Charles C.Y. Wang

Assistant Professor of Business Administration

Charles C.Y. Wang is an assistant professor of business administration in the Accounting and Management Unit and teaches the Financial Reporting and Control course in the MBA required curriculum. Professor Wang is a former lecturer in law and economics at Harvard Law School and a past fellow in its Olin Program on Corporate Governance.

Charles C.Y. Wang is an assistant professor of business administration in the Accounting and Management Unit and teaches the Financial Reporting and Control course in the MBA required curriculum. Professor Wang is a former lecturer in law and economics at Harvard Law School and a past fellow in its Olin Program on Corporate Governance.

In his research, Professor Wang studies empirical asset pricing, equity valuation, corporate governance, and financial regulation. His current focus is on the connections between firm fundamentals and expected returns and on the relationship between governance characteristics and managerial incentives and firm performance. Professor Wang's research has been published in leading journals such as the Journal of Financial Economics and the Journal of Accounting and Economics. Media outlets including The Economist, the Financial Times, The New York Times Dealbook, U.S. News, and Smart Money have cited his research findings.

Professor Wang holds a Ph.D. and an MA in economics from Stanford University and an MS in statistics, also from Stanford. He graduated from Cornell University with a bachelor’s degree in industrial and labor relations. Before his graduate studies, he worked in economic and litigation consulting.

Media and Other Notable Mentions

Wall Street Journal
1/15/2013

Ray Fisman and Tim Sullivan

Chauffeur-driven limousines, millions in stock options, golden parachutes. It's no wonder bosses' pay and perks can rankle. Here's why the best ones are worth it.

FS Insight
12/13/2012

Jeroen Derwall

A significant number of institutional investors publicly state a conviction that using environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG) information in portfolio selection will help them generate better investment returns in comparison to their benchmarks or competitors. But can a performance-driven investment case be a sustainable motivation for adopting responsible investing?

Evolved Employer
02/19/2013

Melissa J. Anderson

US News and World Report
November, 14 2012

One of the unpleasant facts about investing in equity funds is the idea that you're paying for all sorts of things you probably shouldn't be—this obscure management fee, that needless trading cost. Can we add CEO extravagance to the pile?

Smart Money
9/13/2012

Ian Salisbury

New York Times
10/24/2012

Lucian A. Bebchuk

DealBook (New York Times)
09/12/2012
Financial Times
05/2/2012
Conference Board
4/13/2012
M & A Law Prof Blog
February 2, 2011
Truth on the Market
February 2, 2011
Project Syndicate
November 26, 2010
DealBook (New York Times)
11/12/2010

Steven M. Davidoff

Corporate Board Member
Third Quarter 2010

Blog Posts

Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation
4/17/2012
Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation
2/07/2011
Harvard Law School Forum on Corporate Governance and Financial Regulation
12/8/2010