V.G. Narayanan

Thomas D. Casserly, Jr. Professor of Business Administration
Unit Head, Accounting and Management

Research I research topics in management accounting. In particular, I am interested in performance evaluation and incentives. I am using field experiments to understand how firms can use financial incentives and performance feedback to improve performance. I am studying how financial incentives can be used as a catlyst to form desirable habits and to harness other motivators such as peer pressure. I use analytical modeling and field data to research this topic. I am also very interested in understanding how CEO compensation affects the risk levels at banks.

Education

Work Experience

  • September 1994 to present - Professor, Harvard Business School. I have taught Financial Reporting and Control (a first-year required course), Measuring and Driving Corporate Performance (a second-year elective), Management Control and Performance Measurement (a doctoral course), and several executive education courses.
  • March 1985 to May 1988 - Audit Assistant with J. Gowrikanthan & Co., Chartered Accountants, Madras.

Journal Articles

  1. Competition and Cost Accounting

    The central theme of Competition and Cost Accounting is that strategic considerations may make it desirable for a firm to have divisions and product managers internalize something other than their true costs. In the case of transfer prices, a high transfer price serves as a means of promoting tacit collusion. In the case of product cost measurement, an inferior cost allocation system that just spreads costs evenly may promote tacit collusion.

    Keywords: "Cost Allocation," Tranfer Pricing, Decentralization, Bertrand and Cournot Competition; Cost Accounting;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Michael Smith. "Competition and Cost Accounting." Foundations and Trends in Accounting 7, no. 3 (April 2013). View Details
  2. A Field Study on the Acceptance and Use of a New Accounting System

    This study examines the attitudes, use, and acceptance of a new accounting system in a pharmaceutical corporation that switched from an Activity Based Costing System to the Theory of Constraints System (TOC). Using structuration theory as a framework, we posit that user responses and attitudes towards TOC are influenced not only by the technical features of the system and the potential economic benefits, but also by the fit between TOC and the existing structures of the users' environment. When users interact with TOC on an ongoing basis they form interpretations of the new system, and based on such interpretations, they exhibit actions with respect to the use of TOC ranging from championship to rejection of the system. We explore cross sectional variations in the use of the system and link such variations to the practical features of the new system as well as the social structures of the users' environments.

    Keywords: theory of constraints; structuration; field study; Accounting; Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Ranjani Krishnan, and Jamshed J. Mistry. "A Field Study on the Acceptance and Use of a New Accounting System." Journal of Management Accounting Research 24 (2012): 103–133. View Details
  3. The Credit Crisis of 2008: Causes, Consequences and Implications for India

    This article gives a brief overview of the causes and consequences of the current global credit crisis. The article then discusses the benefits and potential drawbacks of real estate loan securitization in India, and what India can do to realize those benefits while avoiding some of the pitfalls.

    Keywords: Financial Crisis; Credit; Mortgages; Real Estate Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "The Credit Crisis of 2008: Causes, Consequences and Implications for India." Chartered Accountant 57, no. 6 (December 2008). View Details
  4. Accounting Standards and the Globalisation of Indian Businesses

    Keywords: Standards; Globalization; Business Ventures; India;

    Citation:

    Miller, Gregory S., and V.G. Narayanan. "Accounting Standards and the Globalisation of Indian Businesses." Chartered Accountant (July 2005): 50–52. View Details
  5. Agency Costs in a Supply Chain with Demand Uncertainty and Price Competition

    Keywords: Cost; Supply Chain; Risk and Uncertainty; Price; Competition;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Ananth Raman, and J. Singh. "Agency Costs in a Supply Chain with Demand Uncertainty and Price Competition." Management Science 51, no. 1 (January 2005). View Details
  6. Aligning Incentives in Supply Chains

    Keywords: Motivation and Incentives; Supply Chain;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ananth Raman. "Aligning Incentives in Supply Chains." Harvard Business Review 82, no. 11 (November 2004). View Details
  7. Contracting in a Supply Chain with Stochastic Demand and Substitute Products

    Keywords: Supply Chain; Product;

    Citation:

    Kraiselburd, Santiago, V.G. Narayanan, and Ananth Raman. "Contracting in a Supply Chain with Stochastic Demand and Substitute Products." Production and Operations Management 13, no. 1 (spring 2004). View Details
  8. Activity Based Pricing in a Monopoly

    Keywords: Price; Monopoly;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Activity Based Pricing in a Monopoly." Journal of Accounting Research 41, no. 3 (June 2003): 473:502. View Details
  9. Case Study: Customer Profitability and Customer Relationship Management at RBC Financial Group

    Keywords: Profit; Customer Relationship Management; Groups and Teams; Finance;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Case Study: Customer Profitability and Customer Relationship Management at RBC Financial Group." Journal of Interactive Marketing 16, no. 3 (summer 2002): 76–98. View Details
  10. An Empirical Investigation of Tax Factors and Mutual Funds' Stock Sales Decisions

    Keywords: Taxation; Stocks; Sales; Financial Instruments;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Steven Huddart. "An Empirical Investigation of Tax Factors and Mutual Funds' Stock Sales Decisions." Review of Accounting Studies 7, nos. 2-3 (June–September 2002): 319–341. View Details
  11. Measuring and Managing Customer Profitability

    Keywords: Measurement and Metrics; Management; Customers; Profit;

    Citation:

    Kaplan, Robert S., and V.G. Narayanan. "Measuring and Managing Customer Profitability." Journal of Cost Management (September/October 2001): 5–15. View Details
  12. The Impact of Activity-Based Costing on Managerial Decisions at Insteel Industries - A Field Study

    Keywords: Activity Based Costing and Management; Management; Decision Making;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ratna G. Sarkar. "The Impact of Activity-Based Costing on Managerial Decisions at Insteel Industries - A Field Study." Journal of Economics & Management Strategy 11, no. 2 (summer 2001). View Details
  13. Impact of Competition and Taxes on Responsibility Center Organization and Transfer Prices

    Keywords: Competition; Taxation; Price;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Michael Smith. "Impact of Competition and Taxes on Responsibility Center Organization and Transfer Prices." Contemporary Accounting Research 17, no. 3 (fall 2000). View Details
  14. Using Delegation and Control Systems to Mitigate the Trade-off between the Performance-Evaluation and Belief-Revision Uses of Accounting Standards

    Keywords: System; Performance Evaluation; Accounting;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and A. Davila. "Using Delegation and Control Systems to Mitigate the Trade-off between the Performance-Evaluation and Belief-Revision Uses of Accounting Standards." Special Issue on Mastering Finance Series. Journal of Accounting & Economics 25, no. 3 (June 1998). View Details
  15. Moral Hazard in Repeated Professional Partnership

    Keywords: Partners and Partnerships;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Moral Hazard in Repeated Professional Partnership." Contemporary Accounting Research (spring 1995). View Details
  16. Gulf Canada Ltd.

    Keywords: Energy Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Steve Huddart. "Gulf Canada Ltd." Journal of Accounting Case Research 2, no. 1 (spring 1994). View Details
  17. An Analysis of Auditor Liability Rules

    Keywords: Accounting Audits;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "An Analysis of Auditor Liability Rules." Special Issue on Accounting, Financial Disclosures, and the Law. Journal of Accounting Research 32 (1994). View Details

Working Papers

  1. The Impact of Forward-Looking Metrics on Employee Decision Making

    This paper analyzes the effects of providing forward-looking metrics on employee decision making. We use data from a southern European bank that, in April 2002, started providing its branch managers with customer lifetime value (CLV) information about mortgage applicants. The data allow us to gauge the effects of enriching the information set of these employees in an environment where incentives and the allocation of decision rights remained unchanged. We find that CLV availability resulted in a significant shift in attention towards the more profitable client segments (the weight of the top segment in the portfolio of customers increases from 26% to 34%), but we do not find evidence of improved cross-selling (except for an increase in the sale of insurance products). Moreover, the use of CLV information did not have a negative impact on pricing, as some of the literature suggests, nor on default risk, indicating that managers increased sales to more profitable customers by providing better customer service.

    Keywords: Customer Value and Value Chain; Decision Choices and Conditions; Mortgages; Employees; Information; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Service Delivery; Banking Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Casas-Arce, Pablo, F. Asis Martinez-Jerez, and V.G. Narayanan. "The Impact of Forward-Looking Metrics on Employee Decision Making." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 11-106, April 2011. View Details
  2. Testing Strategy with Multiple Performance Measures: Evidence from a Balanced Scorecard at Store24

    We analyze balanced scorecard data from a convenience store chain, Store24, during the implementation of an innovative, but ultimately unsuccessful strategy. Quarterly strategic reviews, based in part on the firm's balanced scorecard, led executives at Store24 to identify problems with, and eventually abandon, this strategy over a two year period. We find that formal statistical tests of the hypotheses underlying the firm's balanced scorecard and strategy map reveal problems with the strategy on a timelier basis. We also test alternative hypotheses to those underlying the firm's formal strategy map and scorecard that are consistent with concerns expressed by some of Store24's top executives during the initial stages of implementing the new strategy. Our analysis demonstrates that this firm's balanced scorecard contained useful and timely information for distinguishing between these alternatives. These results provide some of the first field-based evidence on the potential for a firm's balanced scorecard to provide useful information for detecting problems in its strategy.

