Ananth Raman

UPS Foundation Professor of Business Logistics

Ananth Raman, UPS Foundation Professor of Business Logistics, specializes in operations management. He teaches courses in supply chain management, service operations, and the investor's perspective on operations to MBA students and executive participants. He teaches a doctoral course on operations management at Harvard Business School, and serves as primary thesis advisor for multiple doctoral students.

He is co-director of a multi-year research project (the "Consortium for Operational Excellence in Retailing") to study retail operations, supply chain, and merchandising practices. Over 30 retailers from the United States, Japan and Europe have participated in this study. The project involves researchers from a number of universities including the Harvard Business School and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. 

He has consulted with, and been responsible for management education programs for executives in, a number of companies. His research on forecasting and inventory planning has been implemented at multiple companies.

Raman has a Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, an M.B.A. from the Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta, and a Ph.D. from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania.

Books

  1. The New Science of Retailing: How Analytics Are Transforming the Supply Chain and Improving Performance

    Retailers today are drowning in data but lacking in insight: They have huge volumes of information at their disposal. But they're unsure of how to sort through it and use it to make smart decisions. The result? They're struggling with profit-sapping supply chain problems including stock-outs, overstock, and discounting. It doesn't have to be that way. In The New Science of Retailing, supply chain experts Marshall Fisher and Ananth Raman explain how to use analytics to better manage your inventory for faster turns, fewer discounted offerings, and fatter profit margins. Featuring case studies of retailing exemplars from around the world, this practical new book shows you how to accomplish the following: mine your sales data to identify "homerun" products you're missing; reinvent your forecasting and pricing strategies; build end-to-end agility into your supply chain; establish incentives that align your supply chain partners behind shared objectives; and extract maximum value from technologies such as point-of-sale scanners and customer loyalty cards. Highly readable and compelling, The New Science of Retailing is your playbook for turning all that data into a wellspring for new profits and unprecedented efficiency.

    Keywords: Profit; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Logistics; Supply Chain Management; Mathematical Methods; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Fisher, Marshall, and Ananth Raman. The New Science of Retailing: How Analytics Are Transforming the Supply Chain and Improving Performance. Harvard Business Press, 2010. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Retail Inventory: Managing the Canary in the Coal Mine!

    Retail inventory is a statistic that is closely watched by retailers as well as their investors, lenders, and suppliers. Retailers not only benefit from inventory, but also bear the cost of excess inventory. Investors, lenders, and suppliers interpret this statistic for signs of the retailer's health, future sales prospects, and impending costs. While prior research on inventory has typically focused primarily on the retailer's profit and cash flow, this paper synthesizes the perspectives of investors, lenders, and suppliers and shows that inventory turns, a commonly used metric to identify excess inventory, has limitations that reduce its utility for all these stakeholders. This paper presents a new metric, adjusted inventory turns, which overcomes the drawbacks of inventory turns and can be uniformly utilized by all stakeholders to assess whether a retailer is carrying too much or too little inventory. We explain applications of the metric with examples and lay out prescriptions for retailers.

    Keywords: Financial Condition; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Gaur, Vishal, Saravanan Kesavan, and Ananth Raman. "Retail Inventory: Managing the Canary in the Coal Mine!" California Management Review 56, no. 2 (Winter 2014): 55–76. View Details
  2. Health Care's Service Fanatics: How the Cleveland Clinic Leaped to the Top of the Patient-satisfaction Surveys

    The Cleveland Clinic has long had a reputation for medical excellence. But in 2009 the CEO acknowledged that patients did not think much of their experience there, and he decided to act. Since then the Clinic has leaped to the top tier of patient-satisfaction surveys, and it now draws hospital executives from around the world who want to study its practices. The Clinic's journey also holds lessons for organizations outside health care that must suddenly compete by creating a superior customer experience. The authors, one of whom was critical to steering the hospital's transformation, detail the processes that allowed the Clinic to excel at patient satisfaction without jeopardizing its traditional strengths.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Customer Satisfaction; Health Industry; Cleveland;

    Citation:

    Merlino, James, and Ananth Raman. "Health Care's Service Fanatics: How the Cleveland Clinic Leaped to the Top of the Patient-satisfaction Surveys." Harvard Business Review 91, no. 5 (May 2013): 108–116. View Details
  3. The Manufacturer's Incentive to Reduce Lead Times

    It is generally a well acknowledged fact that, ceteris paribus, reducing the lead times between downstream and upstream parties in a supply chain is desirable from an overall system perspective. However, an upstream party (e.g., a manufacturer) may have strong disincentives to offer shorter lead times, even if lead time reduction came at no cost. This paper investigates a manufacturer's incentive to reduce lead times. We consider a setting in which the downstream party has the ability to exert a costly effort to increase demand (e.g., through sales promotions, advertising, etc.) during the selling season and compare two situations: one where there is zero lead time (i.e., all demand can be satisfied after observing the demand realization), and one where orders need to be made before demand is realized. In our analysis, the latter situation corresponds to a newsvendor model with the additional decision of choosing a sales effort to increase demand at a convex increasing cost after observing demand. We identify two interacting effects that may inhibit shorter lead times. A so-called "safety stock effect" can be observed when a lower risk of stocking out under short lead times induces the downstream party to alter its order quantity. A second effect, termed as "effort effect," arises if shorter lead times impact the downstream party's optimal sales effort and, as a consequence, lead to different order quantities. We provide a formal characterization of both effects, insight into how these effects interact, and information on which conditions the manufacturer has an incentive to offer shorter lead times.

