 to 2010 (TN)

    Teaching Note for On Weldon's Watch: Recalls at Johnson & Johnson from 2009 to 2010 HBS case 311-029.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Values and Beliefs; Leadership; Crisis Management; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Quality; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Clayton S. Rose. "On Weldon's Watch: Recalls at Johnson & Johnson from 2009 to 2010 (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 613-064, November 2012. View Details
  7. Global Diversity and Inclusion at Royal Dutch Shell (A)

    Royal Dutch Shell has been among the early players to implement diversity and inclusion policies in the 1990s, first in the U.S. and then globally. In May 2009, Peter Voser, CFO and soon-to-be CEO, wants to adjust the company's business, headcount, and cost levels to adapt to changing economic conditions after one of the worst economic downturns in decades. His all-male executive committee has raised eyebrows since it is a step back from that of his predecessor, and he must decide whether to continue to promote the firm's emphasis on global diversity and inclusion while it restructures its business and reduces its managerial workforce.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Managerial Roles; Restructuring; Resignation and Termination; Diversity Characteristics; Financial Crisis; Energy Industry; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Elena Corsi. "Global Diversity and Inclusion at Royal Dutch Shell (A)." Harvard Business School Case 613-063, October 2012. View Details
  8. Chris and Alison Weston (A), (B), (C) (TN)

    Teaching Note for Chris and Alison Weston(A), (B) and (C) cases.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Moral Sensibility; Values and Beliefs; Conflict of Interests; Value; United States;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Chris and Alison Weston (A), (B), (C) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 613-018, November 2012. View Details
  9. Generation Investment Management, Video

    Examines the Investment process of Generation Investment Management, a "sustainable" investing firm established in 2004 by David Blood and U.S. Vice President Al Gore. Places students in the position of David Lowish, director of global industrials, who must decide whther to recommend an investment in ABB India. The decision pits economic development - supplying energy to impoverished rural area in India, against environmental damage - caused by the use of coal-fired power plants.

    Keywords: leadership and managing people; accountability; ethics; investment management; Social Issues; Investment; Corporate Accountability; Ethics; Development Economics; Natural Environment; Financial Services Industry; Energy Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Generation Investment Management, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 612-704, July 2012. View Details
  10. Generation Investment Management

    Examines the investment process of Generation Investment Management, a "sustainable" investing firm established in 2004 by David Blood and U.S. Vice President Al Gore. Places students in the position of David Lowish, director of global industrials, who must decide whether to recommend an investment in ABB India. The decision pits economic development—supplying energy to impoverished rural areas in India, against environmental damage—caused by the use of coal-fired power plants.

    Keywords: Developing Countries and Economies; Energy Generation; Investment; Environmental Sustainability; Pollution and Pollutants; Welfare or Wellbeing; Financial Services Industry; India; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Matthew Preble. "Generation Investment Management." Harvard Business School Case 613-002, July 2012. View Details
  11. The Impact of Layoffs

    Teaching Note for 612-702.

    Keywords: Resignation and Termination; Outcome or Result; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "The Impact of Layoffs ." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 612-024, August 2011. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  12. Managing the Layoff Process: France

    This note is an overview of the context for managing layoffs in France. It describes the legal responsibilities of managers in conducting layoffs, recent unemployment trends, and the financial, health, training, job placement, and other benefits that laid-off employees can expect to receive.

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Resignation and Termination; Compensation and Benefits; Ethics; Management; Employees; Governance Compliance; France;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Managing the Layoff Process: France." Harvard Business School Background Note 612-083, March 2012. View Details
  13. Managing the Layoff Process: The United States

    This note is an overview of the context for managing layoffs in the United States. It describes the legal responsibilities of managers in conducting layoffs, recent unemployment trends, and the financial, health, training, job placement, and other benefits that laid-off employees can expect to receive.

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Resignation and Termination; Compensation and Benefits; Ethics; Management; Employees; Governance Compliance; United States;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Managing the Layoff Process: The United States." Harvard Business School Background Note 612-067, March 2012. View Details
  14. Managing the Layoff Process: India

    This note is an overview of the context for managing layoffs in India. It describes the legal responsibilities of managers in conducting layoffs, recent unemployment trends, and the financial, health, training, job placement, and other benefits that laid-off employees can expect to receive.

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Resignation and Termination; Compensation and Benefits; Ethics; Management; Employees; Governance Compliance; India;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Managing the Layoff Process: India." Harvard Business School Background Note 612-068, March 2012. View Details
  15. Cipla 2011

    Dr. Yusuf Hamied, head of the Indian pharma and generics manufacturing company Cipla, is weighing options for how to continue to support the global fight against HIV/AIDS while positioning his company for growth in a changing regulatory landscape.

    Keywords: pharmaceutical industry; corporate strategy; leadership; Leading Change; Leadership Style; Management Teams; Governance Compliance; Corporate Strategy; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Deshpande, Rohit, Sandra J. Sucher, and Laura Winig. "Cipla 2011." Harvard Business School Case 511-050, April 2011. (Revised July 2012.) View Details
  16. Chris and Alison Weston (C)

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Celia Moore. "Chris and Alison Weston (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 612-021, December 2011. View Details
  17. A Framework for Ethical Reasoning

    A practical framework for evaluating the ethical dimensions of a proposed course of action for managers and executives.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Ethics; Values and Beliefs; Framework; Corporate Accountability; Leadership; Social Enterprise;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Nien-he Hsieh. "A Framework for Ethical Reasoning." Harvard Business School Background Note 610-050, January 2010. (Revised December 2011.) View Details
  18. Action Planning: An LCA Perspective

    Module note for Leadership and Corporate Accountability course.

