Hirotaka Takeuchi

Professor of Management Practice

Hirotaka Takeuchi is a Professor in the Strategy Unit at Harvard Business School, where he currently teaches three second-year elective courses: Knowledge-based Strategy, Japan IXP, and Microeconomics of Competitiveness (which he co-teaches with University Professor Michael Porter). He received a BA from International Christian University in Tokyo, Japan and an MBA and PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.  Professor Takeuchi's first faculty position at Harvard was in the Marketing Unit from 1976 to 1983 as an Assistant Professor and his second as a Visiting Professor teaching the Advanced Management Program in 1995-1996.  Starting in 1983, he taught at Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo and served as the Founding Dean of its business school, Graduate School of International Corporate Strategy, from 1998 to 2010.  Prior to his academic career, he worked at McCann-Erickson in Tokyo and San Francisco and at McKinsey & Company in Tokyo.

Professor Takeuchi's research has focused on the knowledge creation process within organizations, the competitiveness of Japanese firms in global industries, and the link between strategy and innovation.  He is the author or editor of 17 books, including The Knowledge-Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation co-authored with Ikujiro Nonaka (which won the 1995 Best New Book of the Year Award in the business and management category by the Association of American Publishers), Can Japan Compete? co-authored with Michael Porter, and Extreme Toyota: Radical Contradictions That Drive Success at the World's Best Manufacturer co-authored with Hitotsubashi professors Emi Osono and Norihiko Shimizu (which won the Best 30 Business Books by Soundview Executive Book Summaries in 2008).  His most recent Harvard Business Review article is The Wise Leader (May 2011) with Ikujiro Nonaka.

Professor Takeuchi serves as a member of the board of directors of Integral Corporation, and has served on the board of ORIX Corporation and Trend Micro Inc., all based in Japan. He is also a director of several non-profit organizations, including Japan Society of Boston, Nonaka Institute of Knowledge, and Ark Hills Club.  He is and has been a member of the advisory board of Fast Retailing, All Nippon Airways, NTT DoCoMo, Mitsui & Co., Yoshimoto Kogyo, World Economic Forum, Russell Reynolds, Japan Association of Corporate Directors, Japan Sports Association, among others.  He has been a member of a number of committees and councils formed by government agencies in Japan, including the Cabinet Office; Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry; Ministry of Finance; Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology; and Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport and also a member of the editorial board of Japan Marketing Journal, Journal of Knowledge Management, and Hitotsubashi Business Review.

Takeuchi and his wife Nobu have two children and live in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Books

  1. Extreme Toyota: Radical Contradictions That Drive Success at the World's Best Manufacturer

    Keywords: Production; Success; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Osono, Emi, Norihiko Shimizu, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. Extreme Toyota: Radical Contradictions That Drive Success at the World's Best Manufacturer. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2008. (Selected for the 2008 Soundview Executive Book Summaries.) View Details
  2. Yawarakai Kigyou Senryaku: Marketing Ambition no Jidai (Soft Corporate Strategy: The Age of Marketing Ambition)

    Keywords: Marketing; Corporate Strategy;

    Citation:

    Shimaguchi, Mitsuaki, Junzou Ishii, Yukihiko Uehara, Naoto Onzou, Hotaka Katahira, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. Yawarakai Kigyou Senryaku: Marketing Ambition no Jidai (Soft Corporate Strategy: The Age of Marketing Ambition). Kadokawa Shoten, 2001, Japanese ed. View Details
  3. Nihon no Kyōsō Senryaku [Can Japan Compete?]

    The result of a major piece of research, this book reveals that there have long been two Japans, the familiar one that was highly competitive, and another Japan, almost invisible, that was highly uncompetitive. The authors unravel this puzzle, and provide a solution that challenges the conventional wisdom on the drivers of Japanese competitiveness.