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Balanced Scorecard; Problems and Challenges; Business Strategy; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Campbell, Dennis, Srikant M. Datar, Susan L. Kulp, and V.G. Narayanan. "Testing Strategy with Multiple Performance Measures: Evidence from a Balanced Scorecard at Store24." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 08-081, February 2008. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Building a High Performance Culture at IDFC

    IDFC was set up in 1997 to direct private finance to infrastructure projects in India. Over the years, it expanded its capabilities to become a 'complete solutions provider' offering financing solutions including debt and equity, investment banking, brokerage and asset management services to clients in the infrastructure sector. With nearly 50% of its employees joining through acquisitions, there were significant cultural differences within the company. In 2009, the company embarked on a journey to build 'One-Firm' with a unifying culture and governance system across business groups. IDFC aimed to provide seamless access to products and expertise across business groups, increase its competitive position and maximize interactions with its clients. A critical component of the One-Firm initiative was a technology enabled performance management system that articulated metrics for individual and group performance, and aligned these with the overall performance of IDFC. While the new system had several strengths, it also raised questions on whether a common system allowed IDFC to recognize and retain talent across its diverse businesses. This case examines if a uniform performance management system provided autonomy and flexibility needed to build a culture of high performance across varied business groups.

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Vidhya Muthuram. "Building a High Performance Culture at IDFC." Harvard Business School Case 114-077, May 2014. View Details
  2. Balanced Scorecard Simulation

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Balanced Scorecard Simulation." Harvard Business School Simulation 114-707, June 2014. View Details
  3. Nalli Silk Sarees

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Namrata Arora. "Nalli Silk Sarees." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 113-706, June 2013. View Details
  4. Transport Corporation of India (D): Business Development across Divisions

    Transport Corporation of India was a logistics company that provided multi-modal transport solutions to its customers. Set up in 1958, TCI had grown from a 'one man, one truck, one office' set-up to a company with revenues of $400 million in half a century. TCI's growth had been assisted by the creation of individual divisions that provided specialized services to its clients—Freight, Express, Supply Chain Solutions, Seaways and Global. In 2012, the company renewed it efforts to foster cross-selling across the divisions with the hope that this would increase customer-stickiness and foster growth. However, as the company tried to push the cross-selling agenda across its various divisions, it faced myriad issues. It needed to educate its divisional sales-staff about the services provided by divisions other than their own; to motivate them to cross-sell; and to create intra-division confidence to facilitate cross-selling. While the Joint Managing director, Vineet Agarwal, under the guidance of his father D.P. Agarwal, Vice-Chairman and Managing Director, TCI, and in conjunction with TCI's Executive Committee, had introduced initiatives like training across divisions, competitions on cross-selling, and tracking of cross-selling leads, he was not sure that these were enough. Were there other ways in which TCI could successfully cross-sell? Could they put in place a system that specifically incentivized cross-sales to motivate sales staff? The (A) case focuses on TCI's cross-selling efforts and the strategic decisions before it. Cases (B), (C), and (D) discuss specific situations that demonstrate issues related to the cross-selling initiative.

    Keywords: Transportation Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Saloni Chaturvedi. "Transport Corporation of India (D): Business Development across Divisions ." Harvard Business School Supplement 113-134, May 2013. View Details
  5. Transport Corporation of India (C): Dealing with Shortcomings in Service Quality

    Transport Corporation of India was a logistics company that provided multi-modal transport solutions to its customers. Set up in 1958, TCI had grown from a 'one man, one truck, one office' set-up to a company with revenues of $400 million in half a century. TCI's growth had been assisted by the creation of individual divisions that provided specialized services to its clients—Freight, Express, Supply Chain Solutions, Seaways and Global. In 2012, the company renewed it efforts to foster cross-selling across the divisions with the hope that this would increase customer-stickiness and foster growth. However, as the company tried to push the cross-selling agenda across its various divisions, it faced myriad issues. It needed to educate its divisional sales-staff about the services provided by divisions other than their own; to motivate them to cross-sell; and to create intra-division confidence to facilitate cross-selling. While the Joint Managing director, Vineet Agarwal, under the guidance of his father D.P. Agarwal, Vice-Chairman and Managing Director, TCI, and in conjunction with TCI's Executive Committee, had introduced initiatives like training across divisions, competitions on cross-selling, and tracking of cross-selling leads, he was not sure that these were enough. Were there other ways in which TCI could successfully cross-sell? Could they put in place a system that specifically incentivized cross-sales to motivate sales staff? The (A) case focuses on TCI's cross-selling efforts and the strategic decisions before it. Cases (B), (C), and (D) discuss specific situations that demonstrate issues related to the cross-selling initiative.

    Keywords: Transportation; Transportation Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Saloni Chaturvedi. "Transport Corporation of India (C): Dealing with Shortcomings in Service Quality." Harvard Business School Supplement 113-132, May 2013. View Details
  6. Transport Corporation of India (B): Choosing the Right Candidate

    Transport Corporation of India was a logistics company that provided multi-modal transport solutions to its customers. Set up in 1958, TCI had grown from a 'one man, one truck, one office' set-up to a company with revenues of $400 million in half a century. TCI's growth had been assisted by the creation of individual divisions that provided specialized services to its clients—Freight, Express, Supply Chain Solutions, Seaways and Global. In 2012, the company renewed it efforts to foster cross-selling across the divisions with the hope that this would increase customer-stickiness and foster growth. However, as the company tried to push the cross-selling agenda across its various divisions, it faced myriad issues. It needed to educate its divisional sales-staff about the services provided by divisions other than their own; to motivate them to cross-sell; and to create intra-division confidence to facilitate cross-selling. While the Joint Managing director, Vineet Agarwal, under the guidance of his father D.P. Agarwal, Vice-Chairman and Managing Director, TCI, and in conjunction with TCI's Executive Committee, had introduced initiatives like training across divisions, competitions on cross-selling, and tracking of cross-selling leads, he was not sure that these were enough. Were there other ways in which TCI could successfully cross-sell? Could they put in place a system that specifically incentivized cross-sales to motivate sales staff? The (A) case focuses on TCI's cross-selling efforts and the strategic decisions before it. Cases (B), (C), and (D) discuss specific situations that demonstrate issues related to the cross-selling initiative.

    Keywords: Transportation Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Saloni Chaturvedi. "Transport Corporation of India (B): Choosing the Right Candidate." Harvard Business School Supplement 113-131, May 2013. View Details
  7. Transport Corporation of India (A): The Cross-selling Conundrum

    Transport Corporation of India was a logistics company that provided multi-modal transport solutions to its customers. Set up in 1958, TCI had grown from a 'one man, one truck, one office' set-up to a company with revenues of $400 million in half a century. TCI's growth had been assisted by the creation of individual divisions that provided specialized services to its clients—Freight, Express, Supply Chain Solutions, Seaways and Global. In 2012, the company renewed it efforts to foster cross-selling across the divisions with the hope that this would increase customer-stickiness and foster growth. However, as the company tried to push the cross-selling agenda across its various divisions, it faced myriad issues. It needed to educate its divisional sales-staff about the services provided by divisions other than their own; to motivate them to cross-sell; and to create intra-division confidence to facilitate cross-selling. While the Joint Managing director, Vineet Agarwal, under the guidance of his father D.P. Agarwal, Vice-Chairman and Managing Director, TCI, and in conjunction with TCI's Executive Committee, had introduced initiatives like training across divisions, competitions on cross-selling, and tracking of cross-selling leads, he was not sure that these were enough. Were there other ways in which TCI could successfully cross-sell? Could they put in place a system that specifically incentivized cross-sales to motivate sales staff? The (A) case focuses on TCI's cross-selling efforts and the strategic decisions before it. Cases (B), (C), and (D) discuss specific situations that demonstrate issues related to the cross-selling initiative.

    Keywords: India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Saloni Chaturvedi. "Transport Corporation of India (A): The Cross-selling Conundrum." Harvard Business School Case 113-003, May 2013. View Details
  8. Equitas Microfinance (C): Advent of Regulation

    Keywords: business model; for-profit firms; Micro Finance; growth and development strategy; corporate social responsibility and impact; Social Enterprise; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., V. Kasturi Rangan, and Vidhya Muthuram. "Equitas Microfinance (C): Advent of Regulation." Harvard Business School Supplement 113-006, March 2013. (Revised May 2013.) View Details
  9. Equitas Microfinance (B): Response to the Andhra Pradesh Crisis

    Keywords: business model; for-profit firms; Microfinance; growth and development strategy; corporate social responsibility and impact; social enterprise; financial services industry; Social Enterprise; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., V. Kasturi Rangan, and Vidhya Muthuram. "Equitas Microfinance (B): Response to the Andhra Pradesh Crisis." Harvard Business School Supplement 113-005, March 2013. View Details
  10. TWA Parts (TN) (Abridged)

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Srikant Datar. "TWA Parts (TN) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 113-107, April 2013. View Details
  11. Colorscope, Inc. (Abridged) (TN)

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Srikant Datar. "Colorscope, Inc. (Abridged) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 113-108, February 2013. View Details
  12. Nalli Silk Sarees (B)

    Presents the company's perspective using an interview format. Ramnath K. Nalli, vice chairman of Nalli Silk Sarees Private Limited, and his daughter, Lavanya Nalli (HBS MBA 2011), the fifth generation entrepreneur to be involved in the family business, discuss customer preferences, buying behavior, and price sensitivity for cotton and silk sarees.