    Keywords: Cost; Demand and Consumers; Order Taking and Fulfillment; Production; Supply Chain Management; Sales; Manufacturing Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Kraiselburd, Santiago, Richard Pibernik, and Ananth Raman. "The Manufacturer's Incentive to Reduce Lead Times." Production and Operations Management 20, no. 5 (September–October 2011): 639–653. View Details
  4. The Effect of Product Variety and Inventory Levels on Retail Sales: A Longitudinal Study

    We examine the effects of product variety and inventory levels on store sales. Using four years of data from stores of a large retailer, we show that increases in product variety and inventory levels are both associated with higher sales. We also show that increasing product variety and inventory levels has an indirect negative effect on store sales through their impact on phantom products-products that are physically present at the store, but only in storage areas where customers cannot find or purchase them. Our study highlights a consequence of increased product variety and inventory levels that has previously been overlooked in studies of retail product variety and inventory management. It also quantifies the impact of phantom products on store sales. In addition, our study provides empirical evidence to support earlier claims that higher product variety and inventory levels lead to an increase in defect rate. We discuss the implications of our findings for retail inventory and assortment planning and for the design of retail stores.

    Keywords: Buildings and Facilities; Design; Logistics; Product; Quality; Sales; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Ton, Zeynep, and Ananth Raman. "The Effect of Product Variety and Inventory Levels on Retail Sales: A Longitudinal Study." Production and Operations Management 19, no. 5 (September–October 2010): 546–560. View Details
  5. Do Inventory and Gross Margin Data Improve Sales Forecasts for U.S. Public Retailers?

    Firm-level sales forecasts for retailers can be improved if we incorporate cost of goods sold, inventory, and gross margin (defined here as the ratio of sales to cost of goods sold) as three endogenous variables. We construct a simultaneous equations model, estimated using public financial and non-financial data, to provide joint forecasts of annual cost of goods sold, inventory, and gross margin for retailers using historical data. We show that sales forecasts from this model are more accurate than consensus forecasts from equity analysts. Further, the residuals from this model for one fiscal year are used to predict retailers for whom the relative advantage of model forecasts over consensus forecasts would be large in the next fiscal year. Our results show that historical inventory and gross margin contain information useful to forecast sales, and that equity analysts do not fully utilize this information in their sales forecasts.

    Keywords: Sales; Forecasting and Prediction; Distribution; Goods and Commodities; Cost; Public Sector; Profit; Mathematical Methods; Data and Data Sets; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Kesavan, Saravanan, Vishal Gaur, and Ananth Raman. "Do Inventory and Gross Margin Data Improve Sales Forecasts for U.S. Public Retailers?" Management Science 56, no. 9 (September 2010). View Details
  6. Inventory Record Inaccuracy: An Empirical Analysis

    This study explores the systematic variation in inventory record inaccuracy (IRI) observed both within and across stores. Traditional inventory models, with a few exceptions, do not account for the existence of IRI and those that do treat record inaccuracy as random. Examining nearly 370,000 inventory records from 37 stores of one retailer, we found 65% to be inaccurate. That is, the recorded inventory quantity of an item fails to match the quantity found in the store. We identify factors associated with this inaccuracy that are stock keeping unit- (SKU) and store-specific. SKU-specific factors such as item cost, selling quantity, and method of distribution account for the observed variation in IRI within stores. Store-specific factors such as the density and variety of inventory observed at each store account for the variation in IRI across stores.

    Keywords: Information Management; Measurement and Metrics; Logistics; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    DeHoratius, Nicole, and Ananth Raman. "Inventory Record Inaccuracy: An Empirical Analysis." Management Science 54, no. 4 (April 2008). View Details
  7. Estimating Demand Uncertainty Using Judgmental Forecasts

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Judgments; Forecasting and Prediction;

    Citation:

    Gaur, Vishal, Saravanan Kesavan, Ananth Raman, and Marshall L. Fisher. "Estimating Demand Uncertainty Using Judgmental Forecasts." Manufacturing & Service Operations Management 9, no. 4 (fall 2007). View Details
  8. Store Manager Incentive Design and Retail Performance: An Exploratory Investigation

    Keywords: Motivation and Incentives; Management; Design; Performance; Information;

    Citation:

    DeHoratius, Nicole, and Ananth Raman. "Store Manager Incentive Design and Retail Performance: An Exploratory Investigation." Manufacturing & Service Operations Management 9, no. 4 (fall 2007). View Details
  9. An Econometric Analysis of Inventory Turnover Performance in Retail Services

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods; Assets; Performance; Sales; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Gaur, Vishal, Marshall L. Fisher, and Ananth Raman. "An Econometric Analysis of Inventory Turnover Performance in Retail Services." Management Science 51, no. 2 (February 2005): 181–194. View Details
  10. Agency Costs in a Supply Chain with Demand Uncertainty and Price Competition

    Keywords: Cost; Supply Chain; Risk and Uncertainty; Price; Competition;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Ananth Raman, and J. Singh. "Agency Costs in a Supply Chain with Demand Uncertainty and Price Competition." Management Science 51, no. 1 (January 2005). View Details
  11. Aligning Incentives in Supply Chains

    Keywords: Motivation and Incentives; Supply Chain;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ananth Raman. "Aligning Incentives in Supply Chains." Harvard Business Review 82, no. 11 (November 2004). View Details
  12. Contracting in a Supply Chain with Stochastic Demand and Substitute Products

    Keywords: Supply Chain; Product;

    Citation:

    Kraiselburd, Santiago, V.G. Narayanan, and Ananth Raman. "Contracting in a Supply Chain with Stochastic Demand and Substitute Products." Production and Operations Management 13, no. 1 (spring 2004). View Details
  13. Building on Foundations of Sand?

