Doctoral Student

Maria Ibanez

Maria Ibanez is a doctoral student in the Technology and Operations Management unit at the Harvard Business School.

Maria’s research interests include service operations, market dynamics, decision making under uncertainty, process improvement, productivity, and supply chain management.

Prior to joining HBS, Maria conducted research at the University of Chicago with Professor Steven Levitt.  


Maria Ibanez is a doctoral student in the Technology and Operations Management unit at the Harvard Business School.

Maria’s research interests include service operations, market dynamics, decision making under uncertainty, process improvement, productivity, and supply chain management.

Prior to joining HBS, Maria conducted research at the University of Chicago with Professor Steven Levitt. 

She previously worked as a research/teaching assistant, an investment analyst, and a Web developer.  Maria has volunteered in Latin America, participating in medical brigades as well as acting as a consultant for small businesses in need of technical expertise.  She earned a Master of Science in Applied Economics from Marquette University, and published her thesis in the Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics with Professor Anthony Pennington-Cross.

 

Journal Articles

  1. The Answer is 9,142: Understanding the Influence of Disruption Risk on Inventory Decision Making

    The question was how many units of inventory a manager should order when faced with a possible disruption in supply. The correct answer is not guesswork, but based on 150 years of theory and practice. We examine individual choices made in this critical situation—and the results are not encouraging.

    Keywords: Behavioral; behavioral operations; Inventory; bias; operations; operations management; Operations;

    Citation:

    Cotteleer, Mark, Maria Ibanez, and Geri Gibbons. "The Answer is 9,142: Understanding the Influence of Disruption Risk on Inventory Decision Making."Deloitte Review 14 (January 2014).
  2. Commercial Property Rent Dynamics in U.S. Metropolitan Areas: An Examination of Office, Industrial, Flex and Retail Space

    This paper is concerned with the market rental rate for space offered by commercial property and how that rental rate evolves over time. Rental rates reflect the value of the services provided by the property and can have a significant impact on the ability of its owners to make monthly debt obligations. We investigate commercial property rent dynamics for 34 large metropolitan areas in the U.S. The dynamics are studied from the second quarter of 1990 through the second quarter of 2009 and the results are compared across four property types or uses (office, industrial, flex, and retail). There is substantial heterogeneity in both the long and short run responses to changing demand and supply conditions. In general, the office market is the slowest to adjust back towards equilibrium while industrial and flex markets adjust back to the long run equilibrium very quickly. For industrial and office types, the speed of adjustment is substantially faster within quality segments and is strongest for grade A properties.

    Keywords: Commercial Real Estate; Rent Dynamics; Office property; Flex property; Retail property; Industrial property; Property; Real Estate Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Ibanez, Maria, and Anthony Pennington-Cross. "Commercial Property Rent Dynamics in U.S. Metropolitan Areas: An Examination of Office, Industrial, Flex and Retail Space."Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics 46, no. 2 (February 2013): 232–259.