    Keywords: Competition; Economy; Japan;

    Citation:

    Porter, Michael E., Hirotaka Takeuchi, and M. Sakakibara. Nihon no Kyōsō Senryaku [Can Japan Compete?]. Tokyo: Daiyamondosha [Diamond, Inc.], 2000, Japanese ed. (English ed., Basingstoke: MacMillan, 2000; New York: Basic Books, 2000.) View Details
  4. Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 2: Seihin Kaihatsu Kakushin (The Age of Marketing Innovation 2: Product Development Innovation)

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Product; Research and Development;

    Citation:

    Shimaguchi, Mitsuaki, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Hotaka Katahira, and Junzou Ishii. Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 2: Seihin Kaihatsu Kakushin (The Age of Marketing Innovation 2: Product Development Innovation). Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 1999, Japanese ed. View Details
  5. Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 4: Eigyou Ryuutsuu Kakushin (The Age of Marketing Innovation 4: Sales and Distribution Innovation)

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Marketing; Sales; Distribution;

    Citation:

    Shimaguchi, Mitsuaki, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Hotaka Katahira, and Junzou Ishii. Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 4: Eigyou Ryuutsuu Kakushin (The Age of Marketing Innovation 4: Sales and Distribution Innovation). Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 1998, Japanese ed. View Details
  6. Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 1: Kokyaku Souzou (The Age of Marketing Innovation 1: Customer Creation)

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Marketing; Customers;

    Citation:

    Shimaguchi, Mitsuaki, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Hotaka Katahira, and Junzou Ishii. Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 1: Kokyaku Souzou (The Age of Marketing Innovation 1: Customer Creation). Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 1998, Japanese ed. View Details
  7. The Knowledge-Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation

    Keywords: Knowledge; Business Ventures; Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Nonaka, Ikujiro, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. The Knowledge-Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation. Oxford University Press, 1995. (Awarded the 1995 Best Book of the Year Award for the Business and Management category by the Association of American Publishers.) View Details
  8. Kigyou no Jiko-Kakushin: Chaos to Souzou no Management (Corporate Self-Innovation: Managing Chaos and Creativity)

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Management; Creativity;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, Kiyonori Sakakibara, Tadao Kagono, Akihiro Okumura, and Ikujiro Nonaka. Kigyou no Jiko-Kakushin: Chaos to Souzou no Management (Corporate Self-Innovation: Managing Chaos and Creativity). Chuo Kouron, 1986, Japanese ed. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Knowledge-Based View of Strategy [La Visión de la Estrategia basada en el Conocimiento]

    Strategy is about future creation. Firms differ not just because they have different value chains and activity systems or different resources and competencies, but because they envision different futures. They differ because people in charge of formulating and implementing strategy have their own visions of the firm's future, which are different from those of other firms. This paper provides a preview of the current thinking on the knowledge-based view of strategy. This view recognizes that an essential feature of strategy is to interpret the particular situation at hand and continuously create the future within the social context. The knowledge-based view of strategy differs from other schools of thought in strategy in its singular focus on knowledge as the driver of strategy. This paper analyses how the knowledge-based view of strategy complements the traditional schools of strategy by injecting new thinking along these three dimensions: putting humans at the center of strategy, treating strategy as a dynamic process, and having a social agenda.

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Knowledge-Based View of Strategy [La Visión de la Estrategia basada en el Conocimiento]." Universia Business Review, no. 40 (2013): 68–79. View Details
  2. The Wise Leader

    In an era of increasing discontinuity, wise leadership has nearly vanished. Many leaders find it difficult to reinvent their corporations rapidly enough to cope with new technologies, demographic shifts, and consumption trends. They can't develop truly global organizations that operate effortlessly across borders. And they find it tough to ensure that their people adhere to values and ethics. The world needs leaders who pursue the common good by striving to create social as well as economic value and who pair micromanagement with big-picture aspirations about the future. The authors, who have studied, taught, and interviewed executives in some of the world's leading companies, assert that such leaders must acquire practical wisdom, or what Aristotle called phronesis: experiential knowledge that enables people to make ethically sound judgments. Wise leaders demonstrate six abilities. They make decisions on the basis of what is good for the organization and for society. They quickly grasp the essence of a situation and fathom the nature and meaning of people, things, and events. They provide contexts in which executives and employees can interact to create new meaning. Phronetic leaders use metaphors and stories to convert their experience into tacit knowledge that others can use. They exert political power to bring people together and spur them to act. And wise leaders use apprenticeship and mentoring to cultivate practical wisdom in others.