    Keywords: Corporate Accountability; Leadership; Planning;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Action Planning: An LCA Perspective." Harvard Business School Module Note 605-079, March 2005. (Revised November 2012.) View Details
  19. The Impact of Layoffs

    In video interviews, employees who have been laid off describe their experiences and the effects that the layoff has had on their careers, families, and personal lives.

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., David Rosales, and Elana Green. "The Impact of Layoffs." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 612-702, November 2011. (Revised January 2014.) View Details
  20. Chris and Alison Weston (A)

    Chris and Alison Weston describe how they, a well-educated middle class couple, ended up committing mail fraud, for which they each served a year and a half in federal prison. The case highlights for students how otherwise upstanding individuals much like themselves can commit crimes without being truly aware that they are doing It.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Moral Sensibility; Values and Beliefs; Conflict of Interests; Value;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Celia Moore. "Chris and Alison Weston (A)." Harvard Business School Case 612-019, October 2011. View Details
  21. Chris and Alison Weston (B)

    Chris and Alison Weston describe their trial process and time in prison.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Decisions; Moral Sensibility; Courts and Trials; Behavior;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Celia Moore. "Chris and Alison Weston (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 612-020, October 2011. View Details
  22. A Note on Moral Disengagement

    Moral disengagement is a process that enables people to engage in negative behaviors, from small misdeeds to great atrocities, without believing that they are causing harm or doing wrong. When Conrad Black, the fallen Canadian mogul convicted of multiple counts of fraud and obstruction of justice, claims that he "would never dream of committing a crime in a thousand years," moral disengagement is what allows him to make that claim and believe it. This note provides an overview of the eight mechanisms of moral disengagement as first described by Albert Bandura, and provides examples of how they operate in our daily lives.

    Keywords: Moral Sensibility;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Celia Moore. "A Note on Moral Disengagement." Harvard Business School Background Note 612-043, October 2011. (Revised October 2012.) View Details
  23. Anne Riley: Laid Off

    This case describes the experience of Anne Riley, a 28 year old private equity analyst, who was laid off in 2008. The case explores the emotions she felt throughout the process and how she handled the experience.

    Keywords: Resignation and Termination;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Phillip Andrews. "Anne Riley: Laid Off." Harvard Business School Case 612-008, September 2011. View Details
  24. Global Diversity and Inclusion at Royal Dutch Shell (TN) (A) and (B)

    Teaching Note for 610-056 and 611-051.

    Keywords: Policy; Cost; Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Restructuring; Human Resources; Energy Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Global Diversity and Inclusion at Royal Dutch Shell (TN) (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 612-023, August 2011. (Revised September 2013.) View Details
  25. Differences at Work Series (TN)

    Teaching Note for 408011, 408042, 408037, 408055, 408056, 408012, 408043, 408044, 408014, 408046, 408047, 408015, 408048, 408016, 408049, 408017, 408050, 408019, 408052, 609053, 609054, 408021, 408054, 408013, 408045.

    Keywords: Employees; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work Series (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 611-077, June 2011. View Details
  26. Differences at Work: The Individual Experience

    Keywords: Demographics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Differences at Work: The Individual Experience." Harvard Business School Background Note 608-068, November 2007. (Revised June 2011.) View Details
  27. Yahoo! in China (A)

    In 2007 Jerry Yang, CEO of Yahoo!, was lambasted by U.S. Representative Tom Lantos, chairman of the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs, for Yahoo's role in the arrest and imprisonment of Chinese journalist and democracy advocate Shi Tao. The case describes the actions that Yahoo! had taken to grow its business in China, its handling of a government request for the identity of a Yahoo! user, and subsequent actions by the firm to respond to negative publicity and congressional inquiry. The case raises broad questions about the challenge of complying with domestic law when operating in states that do not consistently respect human rights, and satisfying stakeholders across national boundaries. It allows students to consider the practical steps that a firm can take to protect itself and its stakeholders in states where the law is not always a reliable safeguard.

    Keywords: Ethics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Governance Compliance; Laws and Statutes; Rights; Business and Government Relations; Internet; Information Technology Industry; China; United States;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Daniel Baer. "Yahoo! in China (A)." Harvard Business School Case 609-051, February 2009. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  28. Shell Nigeria: The WikiLeaks Cables

    In November 2010, WikiLeaks began releasing the first of hundreds of thousands of U.S. diplomatic cables that it had obtained. Among the thousands of cables published by early 2011, were several that shed light on Royal Dutch Shell's operations in Nigeria and its relationship with the Nigerian government.

