Das Narayandas

James J. Hill Professor of Business Administration
Senior Associate Dean for HBS Publishing; Senior Associate Dean, Chair, Executive Education

Das Narayandas is the James J. Hill Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. He is currently the Senior Associate Dean, Chair, Harvard Business Publishing and Senior Associate Dean, Chair, Executive Education.  In addition, he is co-chair of the Harvard Business School Executive Education Program, Building Client Management Capabilities in Professional Service Firms. His academic credentials include a Bachelor of Technology degree in Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, a Post-Graduate Diploma in Management from the Indian Institute of Management, and a Ph.D. in Management from Purdue University.

Das previously has been Chair of the Executive Education Advanced Management Program and the Program for Leadership Development, as well as course head of the required first-year Marketing course in the MBA program.  Prior to that, he taught the Business Marketing Elective in the MBA program. Das has been selected as the Class Day faculty speaker and has received the award for teaching excellence from the graduating HBS MBA Class on several occasions. Other awards also include the Greenhill Award that recognizes members of the HBS community who have made significant contributions to the School and the Charles Williams Award for teaching excellence.

Das's background includes management experience in sales and marketing that involved field strategic planning, field salesforce management, new product development, channel management and marketing communications. Das has co-authored two books and his articles have appeared in publications that include Harvard Business Review, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Service Research, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of Marketing Research, and Sloan Management Review. Das has been quoted in publications such as The Economist and U.S. News and World Report amongst others. 

Das has consulted and/or developed and executed in-house training programs for such companies as Areva, Arrow Electronics, Alghanim Group, GE, Honeywell, IBM, ING, J&J, Northrop Grumman, Mitsubishi Corporation, Linfox, Fonterra, Interbank, Stryker, Merrill Lynch, Tata Group, ThyssenKrupp, Zeiss, Fidelity, Liberty Mutual, 3M, and Microsoft among other companies in the areas of B2B Marketing, Customer Satisfaction and Loyalty Management, Strategic Marketing, Pricing, Personal Selling and Sales Management. Das's current research interests focus on business-to-business marketing and management of client relationships in professional service firms.

In addition to being on the Board of Advisors of several firms, Das is a University Director of the Harvard Student Agencies.

Books

  1. Business Market Management: Understanding, Creating, and Delivering Value

    For business-to-business marketing courses. The authors build the book around a framework of understanding, creating, and delivering value.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Customer Value and Value Chain; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Marketing; Marketing Strategy; Business Processes; Value;

    Citation:

    Anderson, James C., James A. Narus, and Das Narayandas. Business Market Management: Understanding, Creating, and Delivering Value. 3rd ed. Pearson Prentice Hall, 2008. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Calculating, Creating, and Claiming Value in Business Markets: Status and Research Agenda

    A key challenge facing business marketers surrounds developing a deeper understanding of customer needs. We conceptualize that challenge as having three dimensions: calculating, creating, and claiming value. We discuss key problems, new developments and research challenges in each of these three domains and note the desirability for a deeper collaboration between academics and practitioners to address the research challenges.

    Keywords: Value Creation; Problems and Challenges; Research; Customer Relationship Management;

    Citation:

    Lilien, Gary L., Rajdeep Grewal, Douglas Bowman, Min Ding, Abbie Griffin, V. Kumar, Das Narayandas, Renana Peres, Raji Srinivasan, and Qiong Wang. "Calculating, Creating, and Claiming Value in Business Markets: Status and Research Agenda." Marketing Letters 21, no. 1 (March 2010): 287–299. View Details
  2. CRM Implementation: Effectiveness Issues and Insights

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Performance Effectiveness;

    Citation:

    Bohling, Timothy, Douglas Bowman, Steve LaValle, Vikas Mittal, Das Narayandas, Girish Ramani, and Rajan Varadarajan. "CRM Implementation: Effectiveness Issues and Insights." Journal of Service Research 9, no. 2 (November 2006): 184–194. View Details
  3. The Impact of Internet Exchanges on Business-to-Business Distribution

    Keywords: Online Technology; Communication; Business Ventures; Distribution;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Narakesari, Mary N. Caravella, and John Deighton. "The Impact of Internet Exchanges on Business-to-Business Distribution." Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science 30, no. 4 (fall 2002). View Details
  4. Managing Customer-Initiated Contacts with Manufacturers: The Impact on Share of Category Requirements and Word-of-Mouth Behavior

    Keywords: Management; Customers; Contracts; Production; Behavior;

    Citation:

    Bowman, Doug, and Das Narayandas. "Managing Customer-Initiated Contacts with Manufacturers: The Impact on Share of Category Requirements and Word-of-Mouth Behavior." Journal of Marketing Research (JMR) 38 (August 2001). View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Linking Customer Management Efforts to Growth and Profitability

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Profit; Business Growth and Maturation;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Douglas Bowman. "Linking Customer Management Efforts to Growth and Profitability." In The Search for Organic Growth, edited by Edward D. Hess and Robert K. Kazanjian, 192–210. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2006. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Cycle for Survival (B)

    Update on Cycle for Survival's 2012, 2013, and 2014 events. Kotkins and Cycle for Survival continued the event's strong growth, and underwent the first phase of a two-year rebranding effort.