    Keywords: Communication Intention and Meaning; Interpersonal Communication; Experience and Expertise; Values and Beliefs; Knowledge Sharing; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Leadership; Leadership Development; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Personal Characteristics; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Nonaka, Ikujiro, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. "The Wise Leader." Harvard Business Review 89, no. 5 (May 2011). View Details
  3. Perspectives on the Productivity Dilemma

    For more than a century, operations researchers have recognized that organizations can increase efficiency by adhering strictly to proven process templates, thereby rendering operations more stable and predictable. For several decades, researchers have also recognized that these efficiency gains can impose heavy costs. The capabilities that enable consistent execution can also hinder learning and innovation, leaving organizations rigid and inflexible. By optimizing their processes for efficiency in the short term, organizations become brittle. In the “Productivity Dilemma”, Abernathy conjectured that short-term efficiency and long-term adaptability are inherently incompatible. Organization theorists have conceptualized Abernathy's dilemma as the challenge of balancing exploitation and exploration. Exploitation leverages existing knowledge and capabilities, resulting in stable and efficient performance. Exploration creates new knowledge, enabling organizations to innovate and adapt to changing conditions. Enduring organizational performance requires ambidexterity, the ability to sustain both exploration and exploitation. Various techniques have been proposed for achieving ambidexterity, such as differentiated exploratory subunits and meta-routines that modify underlying processes. Ambidexterity requires operational processes that combine high levels of efficiency with the flexibility to evolve and improve over time. Thus, the perspectives of operations management are essential to understanding the mechanics of ambidexterity. Moreover, theories of ambidexterity raise important questions for operations management. This article synthesizes several recent perspectives on the dynamics of ambidexterity and the productivity dilemma.

    Keywords: Learning; Innovation and Invention; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Operations; Business Processes; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Performance Efficiency; Performance Improvement; Performance Productivity; Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Adler, Paul S., Mary Benner, David James Brunner, John Paul MacDuffie, Emi Osono, Bradley R. Staats, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Michael Tushman, and Sidney G. Winter. "Perspectives on the Productivity Dilemma." Journal of Operations Management 27, no. 2 (April 2009): 99–113. View Details
  4. Fixing What Really Ails Japan

    Conventional wisdom claims that Japan’s “economic miracle” stemmed from its unique model of government guidance and its revolutionary corporate management techniques. An in-depth study proves this seriously wrong. Rampant government intervention has caused more business failures than successes, and a fundamental cautiousness has led Japanese companies to ignore strategic thinking and shun risk. To pull out of its current slump, Japan must embrace competition, innovation, and bold leadership.

    Keywords: Japan;

    Citation:

    Porter, Michael E., and Hirotaka Takeuchi. "Fixing What Really Ails Japan." Foreign Affairs 78, no. 3 (May–June 1999): 66–81. View Details
  5. Mega-Denshi Sangyou ni okeru Vision no Wana (The Trap of Vision in the Mega-Electronics Industries)

    Keywords: Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Osono, Emi, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. "Mega-Denshi Sangyou ni okeru Vision no Wana (The Trap of Vision in the Mega-Electronics Industries)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (March 1997). View Details
  6. Compaq: Souzou-teki Hakai ni yoru Market Leader e no Henshin (Turning Compaq Around to Become a Market Leader through Creative Destruction)

    Keywords: Markets; Leadership; Creativity; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Compaq: Souzou-teki Hakai ni yoru Market Leader e no Henshin (Turning Compaq Around to Become a Market Leader through Creative Destruction)." Diamond Hābādo bijunesu [Diamond Harvard Business Review] (October–November 1995). View Details
  7. WOW Company: Ko wo Excite saseru 21 Seiki Kigyou (The WOW Company: 21st Century Company That Excites Individuals)

    Keywords: Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Emi Osono. "WOW Company: Ko wo Excite saseru 21 Seiki Kigyou (The WOW Company: 21st Century Company That Excites Individuals)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (August 1995). View Details
  8. Shinseihin no Yosougai no Seikou ga motarasu Kyousou Yuui (Competitive Advantage Arising from the Unexpected Success of New Products)

    Keywords: Competitive Advantage; Success;

    Citation:

    Fujikawa, Yoshinori, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. "Shinseihin no Yosougai no Seikou ga motarasu Kyousou Yuui (Competitive Advantage Arising from the Unexpected Success of New Products)." Māketingu jānaru [Japan Marketing Journal], no. 54 (1994). View Details
  9. Nihon-gata Corporate Governance: Koe naki Stakeholder no Fushigi (Japanese-style Corporate Governance: The Mystery of the Voice-less Stakeholder)