    Keywords: Business and Government Relations; Energy Generation; Operations; Communication Technology; Crime and Corruption; Metals and Minerals; Ethics; Energy Industry; Nigeria;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., Rebecca M. Henderson, and Matthew Preble. "Shell Nigeria: The WikiLeaks Cables." Harvard Business School Case 311-084, April 2011. View Details
  29. Layoffs: Management Implications and Best Practices

    This note reviews decision criteria for carrying out a layoff, best practices for implementation, and ways that managers can prepare themselves to conduct a layoff.

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., Elana Sara Green, and David Alberto Rosales. "Layoffs: Management Implications and Best Practices." Harvard Business School Background Note 611-029, December 2010. (Revised March 2011.) View Details
  30. Note on Human Behavior: Character and Situation

    When we think of human behavior, especially from a moral perspective, we are often drawn to explanations that rest on character. In simple terms, we conclude that virtuous behavior stems from a person of integrity with strong character and immoral behavior from a person of little integrity with weak character. Discussions of character typically hinge on the extent to which an individual believes in and adheres to the basic moral tenets of honesty, fairness, fidelity to commitments, respect for others and their property, no unjustified harm to others, no theft, and no violation of accepted legal codes. The ability to identify empathetically with others is sometimes seen as a necessary component to understanding and complying with such moral precepts. Character is presumed to influence predictably any individual's behavior across different situations and over time (in the language of rational choice, character can be thought of as a stable system of preferences that informs the tradeoffs and choices an individual is likely to make in different circumstances). Teaching Purpose: To provide background on human behavior.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Ethics; Behavior; Personal Characteristics; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Sandra J. Sucher, and Bridget Gurtler. "Note on Human Behavior: Character and Situation." Harvard Business School Background Note 404-091, January 2004. (Revised February 2011.) View Details
  31. Global Diversity and Inclusion at Royal Dutch Shell (B): The Impact of Restructuring

    The (B) case describes the actions taken by Royal Dutch Shell's CEO and his management team to maintain their commitment to diversity and inclusion (D&I), as introduced in the (A) case, during a major restructuring of the whole organization.

    Keywords: Restructuring; Human Resources; Diversity Characteristics; Management Teams; Energy Industry; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Daniela Beyersdorfer. "Global Diversity and Inclusion at Royal Dutch Shell (B): The Impact of Restructuring." Harvard Business School Supplement 611-051, January 2011. View Details
  32. An Intern's Dilemma

    An HBS student is asked to misrepresent himself during the course of his summer internship by his employer in order to obtain data from industry competitors.

    Keywords: ethics; Leadership & Corporate Accountability; power and influence; Conflict, Organizational culture; Leadership; Conflict Management; Competition; Ethics; Knowledge Acquisition; Organizational Culture; Employees; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Matthew Preble. "An Intern's Dilemma." Harvard Business School Case 611-041, January 2011. (Revised August 2013.) View Details
  33. Layoffs: Effects on Key Stakeholders

    From 2004-2009, almost 40,000 mass layoffs occurred in the US, representing over 7 million workers. This note describes the effects of layoffs on employees, firms, and communities.

    Keywords: Restructuring; Decisions; Employees; Resignation and Termination; Business and Stakeholder Relations; United States;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., Elana Sara Green, David Alberto Rosales, and Susan J. Winterberg. "Layoffs: Effects on Key Stakeholders." Harvard Business School Background Note 611-028, December 2010. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  34. On Weldon's Watch: Recalls at Johnson & Johnson from 2009 to 2010

    In October of 2010, Johnson & Johnson (J&J) was unable to extricate itself from a year long recall crisis that had subjected the firm to criticism from Congress and regulators, resulted in the resignation of one of the firm's most senior officers, and cost hundreds of millions of dollars from lost sales of J&J brands. This case examines the series of recalls and the strategic and cultural changes at the company that may have led to the recalls. It allows for an exploration of the reality of the iconic J&J "Credo"—its long standing set of corporate values.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Values and Beliefs; Leadership; Crisis Management; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Quality; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Rose, Clayton S., Sandra J. Sucher, Rachel Gordon, and Matthew Preble. "On Weldon's Watch: Recalls at Johnson & Johnson from 2009 to 2010." Harvard Business School Case 311-029, October 2010. View Details
  35. Social Identity Profile

    This survey asks students to identify their various social identities and the impact these identities have on how they behave and are treated in HBS and in other settings.

    Keywords: Business Education; Behavior; Identity; Culture; Social Issues;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Social Identity Profile." Harvard Business School Exercise 608-091, November 2007. (Revised September 2010.) View Details
  36. Generation Investment Management (TN)

    Teaching Note for 613-002.

    Keywords: Investment; Development Economics; Environmental Sustainability; Management Practices and Processes; Rural Scope; Non-Renewable Energy; Financial Services Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Generation Investment Management (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 611-006, August 2010. (Revised December 2013.) View Details
  37. Module II: Moral Reasoning Class Summaries

    Presents class summaries for the The Moral Leader course.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Moral Sensibility; Leadership; Cognition and Thinking;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Module II: Moral Reasoning Class Summaries." Harvard Business School Module Note 605-046, November 2004. (Revised April 2010.) View Details
  38. Yahoo! in China (A) and (B)

    Teaching Note for [609051].

    Keywords: Business and Stakeholder Relations; Rights; Computer Industry; Web Services Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Daniel Baer. "Yahoo! in China (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 610-067, February 2010. (Revised September 2013.) View Details
  39. Module III: Moral Leadership Class Summaries

    Presents summaries for the The Moral Leader course.