    Keywords: Family Business; Consumer Behavior; Entrepreneurship; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Namrata Arora, and Vidhya Muthuram. "Nalli Silk Sarees (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 113-048, December 2012. View Details
  13. TWA Parts (Abridged)

    Transworld Auto Parts had to implement its new strategy flawlessly to survive the auto industry upheaval. The new CEO asked her leadership team to craft strategy maps and balanced scorecards to help each division implement its strategies.

    Keywords: Business Divisions; Leadership; Balanced Scorecard; Management Teams; Business Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Auto Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "TWA Parts (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 113-030, November 2012. (Revised April 2013.) View Details
  14. Colorscope, Inc. (Abridged)

    A small company in the graphic design business faces severe price competition. The company must respond by cutting costs and making process improvements.

    Keywords: Cost Management; Price; Business Processes; Performance Improvement; Competition; Fine Arts Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Colorscope, Inc. (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 113-025, August 2012. (Revised November 2012.) View Details
  15. Delhi Metro Rail Corporation

    Keywords: Leadership; Projects; Management; Crisis Management; Public Administration Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Saloni Chaturvedi. "Delhi Metro Rail Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 112-013, February 2012. (Revised April 2012.) View Details
  16. Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (A) (Abridged)

    Owens & Minor (O&M) performed lean inventory services for Virginia Mason (VM) as its Alpha Vendor, but the outdated industry pricing model created perverse incentives and could not capture O&M's costs. Together, O&M and VM created an activity-based pricing model: Total Supply Chain Costs (TSCC), which incented both companies to be more efficient and to streamline their distribution activities. After beta testing the TSCC for one year, VM's Daniel Borunda and O&M's Michael Stefanic believed that TSCC was a better and more cost-effective pricing model, but could they convince their companies to continue to invest in TSCC?

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Partners and Partnerships; Activity Based Costing and Management; Business Model; Non-Governmental Organizations; Nonprofit Organizations; Motivation and Incentives; Asset Pricing; Cost Accounting; Fair Value Accounting; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 110-063, April 2010. (Revised September 2011.) View Details
  17. CEO Compensation at GE: A Decade with Jeff Immelt

    When ISS, a large shareholder advisory group, recommended a "no" vote on Jeff Immelt's award of 2 million stock options in April 2011, GE's compensation committee had to decide whether to rescind or amend the award or ignore the ISS recommendation. Was Immelt's 2010 pay in line with his performance? How would shareholders vote on the advisory "say on pay" ballot question at GE's annual meeting in April?

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Stock Options; Stock Shares; Annual Reports; Executive Compensation; Compensation and Benefits; Business and Shareholder Relations; Performance Evaluation; Corporate Governance; Corporate Accountability; Energy Industry; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "CEO Compensation at GE: A Decade with Jeff Immelt." Harvard Business School Case 112-003, July 2011. (Revised September 2011.) View Details
  18. Transworld Auto Parts (A)

    Transworld Auto Parts had to implement its new strategy flawlessly to survive the auto industry upheaval. The new CEO asked her leadership team to craft strategy maps and balanced scorecards to help each division implement its strategies.

    Keywords: Business Divisions; Leadership; Balanced Scorecard; Management Teams; Business Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Auto Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Transworld Auto Parts (A)." Harvard Business School Case 110-027, September 2009. (Revised August 2011.) View Details
  19. Transworld Auto Parts (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Transworld Auto Parts (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 110-028, September 2009. (Revised August 2011.) View Details
  20. Whose Money Is It Anyway? (TN) (A), (B), and (C)

    Teaching Note for 810-008, 810-013, and 810-031.

    Keywords: Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., V.G. Narayanan, and Rachel Gordon. "Whose Money Is It Anyway? (TN) (A), (B), and (C)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 111-128, June 2011. View Details
  21. Sniffing Out Opportunities at PetSmart

    The pet and pet supply industry was one of the few bright lights in an otherwise dismal retail outlook in 2009. This case gives background pet retail industry information and strategic positioning information for both PetSmart and PETCO to enable students to develop their own Balanced Scorecards and strategy maps for the two companies.

    Keywords: Balanced Scorecard; Industry Growth; Industry Structures; Competitive Strategy; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Sniffing Out Opportunities at PetSmart." Harvard Business School Case 110-025, September 2009. (Revised May 2011.) View Details
  22. Sniffing Out Opportunities at PetSmart (TN)

    Teaching Note for #110-025.

    Keywords: Balanced Scorecard; Strategy; Opportunities; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Sniffing Out Opportunities at PetSmart (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 111-083, March 2011. View Details
  23. Transworld Auto Parts (TN) (A) and (B)

    Teaching Note for [110027] and [110028].

    Keywords: Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Transworld Auto Parts (TN) (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 110-064, April 2010. (Revised January 2011.) View Details
  24. Sara Campbell Ltd. (A)

    Describes a situation in which Sara Campbell, the CEO of a women's apparel company, must decide how to resolve the tense relationship with her Financial Controller and ex-brother-in-law, Stephen Holt. Holt was employed by Campbell for 10 years, took on the majority of financial responsibilities for the firm, and knew the business very well. Although he was bright, Campbell was often disappointed by his poor judgment and disorderly nature. By 1999, two incidents by Holt forced Campbell to question how she should proceed in terms of his employment. Students are given context to debate whether Holt's behavior was detrimental enough to overshadow a successful ten-year working relationship and his monetary obligations to Campbell's immediate family.

    Keywords: Accounting; Judgments; Governance Controls; Employee Relationship Management; Behavior; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Autrey, Romana, V.G. Narayanan, and Julia Rozovsky. "Sara Campbell Ltd. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 108-070, January 2008. (Revised October 2010.) View Details
  25. Sara Campbell Ltd. (B)

    Supplements the Sara Campbell Ltd. (A) case by introducing additional concerns with Holt. In January of 1999, Campbell received a certified letter written by Holt. The letter described Holt's own frustration in working for Campbell. Students are given context to discuss how to proceed.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Employee Relationship Management; Management; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Autrey, Romana, V.G. Narayanan, and Julia Rozovsky. "Sara Campbell Ltd. (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 108-071, January 2008. (Revised October 2010.) View Details
  26. Sara Campbell Ltd. (C)

    Supplements the Sara Campbell Ltd. (A) and (B) cases by revealing the aftermath of issues presented in the (B) case. The students are given context to discuss how this situation could have been prevented.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Employee Relationship Management; Outcome or Result; Situation or Environment; Conflict Management; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Autrey, Romana L., V.G. Narayanan, and Julia Rozovsky. "Sara Campbell Ltd. (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 110-034, October 2009. (Revised October 2010.) View Details
  27. Equitas Microfinance: The Fastest-Growing MFI on the Planet

    Founded as a for-profit microfinance company, Equitas had acquired nearly a million clients in the short two years since it was founded. The founder, Vasu, and his management team wished to accelerate the already impressive spurt to three million clients in the next two years. The case describes the company's business model, which attempts to integrate microfinance with social development, and provides students with the opportunity to discuss the scaling options and challenges facing the founder.

    Keywords: Business Model; For-Profit Firms; Microfinance; Growth and Development Strategy; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Social Enterprise; Financial Services Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and V. Kasturi Rangan. "Equitas Microfinance: The Fastest-Growing MFI on the Planet." Harvard Business School Case 510-104, March 2010. (Revised April 2013.) View Details
  28. Executive Pay and the Credit Crisis of 2008 (TN) (A) and (B) and The Credit Crisis of 2008: An Overview

    Teaching Note for 109036, 110005, and 110048.

    Keywords: Financial Crisis; Compensation and Benefits; Management Teams;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Executive Pay and the Credit Crisis of 2008 (TN) (A) and (B) and The Credit Crisis of 2008: An Overview." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 111-027, July 2010. View Details
  29. Whose Money Is It Anyway? (A)

    The Brigham and Women's Physician's Organization (BWPO) and its corporate parent disagree over who has jurisdiction over significant legacy funds. Are they controlled by the BWPO or do they belong to BWPO's corporate parent? The BWPO and its corporate parent must negotiate who has control of the funds which impacts how the funds may be used.

    Keywords: Accounting; Investment Funds; Governance Controls; Agreements and Arrangements; Boundaries; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Rachel Gordon. "Whose Money Is It Anyway? (A)." Harvard Business School Case 810-008, March 2010. (Revised June 2010.) View Details
  30. Executive Pay and the Credit Crisis of 2008 (A)

    The credit crisis of 2008 placed compensation practices at publicly traded firms in the United States under scrutiny. This case examines perceived excessive pay and severance packages at several firms implicated in the credit crisis of 2008, the executive compensation provisions in the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act, and discusses the implications for compensation committees at public companies.