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Business and Stakeholder Relations; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Nihon-gata Corporate Governance: Koe naki Stakeholder no Fushigi (Japanese-style Corporate Governance: The Mystery of the Voice-less Stakeholder)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (February 1992). View Details
  10. Shouhin Shiborikomi Genshou ni Miru Nihon Kigyou no Senryaku Kadai (Strategic Issues of Japanese Firms as Evidenced in the Pruning-of-the-Product Phenomena)

    Keywords: Strategy; Product; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Yoshinori Fujikawa. "Shouhin Shiborikomi Genshou ni Miru Nihon Kigyou no Senryaku Kadai (Strategic Issues of Japanese Firms as Evidenced in the Pruning-of-the-Product Phenomena)." Māketingu jānaru [Japan Marketing Journal], no. 46 (1992). View Details
  11. Kei-haku-tan-shou Shouhin no Kaihatsu: Global Shijou deno Nihon Kigyou no Kyousou Yuuisei (Development of Light-Thin-Short-Small Products: Competitive Advantage of Japanese Firms in the Global Market)

    Keywords: Competitive Advantage; Business Ventures; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Kei-haku-tan-shou Shouhin no Kaihatsu: Global Shijou deno Nihon Kigyou no Kyousou Yuuisei (Development of Light-Thin-Short-Small Products: Competitive Advantage of Japanese Firms in the Global Market)." Māketingu jānaru [Japan Marketing Journal], no. 40 (1991). View Details
  12. Dainiji Ryuutsuu Kakumei go Hiraku Seikatsu Taikoku e no Michi (The Second Distribution Revolution Will Open the Way to a Mega-Nation of Good Living)

    Keywords: Distribution;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Dainiji Ryuutsuu Kakumei go Hiraku Seikatsu Taikoku e no Michi (The Second Distribution Revolution Will Open the Way to a Mega-Nation of Good Living)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (September 1989). View Details
  13. Nihon Kigyou no Kokusai Teikei Senryaku: Data ni Motozuku Genjou Bunseki (International Collaboration Strategy of Japanese Firms: New Findings from Data Analysis)

    Keywords: Cooperation; Strategy; Business Ventures; Information; Theory;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Hiroshi Kobayashi. "Nihon Kigyou no Kokusai Teikei Senryaku: Data ni Motozuku Genjou Bunseki (International Collaboration Strategy of Japanese Firms: New Findings from Data Analysis)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (April 1988). View Details
  14. Service Sangyou ni okeru Kyousou: sono Rironteki Framework (Competition in Global Industries: a Theoretical Framework)

    Keywords: Competition; Theory; Framework;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Ryoko Tohyama. "Service Sangyou ni okeru Kyousou: sono Rironteki Framework (Competition in Global Industries: a Theoretical Framework)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (April 1988). View Details
  15. Global Seihin Kaihatsu ni okeru Kyousou Yuii no Senryaku (Strategy for Gaining Competitive Advantage in Global Product Development)

    Keywords: Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Product; Research and Development;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Global Seihin Kaihatsu ni okeru Kyousou Yuii no Senryaku (Strategy for Gaining Competitive Advantage in Global Product Development)." Hitotsubashi University Annual Research Journal: Commerce and Management (April 1987). View Details
  16. Global High-tech Sangyou: Kawaritsutsu aru Kyousou no Gensoku (Global High-tech Industries: Changing Paradigms of Competition)

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Competition;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Global High-tech Sangyou: Kawaritsutsu aru Kyousou no Gensoku (Global High-tech Industries: Changing Paradigms of Competition)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (August 1986). View Details
  17. Seihin Kaihatsu Process no Management (Management of the Product Development Process)

    Keywords: Management; Product; Research and Development;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Ikujiro Nonaka. "Seihin Kaihatsu Process no Management (Management of the Product Development Process)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (March 1985). View Details
  18. Kourigyou ni okeru Atarashii Data Kanri System no Kousou: Bumon-betsu ROI no Kaihatsu to Bunseki (A Plan for a New Data Management System in the Retailing Industry)

    Keywords: Management; System; Sales; Business Ventures; Retail Industry;

  19. Global Marketing no Senryaku-teki Yakuwari: Sekai-teki Kibo deno Coordination no Kanri ni tsuite (The Strategic Role of Global Marketing: Managing Coordination on a Worldwide Basis)

    Keywords: Marketing; Management; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Michael E. Porter. "Global Marketing no Senryaku-teki Yakuwari: Sekai-teki Kibo deno Coordination no Kanri ni tsuite (The Strategic Role of Global Marketing: Managing Coordination on a Worldwide Basis)." Hitotsubashi bijinesu rebyū [Hitotsubashi Business Review] (August 1983). View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Creating the Dynamics of Hard-to-Imitate Innovation