    Keywords: Moral Sensibility; Leadership; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Module III: Moral Leadership Class Summaries." Harvard Business School Module Note 605-052, December 2004. (Revised December 2009.) View Details
  40. Note on Socially Responsible Investing

    This note describes Socially Responsible Investing, providing a brief history, description of different socially responsible investing approaches, and overview of selected players and institutions involved in the socially responsible investing field. It has been written to provide background for the case study on Generation Investment Management.

    Keywords: Investment; Corporate Governance; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Environmental Sustainability;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Ian McKown Cornell. "Note on Socially Responsible Investing." Harvard Business School Background Note 609-060, February 2009. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  41. Module I: Moral Challenge Class Summaries

    What is a moral challenge? Explores four main types of moral challenge: the challenge of survival, the conflict between "two rights," a moral dilemma—or situation in which it is impossible to satisfy conflicting moral obligations and commitments—and the challenge of "new principles" that raise questions about our values and beliefs. Explores these topics through literature, history, biography, autobiography, and background readings in moral philosophy.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Moral Sensibility; Values and Beliefs; Leadership; Problems and Challenges; Conflict of Interests;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Module I: Moral Challenge Class Summaries." Harvard Business School Module Note 605-036, September 2004. (Revised November 2012.) View Details
  42. Yahoo! in China (B)

    Describes the actions that Jerry Yang took to manage the aftermath of the Shi Tao incident following the 2007 Congressional hearing.

    Keywords: Ethics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Policy; Government Legislation; Crisis Management; Business and Government Relations; Internet; Information Technology Industry; China; United States;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Daniel Baer. "Yahoo! in China (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 609-073, February 2009. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  43. Differences at Work: Martin (A)

    Martin, a gay man who was not out at his Italian firm, witnesses his division manager deliver a homophobic comment to his boss. He wonders what he should do.

    Keywords: Prejudice and Bias; Behavior; Managerial Roles; Ethics; Gender Characteristics; Diversity Characteristics; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Martin (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-019, November 2007. (Revised July 2009.) View Details
  44. Differences at Work: Martin (B)

    In Differences at Work: Martin (B) HBS Case No. 408052 Martin leaves the firm partially because of the incident but he does not tell his firm the reason for his departure.

    Keywords: Demographics; Attitudes; Motivation and Incentives; Resignation and Termination;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Martin (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-052, November 2007. (Revised July 2009.) View Details
  45. Differences at Work: The Leadership Challenge

    This note reviews research findings on the leadership challenges of diversity, including the social psychology of similarity and difference, the value of multiple perspectives to problem-solving, the relationship between diversity and firm performance, and management paradigms for diversity.

    Keywords: Prejudice and Bias; Leadership; Behavior; Ethics; Organizational Culture; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Differences at Work: The Leadership Challenge." Harvard Business School Background Note 609-056, November 2008. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  46. Differences at Work: Sameer (A)

    Sameer, an Indian Muslim, is a summer intern in a small firm. Prompted by a conflict in the Middle East, members of the organization make a number of anti-Muslim jokes. Sameer wonders whether he should surface discomfort; he otherwise enjoys the firm, and is hoping to be given a full-time job offer following his internship.

    Keywords: Prejudice and Bias; Ethnicity Characteristics; Behavior; Religion; Organizational Culture; Middle East; India;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Sameer (A)." Harvard Business School Case 609-053, November 2008. (Revised December 2008.) View Details
  47. Differences at Work: Sameer (B)

    In Differences at Work: Sameer (B) HBS Case No. 9-609-054, Sameer leaves the firm at the summer's end without confronting his employer about the jokes and wondering whether he made the right choice. Later Sameer's former employer calls him to apologize for their behavior after discovering an email that Sameer wrote describing how offended he felt by the jokes. Accepting the apology, Sameer decides to take a full time position with the firm but reflects on how his own inaction at the time of the incident was a missed opportunity to educate his fellow colleagues.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Moral Sensibility; Resignation and Termination; Working Conditions; Opportunities; Behavior;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Sameer (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 609-054, November 2008. View Details
  48. Differences at Work: Will (A)

    A colleague makes a stereotypical remark about gays that Will, an out gay man, knows to be wrong. He struggles with how to correct the senior colleague.

    Keywords: Prejudice and Bias; Behavior; Ethics; Employees; Gender Characteristics; Diversity Characteristics; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Will (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-013, November 2007. (Revised October 2008.) View Details
  49. Differences at Work: Will (B)

    In Differences at Work: Will (B), HBS Case No. 9-408-045, Will describes how decided to respond to the question so that his colleague could tell from his answer that Will was a gay man.

    Keywords: Attitudes; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Will (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-045, November 2007. (Revised October 2008.) View Details
  50. Differences at Work: Jason (A)

    Jason is a member of his firm's recruiting team, which has a mandate to create a more diverse workforce. When the group decides to interview a candidate based on the candidate's race, Jason wonders whether they made the right decision and how, in general, diversity goals should be achieved.