    Keywords: not for profit; cancer; partnerships; United States; fundraising; Nonprofit Organizations; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Kerry Herman, and Noah Fisher. "Cycle for Survival (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-077, May 2014. (Revised October 2014.) View Details
  2. Cycle for Survival (A)

    Katie Kotkins, director of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center's (MSKCC) Cycle for Survival fundraising event, had to determine the best avenue for continuing the event's success and momentum after its founder, Jennifer (Jen) Goodman Linn (HBS '99) passed away from MFH sarcoma. Jen and her husband, David Linn (HBS '00), had founded Cycle for Survival in 2007 as a way for Jen to give back to the community of doctors that had treated her since her diagnosis in 2003.

    The indoor cycling event had grown rapidly, and increased fundraising from $250,000 in 2007 to $4.7 million in 2011. After the event's second year, Jen and David made the decision to hand over control to MSKCC, partner with Equinox, and expand the event's fundraising efforts. At the time of Jen's passing Kotkins was focused on the 2013 event, but was faced with a series of strategic questions after losing the event's face and inspiration.

    Keywords: not for profit; cancer; partnerships; United States; fundraising; Nonprofit Organizations; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Kerry Herman, and Noah Fisher. "Cycle for Survival (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-076, May 2014. View Details
  3. Ron Johnson: Retail at Target, Apple, and J.C. Penney

    In April 2013, Ron Johnson (HBS '84) stepped down after just 18 months as CEO of J.C. Penney. In his brief tenure, Johnson, an acclaimed retailer respected for his innovation and success in shaping the retail image at Target and Apple, introduced dramatic departures from J.C. Penney's traditional retail approach, and enacted changes quickly and simultaneously, with little market testing. Over Johnson's final 12 months as CEO, J.C. Penney shares dropped more than 50%. The case describes the environments at Target, Apple, and J.C. Penney during Johnson's tenure and how his experiences may have shaped the strategies that he implemented while CEO at J.C. Penney.

    Keywords: Change Management; Innovation Leadership; Situation or Environment; Failure; Management Teams; Brands and Branding; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Kerry Herman, and Lisa Mazzanti. "Ron Johnson: Retail at Target, Apple, and J.C. Penney." Harvard Business School Case 513-103, May 2013. (Revised July 2013.) View Details
  4. Eureka Forbes Ltd.: Managing the Selling Effort (A) (Photonovel Version)

    The CEO of EFL (India), a direct sales organization, must decide which changes to the sales compensation systems would better motivate his sales reps and improve their sales performance.

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Kallol Das, and Kerry Herman. "Eureka Forbes Ltd.: Managing the Selling Effort (A) (Photonovel Version)." Harvard Business School Case 513-015, May 2013. View Details
  5. Exeter Group, Inc. (A)

    Jonathan Kutchins and Mark Cullen, managing partners of IT consulting firm Exeter Group, Inc., are considering four potential client engagements. Three of them involve prominent universities, an area of market strength for the firm, and one involves a top-tier strategy consulting firm, a new market for Exeter. Each of the projects has both attractive and unattractive attributes, with various degrees of upside and downside risk. As a relatively new and small IT consulting firm, Exeter needs to make careful choices about how it allocates resources to projects, and it is not clear if the firm has the capacity to add all four projects at once. Thus Kutchins and Cullen have to decide which, if any, of these projects to do. In some cases they must also decide whether they want to try to restructure the nature of the engagement to better fit the firm's service model. Although young and small, the firm has grown successfully and is optimistic about its future prospects. Kutchins and Cullen thus want to make decisions about these very specific client engagements in the context of their overall strategy and the contributions of these engagements in helping the firm achieve its long-term goals.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Resource Allocation; Market Entry and Exit; Service Operations; Performance Capacity; Business Strategy; Information Technology; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Eccles, Robert G., Das Narayandas, and Kerry Herman. "Exeter Group, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 409-001, February 2009. (Revised February 2012.) View Details
  6. Vibco Industrial Vibrators

    Karl Wadensten, president of Vibco Vibrators, was deciding whether to grow his small company through a marketing push for one of two technologies that he believed could launch his company to the next level of sales, or if he should continue to grow his company through small incremental growth and customize his products to each customers unique needs. Should he dedicate the majority of his small firm's marketing budget to just these two products that he hoped could launch Vibco to the next level of sales?