    Keywords: Innovation Strategy; Innovation Leadership;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Creating the Dynamics of Hard-to-Imitate Innovation." In Japan Moving Toward a More Advanced Knowledge Economy: Advanced Knowledge—Creating Companies, by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Tsutomu Shibata. Washington, D.C.: World Bank Institute (WBI), 2006. View Details
  2. Interorganizational Knowledge Creation at Shimano

    Keywords: Knowledge Acquisition; Knowledge Management; Organizational Design; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Networks; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Interorganizational Knowledge Creation at Shimano." In Japan Moving Toward a More Advanced Knowledge Economy: Advanced Knowledge—Creating Companies, by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Tsutomu Shibata. Washington, D.C.: World Bank Institute (WBI), 2006. View Details
  3. The New Dynamism of the Knowledge-Creating Company

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Creativity; Knowledge;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "The New Dynamism of the Knowledge-Creating Company." In Japan Moving Toward a More Advanced Knowledge Economy: Advanced Knowledge—Creating Companies, by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Tsutomu Shibata. Washington, D.C.: World Bank Institute (WBI), 2006. View Details
  4. The Competitiveness of Japanese Industries and Firms

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "The Competitiveness of Japanese Industries and Firms." In Japan Moving Toward a More Advanced Knowledge Economy: Advanced Knowledge—Creating Companies, by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Tsutomu Shibata. Washington, D.C.: World Bank Institute (WBI), 2006. View Details
  5. The Globalization of Markets' Revisited: Japan After Twenty Years

    Keywords: History; Globalized Economies and Regions; Globalized Markets and Industries; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "The Globalization of Markets' Revisited: Japan After Twenty Years." In The Global Market: Developing a Strategy to Manage Across Borders, edited by John A. Quelch and Rohit Deshpandé. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2004. View Details
  6. Rugby Houshiki ni yoru Shin-Seihin Kaihatsu Kyousou (New Product Development Competition Using the Rugby Method)

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Ikujiro Nonaka. "Rugby Houshiki ni yoru Shin-Seihin Kaihatsu Kyousou (New Product Development Competition Using the Rugby Method)." In Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 2: Seihin Kaihatsu Kakushin (The Age of Marketing Innovation 2: Product Development Innovation), by Mitsuaki Shimaguchi, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Hotaka Katahira, and Junzou Ishii. Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 1999, Japanese ed. View Details
  7. Nihon Kigyou no Shin-Seihin Kaihatsu ni okeru Gojuu-nen no Hensen (50-Year History of How New Product Development Changed within Japanese Companies)

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Nihon Kigyou no Shin-Seihin Kaihatsu ni okeru Gojuu-nen no Hensen (50-Year History of How New Product Development Changed within Japanese Companies)." In Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 2: Seihin Kaihatsu Kakushin (The Age of Marketing Innovation 2: Product Development Innovation), by Mitsuaki Shimaguchi, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Hotaka Katahira, and Junzou Ishii. Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 1999, Japanese ed. View Details
  8. Sengo Sewing Machine Gyoukai no Hatten to Seifu no Yakuwari (The Development of the Post-War Sewing Machine Industry and the Role of Government)

    Citation:

    Akutsu, Satoshi, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. "Sengo Sewing Machine Gyoukai no Hatten to Seifu no Yakuwari (The Development of the Post-War Sewing Machine Industry and the Role of Government)." In Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 2: Seihin Kaihatsu Kakushin (The Age of Marketing Innovation 2: Product Development Innovation), by Mitsuaki Shimaguchi, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Hotaka Katahira, and Junzou Ishii. Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 1999, Japanese ed. View Details
  9. Shouhin Kaihatsu ni okeru Miniaturization Senryaku (Miniaturization Strategy for Product Development)

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Shouhin Kaihatsu ni okeru Miniaturization Senryaku (Miniaturization Strategy for Product Development)." In Marketing Kakushin no Jidai 2: Seihin Kaihatsu Kakushin (The Age of Marketing Innovation 2: Product Development Innovation), by Mitsuaki Shimaguchi, Hirotaka Takeuchi, Hotaka Katahira, and Junzou Ishii. Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 1999, Japanese ed. View Details
  10. A Theory of the Firm's Knowledge-Creation Dynamics