    Keywords: Decisions; Ethnicity Characteristics; Job Interviews; Race Characteristics; Recruitment; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Jason (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-016, November 2007. View Details
  51. Differences at Work: Jason (B)

    In Differences at Work: Jason (B) HBS Case No. 9-408-049 Jason decides that his firm should have a more articulated position that everyone in the firm understands about why diversity benefits the firm instead of pursing diversity because it feels like the “right” thing to do.

    Keywords: Management Practices and Processes; Policy; Employees; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Jason (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-049, November 2007. View Details
  52. Differences at Work: Jenny (A)

    Differences at Work: Jenny (A) HBS Case No. 9-408-017 is set in Amsterdam. Accompanied by her boss, Jenny is pitching a marketing engagement, but the prospective client keeps making comments about how attractive he finds her.

    Keywords: Behavior; Personal Characteristics; Employees; Diversity Characteristics; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Jenny (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-017, November 2007. View Details
  53. Differences at Work: Jenny (B)

    In Differences at Work: Jenny (B) HBS Case No. 9-408-050, we learn that Jenny's boss is woman who thought the entire incident was funny. Jenny wonders whether to confront her boss about her discomfort with the situation.

    Keywords: Behavior; Employees; Gender Characteristics; Conflict and Resolution;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Jenny (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-050, November 2007. View Details
  54. Differences at Work: Emily (A)

    In Differences at Work: Emily (A) HBS Case No. 9-408-014 Emily, a private equity analyst, reads disturbing, sexually focused emails written about her by work colleagues and acquaintances after they all attended a work-related social event. Emily debates what she should do.

    Keywords: Moral Sensibility; Behavior; Decision Choices and Conditions; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Emily (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-014, November 2007. View Details
  55. Differences at Work: Emily (B)

    In Differences at Work: Emily (B) HBS Case No. 9-408-046 Emily considers whether to file a formal complaint with her Human Resources department about the emails but ultimately decides to confront the culprits herself, beginning by sending an email to one of her colleagues. He immediately apologizes.

    Keywords: Working Conditions; Interpersonal Communication; Employees; Conflict and Resolution; Communication;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Emily (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-046, November 2007. View Details
  56. Differences at Work: Emily (C)

    In Differences at Work: Emily (C) HBS Case No. 9-408-047 describes how the original email author apologizes to her acknowledging that his behavior was extremely inappropriate. While Emily accepts the apology, she still forwards the email on to her boss with a note saying that she felt after reading the email that she could not remain quiet. Her boss never responds. Later, after Emily has left the firm, she asks her boss about his inaction.

    Keywords: Behavior; Working Conditions; Employees; Interpersonal Communication; Resignation and Termination;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Emily (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-047, November 2007. View Details
  57. Differences at Work: Ben (C)

    In Differences at Work: Ben (C) 9-408-044 Ben shares the remark with his bosses who let Ben decide whether to report the incident to Human Resources. He decides not to, but several years later he still regrets his inaction.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Employees; Working Conditions;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Ben (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-044, November 2007. View Details
  58. Differences at Work: Allie (A)

    On a business trip, Allie's boss demands that she and a colleague skip planned company meetings and "meet him at the beach in their bikinis."

    Keywords: Behavior; Managerial Roles; Ethics; Gender Characteristics; Diversity Characteristics; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Allie (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-037, November 2007. View Details
  59. Differences at Work: Sam (A)

    In Differences at Work: Sam (A) HBS Case No. 9-408-021 Sam is one of the few minorities working at his company at the analyst level. He refuses a request from Human Resources to fill the “Asian spot” in his firm's diversity video.

    Keywords: Ethnicity Characteristics; Employees; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Sam (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-021, November 2007. View Details
  60. Differences at Work: Sam (B)

    In Differences at Work: Sam (B) HBS Case No. 9-408-054 Sam receives an informal apology from Human Resources which leaves Sam feeling unsatisfied as it is not an official company response. Sam leaves the company for unrelated reasons shortly thereafter but still continues to think about the incident.

    Keywords: Working Conditions; Human Resources; Social Psychology; Conflict and Resolution; Resignation and Termination; Employees; Policy;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Sam (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-054, November 2007. View Details
  61. Differences at Work: Allie (B)

    In Differences at Work: Allie (B) HBS Case No. 9-408-055 Allie and her colleague initially refuse to go but when her boss makes a scene they reluctantly agree to accompany him to the beach despite his inappropriate behavior. Later back at company headquarters they tell their boss' boss about the incident who tells the women that he will support them if they decide to file a sexual harassment claim.

    Keywords: Ethics; Working Conditions; Rank and Position; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Allie (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-055, November 2007. View Details
  62. Differences at Work: Allie (C)

    In Differences at Work: (C) HBS Case No. 9-408-056 Allie decides not to pursue a sexual harassment charge and instead remedies the situation by transferring to the marketing division in her company. She reflects on how powerless the situation made her feel and how it has made her extremely cautious about workplace interactions.

    Keywords: Emotions; Ethics; Working Conditions; Rank and Position; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Allie (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-056, November 2007. View Details
  63. Differences at Work: Erica (A)

    In Differences at Work: Erica (A) HBS Case No. 9-408-015 Erica, a junior sales person, has just been offered the opportunity to attend an important client dinner. Later, Erica learns that she received the invitation because of her race.