    Citation:

    DeHoratius, Nicole, and Ananth Raman. "Building on Foundations of Sand?" ECR Journal 3, no. 1 (spring 2003). View Details
  14. Incentives: Getting What You Pay For

    Keywords: Motivation and Incentives;

    Citation:

    DeHoratius, Nicole, and Ananth Raman. "Incentives: Getting What You Pay For." ECR Journal (winter 2003). View Details
  15. Quantifying the Impact of Inventory Holding Cost and Reactive Capacity on an Apparel Manufacturer's Profitability

    Keywords: Assets; Cost; Profit; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Kim Bowon. "Quantifying the Impact of Inventory Holding Cost and Reactive Capacity on an Apparel Manufacturer's Profitability." Production and Operations Management 11, no. 1 (spring 2002). View Details
  16. Optimizing Inventory Replenishment of Retail Fashion Products

    Keywords: Assets; Product;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Marshall Fisher, and Kumar Rajaram. "Optimizing Inventory Replenishment of Retail Fashion Products." Manufacturing & Service Operations Management 3, no. 3 (summer 2001): 230–241. View Details
  17. The Achilles Heel of Supply Chain Management

    Keywords: Supply Chain; Management;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Nicole DeHoratius, and Zeynep Ton. "The Achilles Heel of Supply Chain Management." Harvard Business Review 79, no. 5 (May 2001): 136–152. View Details
  18. Execution: The Missing Link in Retail Operations

    Keywords: Sales;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Nicole DeHoratius, and Zeynep Ton. "Execution: The Missing Link in Retail Operations." California Management Review 43, no. 3 (spring 2001). View Details
  19. Rocket-Science Retailing Is Almost Here: Are You Ready?

    Keywords: Science; Sales;

    Citation:

    Fisher, Marshall L., A. Raman, and Anna McClelland. "Rocket-Science Retailing Is Almost Here: Are You Ready?" Harvard Business Review 78, no. 4 (July–August 2000): 115–124. View Details
  20. Coordinating and Managing Supply Chains: The General Manager's Role

    Keywords: Management; Supply Chain;

    Citation:

    Raman, A. "Coordinating and Managing Supply Chains: The General Manager's Role." POMS Series in Technology and Operations Management (January 2000). View Details
  21. Configuring a Supply Chain to Reduce the Cost of Demand Uncertainty

    Keywords: Supply Chain; Cost; Risk and Uncertainty;

    Citation:

    Raman, A., M. Fisher, J. Hammond, and W. Obermeyer. "Configuring a Supply Chain to Reduce the Cost of Demand Uncertainty." Production and Operations Management 6, no. 3 (fall 1997): 211–225. View Details
  22. Reducing the Cost of Demand Uncertainty through Accurate Response to Early Sales

    Keywords: Cost; Risk and Uncertainty; Sales;

    Citation:

    Raman, A., and M. Fisher. "Reducing the Cost of Demand Uncertainty through Accurate Response to Early Sales." Operations Research 44, no. 4 (January 1996): 87–99. View Details
  23. Analysis of Distribution Strategies in the Industrial Paper and Plastics Industry

    Keywords: Strategy; Pulp and Paper Industry; Industrial Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, A., M. Cohen, N. Agrawal, and V. Agrawal. "Analysis of Distribution Strategies in the Industrial Paper and Plastics Industry." Operations Research 43, no. 1 (January 1995): 6–19. View Details
  24. Making Supply Meet Demand in an Uncertain World

    Keywords: Supply and Industry;

    Citation:

    Fisher, M., J. Hammond, W. Obermeyer, and A. Raman. "Making Supply Meet Demand in an Uncertain World." Harvard Business Review 72, no. 3 (May–June 1994): 83–92. View Details
  25. Accurate Response: The Key to Profiting from Quick Response

    Keywords: Profit;

    Citation:

    Raman, A., M. Fisher, J. Hammond, and W. Obermeyer. "Accurate Response: The Key to Profiting from Quick Response." Bobbin (February 1994). View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Managing Global Supply Chains

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Globalized Markets and Industries;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Noel Watson. "Managing Global Supply Chains." In The Global Market: Developing a Strategy to Manage Across Borders, edited by John A. Quelch and Rohit Deshpandé. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2004. View Details
  2. Managing Short-Lifecycle Products

    Keywords: History;

    Citation:

    Raman, A., and Marshall Fisher. "Managing Short-Lifecycle Products." In Achieving Supply Chain Excellence through Technology, edited by David L. Anderson. Montgomery Research, Inc., 1999. View Details
  3. Managing Inventory for Fashion Products

    Keywords: Logistics; Fashion Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, A. "Managing Inventory for Fashion Products." In Quantitative Models for Supply Chain Management, edited by S. Tayur, R. Gaheshan, and M. Magazine. Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999. View Details
  4. Configuring a Supply Chain to Reduce the Cost of Demand Uncertainty

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Cost Management; Demand and Consumers; Risk Management; Risk and Uncertainty;

    Citation:

    Hammond, J. H., Marshall L. Fisher, Walter Obermeyer, and A. Raman. "Configuring a Supply Chain to Reduce the Cost of Demand Uncertainty." In Global Supply Chain and Technology Management. Vol. 1, edited by Hau Lee and Shu Ming Ng, 76–90. POMS Series in Technology and Operations Management. Miami: Production and Operations Management Society (POMS), 1998. View Details
  5. Matching Supply with Demand in Supply Chains: The Impact of Factor Markets and Mismatched Incentives

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Motivation and Incentives;

    Citation:

    Raman, A. "Matching Supply with Demand in Supply Chains: The Impact of Factor Markets and Mismatched Incentives." In Strategic Supply Chain Alignment: Best Practice in Supply Chain Management, edited by John L. Gattorna. Gower, 1998. View Details

Working Papers

  1. Improving Store Liquidation

    Store liquidation is the time-constrained divestment of retail outlets through an in-store sale of inventory. The retail industry depends extensively on store liquidation, not only as a means for investors to recover capital from failed ventures, but also to allow managers of going concerns to divest stores in efforts to enhance performance and to change strategy. Recent examples of entire chains being liquidated include Borders Group in 2012, Circuit City in 2009, and Linens 'n Things in 2008; the value of inventory sold during these liquidations alone is $3B. The store liquidation problem is related to but also differs substantially from the markdown optimization problem that has been studied extensively in the literature. This paper introduces the store liquidation problem to the literature and presents a technique for optimizing key decision variables, such as markdown, inventory, and store closing decisions during liquidations. We show that our approach could improve net recovery on cost (i.e., the profit obtained during liquidations stated as a percentage of the cost value of liquidated assets) by 2 to 7 percentage points in the cases we examined. The paper also identifies ways in which current practice in store liquidation differs from the optimal decisions identified in the paper and traces the consequences of these differences.