    Keywords: Creativity; Knowledge Acquisition; Knowledge Management; Business Ventures; Organizational Design;

    Citation:

    Nonaka, Ikujiro, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. "A Theory of the Firm's Knowledge-Creation Dynamics." In The Dynamic Firm, edited by Alfred D. Chandler Jr., Peter Hagstrom, and Orjan Solvell. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. View Details
  11. Seihin Kaihatsu Process no Management (Management of the Product Development Process)

    Keywords: Product Development;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Ikujiro Nonaka. "Seihin Kaihatsu Process no Management (Management of the Product Development Process)." In Nihon no Kigyou System 2: Shoshiki to Senryaku (Japanese Corporate System 2: Organization and Strategy). Yuuhikaku, 1993, Japanese ed. View Details
  12. Kokusai Marketing to Kyousou Senryaku (International Marketing and Competitive Strategy)

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Marketing Strategy; Trade;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Michael E. Porter. "Kokusai Marketing to Kyousou Senryaku (International Marketing and Competitive Strategy)." In Nihon no Kigyou System 2: Soshiki to Senryaku (Japanese Corporate System 2: Organization and Strategy), edited by Hiroyuki Itami, Tadao Kagono, and Motoshige Ito. Bungei Shunjau, 1993, Japanese ed. View Details
  13. Leadership Development as a Lever for Global Transformation

    Keywords: Leadership Development; Competitive Strategy; Globalized Firms and Management; Transformation;

    Citation:

    Tichy, Noel M., Michael I. Brimm, Ram Charan, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. "Leadership Development as a Lever for Global Transformation." In Globalizing Management: Creating and Leading the Competitive Organization. John Wiley & Sons, 1992. View Details
  14. Seihin Kaihatsu ni okeru Senryaku to Soshiki (Strategy and Organization for Product Development)

    Keywords: Product Development; Corporate Strategy; Organizational Design;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Ikujiro Nonaka. "Seihin Kaihatsu ni okeru Senryaku to Soshiki (Strategy and Organization for Product Development)." In Innovation to Soshiki (Innovation and Organization). Tōyō Keizai Shinpōsha, 1986, Japanese ed. View Details
  15. Managing the New Product Development Process: How Japanese Companies Learn and Unlearn

    Keywords: Product Development; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Japan;

    Citation:

    Imai, Ken-ichi, Ikujiro Nonaka, and Hirotaka Takeuchi. "Managing the New Product Development Process: How Japanese Companies Learn and Unlearn." In The Uneasy Alliance: Managing the Productivity-Technology Dilemma, edited by R. Hayes, K. Clark, and C. Lorenz. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1985. View Details
  16. America de Naze 'Gorin no Sho' go Yomarete iruka (Why 'The Book of Five Rings' Is Read in America)

    Keywords: Strategy; Books; United States; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "America de Naze 'Gorin no Sho' go Yomarete iruka (Why 'The Book of Five Rings' Is Read in America)." In Gorin no Sho no Yomikata (Interpreting The Book of Five Rings). Goma Shobō, 1982, Japanese ed. View Details
  17. Productivity Measurement at the Level of the Firm: An Application within the Service Industry

    Keywords: Performance Productivity; Measurement and Metrics; Mathematical Methods; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Productivity Measurement at the Level of the Firm: An Application within the Service Industry." In Productivity Analysis at the Firm Level, edited by Ali Dogramaci and Nabil R. Adam. Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1981. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. The Great East Japan Earthquake (E): Yamato Transport's Response

    CEO Kikawa of Yamato Transport gave orders to his managers right after the triple disaster hit the Tohoku region of Japan to do whatever it takes to save lives and not to worry about costs. He also felt that he had to confront the government to make donations to the affected district tax-free. He also wanted to donate 10 yen per Takkyubin package the company was delivering as relief money for Tohoku but was wondering how the shareholders would react to this proposal.

    Keywords: Japan; Earthquake; Yamato Transport Company; Transportation Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, Leonard Kosinski, Christina Royce, Anna Stetsovskaya, and Evgeny Vasilyev. "The Great East Japan Earthquake (E): Yamato Transport's Response." Harvard Business School Supplement 713-442, January 2013. View Details
  2. The Great East Japan Earthquake (D): Lawson's Response

    CEO Niinami Takeshi (HBS '91) stared out his corner office window as the Tokyo skyscrapers swayed and the concrete trembled. He was in the midst of the largest seismic event to hit Japan in recorded history. Lawson's managers understood earthquake response. They had prior experience from the earthquakes in Kobe (1995), and Chuetsu (2007).