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Customer Relationship Management; Decision Choices and Conditions; Marketing; Product Launch; Customization and Personalization; Expansion; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Kerry Herman, and Matthew Preble. "Vibco Industrial Vibrators." Harvard Business School Case 512-005, September 2011. View Details
  7. Exeter Group, Inc. (B)

    This case presents a brief description of the decisions the company made regarding whether or not to pursue each of the four projects that are the basis of the (A) case.

    Keywords: Customers; Decision Choices and Conditions; Projects;

    Citation:

    Eccles, Robert G., Das Narayandas, and Kerry Herman. "Exeter Group, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 412-035, September 2011. View Details
  8. Beohemija's Duel

    Vladimir Joksic, Director of Marketing for Serbia's Beohemija, along with his marketing team has managed to grow Duel, the firm's soap powder offering from single digits to almost 40% of the Serbian market in just a few short years. He has used innovative and strategic, cost-saving tactics to achieve this growth, taking share from multi-national competitors P&G and Henkel, as well as other domestic competitors. Beohemija's management is proud of these achievements and looking to possibly leverage Duel's new brand strength with new products in the pipeline for launch. Joksic is more cautious. He is worried that Beohemija has woken the sleeping giants and wonders if the firm should instead invest more in the Duel brand. The case provides detailed information about the Duel campaigns.

    Keywords: Investment; Growth and Development; Innovation Strategy; Management Teams; Marketing; Product Launch; Competition; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Kerry Herman. "Beohemija's Duel." Harvard Business School Case 511-018, July 2010. (Revised December 2010.) View Details
  9. NetApp

    NetApp had undertaken an award-winning overhaul and upgrading of its channel strategy design that accounted for 46 percent of North America sales in 2006. Nonetheless, NetApp senior management announced they expected to grow revenue another 30% in fiscal 2007 with half the growth coming from channel sales. To meet those goals, a number of issues that had developed around the channel sales program would need to be addressed.

    Keywords: Advertising; Business Model; Design; Revenue; Planning; Problems and Challenges; Sales; Manufacturing Industry; Computer Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Elizabeth A. Kind. "NetApp." Harvard Business School Case 511-058, September 2010. View Details
  10. Marketing Simulation: Managing Segments and Customers

    In this single-player simulation, students assume the position of CEO of a medical motor manufacturer and are tasked with executing a successful business-to-business marketing strategy over a period of twelve fiscal quarters. Students determine all aspects of the company's go-to-market approach (including sales-force deployment and distribution channel strategy) and associated elements of product policy, including pricing and market positioning of the company's product line to both small and large volume customers. Students also prioritize the manufacturer's efforts in acquiring and retaining customers in order to achieve a combination of sustainable revenues and profits and maximize cumulative profits at the end of the simulation. The simulation also illustrates the benefits of investment in market research. Ideal for core marketing 101 courses (as a Capstone session) or in the introductory module of an advanced marketing strategy course. This simulation can be used in advanced undergraduate, MBA, and executive education programs.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Salesforce Management; Distribution Channels; Price; Product Positioning; Customer Relationship Management; Profit; Revenue; Cost vs Benefits; Policy; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Marketing Simulation: Managing Segments and Customers." Simulation and Teaching Note. Harvard Business Publishing, 2010. Electronic. View Details
  11. The Termination of U.S. Auto Dealerships in 2009

    The case chronicles the sudden termination of many U.S. autodealers in the wake of the economic crisis in the fall of 2008.

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Financial Crisis; Marketing; Distribution; Sales; Auto Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Kerry Herman, and Sarah Morton. "The Termination of U.S. Auto Dealerships in 2009." Harvard Business School Case 510-044, September 2009. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  12. BMW's Project Switch (B): Importers vs. National Sales Companies

    BMW is faced with potential channel conflicts across several EU country markets. The case concludes the (A) case's exploration of BMW's approach to redesigning the channel in Greece. The case provides details on both headquarter and country head perspective on BMW's channel strategy.

    Keywords: Business Units; Business Headquarters; Marketing Strategy; Distribution Channels; Conflict and Resolution; Auto Industry; European Union;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Kerry Herman, and Laura Winig. "BMW's Project Switch (B): Importers vs. National Sales Companies." Harvard Business School Supplement 509-024, November 2008. (Revised May 2009.) View Details
  13. Eureka Forbes Ltd.: Managing the Selling Effort (A)

    The CEO of EFL (India), a direct sales organization, must decide which changes to the sales compensation systems would better motivate his sales reps and improve their sales performance.

    Keywords: Compensation and Benefits; Management; Performance Improvement; Sales; Motivation and Incentives; India;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Kerry Herman. "Eureka Forbes Ltd.: Managing the Selling Effort (A)." Harvard Business School Case 506-003, July 2005. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  14. Tanishq: Positioning to Capture the Indian Woman's Heart

    The firm has to choose between an established brand, Tanishq, and a new skunkworks brand, GoldPlus, to go after the Indian plain gold jewelry market: Tanishq, initially targeted at a western customer, has undergone strategic retooling and has currently been repositioned to serve the "traditional yet modern" Indian woman. The brand still carries some baggage from its past. GoldPlus, on the other hand, is a new brand that is positioned to serve the plain gold wedding jewelry market. A variety of strategic, economic, organizational and brand investment reasons make the decision an important one.