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Financial Condition; Operations; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Craig, Nathan, and Ananth Raman. "Improving Store Liquidation." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 13-096, May 2013. View Details
  2. When Supply-Chain Disruptions Matter

    Supply-chain disruptions have a material effect on company value, but this impact can vary considerably. Thus, it is important for managers and investors to recognize the types of disruptions and the organizational factors that lead to the worst outcomes. Prior research remains unsettled as to whether improvements to firm operational efficiency aggravate or alleviate the impact of disruptions. Improved operational efficiency may leave firms more exposed when a disruption occurs, or it may improve firms' agility and allow them to respond more effectively to a disruption. We hypothesize that the impact of improved operational efficiency depends on whether the disruption is due to factors that are internal versus external to the firm and its supply chain. We use a sample of over 500 disruptions collected from company press releases and find empirical evidence that a higher rate of improvement in operating performance aggravates the impact of internal disruptions but not external disruptions. By taking advantage of an exogenous policy shock regarding corporate disclosure rules, we also find that managers show systematic bias in the disruptions they choose to announce, and we control for this effect in our model specifications.

    Keywords: Supply Chain; Operations; Performance Efficiency;

    Citation:

    Schmidt, William, and Ananth Raman. "When Supply-Chain Disruptions Matter." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 13-006, July 2012. (Revised January 2013.) View Details
  3. Signaling to Partially Informed Investors in the Newsvendor Model

    We investigate a puzzling phenomenon in which firms make investment decisions that purposefully do not maximize expected profits. Using an extension to the newsvendor model, we focus on a relatively common scenario in which the firm's investor has imperfect information concerning the quality of the firm's investment opportunities. We apply Perfect Bayesian equilibrium solution concepts and confirm that over a range of reasonable model parameters the firm's investment decision does not maximize expected profits. Surprisingly, this includes instances in which a firm with a higher quality investment opportunity finds it attractive to underinvest, thereby behaving as if she faces a lower quality investment opportunity. This is particularly interesting as prior research in the finance literature has shown that firms will overinvest in high quality projects when investors have imperfect information about the quality of the firm's opportunities. While we conduct our analysis in the context of an inventory stocking decision, our model is generalizable to other types of capacity investment decisions.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Investment; Profit; Logistics; Performance Capacity; Game Theory; Valuation;

    Citation:

    Schmidt, William, Vishal Gaur, Richard Lai, and Ananth Raman. "Signaling to Partially Informed Investors in the Newsvendor Model." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 11-105, April 2011. (Revised March 2012.) View Details
  4. The Impact of Supplier Reliability on Retailer Demand

    To set inventory service levels, firms must understand how changes in service level affect customer demand. While the effects of service level changes have been studied empirically at the level of the end consumer, relatively little is known about the interaction between a retailer and a supplier. Using data from a manufacturer of branded apparel, we show increases in service level to be associated with statistically significant increases in retailer orders (i.e., demand, not just sales). Controlling for other factors that might affect demand, we find a 1 percent increase in historical service level to be associated with a 12 percent increase in demand from retailers, where historical service level is the type 1 service level performance of the apparel manufacturer over the prior year. Further, we find that retailers that order frequently exhibit a more substantial reaction to changes in service level, an outcome that is consistent with retailers learning about and reacting to changes in supplier service level. Our study not only provides the first empirical evidence of the impact of changes in service level on demand from retailers but also illustrates a method for estimating this relationship in practice.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Forecasting and Prediction; Learning; Consumer Behavior; Service Delivery; Performance Expectations; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Craig, Nathan, Nicole DeHoratius, and Ananth Raman. "The Impact of Supplier Reliability on Retailer Demand." Working Paper, September 2013. (Under revision.) View Details
  5. Incorporating Price and Inventory Endogeneity in Firm-Level Sales Forecasting

    Citation:

    Kesavan, Saravanan, Vishal Gaur, and Ananth Raman. "Incorporating Price and Inventory Endogeneity in Firm-Level Sales Forecasting." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 07-056, March 2007. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Beijing's Terminal 3: Building a New Gateway to China

    Citation:

    Fearing, Douglas, Ananth Raman, and G.A. Donovan. "Beijing's Terminal 3: Building a New Gateway to China." Harvard Business School Case 613-051, January 2013. View Details
  2. SCMS: Battling HIV/AIDS in Africa

    In 2005, USAID and the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), created the Supply Chain Management System (SCMS) to procure and distribute essential medicines and supplies; provide technical assistance to transform existing supply chains; and collaborate with in-country and global partners to coordinate efforts. The new U.S. Global Health Initiative (GHI) initialized in 2010 sought to build on these efforts through strengthened platforms and systems. PEPFAR's five-year strategy, as contribution to the GHI, focused on transitioning the program from an emergency response to a sustainable, country-owned effort. The case describes the general approach designed by SCMS, the intricacies of its successful implementation in Ethiopia, and the challenges moving forward in that country.

    Keywords: HIV; AIDS; procurement coordination; developing countries; healthcare; supply chain management; public health; Ethiopia; Supply Systems for healthcare delivery in developing countries; Healthcare Logistics Industry; Health Disorders; Health Care and Treatment; Service Delivery; Supply Chain Management; Logistics; Developing Countries and Economies; Programs; Transition; Strategy; Pharmaceutical Industry; Health Industry; Ethiopia; Africa;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Noel Watson, Santiago Kraiselburd, and Emmanuel Akili. "SCMS: Battling HIV/AIDS in Africa." Harvard Business School Case 613-023, September 2012. View Details
  3. Merck: Operating Science-Based Business

    Merck is known for its commitment to investing in basic R&D. Are Merck's long-term investments justifiable when the firm faces extreme earnings pressure?