    Keywords: Race Characteristics; Employees;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Erica (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-015, November 2007. View Details
  64. Differences at Work: Erica (B)

    In Differences at Work: Erica (B) HBS Case No. 9-408-048, Erica discovers that both she and the client are African-American. She reflects on why she has been invited to attend the dinner.

    Keywords: Race Characteristics; Employees;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Erica (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-048, November 2007. View Details
  65. Differences at Work: Alex (A)

    At an interview for his dream job, Alex has been asked an inappropriate question by the interviewer. How will Alex handle the situation? Should he accept the position is offered?

    Keywords: Prejudice and Bias; Behavior; Job Interviews; Ethics; Human Resources; Diversity Characteristics; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Alex (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-011, November 2007. View Details
  66. Differences at Work: Alex (B)

    In Differences at Work: Alex (B) HBS Case No. 9-408-042 turns to his uncle, an employment lawyer, to discuss the situation. After receiving a matching offer from his current firm, Alex decides to stay with his firm but concedes that he did not have to make any hard ethical decisions. He wonders what he would have done if he had not received the matching offer.

    Keywords: Decisions; Ethics; Job Offer; Compensation and Benefits;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Alex (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-042, November 2007. View Details
  67. Differences at Work: Ben (A)

    During a casual conversation one of Ben's professional colleagues unexpectedly makes an anti-Semitic remark. What should Ben do?

    Keywords: Prejudice and Bias; Behavior; Ethics; Religion; Employees; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Ben (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-012, November 2007. View Details
  68. Differences at Work: Ben (B)

    In Differences at Work: Ben (B) HBS Case No. 9-408-043 Ben shares his colleague's comment with another colleague who empathizes with Ben's discomfort but dismisses the remark as a joke, leaving Ben to decide whether he wants to confront his colleague.

    Keywords: Employees; Conflict and Resolution; Perception;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Rachel Gordon. "Differences at Work: Ben (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-043, November 2007. View Details
  69. Restoring Trust at WorldCom (TN)

    Teaching Note to (404-138) and (304-091).

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Aldo Sesia. "Restoring Trust at WorldCom (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 307-025, September 2006. (Revised July 2007.) View Details
  70. Blessed Assurance: The Challenge of a Moral Dilemma

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the third class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Moral Sensibility;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Blessed Assurance: The Challenge of a Moral Dilemma." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-067, February 2007. (Revised March 2007.) View Details
  71. Antigone: The Challenge of Right Versus Right

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the second class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Values and Beliefs; Decision Choices and Conditions; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Antigone: The Challenge of Right Versus Right." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-066, February 2007. (Revised March 2007.) View Details
  72. Things Fall Apart Summary: The Challenge of New Principles

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the fourth class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Ethics; Leadership; Decision Making; Moral Sensibility;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Things Fall Apart Summary: The Challenge of New Principles." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-068, February 2007. (Revised March 2007.) View Details
  73. The Sweet Hereafter Summary: Reasoning from Personal Perspective

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the sixth class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Perspective; Cognition and Thinking;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "The Sweet Hereafter Summary: Reasoning from Personal Perspective." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-070, February 2007. (Revised March 2007.) View Details
  74. Truman and the Bomb Summary: Balancing Benefits and Harms

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the eleventh class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Political History;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Truman and the Bomb Summary: Balancing Benefits and Harms." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-075, February 2007. (Revised March 2007.) View Details
  75. Endurance Summary: The Challenge of Right Versus Wrong

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the first class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Moral Sensibility; Leadership; Curriculum and Courses;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Endurance Summary: The Challenge of Right Versus Wrong." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-065, February 2007. View Details
  76. Trifles Summary: Reasoning from Moral Theory

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the fifth class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Leadership; Moral Sensibility; Business Education;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Trifles Summary: Reasoning from Moral Theory." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-069, February 2007. View Details
  77. The Remains of the Day Summary: Reasoning From a Moral Code

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the seventh class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Leadership; Moral Sensibility; Business Education;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "The Remains of the Day Summary: Reasoning From a Moral Code." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-071, February 2007. View Details
  78. A Man for All Seasons Summary: Reasoning from Multiple Moralities

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the eight class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Ethics; Leadership; Decision Choices and Conditions;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "A Man for All Seasons Summary: Reasoning from Multiple Moralities." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-072, February 2007. View Details
  79. The Prince Summary: Exercising Authority

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the ninth class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Leadership; Moral Sensibility; Business Education;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "The Prince Summary: Exercising Authority." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-073, February 2007. View Details
  80. The Secret Sharer Summary: Earning Legitimacy

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the tenth class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Ethics; Power and Influence; Moral Sensibility;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "The Secret Sharer Summary: Earning Legitimacy." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-074, February 2007. View Details
  81. Katharine Graham Summary: Taking a Stand

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the twelfth class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Moral Sensibility; Leadership; Curriculum and Courses;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Katharine Graham Summary: Taking a Stand." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-076, February 2007. View Details
  82. American Ground Summary: Assuming Leadership

    A summary of the major themes discussed in the thirteenth class of The Moral Leader (EC curriculum).