    Keywords: Customers; Brands and Branding; Product Positioning; Segmentation; Apparel and Accessories Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Kerry Herman. "Tanishq: Positioning to Capture the Indian Woman's Heart." Harvard Business School Case 507-025, August 2006. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  15. BMW's Project Switch (A): Importers vs. National Sales Companies

    BMW is faced with potential channel conflicts across several EU country markets. The case highlights BMW's approach to redesigning its channel in Greece. The case provides details on both headquarter and country head perspective on BMW's channel strategy.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Distribution Channels; Conflict and Resolution; Auto Industry; European Union; Greece;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Kerry Herman. "BMW's Project Switch (A): Importers vs. National Sales Companies." Harvard Business School Case 509-023, September 2008. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  16. Biocon: Launching a New Cancer Drug in India (TN)

    Teaching Note for [508026].

    Keywords: Product Launch; Market Timing; Price; Distribution Channels; Marketing Strategy; Health Care and Treatment; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Gupta, Sunil, and Das Narayandas. "Biocon: Launching a New Cancer Drug in India (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 509-039, January 2009. View Details
  17. Biocon: Launching a New Cancer Drug in India

    Kiran Majumdar-Shaw, the CEO of Biocon has to make product launch timing, pricing, channel, and communications mix decisions relating to the launch of BioMAb, a new cancer drug in India.

    Keywords: Price; Health Care and Treatment; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Planning; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Gupta, Sunil, and Das Narayandas. "Biocon: Launching a New Cancer Drug in India." Harvard Business School Case 508-026, August 2007. (Revised November 2008.) View Details
  18. Marketing as Competitive Advantage: Fundamentals

    Marketing as Competitive Advantage: Fundamentals will help today's business executives and tomorrow's business leaders understand the key elements of a successful marketing strategy. The multimedia resource includes video lectures by Harvard Business School faculty, who teach core principles of marketing, as well as animated frameworks, articles, and notes. Instructional workbook exercises will help you evaluate your own marketing efforts and create a marketing plan for your organization.

    Keywords: Customers; Framework; Marketing Strategy; Product Positioning; Planning; Competitive Advantage; Segmentation;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, David E. Bell, Anita Elberse, John T. Gourville, David B. Godes, John A. Quelch, Gail J. McGovern, Luc R. Wathieu, and Marta Wosinska. "Marketing as Competitive Advantage: Fundamentals." Harvard Business School Class Lecture 509-719, October 2008. View Details
  19. Reinventing Ericsson

    Carl-Henric Svanberg, CEO of the Swedish telecom infrastructure company Ericsson, has to reorganize the recovering company in late 2003 after a major industry downturn. He is convinced that only a more market-orientated and customer-focused organization will be able to remain competitive in this maturing, high-technology-focused industry. Presents his change project, in which the sales and marketing structure play a central role. Will his ideas allow the company to keep its customers and successfully go after new markets?

    Keywords: Restructuring; Customer Focus and Relationships; Marketing; Organizational Structure; Sales; Competitive Advantage; Telecommunications Industry; Sweden;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Vincent Marie Dessain, Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Anders Sjoman. "Reinventing Ericsson." Harvard Business School Case 507-075, June 2007. (Revised February 2008.) View Details
  20. Ericsson: Leading in Times of Change

    After its dramatic corporate turnaround, the Swedish telecom infrastructure company Ericsson hires a new CEO to bring the former Swedish flagship company back on track. Puts students in the shoes of Carl-Henric Svanberg, an industry outsider and CEO of locks group Assy Abloy, who does not hesitate a moment when he gets the call in early 2003. Looks back on the reasons for Ericsson's current situation and the recent restructuring programs that cut the company's staff and operating expenses in half. Presents Svanberg's vision for how to re-energize the ailing company and reach profitability once again, and gives students the opportunity to debate these issues.

    Keywords: Restructuring; Profit; Leading Change; Goals and Objectives; Managerial Roles; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Problems and Challenges; Sweden;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, Vincent Marie Dessain, Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Anders Sjoman. "Ericsson: Leading in Times of Change." Harvard Business School Case 507-074, June 2007. (Revised February 2008.) View Details
  21. Angels and Devils: Best Buy's New Customer Approach (A)

    In November 2004, The Wall Street Journal reported that consumer electronics retailer Best Buy's new customer approach was to shun the "devils" among its customers. The "customer centricity" initiative, which was led by Best Buy's CEO Brad Anderson, was based on an analysis of the purchase histories of several customer groups. The central idea was to revamp stores according to the most lucrative types of customers they served—the "angels" among the company's customers. Encourages an assessment of Best Buy's strategy and, more generally, of the challenges and opportunities in managing customers for profits.