    Keywords: Science-Based Business; Management; Research and Development; Business and Shareholder Relations; Operations; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Inga Maurer, and William Schmidt. "Merck: Operating Science-Based Business." Harvard Business School Case 612-082, April 2012. (Revised May 2012.) View Details
  4. Inventory-Based Lending Industry Note

    Inventory-based lending is a form of asset-based lending used by retailers and wholesalers. This note describes the development and the current state of the inventory-based lending industry.

    Keywords: Banks and Banking; Financing and Loans; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Foley, C. Fritz, Ananth Raman, and Nathan C. Craig. "Inventory-Based Lending Industry Note." Harvard Business School Background Note 612-057, January 2012. (Revised May 2013.) View Details
  5. Cleveland Clinic: Improving the Patient Experience

    Healthcare has traditionally focused on medical outcomes and financial performance. The big question is always, "How much is it going to cost?" What would happen, though, if healthcare also considered the question of "How does the patient feel?" This case looks at the Cleveland Clinic's attempt to answer the latter question by attempting to institutionalize empathy as part of its delivery of care.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Customer Satisfaction; Performance Improvement; Service Delivery; Value Creation; Personal Characteristics; Human Needs;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Anita L. Tucker. "Cleveland Clinic: Improving the Patient Experience." Harvard Business School Case 612-031, September 2011. (Revised February 2013.) View Details
  6. The Cleveland Clinic: Improving the Patient Experience (Abridged)

    Healthcare has traditionally focused on medical outcomes and financial performance. The big question is always, "How much is it going to cost?" What would happen though if healthcare also considered question of "How does the patient feel?" This case looks at the Cleveland Clinic's attempt to answer the latter question by attempting to institutionalize empathy as part of its delivery of care.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Ethics; Health Care and Treatment; Six Sigma; Performance Improvement; Safety; Value Creation;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Anita L. Tucker, and Rachel Gordon. "The Cleveland Clinic: Improving the Patient Experience (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 611-015, October 2010. View Details
  7. Investor Meets Calendar Retailer (AMP)

    Keywords: Investment; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Vishal Gaur, and Richard Lai. "Investor Meets Calendar Retailer (AMP)." Harvard Business School Exercise 611-031, October 2010. View Details
  8. Merck: Investing in Science-Based Business (Abridged)

    Ray Gilmartin faces a dilemma. His company's credibility has been damaged by the recent withdrawal of Vioxx, a multi-billion dollar drug. Moreover, the withdrawal of Vioxx would imply that Merck would fail to meet analysts' earnings expectations for 2005 unless Gilmartin cuts the R&D budget. Cutting the budget might hurt morale and productivity in Merck labs.

    Keywords: Factories, Labs, and Plants; Cost Management; Production; Research and Development;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Inga Katharina Maurer. "Merck: Investing in Science-Based Business (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 611-027, September 2010. View Details
  9. Airbus A380—Turbulence Ahead

    Multiple delays of the Airbus A380 have shocked analysts and investors alike. What are the causes of these delays and how should investors respond to the signals they may be sending about the company's outlook?

    Keywords: Investment; Product Development; Outcome or Result; Performance Expectations; Air Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, William Schmidt, and Vishal Gaur. "Airbus A380—Turbulence Ahead." Harvard Business School Case 609-041, October 2008. (Revised January 2010.) View Details
  10. Investor Meets Calendar Retailer

    Keywords: Investment; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Vishal Gaur, and Richard Lai. "Investor Meets Calendar Retailer." Harvard Business School Exercise 610-037, November 2009. View Details
  11. David Berman (TN)

    Teaching Note for [605081].

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Vishal Gaur, and Saravanan Kesavan. "David Berman (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 609-006, July 2008. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  12. Supply Chain Optimization at Hugo Boss (A)

    We evaluate the impact of a supply chain pilot implemented at Hugo Boss. This pilot entailed altering the way in which Hugo Boss orders from its suppliers. We explore the challenge of assessing the impact of supply chain change, the link between operational performance and firm performance, and the relationship between sales, inventory, and product availability.

    Keywords: Order Taking and Fulfillment; Logistics; Supply Chain Management; Performance Evaluation; Sales; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Retail Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Nicole DeHoratius, and Zahra Kanji. "Supply Chain Optimization at Hugo Boss (A)." Harvard Business School Case 609-029, April 2009. View Details
  13. Supply Chain Optimization at Hugo Boss (B) - The M-Ratio

    We evaluate the impact of a supply chain pilot implemented at Hugo Boss. This pilot entailed altering the way in which Hugo Boss orders from its suppliers. We explore the challenge of assessing the impact of supply chain change, the link between operational performance and firm performance, and the relationship between sales, inventory, and product availability.

    Keywords: Supply Chain; Performance Evaluation; Problems and Challenges; Sales; Change; Valuation; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Nicole DeHoratius, and Zahra Kanji. "Supply Chain Optimization at Hugo Boss (B) - The M-Ratio." Harvard Business School Supplement 609-055, April 2009. View Details
  14. Operational Execution at Arrow Electronics

    Distribution center operations (from order taking to order fulfillment) and the importance of attending to process details at Arrow Electronics, a large distributor of electronic components and computer products are described. The case also details the actions the company takes to achieve and maintain accurate inventory records and the importance of inventory record accuracy to the company's strategy.

    Keywords: Information; Distribution; Logistics; Strategy; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Zeynep Ton. "Operational Execution at Arrow Electronics." Harvard Business School Case 603-127, April 2003. (Revised March 2009.) View Details
  15. Borders Group, Inc. (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-601-037).