    Keywords: Financial Crisis; Governing and Advisory Boards; Government Legislation; Executive Compensation; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Fabrizio Ferri, and Lisa Brem. "Executive Pay and the Credit Crisis of 2008 (A)." Harvard Business School Case 109-036, October 2008. (Revised June 2010.) View Details
  31. Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (A)

    Virginia Mason Medical Center (VM) hired Owens & Minor (O&M) as its alpha vendor for medical/surgical supplies in 2004. By 2005, O&M was performing Just-in-Time and Low Unit of Measure services for VM, but they believed the pricing model in the industry was outdated. VM and O&M partnered to create the Total Supply Chain Cost (TSCC) pricing program, an activity-based model that assigned all the cost drivers of distribution and inventory handling to VM, but also assured O&M of a profit. The TSCC incented VM to streamline its distribution activities, since these would directly impact its fee. After beta testing the TSCC for one year, VM's Daniel Borunda and O&M's Michael Stefanic believed that TSCC was a better and more cost-effective pricing model, but could they convince their companies to continue to invest in TSCC?

    Keywords: Activity Based Costing and Management; Price; Distribution; Supply Chain Management; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (A)." Harvard Business School Case 109-076, April 2009. (Revised June 2010.) View Details
  32. Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (B)

    The epilogue to Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (A), the B case details the outcome of the issues discussed in Case A; namely that Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor did implement the TSCC contract. Virginia Mason also kept the suture contract with O&M because the TSCC model was able to prove that O&M was the low-cost provider. Case B also gives results metrics, such as reduction in line items, orders, and days sales outstanding.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Supply Chain Management; Partners and Partnerships; Measurement and Metrics; Contracts; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 109-077, April 2009. (Revised June 2010.) View Details
  33. Executive Pay and the Credit Crisis of 2008 (B)

    As the recession lingered on into 2009, the U.S. government sought to limit executive pay and excessive risk. The debate raged over what constituted excessive risk and how best to mitigate it. This case describes the government restrictions on executive pay for TARP recipients and delves into the debate on executive compensation and incentives that encourage excessive risk.

    Keywords: Financial Crisis; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Government Legislation; Executive Compensation; Risk Management; Business and Government Relations; Motivation and Incentives; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Executive Pay and the Credit Crisis of 2008 (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 110-005, July 2009. (Revised June 2010.) View Details
  34. Kim Park (B): Liabilities

    A series of caselets exploring the accounting for liabilities.

    Keywords: Accounting; Financial Reporting; International Accounting; Standards; United States;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., Gregory Miller, and V.G. Narayanan. "Kim Park (B): Liabilities." Harvard Business School Supplement 110-018, July 2009. (Revised June 2010.) View Details
  35. Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (TN) (A1), (A2), (A), and (B)

    Teaching Note for 109013, 109014, 108024 and 108073.

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Ferri, Fabrizio, V.G. Narayanan, and Lisa Brem. "Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (TN) (A1), (A2), (A), and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 110-074, June 2010. View Details
  36. Strategy Map Tool

    Keywords: Strategy;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. Strategy Map Tool. Harvard Business School Tool 110-709, June 2010. View Details
  37. Ujjivan: A Microfinance Institution at a Crossroads (TN) (A) and (B)

    Teaching Note for [108057] and [108083].

    Keywords: Microfinance; Decision Making; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Ujjivan: A Microfinance Institution at a Crossroads (TN) (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 110-069, May 2010. View Details
  38. Say on Pay (TN)

    Teaching Note for [407129].

    Keywords: Business and Shareholder Relations; Voting; Executive Compensation; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Say on Pay (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 110-072, May 2010. View Details
  39. Offering the Right Service in the Right Place: Growing Orthopedics at the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner (BW/F) Hospitals (TN)

    Teaching Note for [108016].

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Performance Efficiency; Decisions; Competitive Advantage; Service Delivery; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Offering the Right Service in the Right Place: Growing Orthopedics at the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner (BW/F) Hospitals (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 110-073, May 2010. View Details
  40. Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (TN) (A), (B), and (A) (Abridged)

    Teaching Note for [109076], [109077], and [110063]..

    Keywords: Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Supply Chain Partners: Virginia Mason and Owens & Minor (TN) (A), (B), and (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 110-056, April 2010. View Details
  41. The Credit Crisis of 2008: An Overview

    This case examines the causes and consequences of the credit crisis of 2008 from a national and global perspective and explores the actions taken and proposed by the U.S. and European governments.

    Keywords: Credit; Financial Crisis; Crisis Management; Risk Management; Globalized Economies and Regions; Global Strategy; Mortgages; Performance Effectiveness; Financial Services Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Fabrizio Ferri, and Lisa Brem. "The Credit Crisis of 2008: An Overview." Harvard Business School Case 110-048, April 2010. View Details
  42. Whose Money Is It Anyway? (B)

    The case describes the various reactions of doctors and administrators to the solutions they developed.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Organizations; Behavior; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Rachel Gordon. "Whose Money Is It Anyway? (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 810-013, March 2010. View Details
  43. Whose Money Is It Anyway? (C)

    The case describes how the Brigham and Women's Physicians Organization and its corporate parent resolved the issue of how the disputed funds would be distributed and used.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Business Subsidiaries; Organizational Design; Conflict and Resolution; Resource Allocation; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Rachel Gordon. "Whose Money Is It Anyway? (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 810-031, March 2010. View Details
  44. Indus Towers: Collaborating with Competitors on Infrastructure

    The case describes the formation of Indus Towers, the largest telecom tower company in the world that has a joint venture created to build and manage the passive infrastructure of wireless telecom operators by bringing together three competitors in India's tough telecom market—Bharti Airtel, Vodafone Essar, and Idea Cellular—and merging their tower holdings. It focuses on the issue as to how do you collaborate with your competitors in setting up towers but engage in a brutal competition with them in the marketplace?

    Keywords: Joint Ventures; Cost Management; Infrastructure; Alliances; Competition; Cooperation; Telecommunications Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Gulati, Ranjay, Francisco de Asis Martinez-Jerez, V.G. Narayanan, and Rachna Tahilyani. "Indus Towers: Collaborating with Competitors on Infrastructure." Harvard Business School Case 110-057, February 2010. (Revised November 2012.) View Details
  45. Kim Park (B): Liabilities (TN)

    Teaching Note for [110018].

    Keywords: Accounting;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., Gregory Miller, and V.G. Narayanan. "Kim Park (B): Liabilities (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 110-021, July 2009. View Details
  46. Areva

    Areva, the world's market leader in civilian nuclear power, was positioned to take advantage of the resurgence of nuclear power. However, three issues clouded the positive outlook: (1) a 1.7 billion euro loss on the construction of the first next generation nuclear reactor in Finland, (2) the decision of German company Siemens to pull out of its partnership in Areva NP and exercise its 2.1 billion euro put option, and (3) the projected investment budget shortfall of 3 billion euros in 2008. How can Areva best generate cash to finance its investments for 2008 and beyond?

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Financial Statements; Energy Generation; Cash Flow; Investment; Energy Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Areva." Harvard Business School Case 109-092, May 2009. (Revised June 2009.) View Details
  47. Offering the Right Service in the Right Place: Growing Orthopedics at the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner (BW/F) Hospitals

    After the merger of two local hospitals, hospital leaders much decide how to reorganize services to take advantage of newly created efficiencies. Focuses on the Orthopedics department at one of the hospitals.

    Keywords: Cost Accounting; Mergers and Acquisitions; Cost vs Benefits; Service Operations; Organizational Structure; Performance Efficiency; Competitive Advantage; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Michael G. Wilson, and Rachel Gordon. "Offering the Right Service in the Right Place: Growing Orthopedics at the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner (BW/F) Hospitals." Harvard Business School Case 108-016, October 2007. (Revised May 2009.) View Details
  48. Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (A1)

    Two activist investors, one a founder and one a hedge fund manager, seek to improve board oversight at a chain restaurant company. Prestley Blake founded Friendly Ice Cream in 1935 with his brother, and the two created a chain of full-service restaurants. In 1979, they sold the business and retired. In 2000, Blake became concerned that Friendly's CEO, who owned approximately 10% of Friendly and also owned a larger percentage of another restaurant company, was shifting expenses between the businesses in a way detrimental to Friendly shareholders but personally advantageous to the CEO. Further, Blake believed that Friendly's board of directors was not meeting their fiduciary obligations to shareholders by properly overseeing the activities of the CEO and that the directors had conflicts of interest because they were involved with the CEO's non-Friendly business activities. In 2003, Blake filed a lawsuit against the CEO and the company. In 2006, Sardar Biglari, a hedge fund manager who had invested in Friendly, entered into negotiations with Friendly for him to join the board of directors to help improve the management of the business. When these negotiations failed, Biglari launched a proxy fight against Friendly in 2007. While these two activist investors shared similar objectives, they worked independently and chose different strategies. The A1 case ends as activists Sardar Biglari and Phil Cooley prepare to meet with CEO Don Smith at Friendly's headquarters in September 2006.