    Keywords: History; Customer Relationship Management; Opportunities; Marketing Strategy; Leadership Style; Problems and Challenges; Growth and Development Strategy; Retail Industry; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Elberse, Anita, John T. Gourville, and Das Narayandas. "Angels and Devils: Best Buy's New Customer Approach (A)." Harvard Business School Case 506-007, September 2005. (Revised February 2007.) View Details
  22. Angels and Devils: Best Buy's New Customer Approach (B)

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Electronics Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Elberse, Anita, John T. Gourville, and Das Narayandas. "Angels and Devils: Best Buy's New Customer Approach (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 506-008, September 2005. (Revised February 2007.) View Details
  23. Arrow Electronics, Inc.

    Deals with the issue of cross-selling and managing a portfolio of products and services in business markets. Arrow/Schweber (A/S), a subsidiary of electronic parts distributor Arrow Electronics, has a portfolio of products that differ in the amount of value added by A/S. A/S uses value-added items such as programmable logic chips as "loss leaders" in order to acquire and retain a customer. It makes money when it sells the so-called "commodity" or low value-added products to the same customer. An Internet-based distributor is now offering Arrow a chance to sell commodity products through its e-commerce site. This new channel can threaten Arrow's overall business model if a large portion of its existing customers switch their purchases of the commodity products to this new distribution channel. Arrow needs to decide how it should respond to this challenge.

    Keywords: Distribution Channels; Internet; Problems and Challenges; Change Management; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Arrow Electronics, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 598-022, April 1998. (Revised January 2007.) View Details
  24. Perelson Weiner LLP

    Perelson Weiner LLP, a successful accounting firm in New York City, is re-evaluating its incentive strategy as it makes plans to grow its business.

    Keywords: Accounting; Growth and Development; Compensation and Benefits; Management; Planning; Sales; Motivation and Incentives; Corporate Strategy; Accounting Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Steenburgh, Thomas J., and Das Narayandas. "Perelson Weiner LLP." Harvard Business School Case 506-006, October 2005. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  25. Kingsford Charcoal

    Since the 1980s, Kingsford had continued to enjoy steady, moderate growth of 1% to 3% in revenues each year. During most of this time, the charcoal category as a whole grew as well. However, the summer of 2000 represented the first softening in the category in several years. Forces students to step into the brand manager's shoes, analyze the reasons for the current situation, and come up with recommendations related to pricing, branding and advertising, and merchandising and promotion of the Kingsford brand.

    Keywords: Price; Marketing Strategy; Business Growth and Maturation; Advertising; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Alison Berkley Wagonfeld. "Kingsford Charcoal." Harvard Business School Case 506-020, September 2005. (Revised July 2006.) View Details
  26. NOK (A)

    Highlights issues that a multidivision firm faces as it moves from managing products for profit to managing customers for profit.

    Keywords: Business Divisions; Transformation; Customer Focus and Relationships; Profit; Management; Product Marketing; Organizations; Commercialization;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Kate Attea. "NOK (A)." Harvard Business School Case 506-040, March 2006. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  27. Note on Personal Selling and Sales Management

    Provides the background materials for the Sales Module in the first-year marketing course taught at HBS.

    Keywords: Business Education; Management; Sales; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Steenburgh, Thomas J., and Das Narayandas. "Note on Personal Selling and Sales Management." Harvard Business School Background Note 506-038, November 2005. View Details
  28. KONE: The MonoSpace Launch in Germany

    Focuses on the launch of a new elevator product in Germany. In 1996, global construction slumps and low differentiation among competitive offerings has led to significant price competition and margin erosion in the elevator industry. In these circumstances, KONE, one of the global players in this industry, has developed the Monospace elevator product that uses revolutionary technologies. This new product is expected to have a significant impact on the current product lines of KONE and its competitors. The firm has test marketed the product in three European country markets to varying degrees of success. The firm is now planning to launch the new product in Germany, the largest country market in Europe and vital to KONE's overall success. With little room for error and the future of the firm at stake, KONE's German subsidiary needs to develop a detailed launch plan for Monospace in Germany.

    Keywords: Machinery and Machining; Product Launch; Product Development; Construction Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Gordon Swartz. "KONE: The MonoSpace Launch in Germany." Harvard Business School Case 501-070, May 2001. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  29. Hewlett Packard--Computer Systems Organization: Selling to Enterprise Customers

    In late 1996, Manuel Diaz, head of Worldwide Sales for Hewlett-Packard's (HP) Computer Systems Organization (CSO), is reviewing the results of an audit of HP's enterprise customer management approach with the objective of identifying market and organizational opportunities that might provide HP the next wave of growth while further reducing sales and support costs. HP's current customer management approach, although successful, had involved structural changes that had forced a deep-rooted overhaul of HP's traditional regional sales approach. The new recommendations would necessitate another round of drastic changes in the way HP manages relationships with its large enterprise customers. Diaz does not want to put the sales organization through another round of changes unless he is sure they are necessary. He has to figure out if the organization is ready for more change, and whether the benefits outweigh the costs of implementation. The case provides a detailed review of the audit process and the findings.