    Keywords: Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Ton, Zeynep, and Ananth Raman. "Borders Group, Inc. (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 606-144, May 2006. (Revised March 2009.) View Details
  16. AREVA T&D

    The case explores the rapid and highly effective turnaround at AREVA's transmission and distribution (T and D) business by focusing on the division's operations. The division was struggling in 2004 when newly-appointed CEO Philippe Guillemot and his team improved performance substantially by focusing on four levers— industrial footprint realignment, competitive sourcing, process efficiency, and a competitive product offering. In 2008, the case challenges students to identify the best path forward. How can the progress achieved from 2004 to 2007 be sustained? AREVA T and D hopes to surpass ABB and Siemens in sales and profitability by focusing on superior product offerings, through "customer intimacy" (e.g., involving customers in new product development) and developing a reputation for environmentally friendly behavior. What is the role of operations management in this context?

    Keywords: Business Divisions; Customer Focus and Relationships; Product Development; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Performance Improvement; Environmental Sustainability;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Vincent Marie Dessain, Ane Damgaard Jensen, and Gudrun Urfalino Kristinsdottir. "AREVA T&D." Harvard Business School Case 608-174, June 2008. (Revised October 2008.) View Details
  17. Tale of Two Electronic Components Distributors

    Discusses the role of distribution intermediaries in the electronic components industry, and describes operations at two of these distributors. Serves as a vehicle to discuss the functions provided by distributors in the channel. Also lets students understand the differences between the distributors and discuss how each of them is going to deal with issues like consolidation and the rapid growth of the Internet. Also introduces students to the complexity of managing operations at a small distributor.

    Keywords: Growth and Development Strategy; Distribution Channels; Consolidation; Internet; Distribution Industry; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Bharat P. Rao. "Tale of Two Electronic Components Distributors." Harvard Business School Case 697-064, February 1997. (Revised November 2007.) View Details
  18. David Berman

    Examines the decision of a hedge fund manager who is considering investing in a retail stock. The protagonist is concerned about the retailer's inventory level. Explores the relationship between the retailer's inventory and future earnings--and, hence, the relationship between inventory level and stock price.

    Keywords: Business Earnings; Stocks; Price; Supply Chain Management; Investment;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Vishal Gaur, and Saravanan Kesavan. "David Berman." Harvard Business School Case 605-081, April 2005. (Revised October 2006.) View Details
  19. Sport Obermeyer Ltd.

    The case describes operations at a skiwear design and merchandising company and its supply partner. Introduces production planning for short-life-cycle products with uncertain demand and allows students to analyze a reduced version of the company's production planning problem. In addition, it provides details about information and material flows that allow students to make recommendations for operational improvements, including comparisons between sourcing products in Hong Kong and China.

    Keywords: Product; Supply Chain; Demand and Consumers; Production; Planning; Globalized Markets and Industries; Forecasting and Prediction; Industry Growth; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Sports Industry; United States; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Hammond, Janice H., and Ananth Raman. "Sport Obermeyer Ltd." Harvard Business School Case 695-022, October 1994. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  20. India's Big Bazaar

    Keywords: Retail Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Laura Winig. "India's Big Bazaar." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 606-711, June 2006. View Details
  21. Big Bazaar

    Describes a high-growth Indian retailer, Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd., and two of the company's formats--Big Bazaar and Food Bazaar. Challenges students to debate the company's concept, its strategic decision on how quickly it would like to grow, and some key decisions on its supply chain. At the time of the case (2006), small "mom-and-pop" stores still dominated Indian retailing, but that was changing rapidly because of the entry of "organized" retailers such as Pantaloon. Pantaloon's management faced some exciting opportunities as well as some potential competition from global retailers that were planning to enter the Indian market and large Indian business houses that were planning to establish retailing businesses.

    Keywords: Business Units; Transformation; Growth and Development Strategy; Emerging Markets; Market Entry and Exit; Supply Chain Management; Competition; Corporate Strategy; Retail Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Laura Winig. "Big Bazaar." Harvard Business School Case 606-099, April 2006. View Details
  22. Bradman and Tendulkar, LLC

    An investment firm is trying to project inventory turns for Radio Shack, a chain of consumer electronics stores. The investment firm has access to public financial data but not to internal operational metrics. It needs to project inventory turns because inventory impacts cash flow, which affects valuation.

    Keywords: Forecasting and Prediction; Cash Flow; Demand and Consumers; Distribution Channels; Mathematical Methods; Valuation;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Vishal Gaur. "Bradman and Tendulkar, LLC." Harvard Business School Case 604-085, February 2004. View Details
  23. Borders Group, Inc.

    Describes Borders Group, a well-known retail chain, in late 1999 and its traditional strengths and rapid growth in the 1990s. By 1990, however, the company had fallen behind Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble in leveraging the Internet for book retailing, although it potentially had an opportunity to be the leader in integrating the store with the Internet in a "bricks and clicks" model. Allows students to explore the opportunities and pitfalls in pursuing bricks and clicks. Highlights the need for excellence in store execution.

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Customer Value and Value Chain; Distribution Channels; Service Operations; Business Growth and Maturation; Economic Growth; Industry Growth; Growth and Development; Internet; Business Model; Order Taking and Fulfillment; Supply and Industry; Retail Industry; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Ton, Zeynep, and Ananth Raman. "Borders Group, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 601-037, August 2000. (Revised February 2003.) View Details
  24. Hamptonshire Express

    Presents a series of problems that face a newspaper publisher, including inventory level, effort level, subsidy for unsold inventory, and commission for sales. Each problem is accompanied by one or more spreadsheets. Students must make various operational decisions.

    Keywords: Marketing Channels; Motivation and Incentives; Performance; Operations; Problems and Challenges; Decision Making; Sales; Demand and Consumers; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Publishing Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ananth Raman. "Hamptonshire Express." Harvard Business School Case 698-053, March 1998. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  25. Hamptonshire Express TN

    Teaching Note for (9-698-053).