    Keywords: Investment Activism; Governing and Advisory Boards; Lawsuits and Litigation; Business or Company Management; Business and Shareholder Relations; Conflict of Interests; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Ferri, Fabrizio, V.G. Narayanan, and James Weber. "Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (A1)." Harvard Business School Case 109-013, September 2008. (Revised October 2008.) View Details
  49. Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (A2)

    The A1 and A2 versions of the “Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (A)” split the original A case into two parts. The A1 case ends as activists Sardar Biglari and Phil Cooley prepare to meet with CEO Don Smith at Friendly's headquarters in September 2006. The A2 case resumes the story just after the meeting and details Biglari's and Friendly's actions from that point on. The A1 and A2 cases are provided for instructors who wish more flexibility in the teaching plan. These cases do not omit or abridge any information contained in the original A case. Two activist investors, one a founder and one a hedge fund manager, seek to improve board oversight at a chain restaurant company. Prestley Blake founded Friendly Ice Cream in 1935 with his brother and the two created a chain of full-service restaurants. In 1979 they sold the business and retired. In 2000, Blake became concerned that Friendly's CEO, who owned approximately 10% of Friendly and also owned a larger percentage of another restaurant company, was shifting expenses between the businesses in a way detrimental to Friendly shareholders, but personally advantageous to the CEO. Further, Blake believed that Friendly's board of directors was not meeting their fiduciary obligations to shareholders by properly overseeing the activities of the CEO and that the directors had conflicts of interest because they were involved with the CEO's non-Friendly business activities. In 2003, Blake filed a lawsuit against the CEO and the company. In 2006, Sardar Biglari, a hedge fund manager who had invested in Friendly, entered into negotiations with Friendly for him to join the board of directors to help improve the management of the business. When these negotiations failed, Biglari launched a proxy fight against Friendly in 2007. While these two activist investors shared similar objectives, they worked independently and chose different strategies.

    Keywords: Investment Activism; Business and Shareholder Relations; Governing and Advisory Boards; Conflict and Resolution; Lawsuits and Litigation; Business or Company Management; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Fabrizio Ferri, and James Weber. "Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (A2)." Harvard Business School Supplement 109-014, September 2008. (Revised October 2008.) View Details
  50. Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (A)

    Two activist investors, one a founder and one a hedge-fund manager, seek to improve board oversight at a chain restaurant company. Prestley Blake founded Friendly Ice Cream in 1935 with his brother, and the two created a chain of full-service restaurants. In 1979 they sold the business and retired. In 2000, Blake became concerned that Friendly's CEO, who owned approximately 10% of Friendly and also owned a larger percentage of another restaurant company, was shifting expenses between the businesses in a way detrimental to Friendly shareholders, but personally advantageous to the CEO. Further, Blake believed that Friendly's board of directors was not meeting their fiduciary obligations to shareholders by properly overseeing the activities of the CEO, and that the directors had conflicts of interest, because they were involved with the CEO's non-Friendly business activities. In 2003, Blake filed a lawsuit against the CEO and the company. In 2006, Sardar Biglari, a hedge-fund manager who had invested in Friendly, entered into negotiations with Friendly for him to join the board of directors to help improve the management of the business. When these negotiations failed, Biglari launched a proxy fight against Friendly in 2007. While these two activist investors shared similar objectives, they worked independently and chose different strategies.

    Keywords: Investment Activism; Governing and Advisory Boards; Lawsuits and Litigation; Business or Company Management; Business and Shareholder Relations; Conflict of Interests; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Ferri, Fabrizio, V.G. Narayanan, and James Weber. "Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (A)." Harvard Business School Case 108-024, April 2008. (Revised September 2008.) View Details
  51. Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (B)

    This case study briefly describes the outcome of the Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (A) case.

    Keywords: Investment Activism; Business and Shareholder Relations; Conflict and Resolution; Outcome or Result;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Fabrizio Ferri, and James Weber. "Shareholder Activists at Friendly Ice Cream (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 108-073, April 2008. (Revised August 2008.) View Details
  52. Say on Pay

    Briefly describes the trend in 2006 and 2007 in the United States to give shareholders an advisory vote on executive compensation. Highlights a few examples where shareholders have successfully garnered a majority in support of an advisory vote measure on company proxy ballots, and describes discussion within Congress on the matter.

    Keywords: Voting; Corporate Governance; Governing and Advisory Boards; Executive Compensation; Business and Government Relations; Business and Shareholder Relations; United States;

    Citation:

    Lorsch, Jay W., V.G. Narayanan, and Alexis Chernak. "Say on Pay." Harvard Business School Case 407-129, June 2007. (Revised April 2008.) View Details
  53. Store24 (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-103-058).

    Keywords: Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Campbell, Dennis, Susan L. Kulp, and V.G. Narayanan. "Store24 (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 103-078, April 2003. (Revised April 2008.) View Details
  54. Ujjivan: A Microfinance Institution at a Crossroads (A)

    Samit Ghosh, the CEO and founder of Ujjivan, a major microfinance provider in Bangalore, wants to grow his business rapidly and become financially sustainable, but he's struggling with staff fraud, high costs, and how to stay true to Ujjivan's mission of poverty alleviation, while simultaneously reaching out to higher-income customers. The case explores how Ujjivan can grow, looking at such issues as new technology, diversifying product offerings, and how to hire the best staff.

    Keywords: Financial Institutions; Microfinance; Ethics; Mission and Purpose; Growth and Development Strategy; Financial Services Industry; Bangalore;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Pamela Freed. "Ujjivan: A Microfinance Institution at a Crossroads (A)." Harvard Business School Case 108-057, March 2008. View Details
  55. Ujjivan: A Microfinance Institution at a Crossroads (B)

    Case (B) of "Ujjivan: A Microfinance Institution at a Crossroads" addresses some of the actions Ujjivan, a microfinance provider in Bangalore, has taken with regard to issues raised in the (A) case, particularly regarding fraud and establishing financial sustainability. For example, the CEO of Ujjivan, Samit Ghosh, decides to strengthen the Audit Team and implements new loan products.

    Keywords: Financial Institutions; Microfinance; Crime and Corruption; Accounting Audits; Product Development; Financial Services Industry; Bangalore;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Pamela Freed. "Ujjivan: A Microfinance Institution at a Crossroads (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 108-083, March 2008. View Details
  56. Executive Remuneration at Reckitt Benckiser plc (TN)

    Teaching Note for [104-062].

    Keywords: Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Executive Remuneration at Reckitt Benckiser plc (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 108-063, December 2007. View Details
  57. Executive Compensation at General Electric (TN) (A) and (B)

    Teaching Note for [105072] and [105070].

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Executive Compensation at General Electric (TN) (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 108-064, December 2007. View Details
  58. Strategic Outsourcing at Bharti Airtel Limited

    Faced with exponential growth and a competitive telecom environment, Bharti looks for ways to better manage its capital expenditures for telecommunications and information technology. One option is to hand over management of its telecom and IT networks to its vendors. Explores the pros and cons of such an outsourcing arrangement for a company in an industry where technological superiority is considered an essential element in competitive strategy.

    Keywords: Innovation and Management; Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Competitive Advantage; Technology Networks; Telecommunications Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Martinez-Jerez, Francisco de Asis, V.G. Narayanan, and Michele Jurgens. "Strategic Outsourcing at Bharti Airtel Limited." Harvard Business School Case 107-003, July 2006. (Revised December 2007.) View Details
  59. Strategic Outsourcing at Bharti Airtel Limited: One Year Later.

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing;

    Citation:

    Martinez-Jerez, Francisco de Asis, V.G. Narayanan, and Michele Jurgens. "Strategic Outsourcing at Bharti Airtel Limited: One Year Later." Harvard Business School Supplement 107-004, July 2006. (Revised December 2007.) View Details
  60. Internet Customer Acquisition Strategy at Bankinter (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-103-021).

    Keywords: Banking Industry; Information Technology Industry; Spain;

    Citation:

    Martinez-Jerez, Francisco de Asis, and V.G. Narayanan. "Internet Customer Acquisition Strategy at Bankinter (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 104-004, January 2004. (Revised August 2007.) View Details
  61. Customer Profitability and Customer Relationship Management at RBC Financial Group (Abridged)

    The Royal Bank of Canada uses customer relationship management and customer profitability tools to gain a competitive advantage in Canada's increasingly crowded financial services market. The case presents two pricing and customer management issues: one from the point of view of the vice president of customer relationship marketing and the other from a line manager's perspective.

    Keywords: Customers; Customer Relationship Management; Price; Perspective; Marketing; Competitive Advantage; Financial Services Industry; Banking Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Customer Profitability and Customer Relationship Management at RBC Financial Group (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 102-072, March 2002. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  62. Internet Customer Acquisition Strategy at Bankinter

    Bankinter, a relatively small Spanish bank, has a large presence as an Internet financial services provider. Leading the way to profitability through the Internet will give Bankinter a major competitive advantage over the larger, more established Spanish banks. Ann Peralta, director of the Internet network in Bankinter, must evaluate whether the thousands of new customers pouring in from other portals are profitable for the bank. Peralta uses tools such as customer relationship management, activity-based costing, customer profitability, and lifetime value computations to determine the value of this cohort of new customers for the bank and in doing so, can decide on future customer acquisition strategies.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Internet; Activity Based Costing and Management; Customer Value and Value Chain; Banks and Banking; Banking Industry; Spain;

    Citation:

    Martinez-Jerez, Francisco de Asis, V.G. Narayanan, and Lisa Brem. "Internet Customer Acquisition Strategy at Bankinter." Harvard Business School Case 103-021, February 2003. (Revised March 2007.) View Details
  63. Achieving Customer Satisfaction at Pizza Hut (A)

    Describes how Pizza Hut measures and monitors customer satisfaction, customer complaints, and the quality of its retail locations.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Management Systems; Risk Management; Franchise Ownership; Performance Evaluation; Problems and Challenges; Quality; Food and Beverage Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Preeti Choudhary. "Achieving Customer Satisfaction at Pizza Hut (A)." Harvard Business School Case 101-006, December 2000. (Revised February 2007.) View Details
  64. Introduction to Cost Accounting Systems (TN)

    Keywords: Cost Accounting;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, Michele Jurgens, and Jacob Cohen. "Introduction to Cost Accounting Systems (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 106-045, February 2006. (Revised October 2006.) View Details
  65. Executive Remuneration at Reckitt Benckiser plc

    Reckitt Benckiser plc has developed an executive compensation system. This case outlines the structure of the system, its emphasis on performance-based pay and a global outlook, and explains the role of the human resources department, the board of directors, and company shareholders in determining pay. It raises questions about how to balance incentive remuneration effectively in recruiting and retaining top managers, while addressing shareholder concerns about executive compensation.