    Keywords: East Japan; Earthquake; Lawson's; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, Victor Stone, Samer Abughannam, Sebastien D'Incau, Jonathan Driscoll, Katharine Hill, and Jeffrey Reynolds. "The Great East Japan Earthquake (D): Lawson's Response." Harvard Business School Supplement 713-441, January 2013. View Details
  3. The Great East Japan Earthquake (C): Ishinomaki Kouwan Hospital's Response

    On the evening of March 11, 2011, Mayama Fumihiro, the Managing Director of Ishinomaki Kouwan Hospital knew that it would be a long, cold night. The 103 staff members and 162 patients and families were huddled on the top two floors of the four-story hospital, where they had gone to escape three tsunami waves that had destroyed the first floor and part of the second floor.

    Keywords: East Japan; Earthquake; Ishinomaki Kouwan Hospital; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, Yukiko Sakai, Rebecca Agonafir, Peter Cholewinski, Allison Kean, and Emily Kloeblen. "The Great East Japan Earthquake (C): Ishinomaki Kouwan Hospital's Response." Harvard Business School Supplement 713-440, January 2013. View Details
  4. The Great East Japan Earthquake (B): Fast Retailing Group's Response

    A few hours after the earthquake hit on March 11, 2011, CEO Tadashi Yanai of Fast Retailing was eating sushi at a restaurant near his office. He was confident that his store managers would be able to decide for themselves the best action to take in the midst of this crisis. Some of the pending decisions were whether or not to reopen the UNIQLO stores that were wiped out by the tsunami, to follow government orders to turn off the store lights, and to distribute warm clothing in the devastated areas.

    Keywords: Japan; Earthquake; Fast Retailing Group; Decisions; Natural Disasters; Crisis Management; Retail Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, Kenichi Nonomura, Dena Neuenschwander, Meghan Ricci, David Roth, Kate Schoch, and Sergey Vartanov. "The Great East Japan Earthquake (B): Fast Retailing Group's Response." Harvard Business School Supplement 713-439, November 2012. (Revised July 2013.) View Details
  5. The Great East Japan Earthquake (A)

    At 2:46pm on March 11th, 2011, a 9.0M earthquake shook the Tohoku (Northeastern) region of Japan. The epicenter of the earthquake was in the coastal waters of Tohoku and reverberations from the quake triggered a tsunami that ravaged the coastal shores of Eastern Japan. The tsunami was the greatest recorded wave in history, with its highest peak at 38.9m and waves higher than 10m hitting 530km of coastal Japan.

    Keywords: Japan; Earthquake; Tohoku; Tsunami; Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Facility; Natural Disasters; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Victor Stone. "The Great East Japan Earthquake (A)." Harvard Business School Case 712-480, April 2012. (Revised January 2013.) View Details
  6. Fast Retailing Group

    On January 1, 2011, Tadashi Yanai, the CEO of Fast Retailing Group (FR), sent his annual New Year's message to everyone in the company. The message, entitled "Change or Die," declared that FR - which included UNIQLO, Theory, Comptoir des Cotonniers, Princesse tam.tam and others within the group - would become the No. 1 apparel company in the world.

    Keywords: Expansion; Global Strategy; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Fast Retailing Group." Harvard Business School Case 711-496, April 2011. (Revised October 2012.) View Details
  7. ASAHI Net: Bringing Innovation to Education

    ASAHI Net developed a cloud-based platform for higher education institutions to use in Japan and was wondering if that platform could be accepted in the U.S. as well.

    Keywords: Higher Education; Information Management; Innovation and Invention; Knowledge Sharing; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Technology Platform; Education Industry; Information Technology Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "ASAHI Net: Bringing Innovation to Education." Harvard Business School Case 711-498, April 2011. (Revised April 2014.) View Details
  8. Knowledge Creation at Eisai Co., Ltd.

    Eisai has used knowledge creation as the engine of growth for its operation in Japan and was wondering if it can be utilized on a global scale.

    Keywords: Growth and Development; Operations; Knowledge Management; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, Ikujiro Nonaka, and Mayuka Yamazaki. "Knowledge Creation at Eisai Co., Ltd." Harvard Business School Case 711-492, April 2011. (Revised November 2011.) View Details
  9. BOOKOFF Corporation in 2006

    A visionary founder appoints a former part-time worker and homemaker as his successor in order to keep the corporate culture he created intact.