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ananth Raman. "Hamptonshire Express TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 698-073, April 1998. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  26. Supply Chain Management at World Co., Ltd.

    Describes a supply chain with very quick (i.e., two week) response times and allows students to explore how such short response times are achieved. Allows students to explore why other supply chains, with much longer response times, might not be able to replicate this performance.

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Supply Chain; Knowledge Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Management Practices and Processes; Performance Improvement;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, Marshall L. Fisher, and Anna Sheen McClelland. "Supply Chain Management at World Co., Ltd." Harvard Business School Case 601-072, April 2001. (Revised November 2001.) View Details
  27. Norwalk Furniture (A) and (B) TN

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Norwalk Furniture (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-153, June 2001. View Details
  28. Supply Chain Management at World Co., Ltd. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-601-072).

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Supply Chain Management at World Co., Ltd. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-147, June 2001. View Details
  29. i2 Technologies, Inc. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-699-042).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "i2 Technologies, Inc. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-143, June 2001. View Details
  30. CompUSA: The Computer Superstore TN

    Teaching Note for (9-699-026).

    Keywords: Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "CompUSA: The Computer Superstore TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-145, June 2001. View Details
  31. Merchandising At Nine West Retail Stores TN

    Teaching Note for (9-698-098).

    Keywords: Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Merchandising At Nine West Retail Stores TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-148, June 2001. View Details
  32. Coordinating + Managing Supply Chains: Course Overview Note TN

    Describes the MBA elective course on supply chain management at HBS. Coordinating and Managing Supply Chains focuses on the managerial aspects of supply chains. Acquaints students with practical issues in a variety of supply chains and then identifies barriers to, and frameworks and tools for, improving supply chain operations. The course emphasizes the difficulty of achieving the vision of supply chain integration that has been argued effectively by many authors and makes clear that suitable information technology and appropriate algorthims are a necessary, but not sufficient, ingredient for supply chain integration. Cases in the course illustrate that barriers to integrating supply chains often relate to behavioral (e.g., misaligned incentives and change management) and process (e.g., execution problems in stores and distribution centers) issues that fall squarely in the domain of the general manager. Because effective supply chain management necessitates the crossing of functional as well as organizational boundaries, the course draws upon students' knowledge of diverse functional areas, such as finance, marketing, operations, and organizational behavior. Consequently, it is most effectively employed in MBA or Executive Education programs oriented toward general management.

    Keywords: Finance; Framework; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Management Practices and Processes; Managerial Roles; Marketing; Supply Chain Management; Performance Improvement; Planning; Behavior; Integration;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Coordinating + Managing Supply Chains: Course Overview Note TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-159, June 2001. View Details
  33. Retail Operations TN

    Describes the teaching objectives and content of the Retail Operations Module in the Coordinating and Managing Supply Chains elective course at HBS. First describes the motivation for developing a module on retail operations in a supply chain course and then addresses the themes and content in the module.

    Keywords: Curriculum and Courses; Operations; Supply Chain Management; Motivation and Incentives; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Retail Operations TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-150, June 2001. View Details
  34. Role of Intermediaries in Supply Chains TN

    Describes the role of intermediaries in the Coordinating and Managing Supply Chains elective course at HBS. Contrary to many observers' predictions, intermediaries have continued to survive and even grow. This module examines the ways in which intermediaries can add value to a supply chain. Also closely examines how intermediaries reduce labor and capital costs and align incentives in supply chains.

    Keywords: Cost of Capital; Cost Management; Labor; Supply Chain Management; Motivation and Incentives;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Role of Intermediaries in Supply Chains TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-151, June 2001. View Details
  35. Aligning Incentives for Supply Chain Efficiency TN

    Teaching Note for (9-600-110).

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Aligning Incentives for Supply Chain Efficiency TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-144, June 2001. View Details
  36. Merchandising at Nine West Retail Stores

    Describes the merchandising decision process (organization, structure, and incentives) at Nine West retail stores, a large footwear retailer in the United States. Also describes changes currently occurring at Nine West and thus provides a context in which students can recommend changes to the merchandising process and the structure of the merchandising organization. To explain how merchandising decisions are made at a fashion retailer and to explore how changes in the environment will impact the merchandising organization.

    Keywords: Organizational Structure; Situation or Environment; Motivation and Incentives; Decision Making; Change; Budgets and Budgeting; Forecasting and Prediction; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Product Marketing; Retail Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Colin S Welch. "Merchandising at Nine West Retail Stores." Harvard Business School Case 698-098, May 1998. (Revised May 2001.) View Details
  37. Campbell Soup Company: A Leader in Continuous Replenishment Innovations TN

    Teaching Note for (9-195-124).

    Keywords: Demand and Consumers; Price; Policy; Production; Customers; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Campbell Soup Company: A Leader in Continuous Replenishment Innovations TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 601-149, May 2001. View Details
  38. Aligning Incentives for Supply Chain Efficiency

    Introduces students to the basics of principal-agency theory as it applies to supply chains. Operational problems in supply chains can often be traced to incentive issues. Students and managers lack frameworks to analyze incentive problems in supply chains. This note offers such a framework.

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Motivation and Incentives; Framework; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Agency Theory;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ananth Raman. "Aligning Incentives for Supply Chain Efficiency." Harvard Business School Background Note 600-110, April 2000. View Details
  39. Dore-Dore TN

    Teaching Note for (9-692-028).

    Keywords: Performance Productivity; System; Design; Quality; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Hammond, Janice H., and Ananth Raman. "Dore-Dore TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 696-045, July 1995. (Revised August 1999.) View Details
  40. i2 Technologies, Inc.

    Describes the emergence and growth of i2 Technologies and the supply chain planning software industry. In December 1998, i2's market capitalization was in excess of $2 billion; the supply chain planning software industry had annual sales of approximately $1 billion and was expected to grow at 57% annually. By describing i2's products and the process that the company followed to sell and implement its software at companies, the case provides students with the background needed to understand why i2 was successful. This understanding enables students to address issues like what i2 should do in the future, and whether new competition such as SAP poses a substantial threat to i2's future success.