    Keywords: Governing and Advisory Boards; Employee Relationship Management; System; Executive Compensation; Retention; Performance; Human Resources; Recruitment; Business and Shareholder Relations;

    Citation:

    Lorsch, Jay W., V.G. Narayanan, Krishna G. Palepu, Lisa Brem, and Ashley Robertson. "Executive Remuneration at Reckitt Benckiser plc." Harvard Business School Case 104-062, January 2004. (Revised July 2006.) View Details
  66. Cost-Volume-Profit Models (TN)

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, Michele Jurgens, and Jacob Cohen. "Cost-Volume-Profit Models (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 106-046, February 2006. View Details
  67. Alternative Choice Decision Analysis (TN)

    Keywords: Decision Making;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, Michele Jurgens, and Jacob Cohen. "Alternative Choice Decision Analysis (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 106-048, February 2006. View Details
  68. Introduction to Responsibility Accounting Systems (TN)

    Keywords: Accounting;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, Michele Jurgens, and Jacob Cohen. "Introduction to Responsibility Accounting Systems (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 106-047, February 2006. View Details
  69. Introduction to Cost Accounting Systems

    Covers the basics of cost system design, demonstrating in a clear, step-by-step fashion how costs are assigned to cost objects. Key concepts include direct and indirect costs, two-stage allocation, cost pools, and cost drivers. Also provides a brief review of several variations of cost systems, explaining the difference between job and process costing, direct and full cost systems, as well as standard cost systems. Provides exercises throughout the tutorial to test understanding of the material.

    Keywords: Cost Accounting; Cost; System;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, Jacob Cohen, and Michele Jurgens. Introduction to Cost Accounting Systems. Harvard Business School Tutorial 105-701, September 2004. (Revised January 2006.) View Details
  70. Introduction to Responsibility Accounting Systems

    Responsibility accounting systems generate financial and related nonfinancial information about the actual and planned activities of a company's responsibility centers--organizational units headed by managers responsible for a unit's performance. The principal components covered are budgets, performance reports, variance reports, and transfer prices. Describes these components and walks students through how a responsibility center's actual performance is compared to its planned (budgeted) performance and how resources can be transferred from one center to another. Also explains the management planning and control process. Provides numerous exercises to test understanding of the material.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Cost Accounting; Governance Controls; Financial Reporting; Performance Evaluation; Budgets and Budgeting; Planning;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, Jacob Cohen, and Michele Jurgens. Introduction to Responsibility Accounting Systems. Harvard Business School Tutorial 105-703, October 2004. (Revised January 2006.) View Details
  71. Alternative Choice Decisions Analysis

    Shows how managers use information on costs and revenues to decide between possible alternative courses of action. Presents two case examples of differential cost analysis. The first, a make or buy decision, examines two alternatives in which only costs vary. The second presents a situation in which both revenues (changes in price and volume) and costs (including fixed costs) change. Both analyses allow students to act as managers and conclude which of several alternatives yields the greatest differential profits.

    Keywords: Cost; Profit; Revenue; Information; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Problems and Challenges; Conflict and Resolution;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, Jacob Cohen, and Michele Jurgens. Alternative Choice Decisions Analysis. Harvard Business School Tutorial 105-706, January 2006. View Details
  72. Cost-Volume Profit Models

    Covers fixed, variable, and semivariable costs and their role in building and interpreting cost-volume-profit models. Introduces the cost-volume and contribution-volume-profit models and identifies some of their uses and limitations. Teaches how to use the cost-volume-profit model to determine profit at various levels of unit volume and how to calculate a breakeven point. Includes multiple exercises throughout the tutorial.

    Keywords: Volume; Cost; Profit; Mathematical Methods;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, Jacob Cohen, and Michele Jurgens. Cost-Volume Profit Models. Harvard Business School Tutorial 105-705, January 2006. View Details
  73. Executive Compensation at General Electric (A)

    Faced with falling share prices and the critical eye of the media focused on Jack Welch's retirement plan, newly appointed CEO Jeff Immelt had the challenge of reassessing GE as a leader of corporate integrity and good governance. Presents the changes Immelt initiated in the board of directors, in Immelt's own compensation scheme, and in the compensation scheme for all GE executives, designed to address GE's corporate governance issues. Examines the use of stock options and alternative stock-based incentive schemes, along with the importance of each tool in a total compensation plan. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Executive Compensation; Employee Stock Ownership Plan; Governing and Advisory Boards; Media; Governance; Corporate Accountability;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Michele Jurgens. "Executive Compensation at General Electric (A)." Harvard Business School Case 105-072, April 2005. (Revised May 2005.) View Details
  74. Executive Compensation at General Electric (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Executive Compensation; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Michele Jurgens. "Executive Compensation at General Electric (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 105-070, April 2005. (Revised May 2005.) View Details
  75. Henkel Iberica (A)

    In 2002, Esteban Garriga, customer service director at Henkel Iberica, questions whether Collaborative Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment (CPFR) would help manage retail promotions and limit their impact on the stock-outs and obsolete inventory. Describes the situation facing Henkel Iberica, the Spanish subsidiary of the German consumer products company Henkel KgaA, with respect to the management of retail promotions. The increasing number of promotions and the complexity of the company portfolio seriously taxed Henkel Iberica's sales, production, and distribution systems. Many in the organization believed the company should abandon or cut back promotions and adopt an everyday low pricing strategy. Garriga believes the solution to be in CPFR. Describes Henkel Iberica's operations and provides the necessary background to discuss whether CPFR is the adequate solution for its problems.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Forecasting and Prediction; Price; Distribution Channels; Strategic Planning; Commercialization; Valuation; Rail Industry; Germany; Spain;

    Citation:

    Martinez-Jerez, Francisco de Asis, V.G. Narayanan, and Lisa Brem. "Henkel Iberica (A)." Harvard Business School Case 105-023, March 2005. View Details
  76. Henkel Iberica (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Rail Industry; Germany; Spain;

    Citation:

    Martinez-Jerez, Francisco de Asis, V.G. Narayanan, and Lisa Brem. "Henkel Iberica (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 105-024, March 2005. View Details
  77. Metalcraft Supplier Scorecard, TN

    Teaching Note for (9-102-047).

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Kulp, Susan L., and V.G. Narayanan. "Metalcraft Supplier Scorecard, TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 102-081, May 2002. (Revised April 2004.) View Details
  78. Store24

    Illustrates how nonfinancial performance measures can be used to manage a business and evaluate the success of a strategy.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Balanced Scorecard; Performance Evaluation; Strategy; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Kulp, Susan L., V.G. Narayanan, and Dennis Campbell. "Store24." Harvard Business School Case 103-058, February 2003. (Revised March 2004.) View Details
  79. Metalcraft Supplier Scorecard

    An automotive components company uses a supplier scorecard to make sourcing decisions and review its supplier performance.

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Quality; Performance Evaluation; Decision Making; Service Operations; Motivation and Incentives; Supply and Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Kulp, Susan L., V.G. Narayanan, and Ronald L. Verkleeren. "Metalcraft Supplier Scorecard." Harvard Business School Case 102-047, March 2002. (Revised March 2004.) View Details
  80. Activity-Based Management at W.S. Industries (TN) (A) and (B)

    Teaching Note for (9-101-062) and (9-102-063).

    Keywords: Activity Based Costing and Management;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Activity-Based Management at W.S. Industries (TN) (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 103-011, August 2002. (Revised November 2003.) View Details
  81. Executive Compensation at Reckitt Benckiser plc

    Investors felt betrayed by the increasingly lucrative pay packages awarded to CEOs and other top executives at multinational companies. Yet, board members charged with adequately rewarding executives were forced to compete with rising packages of salaries and stock options. Bart Becht, CEO of Reckitt Benckiser, the Anglo-Dutch manufacturer of cleaning products, was the United Kingdom's highest paid CEO in 2003. With shareholder protests looming at its annual meeting, should the board reconsider Becht's pay package or ride out the storm? Examines the issues facing board compensation committees when trying to design remuneration packages that will keep CEOs performing and meet shareholder goals. Discusses the viability of stock options, proper balance between variable and nonvariable pay, setting effective performance targets, and how rising U.S. pay affects global companies.