    Keywords: Accounting Audits; Transformation; Customer Relationship Management; Cost vs Benefits; Marketing Strategy; Sales; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Robert C. Dudley. "Hewlett Packard--Computer Systems Organization: Selling to Enterprise Customers." Harvard Business School Case 500-064, March 2000. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  30. Arrow Electronics, Inc. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-598-022).

    Keywords: Product Marketing; Sales; Business Subsidiaries; Internet; Distribution; Business Model; Decision Choices and Conditions; Problems and Challenges; Information Technology Industry; Semiconductor Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Arrow Electronics, Inc. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 500-111, June 2000. (Revised June 2003.) View Details
  31. Customer Management Strategy in Business Markets

    Describes in detail customer management strategies in business markets, including selection decisions, design and management of customer relationship strategies, monitoring the health of customer relations, and linking the vendors' customer management effort to customer profitability.

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Customer Relationship Management; Decision Making; Networks; Customization and Personalization; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Customer Management Strategy in Business Markets." Harvard Business School Background Note 503-060, May 2003. View Details
  32. Managing Markets Module Note

    Provides an overview of the managing markets module in the Business Marketing course taught at HBS.

    Keywords: Business Education; Curriculum and Courses; Management; Markets; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Managing Markets Module Note." Harvard Business School Background Note 503-029, September 2002. (Revised March 2003.) View Details
  33. Managing a Customer Relationship Over Time

    Describes the different ways in which vendors can sell a portfolio of products to industrial customers.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Management; Marketing Strategy; Product Marketing; Networks; Sales; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Managing a Customer Relationship Over Time." Harvard Business School Background Note 503-071, March 2003. View Details
  34. Monitoring the Health of Customer Relationships

    Discusses the role of satisfaction and loyalty measurement in monitoring the health of customer relationships.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Customer Satisfaction; Demand and Consumers; Measurement and Metrics; Business and Stakeholder Relations;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Monitoring the Health of Customer Relationships." Harvard Business School Background Note 503-081, March 2003. View Details
  35. Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 2

    How does a $2 million software sale happen? This case traces efforts by Siebel Systems to sell lead management software to discount broker Quick & Reilly. The buying process is mapped out over four years. Covers in detail the last six months--from Siebel's initial involvement to a challenge from competitor Oracle to the climax. The structure of Quick & Reilly's buying center is mapped, as is the role of its parent, Fleet Bank. The fortunes of the sale rise and fall as the Siebel account manager faces one obstacle after another. Presented in three parts, with opportunities to debate the account manager's choices and actions at each state. Part 2 describes the start of the sale from the buyer's perspective.

    Keywords: Business Cycles; Leadership; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Organizational Structure; Behavior; Competition; Software; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Das Narayandas. "Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 2." Harvard Business School Case 503-022, August 2002. (Revised February 2003.) View Details
  36. Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 1

    How does a $2 million software sale happen? This case traces efforts by Siebel Systems to sell lead management software to discount broker Quick & Reilly. The buying process is mapped out over four years. Covers in detail the last six months--from Siebel's initial involvement to a challenge from competitor Oracle to the climax. The structure of Quick & Reilly's buying center is mapped, as is the role of its parent, Fleet Bank. The fortunes of the sale rise and fall as the Siebel account manager faces one obstacle after another. Presented in three parts, with opportunities to debate the account manager's choices and actions at each stage. Part 1 describes the start of the sale from the seller's perspective.

    Keywords: Leadership; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Organizational Structure; Behavior; Competition; Software; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Das Narayandas. "Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 1." Harvard Business School Case 503-021, August 2002. (Revised January 2003.) View Details
  37. Customer Benefit Stack

    Describes a process to understand customer benefits created in industrial markets using the metaphor of a customer benefit stack.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Customer Value and Value Chain; Marketing Strategy; Product Marketing; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Customer Benefit Stack." Harvard Business School Background Note 503-028, August 2002. View Details
  38. Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 3

    How does a $2 million software sale happen? This case traces efforts by Siebel Systems to sell lead management software to discount broker Quick & Reilly. The buying process is mapped out over four years. Covers in detail the last six months--from Siebel's initial involvement to a challenge from competitor Oracle to the climax. The structure of Quick & Reilly's buying center is mapped, as is the role of its parent, Fleet Bank. The fortunes of the sale rise and fall as the Siebel account manager faces one obstacle after another. Presented in three parts, with opportunities to debate the account manager's choices and actions at each state. Part 3 describes the unfolding of the sale over a 4-year period.