    Keywords: Leadership; Moral Sensibility;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "American Ground Summary: Assuming Leadership." Harvard Business School Module Note 607-077, February 2007. View Details
  83. James Burke: A Career in American Business Series (LCA) (TN)

    Keywords: Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Aldo Sesia. "James Burke: A Career in American Business Series (LCA) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 307-028, September 2006. View Details
  84. Reading the Material

    This note is intended to aid students preparing for The Moral Leader course. Given the unique nature of the materials used in the course (history, literature, biography, autobiography, plays, philosophical extracts), a different approach to reading is required for students to make maximum use of the materials and class designs.

    Keywords: Education;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Reading the Material." Harvard Business School Background Note 605-027, August 2004. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  85. Moral Reasoning: A Practical Guide for Leaders

    We encounter moral or ethical challenges in our professional lives, in our close relationships, and as members of the broader communities that we are part of. This methodology demonstrates how moral reasoning works and how it can be integrated into a problem-solving format. It is meant to supplement problem-solving skills that you already have with a systematic approach to use with moral or ethical problems. The methodology provides a structure for addressing issues and lays out some criteria to augment others you would ordinarily rely on for decision making, action planning, and implementation.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Moral Sensibility; Management Systems; Problems and Challenges; Civil Society or Community;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Moral Reasoning: A Practical Guide for Leaders." Harvard Business School Background Note 604-054, October 2003. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  86. Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, The

    In just seven days, the Ritz-Carlton transforms newly hired employees into "Ladies and Gentlemen Serving Ladies and Gentlemen." The case details a new hotel launch, focusing on the unique blend of leadership, quality processes, and values of self-respect and dignity, to create award-winning service.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Innovation and Invention; Leadership; Brands and Branding; Product Launch; Service Operations; Performance Improvement; Problems and Challenges; Quality; Status and Position; Culture; Value Creation; Accommodations Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Stacy McManus. "Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, The." Harvard Business School Case 601-163, March 2001. (Revised September 2005.) View Details
  87. Novartis: The Challenge of Success (A)

    Preliminary results from Phase 1 clinical trials of a newly developed compound, STI571, showed that 31 out of 31 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) had their blood counts return to normal. In the world of oncology, this was unheard of. This was the unexpected data processed by Alex Matter, head of oncology research at Novartis, AG. CML was a rare form of cancer that affected a very small number of individuals in the world. The development of STI571 was a pioneering concept in genetically targeted drug development. This case enables students to decide whether and how they would advance the development, production, and distribution of the drug given these extraordinarily successful Phase 1 results. Provides details on factors that complicate this decision, including production complexity, precedents from other high-profile drug treatments, and market pressures.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Health Testing and Trials; Innovation and Invention; Markets; Distribution; Product Development; Production; Problems and Challenges; Research; Research and Development; Complexity; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Stacy McManus. "Novartis: The Challenge of Success (A)." Harvard Business School Case 603-043, April 2003. (Revised October 2004.) View Details
  88. Novartis: The Challenge of Success (B)

    When Dr. Daniel Vasella learned of the early Phase 1 trial results, he immediately decided what course of action Novartis would take. Students will be able to examine and assess the concrete steps, and the rationale behind them, that Novartis took in response to this challenge. Focuses not on morality versus immorality but on principled decision making, action, and the practical implications of making good on a moral decision.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Moral Sensibility; Innovation and Invention; Distribution; Product Development; Production; Problems and Challenges; Research and Development; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Stacy McManus. "Novartis: The Challenge of Success (B)." Harvard Business School Case 603-044, April 2003. (Revised October 2004.) View Details
  89. Novartis: The Challenge of Success (C)

    Supplements the (A) and (B) cases.

    Keywords: Pharmaceutical Industry; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Stacy McManus. "Novartis: The Challenge of Success (C)." Harvard Business School Case 603-045, June 2003. (Revised October 2004.) View Details
  90. Novartis: The Challenge of Success (D)

    Supplements the (A) and (B) cases.

    Keywords: Pharmaceutical Industry; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Stacy McManus. "Novartis: The Challenge of Success (D)." Harvard Business School Case 603-046, June 2003. (Revised October 2004.) View Details
  91. Crimson Greetings Simulation (TN)

    Teaching Note for the Crimson Greetings Simulation. (Not in the system.) A rewritten version of an earlier teaching note.

    Keywords: Technology; Operations; Management;

    Citation:

    Reiling, Henry B., M. Diane Burton, and Sandra J. Sucher. "Crimson Greetings Simulation (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 603-051, August 2002. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  92. Herman Miller (A): Innovation by Design (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-602-023).