    Keywords: Design; Stock Options; Investment Activism; Corporate Accountability; Compensation and Benefits; Employee Stock Ownership Plan; Management Teams; Business and Shareholder Relations; Consumer Products Industry; Netherlands; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Krishna G. Palepu, and Lisa Brem. "Executive Compensation at Reckitt Benckiser plc." Harvard Business School Case 104-006, September 2003. View Details
  82. Design and Implementation of Activity-Based Cost Systems

    Describes the main themes of the module on the design and implementation of an activity-based costing (ABC) system. Instructors can teach this module to second-year MBA students who have been exposed to activity-based costing in their first-year core accounting courses. Emphasizes how a firm's particular business context affects ABC system design and the factors that help an ABC implementation succeed.

    Keywords: Cost Accounting;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Design and Implementation of Activity-Based Cost Systems." Harvard Business School Module Note 103-075, June 2003. View Details
  83. Control in Inter-organizational Settings

    Describes the main themes of the module on control in interorganizational settings, which instructors can teach as part of a second-year MBA course on control. Identifies the root causes of control problems in interorganizational settings and identifies principles for mitigating these problems.

    Keywords: Curriculum and Courses; Governance Controls; Policy; Organizational Design; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Control in Inter-organizational Settings." Harvard Business School Module Note 103-079, June 2003. View Details
  84. How to Induce Retailers to Reduce Stockouts?

    Describes how the lack of incentive alignment between retailers and their vendors can lead to stockouts. Also describes various means to reduce incentive misalignment and hence stockouts.

    Keywords: Motivation and Incentives; Supply Chain Management; Order Taking and Fulfillment; Distribution; Alignment; Business Strategy; Consumer Products Industry; Industrial Products Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "How to Induce Retailers to Reduce Stockouts?" Harvard Business School Background Note 103-080, May 2003. View Details
  85. Owens & Minor, Inc. (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-100-055) and (9-100-079).

    Keywords: Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Distribution Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Owens & Minor, Inc. (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 100-100, March 2000. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  86. Supply Chain Close-Up: The Video Vault

    The owners of the Video Vault struggle to determine the optimal stocking levels of home videos in an industry fraught with new technology, new pricing paradigms, and stiff competitive pressure from large national chains. Teaching Purpose: To demonstrate the role of incentive contracts in achieving supply chain coordination.

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Competition; Motivation and Incentives; Price; Technological Innovation; Service Delivery; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Supply Chain Close-Up: The Video Vault." Harvard Business School Case 102-070, March 2002. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  87. Supply Chain Close-Up: The Video Vault TN

    Teaching Note for (9-102-070).

    Keywords: Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Supply Chain Close-Up: The Video Vault TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 103-012, August 2002. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  88. Queueing Theory

    Explains the assumptions behind and the insights from a simple queueing model.

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods; Theory; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Motivation and Incentives; Service Delivery;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and George Batta. "Queueing Theory." Harvard Business School Background Note 102-023, December 2001. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  89. Delays at Logan Airport: Problem Set

    Supplements the case.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Air Transportation Industry; Boston;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and George Batta. "Delays at Logan Airport: Problem Set." Harvard Business School Exercise 102-022, December 2001. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  90. Colorscope, Inc. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-197-040).

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Colorscope, Inc. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 198-110, February 1998. (Revised April 2003.) View Details
  91. Delays at Logan Airport

    Logan Airport is facing mounting delays for flights landings and takeoffs, especially in inclement weather. An additional runway and peak-period pricing are two alternatives being considered.

    Keywords: Price; Problems and Challenges; Decision Making; Mathematical Methods; Air Transportation Industry; Service Industry; Boston;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and George Batta. "Delays at Logan Airport." Harvard Business School Case 102-011, December 2001. (Revised April 2003.) View Details
  92. Delays At Logan Airport, TN

    Teaching Note for (9-102-011).

    Keywords: Air Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Delays At Logan Airport, TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 103-010, August 2002. (Revised April 2003.) View Details
  93. Achieving Customer Satisfaction at Pizza Hut (TN) (A) and (B)

    Teaching Note for (2-101-006) and (2-101-042).

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Achieving Customer Satisfaction at Pizza Hut (TN) (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 103-059, April 2003. View Details
  94. Firestone/Ford Trie Controversy (TN) (A) and (B), The

    Teaching Note for (9-101-034) and (9-101-087).

    Keywords: Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Firestone/Ford Trie Controversy (TN) (A) and (B), The." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 103-071, April 2003. View Details
  95. Andina Bottling Co. (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-102-040).

    Keywords: Distribution Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Andina Bottling Co. (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 103-070, March 2003. View Details
  96. Activity-Based Management at W.S. Industries (B)

    Describes activity-based budgeting at W.S. Industries. Also describes target costing-led product redesign, and product, customer, and order profitability.

    Keywords: Activity Based Costing and Management; Operations; Energy Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Jeremy Cott. "Activity-Based Management at W.S. Industries (B)." Harvard Business School Case 102-063, February 2002. (Revised November 2002.) View Details
  97. Activity-Based Management at W.S. Industries (A)

    W.S. Industries undertakes the design and implementation of an activity based costing (ABC) system, and the ABC information empowers workers to make process improvement decisions. Workers' incentive pay is tied to cost savings from process improvements.

    Keywords: Activity Based Costing and Management; Motivation and Incentives; Performance Evaluation; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Knowledge Management; Energy Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Sanjay Pothen. "Activity-Based Management at W.S. Industries (A)." Harvard Business School Case 101-062, November 2000. (Revised November 2002.) View Details
  98. Accounting for the Intel Pentium Chip Flaw

    Investigates the 1994 Intel Pentium plan.

    Keywords: Fair Value Accounting; Quality; Measurement and Metrics; Cost; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Miller, Gregory S., V.G. Narayanan, and Lisa Brem. "Accounting for the Intel Pentium Chip Flaw." Harvard Business School Case 101-072, June 2001. (Revised October 2002.) View Details
  99. Cambridge Hospital Community Health Network - The Primary Care Unit

    The Cambridge Hospital Community Health Network needed to gain a better understanding of its unit-of-service costs, which had been rising at a rate of 10% per year. The network's step-down costing system gave only aggregate costing information, and there was some concern that it might be inaccurately representing the true cost of the intern and resident program, the interpretive services department, and the use of nurse practitioners. So the Primary Care Unit (PCU) initiated a pilot activity-based costing program. The case provides detailed exhibits on the methods of allocating costs using activity-based drivers.

    Keywords: Activity Based Costing and Management; Health Care and Treatment; Cost Accounting; Cost; Network Effects; Health Industry; Service Industry; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Lisa Brem, and Ryan Moore. "Cambridge Hospital Community Health Network - The Primary Care Unit." Harvard Business School Case 100-054, January 2000. (Revised October 2002.) View Details
  100. Andina Bottling Co.

    Andina Bottling develops an information system for monitoring the performance and operations of its various foreign and domestic subsidiaries.

    Keywords: Operations; Information Technology; Performance Evaluation; Decision Making; Business Subsidiaries; Measurement and Metrics; Business or Company Management; Distribution;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Alberto Ballve. "Andina Bottling Co." Harvard Business School Case 102-040, April 2002. (Revised October 2002.) View Details
  101. Hamptonshire Express

    Presents a series of problems that face a newspaper publisher, including inventory level, effort level, subsidy for unsold inventory, and commission for sales. Each problem is accompanied by one or more spreadsheets. Students must make various operational decisions.

    Keywords: Marketing Channels; Motivation and Incentives; Performance; Operations; Problems and Challenges; Decision Making; Sales; Demand and Consumers; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Publishing Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ananth Raman. "Hamptonshire Express." Harvard Business School Case 698-053, March 1998. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  102. Hamptonshire Express TN

    Teaching Note for (9-698-053).

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ananth Raman. "Hamptonshire Express TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 698-073, April 1998. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  103. Customer Profitability and Customer Relationship Management at RBC Financial Group (Abridged), TN

    Teaching Note for (9-102-072).

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry; Banking Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Customer Profitability and Customer Relationship Management at RBC Financial Group (Abridged), TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 103-013, August 2002. View Details
  104. Intel Pentium Chip Controversy (A), The

    Following Intel Inc.'s decision to replace flawed Pentium chips, the company faces revenue recognition choices. Events leading up to IBM's decision to halt shipment of computers that have Intel's microprocessor inside and Intel's decision to replace all the flawed chips are outlined. Intel must decide whether to: make a provision for the costs of replacing the chips, defer recognition of revenue on the flawed chips that it has now agreed to replace, or make no entries on grounds of materiality.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Decision Choices and Conditions; Revenue Recognition; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and James D Evans. "Intel Pentium Chip Controversy (A), The." Harvard Business School Case 196-091, September 1995. (Revised June 2002.) View Details
  105. Cambridge Hospital Community Health Network - The Primary Care Unit TN

    Teaching Note for (9-100-054).

    Keywords: Health Industry; Service Industry; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Cambridge Hospital Community Health Network - The Primary Care Unit TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 101-007, July 2000. (Revised May 2002.) View Details
  106. Intel Pentium Chip Controversy (B), The

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Hardware; Conflict and Resolution; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and James D Evans. "Intel Pentium Chip Controversy (B), The." Harvard Business School Supplement 196-092, September 1995. (Revised May 2002.) View Details
  107. That's a Wrap: The Dynamics of the Video Rental Industry

    The history, current dynamics, and future trends of the $10 billion home video rental industry provides a platform to discuss revenue-sharing contracts between suppliers of home videocassettes and retailers.