    Keywords: Sales; Decision Choices and Conditions; Competitive Strategy; Customer Relationship Management; Product Marketing; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Das Narayandas. "Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 3." Harvard Business School Case 503-023, August 2002. View Details
  39. Customer Value Measurement at Nortel Networks--Optical Networks Division

    Since 1995, Nortel Networks' Optical Networks (ON) division has been incorporating customer satisfaction and loyalty measures into its business practices to increase customer value. Over the years, key process owners in various parts of the organization have become accustomed to receiving such information in the format with which they are familiar. Recent initiatives by the Customer Value Measurement (CVM) team have shown that the current methodology does not provide all the insights required to achieve the full potential of customer value measurement. The CVM team now needs to present Nortel's senior management with the optimal combination of the many choices for soliciting customer perceptions that would make the best use of available resources, minimize the intrusion on customers' time, and add value for the business and customers alike.

    Keywords: Business Divisions; Customer Focus and Relationships; Customer Satisfaction; Management Teams; Marketing Strategy; Value Creation; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "Customer Value Measurement at Nortel Networks--Optical Networks Division." Harvard Business School Case 501-050, February 2001. (Revised June 2002.) View Details
  40. Hunter Business Group: TeamTBA

    The Hunter Business Group (HBG), a direct marketing consulting firm specializing in reorganizing the sales and marketing efforts of industrial firms, uses integrated customer contact technologies (including field sales, telephone, and mail) as a means of "revolutionizing the face of business-to-business (b2b) direct marketing." The firm operates under the theory that a seller's communications provide genuine value to a customer, and that successful direct marketing programs result in solid relationships, high retention rates, and increased profitability for the customer. This case highlights, in detail, HBG's implementation of its approach for Star Oil's tire, battery, and accessory (TBA) business that has been facing declining market share and profitability in the face of ever-increasing competition.

    Keywords: Communication Technology; Marketing Communications; Marketing Reference Programs; Marketing Strategy; Market Participation; Sales; Value Creation; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Elizabeth R. Caputo. "Hunter Business Group: TeamTBA." Harvard Business School Case 500-030, December 1999. (Revised March 2002.) View Details
  41. Korea-Tender

    Korea-Tender is a closed-bidding auction company trying to break even and must select the best opportunity to increase membership and revenue. It can continue its current model with heavy advertising, try to modify its costs, or develop an additional business model such as telemarketing, direct sales, or CRM. Among the issues facing president and CEO Edwin Yu, conveying credibility and educating potential consumers on tendering the company's primary sales model, is the first priority. He must decide whether proper execution of marketing is enough to exhaust Korea-Tender's membership growth, whether it can be improved in some manner, or whether a new supplemental revenue stream is necessary to reach break even. If Yu develops another business model, he must decide which one best complements the company's current resources and skills. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Auctions; Business Model; Advertising; Business Startups; Problems and Challenges; Marketing Strategy; Revenue; Growth and Development Strategy;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Kate Attea. "Korea-Tender." Harvard Business School Case 502-035, November 2001. View Details
  42. Color Kinetics Incorporated (A)

    Two-year-old start-up Color Kinetics has developed unique colored lighting technology using digitally controlled LEDs, and has developed that technology into a successful line of products for its first targeted market of "retailtainment." Now in November 1999, the management team is evaluating how to best extend this success into other markets and/or strategic initiatives and achieve the growth it has targeted internally and with investors.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Growth and Development; Management Teams; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Market Entry and Exit; Business Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Mary N. Caravella. "Color Kinetics Incorporated (A)." Harvard Business School Case 501-077, April 2001. (Revised August 2001.) View Details
  43. CMR Enterprises

    Sam Marcus recently purchased a small cabinet-making company, and is looking for dramatic growth. The company competes in commercial and residential construction markets; shortly after the acquisition, the company gains a large new residential customer. The case traces the changes made at the company and how the relationship with this customer begins to deteriorate. At the end of the case, Marcus must decide whether to fix or end the relationship.

    Keywords: Acquisition; Customer Relationship Management; Entrepreneurship; Leadership; Marketing Strategy; Performance Evaluation; Relationships; Segmentation; Construction Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Mary N. Caravella. "CMR Enterprises." Harvard Business School Case 501-012, November 2000. (Revised April 2001.) View Details
  44. Coca-Cola's New Vending Machine (A): Pricing To Capture Value, or Not?

    Chairman and CEO M. Douglas Ivester stumbles when he tells a Brazilian newsmagazine about a new Coke vending machine that can automatically raise prices in hot weather. Reaction around the world is swift and negative.

    Keywords: Price; Brands and Branding; Product Development; Outcome or Result; Public Opinion; Value Creation;

    Citation:

    King, Charles, III, and Das Narayandas. "Coca-Cola's New Vending Machine (A): Pricing To Capture Value, or Not?" Harvard Business School Case 500-068, February 2000. (Revised December 2000.) View Details
  45. VerticalNet (www.verticalnet.com)

    VerticalNet, a leading creator of targeted business-to-business vertical trade communities on the Internet, is trying to expand its model to facilitate e-commerce. Mark Walsh, the CEO of VerticalNet, has to decide how far he can extend the firm's business model without negatively affecting his current franchise.