    Keywords: Technology; Information Technology; Software; Supply Chain Management; Production; Forecasting and Prediction; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Jasjit Singh. "i2 Technologies, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 699-042, December 1998. (Revised February 1999.) View Details
  41. CompUSA The Computer Superstore

    Examines the CompUSA organization, focusing especially on the operations and the company culture. Highlights the economics of PC retailing and the importance of a responsive supply chain for their product category. The description of company culture emphasizes the role of people-management and incentives in achieving responsiveness.

    Keywords: Supply Chain; Organizational Culture; Motivation and Incentives; Supply Chain Management; Computer Industry; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Anna Sheen McClelland. "CompUSA The Computer Superstore." Harvard Business School Case 699-026, October 1998. (Revised December 1998.) View Details
  42. Coordination: An Overview TN

    Teaching Note for (9-696-001).

    Keywords: Auto Industry; Manufacturing Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Coordination: An Overview TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 698-001, July 1997. View Details
  43. Apparel Exports and the Indian Economy TN

    Teaching Note for (9-696-065).

    Keywords: Apparel and Accessories Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Apparel Exports and the Indian Economy TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 697-123, May 1997. View Details
  44. Tale of Two Electronic Components Distributors TN

    Teaching Note for (9-697-064).

    Keywords: Distribution Channels; Negotiation Deal; Consolidation; Growth and Development; Internet; Complexity; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Bharat P. Rao. "Tale of Two Electronic Components Distributors TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 697-124, May 1997. View Details
  45. Module Overview: Coordinating and Managing Supply Chains: Matching Supply and Demand TN

    Prepares students to configure operating and distribution systems to provide product (or service) supply to match customer demand. Begins by introducing students to the supply-demand mismatch problem, documenting its significance in many companies, and suggesting ways to quantify its components. Also examines the underlying causes of mismatched supply and demand; although emanating primarily from a firm's inability to forecast demand, supply-demand mismatch is exacerbated by poor planning, operational constraints, and high working capital costs among other factors. Helps students identify how managers can reduce supply-demand mismatch costs, not only by reducing exacerbating factors but also by employing other mechanisms, such as effective use of supply chain intermediaries.

    Keywords: Demand and Consumers; Working Capital; Distribution; Cost of Capital; Management Practices and Processes; Supply Chain Management; Forecasting and Prediction; Supply and Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Module Overview: Coordinating and Managing Supply Chains: Matching Supply and Demand TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 697-126, May 1997. View Details
  46. Northco (A) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-697-017).

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Kim Bowon. "Northco (A) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 697-125, April 1997. View Details
  47. Northco (A)

    A small school-uniform manufacturer wrestles with seasonal demand. The company is saddled with excess inventory when it is bought by a leveraged buyout firm. Students are required to identify ways to analyze and solve the problem.

    Keywords: Demand and Consumers; Leveraged Buyouts; Supply Chain Management; Corporate Finance; Manufacturing Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth, and Bowon Kim. "Northco (A)." Harvard Business School Case 697-017, October 1996. (Revised April 1997.) View Details
  48. Apparel Exports and the Indian Economy

    Indian apparel exports are enjoying considerable success in the international markets. However, the future is uncertain owing to impending technological, regulatory, and market changes. This case explores the long lead times for sourcing apparel from India and provides situational context for students to explain this phenomenon.

    Keywords: Working Capital; Supply Chain Management; Supply and Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Apparel Exports and the Indian Economy." Harvard Business School Case 696-065, October 1995. (Revised April 1997.) View Details
  49. Coordination: An Overview

    Designed to accompany Module II of the first-year required course on Technology and Operations Management. Particularly useful in conjunction with Corning Glass Works: Erwin Automotive Plant, Toyota Motor Manufacturing, U.S.A., Inc., Johnson Controls, Automotive Systems Group: The Georgetown Kentucky Plant, Process Flow Design Exercise (A) and (B), and Sport Obermeyer Ltd.

    Keywords: Management; Operations; Technology; Auto Industry; Manufacturing Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Raman, Ananth. "Coordination: An Overview." Harvard Business School Background Note 696-001, October 1995. View Details
  50. Sport Obermeyer, Ltd. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-695-022).

    Keywords: Apparel and Accessories Industry; Sports Industry; United States; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Hammond, Janice H., and Ananth Raman. "Sport Obermeyer, Ltd. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 696-012, July 1995. View Details

Presentations

  1. Phantom Stockouts: Problem Description, Research Design, Preliminary Results

    Citation:

    Raman, A., and Zeynep Ton. "Phantom Stockouts: Problem Description, Research Design, Preliminary Results." In Proceedings of the MSOM Conference. Paper presented at the INFORMS Society on Manufacturing and Service Operations Management Conference, University of Michigan, June 01, 2000. View Details

Other Publications and Materials

  1. A Technique to Estimate Retail Demand and Lost Sales

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods; Demand and Consumers; Sales; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, A., and Giulio Zotteri. "A Technique to Estimate Retail Demand and Lost Sales." View Details
  2. Cross Sectional Analysis of Phantom Products at Retail Stores

    Keywords: Distribution; Logistics; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Ton, Zeynep, and Ananth Raman. "Cross Sectional Analysis of Phantom Products at Retail Stores." View Details
  3. Inventory Record Inaccuracy: An Empirical Analysis

    Citation:

    DeHoratius, Nicole, and A. Raman. "Inventory Record Inaccuracy: An Empirical Analysis." April 2001. View Details
  4. Linking Operations and Finance in Retailing

    Keywords: Operations; Corporate Finance; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Raman, A., Vishal Gaur, and Marshall Fisher. "Linking Operations and Finance in Retailing." April 2001. View Details