    Keywords: Contracts; Motivation and Incentives; Supply Chain Management; Revenue; Financial Strategy; Motion Pictures and Video Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "That's a Wrap: The Dynamics of the Video Rental Industry." Harvard Business School Background Note 102-051, February 2002. (Revised May 2002.) View Details
  108. Accounting for the Intel Pentium Chip Flaw TN

    Teaching Note for (9-101-072).

    Keywords: Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Miller, Gregory S., and V.G. Narayanan. "Accounting for the Intel Pentium Chip Flaw TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 102-077, April 2002. View Details
  109. Customer Profitability and Customer Relationship Management at RBC Financial Group

    The Royal Bank of Canada uses customer relationship management and customer profitability tools to gain a competitive advantage in Canada's increasingly crowded financial services market. The case presents two pricing and customer management issues: one from the point of view of the vice president of customer relationship marketing and the other from a line manager's perspective.

    Keywords: Competitive Advantage; Price; Customer Relationship Management; Marketing; Customer Value and Value Chain; Financial Services Industry; Banking Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Customer Profitability and Customer Relationship Management at RBC Financial Group." Harvard Business School Case 102-043, February 2002. (Revised March 2002.) View Details
  110. Owens & Minor, Inc. (A)

    A forward-thinking manager at Owens & Minor (O&M), a large national medical and surgical distribution company, enlisted the help of both logistics and cost managers to develop an innovative pricing schedule based on the customer's activities instead of the price of the product since the existing cost-plus pricing structure made it impossible for O&M to price services appropriately. The case also explores the customer resistance to his new proposal.

    Keywords: Activity Based Costing and Management; Logistics; Distribution; Price; Supply Chain Management; Customer Relationship Management; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Distribution Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Owens & Minor, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 100-055, February 2000. (Revised February 2002.) View Details
  111. Budgeting

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. Budgeting. Tool. Harvard Business School Publishing, 2002. Electronic. View Details
  112. Catanese and Vulcan (A)

    A small CPA firm puts in a new performance measurement system, and profits increase by 350% in less than a year. This case illustrates the reasons for improved profitability as well as the sustainability of levels of growth, the opportunities, and the threats that await the company.

    Keywords: Cost Accounting; Performance Evaluation; SWOT Analysis; Profit;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Sanjay Pothen. "Catanese and Vulcan (A)." Harvard Business School Case 100-021, August 1999. (Revised May 2001.) View Details
  113. Firestone/Ford Tire Controversy, The (A)

    Examines the high-profile Firestone/Ford product recall/investigation that took place in the summer of 2000. Focuses on the management of supplier relationships and incentives.

    Keywords: Knowledge Sharing; Supply Chain Management; Motivation and Incentives; Crisis Management; Corporate Accountability; Product; Service Operations; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Roger Orosman Nieves. "Firestone/Ford Tire Controversy, The (A)." Harvard Business School Case 101-034, October 2000. (Revised March 2001.) View Details
  114. Firestone/Ford Tire Controversy (B), The

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Roger Orosman Nieves. "Firestone/Ford Tire Controversy (B), The." Harvard Business School Case 101-087, March 2001. View Details
  115. Measurement and Management at CitySoft TN

    Teaching Note for (9-100-056).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Lisa Brem, and Sanjay Pothen. "Measurement and Management at CitySoft TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 101-073, January 2001. View Details
  116. Achieving Customer Satisfaction at Pizza Hut (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Food; Customer Satisfaction; Quality; Marketing; Food and Beverage Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Achieving Customer Satisfaction at Pizza Hut (B)." Harvard Business School Case 101-042, January 2001. View Details
  117. Catanese and Vulcan (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-100-021) and (9-100-080).

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Catanese and Vulcan (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 100-108, June 2000. View Details
  118. Aligning Incentives for Supply Chain Efficiency

    Introduces students to the basics of principal-agency theory as it applies to supply chains. Operational problems in supply chains can often be traced to incentive issues. Students and managers lack frameworks to analyze incentive problems in supply chains. This note offers such a framework.

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Motivation and Incentives; Framework; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Agency Theory;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ananth Raman. "Aligning Incentives for Supply Chain Efficiency." Harvard Business School Background Note 600-110, April 2000. View Details
  119. Catanese and Vulcan (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Sanjay Pothen. "Catanese and Vulcan (B)." Harvard Business School Case 100-080, February 2000. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  120. Owens & Minor, Inc. (B)

    After a manager at Owens & Minor, a national medical and surgical distribution company, proposes and develops a formalized activity-based pricing and activity-based management approach to sales and service provision, this case explore the outcome.

    Keywords: Activity Based Costing and Management; Logistics; Distribution; Price; Supply Chain Management; Sales; Outcome or Result; Management Style; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Distribution Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Lisa Brem. "Owens & Minor, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 100-079, February 2000. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  121. Measurement and Management at CitySoft

    CitySoft is a very small software developer that is grappling with issues of cost measurement and management.

    Keywords: Cost Accounting; Cost Management; Software; Problems and Challenges; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Sanjay Pothen. "Measurement and Management at CitySoft." Harvard Business School Case 100-056, January 2000. View Details
  122. Lehigh Steel TN

    Teaching Note for (9-198-085).

    Keywords: Steel Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Laura Donohue. "Lehigh Steel TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 198-112, April 1998. (Revised November 1999.) View Details
  123. Insteel Wire Products: ABM at Andrews

    Insteel implements an activity-based costing (ABC) system in 1996. It finds pallet nails to be its most profitable product and decides to expand the number of cells making pallet nails from two to four. A repeat of the ABC study in 1997 shows pallet nails have become the least profitable product.

    Keywords: Cost Accounting; Expansion; Resource Allocation; Activity Based Costing and Management;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ratna G. Sarkar. "Insteel Wire Products: ABM at Andrews." Harvard Business School Case 198-087, February 1998. (Revised September 1998.) View Details
  124. Insteel Wire Products: ABM at Andrews TN

    Teaching Note for (9-198-087).

    Keywords: Steel Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Ratna G. Sarkar. "Insteel Wire Products: ABM at Andrews TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 198-111, April 1998. View Details
  125. Lehigh Steel

    Lehigh Steel is a specialty steel manufacturer that plummeted from record profits to record losses in less than three years, driven by an inability to distinguish between profitable and unprofitable business. The scale and growth of service activities and overhead costs in an increasingly customized product line suggests that activity-based costing (ABC) could unlock the secrets of profitability. However, the high fixed-cost structure suggests that theory of constraints (TOC) could also be relevant. Lehigh must determine how to measure profitability to rationalize its products.

    Keywords: Measurement and Metrics; Product; Cost; Activity Based Costing and Management; Profit; Accounting; Corporate Finance; Steel Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Laura Donohue. "Lehigh Steel." Harvard Business School Case 198-085, March 1998. (Revised April 1998.) View Details
  126. Colorscope, Inc.

    A small company in the graphic arts business faces severe price competition. The company must respond by cutting costs and making process improvements.

    Keywords: Cost Management; Price; Business Processes; Performance Improvement; Competition; Fine Arts Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Joseph Cha. "Colorscope, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 197-040, December 1996. (Revised February 1998.) View Details
  127. Romeo Engine Plant TN

    Teaching Note for (9-194-032).

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Amy P. Hutton. "Romeo Engine Plant TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 196-142, June 1996. (Revised March 1997.) View Details
  128. Analyzing Standard Costs: Technical Note

    Explains variance analysis. Concepts of price variance and quantity variance are introduced to analyze prime cost variances. Spending variance and capacity variance are used to analyze overhead variance. Consistent with conducting variance analysis in an activity-based costing setting. All concepts are illustrated graphically.

    Keywords: Cost Accounting; Cost; Analysis;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G. "Analyzing Standard Costs: Technical Note." Harvard Business School Technical Note 196-109, November 1995. View Details
  129. AB SKA (Sweden)

    A senior manager faces three accounting and control decisions related to a new R&D project: to expense or capitalize, how to implement management control over the R&D function, and how to use activity-based cost drivers for product costing.

    Keywords: Cost Accounting; Management Practices and Processes; Cost Management; Activity Based Costing and Management; Research and Development; Sweden;

    Citation:

    Hawkins, David F., V.G. Narayanan, and Robert L. Simons. "AB SKA (Sweden)." Harvard Business School Case 195-180, December 1994. View Details

Other Publications and Materials

  1. The Impact of Forward-Looking Metrics on Employee Decision Making

    Keywords: Decision Making; Employees; Measurement and Metrics;

    Citation:

    Casas-Arce, Pablo, Francisco de Asis Martinez-Jerez, and V.G. Narayanan. "The Impact of Forward-Looking Metrics on Employee Decision Making." January 2011. View Details
  2. Impact of Costing Systems on Pricing Decisions in a Duopoly

    Keywords: Duopoly and Oligopoly; Decision Making; Cost Accounting; Price;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., and Jytte Grambo Larsen. "Impact of Costing Systems on Pricing Decisions in a Duopoly." September 2002. View Details