    Keywords: Business Model; Decisions; Market Platforms; Expansion; Internet;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "VerticalNet (www.verticalnet.com)." Harvard Business School Case 500-041, November 1999. (Revised June 2000.) View Details
  46. Granny's Goodies, Inc.

    The young entrepreneurs of Granny's Goodies, Inc., a corporate gift package specialist, face the challenge of finding ways to create consistent revenue streams and reduce sales costs. Outside of a few long-term contracts, the two founders have had to work very hard for each sale. Using extensive customer information that the firm has diligently collected over the previous two years, students need to develop a plan that covers market selection, product policy, and relationship management strategy for the firm.

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Customer Relationship Management; Entrepreneurship; Cost Management; Marketing Strategy; Product Design; Problems and Challenges; Sales; Segmentation; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Katherine B. Korman. "Granny's Goodies, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 500-049, November 1999. (Revised February 2000.) View Details
  47. SaleSoft, Inc. (A)

    SaleSoft, a start-up firm, markets Comprehensive Sales Automation Solutions (CSAS) that automate a firm's sales, marketing, and service functions. Even though the product has received very favorable responses from prospects, product complexity and a long buying cycle have made it difficult for the firm to convert interest into sales orders. SaleSoft now has an opportunity to sell a part of the total CSAS solution as a stand-alone product. This "Trojan Horse" (TH) product offers an easy way for the firm to enter new customer accounts, gain quick sales, and generate much needed revenues. However, it could potentially distract the firm from its primary objective and cannibalize CSAS sales. SaleSoft needs to decide whether to continue selling CSAS or launch TH. And, the firm needs to develop a detailed marketing strategy to implement this decision.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Decisions; Revenue; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Sales; Opportunities; Information Technology; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "SaleSoft, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 596-112, May 1996. (Revised March 1998.) View Details
  48. Human Element in Marketing Strategy,The: A Look at the Creative and Subjective Side

    Explores the human element in formulating marketing strategy. A rewritten version of an earlier note. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Employees; Marketing Strategy; Creativity; Perspective;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and Gerald Zaltman. "Human Element in Marketing Strategy,The: A Look at the Creative and Subjective Side." Harvard Business School Case 598-105, February 1998. View Details
  49. WESCO Distribution, Inc.

    In 1996, WESCO, a national distributor of electrical equipment and supplies, charted out a growth of 6 to 8 percent in sales, and 12 to 16 percent in profitability over the next five years. The centerpiece of this growth strategy is the National Accounts (NA) program that WESCO has developed to serve its major industrial customers in response to recent changes that they made to their business processes. However, as of June 1997, the NA program has not delivered the expected results. WESCO now needs to isolate the root cause of the NA program shortfall and implement changes that will put this program back on track. It needs to decide whether to continue to be proactive in initiating, building, and maintaining national accounts, or to be passive and offer the NA program only after customers have shown a legitimate interest.

    Keywords: Restructuring; Customer Satisfaction; Growth and Development; Growth and Development Strategy; Distribution; Sales; Balance and Stability; Distribution Industry; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das. "WESCO Distribution, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 598-021, November 1997. (Revised February 1998.) View Details
  50. Orbital Sciences Corporation: ORBCOMM

    In late 1993, Orbital Communications Corp. (OCC), a subsidiary of Orbital Sciences Corp., is developing a global two-way wireless data communications system, called "ORBCOMM," based on a 26-satellite constellation in low earth orbit. Service is scheduled to begin in the United States in late 1994, followed by a rollout to international markets in 1995. The case focuses on OCC's marketing strategy in the years prior to the product/service being available. Provides details on how the firm has defined its markets and estimated the demand for the United States and international markets. There is also a rich discussion of other parts of OCC's marketing strategy including product design and development, marketing to regulatory bodies, development of the sales organization to include channel partners to enter the domestic and international markets, pricing strategy, and the role of competition. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Business Model; Business Startups; Price; Global Strategy; Marketing Strategy; Demand and Consumers; Partners and Partnerships; Salesforce Management; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and John A. Quelch. "Orbital Sciences Corporation: ORBCOMM." Harvard Business School Case 598-027, August 1997. View Details
  51. Dell Computer Corporation

    Traces the evolution of the personal computer industry over the last 20 years and uses this as a backdrop to look at how Dell Computer Corp. grew from a small start-up to a multi-billion-dollar company in a decade. Dell is now faced with a set of decisions on the product markets it needs to serve in order to sustain its growth profitably into the future.

    Keywords: Industry Growth; Competitive Strategy; Profit; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and V. Kasturi Rangan. "Dell Computer Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 596-058, October 1995. (Revised September 1996.) View Details