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Herman Miller (A): Innovation by Design (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 604-056, October 2003. View Details
  93. Herman Miller (A): Innovation by Design

    Gary Van Spronsen, president of Miller SQA, has been asked to leave the thriving subsidiary he helped to reinvent to join Herman Miller's corporate initiative on innovation. Miller SQA has pioneered processes new to the Herman Miller organization, such as computer-assisted sales and value chain integration. This case details the innovations that have led to a completely new business model for a previously underserved market and highlights the integration of target customer, product design, manufacturing, and supply chain management. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Product Design; Product Development; Supply Chain Management; Business Model; Organizations; Values and Beliefs; Manufacturing Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Stacy McManus. "Herman Miller (A): Innovation by Design." Harvard Business School Case 602-023, October 2001. (Revised November 2002.) View Details
  94. Herman Miller(B): Creating Innovation Streams

    In 1997, Mike Volkema faced the difficulty of attempting to revitalize a once dynamic organization. Volkema wondered how he could incorporate advances made within subsidiaries, such as Miller SQA's business model innovation, into the company as a whole while also reinvigorating the product focus that had made Herman Miller great. This case details Herman Miller's development of business model designs for each of its target market segments and the evolution of its famed cubicle office system to a new design for the twenty-first century. Herman Miller's traditional focus on product design has been supplemented by a new focus on targeted business models. Students can analyze the changes, including market expansion, reintegration of the fragmented value chain, and sharing capabilities throughout the organization that Volkema introduced to redirect the firm toward greater growth. The details of customer-oriented business model design are examined. Concludes with a series of issues for organizational processes and structures to enable a firm to manage innovation on multiple fronts. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Innovation and Management; Product Design; Product Development; Product; Supply Chain Management; Business Model; Service Delivery; Customer Value and Value Chain; Manufacturing Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Stacy McManus. "Herman Miller(B): Creating Innovation Streams." Harvard Business School Case 602-024, October 2001. (Revised November 2002.) View Details
  95. Four Principles of Biomedical Ethics: Definitions and Examples

    Introduces four principles of biomedical ethics, excerpted from Principles of Biomedical Ethics, Tom L. Beauchamp and James F. Childress (Oxford University Press, 2001). The principles provide a conceptual framework for the analysis and resolution of moral problems encountered in the clinical delivery of health care, medical research, and the distribution of health care resources. The four principles are: respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence ("doing no harm"), beneficence, and justice.

    Keywords: Framework; Moral Sensibility; Health Care and Treatment; Distribution; Problems and Challenges; Research; Emotions; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Pharmaceutical Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Four Principles of Biomedical Ethics: Definitions and Examples." Harvard Business School Compilation 603-079, November 2002. View Details
  96. Le Petit Chef

    Brigitte Gagne, Le Petit Chef's director of microwave R&D, is deciding on the product development agenda for next year. She has to decide which of the available projects to fund, and evaluate the overall portfolio of projects currently under development. The recent poor performance of the firm prompts Gagne to think about reassessing the way projects are generated, evaluated, and selected at Le Petit Chef. However, Gagne has a pressing deadline to meet—the executive team is due to review the next year's agenda at a meeting in Paris tomorrow.

    Keywords: Production; Product Development; Projects; Planning; Research and Development; Performance; Problems and Challenges; Management Teams; Resource Allocation;

    Citation:

    MacCormack, Alan D., Sandra J. Sucher, and Suraj Rangashayi. "Le Petit Chef." Harvard Business School Case 602-080, October 2001. (Revised November 2002.) View Details
  97. Le Petit Chef TN

    Teaching Note for (9-602-080).

    Keywords: Paris;

    Citation:

    MacCormack, Alan D., and Sandra J. Sucher. "Le Petit Chef TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 602-117, January 2002. (Revised November 2002.) View Details
  98. WingspanBank.com (A)

    The case describes the new product development process for WingspanBank.com, an Internet-only financial services "infomediary" created by a team from Bank One's First USA division. The creation of the bank is described from concept development to prelaunch decision making. Rich detail is provided for analysis about the processes and managerial decisions that allowed the bank to be created in roughly 120 days through a team of 30 vendors. In addition, the concept of an "infomediary" is introduced. The case's decision point requires students to make tradeoffs between speed (the desire to achieve first-mover advantage in online banking) and reliability and completeness of concept.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Decision Making; Information Management; Management Practices and Processes; Managerial Roles; Product Development; Performance Consistency; Competitive Advantage; Internet; Financial Services Industry; Web Services Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Daniel Galvin. "WingspanBank.com (A)." Harvard Business School Case 600-035, October 1999. (Revised July 2002.) View Details
  99. WingspanBank.com (B): Should This Bird Still Fly?

    WingspanBank.com is launched to critical acclaim, but its fate is hardly certain. Bank One's new CEO, Jamie Dimon, must decide what to do with what is now a second Web site for the bank's current and prospective customers.

    Keywords: Business Model; Business Startups; Customers; Innovation and Management; Organizations; Complexity; Web Sites; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J., and Stacy McManus. "WingspanBank.com (B): Should This Bird Still Fly?" Harvard Business School Case 601-071, March 2001. (Revised July 2002.) View Details
  100. Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, The TN

    Teaching Note for (9-601-163).

    Keywords: Accommodations Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Sucher, Sandra J. "Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, The TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 602-113, January 2002. View Details
  101. Reading Rehabilitation Hospital: Implementing Patient-Focused Care TN

    Teaching Note for (9-898-172). A rewritten version of an earlier teaching note.

    Keywords: Health; Health Care and Treatment; Medical Specialties; Health Testing and Trials; Valuation; Service Operations; Balance and Stability; Production; Demand and Consumers; Risk and Uncertainty; Technology; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Gittell, Jody H., and Sandra J. Sucher. "Reading Rehabilitation Hospital: Implementing Patient-Focused Care TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 899-139, May 1999. (Revised July 2000.) View Details