    Keywords: Leadership; Knowledge Use and Leverage;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Yoshinori Fujikawa. "BOOKOFF Corporation in 2006." Harvard Business School Case 711-454, March 2011. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  10. Shimano: The Intel of the Bicycle Business

    Shimano, known as the Intel of the bicycle business, is contemplating on investing in a new growth market, namely the comfort bicycle market.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Interactive Communication; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Industry Growth; Expansion; Bicycle Industry;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Shimano: The Intel of the Bicycle Business." Harvard Business School Case 711-460, April 2011. View Details
  11. Seven-Eleven Japan: The Tanpin Kanri Retail Practice

    This case focuses on Tanpin Kanri, which uses both store-level human knowledge and product information sharing.

    Keywords: Knowledge Sharing; Employees; Practice; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Competitive Strategy; Retail Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Seven-Eleven Japan: The Tanpin Kanri Retail Practice." Harvard Business School Case 711-501, March 2011. View Details
  12. Seven-Eleven Japan: Knowledge Creation and Sharing

    This case focuses on how to create new knowledge through hypothesis building, testing, and verification.

    Keywords: Knowledge Management; Knowledge Sharing; Japan;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, Ikujiro Nonaka, and Dai Senoo. "Seven-Eleven Japan: Knowledge Creation and Sharing." Harvard Business School Supplement 711-465, March 2011. View Details
  13. BOOKOFF Corporation in 2007

    A visionary founder appoints a former part-time worker and homemaker as his successor in order to keep the corporate culture he created intact.

    Keywords: Knowledge Dissemination; Leadership; Management Succession; Organizational Culture; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka, and Yoshinori Fujikawa. "BOOKOFF Corporation in 2007." Harvard Business School Supplement 711-506, March 2011. View Details
  14. U.S. Pioneer Electronics Corp.

    Focuses on the problem of the means by which a manufacturer controls its channel of distribution. U.S. Pioneer's retail outlets have turned "dissident" and management has to decide what tactics to employ to stop further erosion (short-run) and what long-run distribution channel to pursue. Software for this case is available (9-588-546).

    Keywords: Decisions; Growth and Development Strategy; Distribution Channels; Production; Problems and Challenges; Software; Electronics Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "U.S. Pioneer Electronics Corp." Harvard Business School Case 579-079, October 1978. (Revised July 1991.) View Details
  15. L.L. Bean, Inc.: Corporate Strategy

    L.L. Bean, Inc., a Maine-based manufacturer and mail-order retailer of sporting goods and apparel, has grown from $3 million in sales (1967) to over $120 million (1980). Current projections predict an annual compounded growth of 25% through 1985. Management must decide how to achieve this growth: through mail order, by opening more retail stores, by increasing manufacturing operations, or by going international. In managing growth, the company president is determined to maintain the highly personal service, excellent product quality, and friendly, informal working environment which he considers key to the company's popularity with customers and employees.

    Keywords: Globalization; Growth and Development; Growth Management; Production; Quality; Sales; Situation or Environment; Corporate Strategy; Online Technology; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "L.L. Bean, Inc.: Corporate Strategy." Harvard Business School Case 581-159, June 1981. (Revised May 1988.) View Details
  16. Strategic Issues in Distribution

    Provides students with an in-depth understanding of the channel decision from the manufacturer's point of view. The two issues addressed in the note are selection of channel design and channel management.

    Keywords: Distribution Channels; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Strategic Issues in Distribution." Harvard Business School Background Note 581-026, September 1980. (Revised February 1987.) View Details
  17. Dunkin' Donuts (C): Growth Strategy

    Dunkin' Donuts franchises and operates retail donut shops for take-home and in-shop consumption. Looks at three growth alternatives: 1) More shops (owned or franchised); 2) A broader product line; and 3) More advertising. Raises important issues related to franchise relations. A merger of Dunkin' Donuts (A) and (B).

    Keywords: Advertising; Growth and Development Strategy; Growth Management; Brands and Branding; Logistics; Franchise Ownership; Relationships; Food and Beverage Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka. "Dunkin' Donuts (C): Growth Strategy." Harvard Business School Case 584-041, September 1983. (Revised December 1985.) View Details