Rosabeth M. Kanter

Ernest L. Arbuckle Professor of Business Administration

Rosabeth Moss Kanter holds the Ernest L. Arbuckle Professorship at Harvard Business School, where she specializes in strategy, innovation, and leadership for change. Her strategic and practical insights have guided leaders of large and small organizations worldwide for over 25 years, through teaching, writing, and direct consultation to major corporations and governments. The former Editor of Harvard Business Review (1989-1992), Professor Kanter has been repeatedly named to lists of the "50 most powerful women in the world" (Times of London), and the "50 most influential business thinkers in the world" (Thinkers 50). In 2001, she received the Academy of Management's Distinguished Career Award for her scholarly contributions to management knowledge; and in 2002 was named "Intelligent Community Visionary of the Year" by the World Teleport Association, and in 2010 received the International Leadership Award from the Association of Leadership Professionals.  She is the author or co-author of 18 books.  Her latest book, SuperCorp:  How Vanguard Companies Create Innovation, Profits, Growth, and Social Good, a manifesto for leadership of sustainable enterprises, was named one of the ten best business books of 2009 by Amazon.com.

Her previous book, Confidence: How Winning Streaks & Losing Streaks Begin & End (a New York Times business and #1 Business Week bestseller), describes the culture and dynamics of high-performance organizations as compared with those in decline, and shows how to lead turnarounds, whether in businesses, hospitals, schools, sports teams, community organizations, or countries. Her classic prizewinning book, Men & Women of the Corporation (which won the C. Wright Mills award winner for the year's best book on social issues) offered insight to countless individuals and organizations about corporate careers and the individual and organizational factors that promote success; a spin-off video, A Tale of ‘O': On Being Different, is among the world's most widely-used diversity tools; and a related book, Work & Family in the United States, set a policy agenda (in 2001, a coalition of university centers created the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award in her honor for the best research on work/family issues).  Another award-winning book, When Giants Learn to Dance, showed how to master the new terms of competition at the dawn of the global information age. World Class: Thriving Locally in the Global Economy identified the rise of new business networks and analyzed dilemmas of globalization

She has received 24 honorary doctoral degrees, as well as numerous leadership awards and prizes for her books and articles; for example, her book The Change Masters was named one of the most influential business books of the 20th century (Financial Times).  Through Goodmeasure Inc., the consulting group she co-founded, she has partnered with IBM on applying her leadership tools from business to other sectors; she is a Senior Advisor for IBM's Global Citizenship portfolio. She advises CEOs of large and small companies, has served on numerous business and non-profit boards including City Year, the urban "Peace Corps" now focused on addressing the school dropout crisis, and national or regional commissions including the Governor's Council of Economic Advisors.  She speaks widely, often sharing the platform with Presidents, Prime Ministers, and CEOs at national and international events, such as the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.  Before joining the Harvard Business School faculty, she held tenured professorships at Yale University and Brandeis University and was a Fellow at Harvard Law School, simultaneously holding a Guggenheim Fellowship.

She is Chair and Director of the Advanced Leadership Initiative of Harvard University, a collaboration across the professional schools to help successful leaders at the top of their professions apply their skills to addressing challenging national and global problems in their next stages of life.

Books

  1. Supercorp: How Vanguard Companies Create Opportunity, Profits, Growth, and Social Good

    Supercorp is based on a 3-year study involving more than 350 interviews in 20 countries to identify the leadership practices and operating methods of major companies seeking profitable growth through innovation that benefits society. For example, when the tsunami and earthquake struck India in 2006, IBM did not just write a check. It used its core competence-expertise in technology-and its skilled people to accomplish what government and relief agencies could not: an information system and supply chain that tracked and managed the flow of relief supplies. Its efforts were crucial in avoiding the all-too-familiar problem in disaster relief-chaos and mobs of desperate people. IBM's actions, as well as many others reported on by Rosabeth Moss Kanter, capture the emerging zeitgeist of business: the vanguard company simultaneously pursuing-and creating synergy between-opportunity, growth, profit, humanistic values and social good. Vanguard companies have a sense of mission enabling them to deliver what their customers want in a way that is significantly better than the competition. As a formula for the future it brings together the necessity of financial success shareholders demand and the social conscience demanded from the new generation moving up the corporate ranks.

    Keywords: Profit; Leadership; Mission and Purpose; Opportunities; Welfare or Wellbeing;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. Supercorp: How Vanguard Companies Create Opportunity, Profits, Growth, and Social Good. New York: Crown Business, 2009. View Details
  2. America the Principled: 6 Opportunities for Becoming a Can-Do Nation Once Again

    This book draws on the author's multiple research projects and field observations to analyze problems facing the United States in recent years and to create an agenda for renewing American strengths through returning to core American principles—but in new ways suitable to 21st century conditions. On the agenda are six opportunities for action by citizens and policy-makers alike: (1) securing the future through innovation strategies suitable for an emerging "white coat economy" that is discovery-based; (2) pursuing happiness by addressing the connection between work and family life and reinventing work to help women in particular use their talents flexibly; (3) encouraging the growth of good companies that can replace imperial excess with values-based capitalism; (4) restoring respect for government by ending decades of contempt for the public sector and ensuring competence in that vital sector; (5) connecting with the world in a way that fits the new realities of the global economy, fosters leadership, and uses citizen-diplomats to befriend moderates in troubled regions and business networks to ensure success in the major emerging economies; and (6) building community by stressing national and community service for all age groups to bridge social divides and unite citizens in a sense of common purpose. The book offers examples of solutions to address each opportunity and concludes with a call to action.

    Keywords: Values and Beliefs; Policy; Leadership; Civil Society or Community; Cooperation; United States;

  3. Confidence: How Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks Begin and End

    Is success simply a matter of money and talent? Or is there another reason why some people and organizations always land on their feet, while others, equally talented, stumble again and again? There's a fundamental principle at work—confidence—that makes the difference between winning and losing in any competition. Based on investigation of success and failure in companies such as Continental Airlines and Verizon and sports teams such as the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles, as well as the arenas of education, health care, and politics, Kanter expores a new theory and pracice of success and provides people in leadership postiions with a prescriptive program for maintaining a winning streak or turning around a downward spiral.

    Keywords: Social Psychology;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. Confidence: How Winning Streaks and Losing Streaks Begin and End. New York: Three Rivers Press, 2006. (Paperback edition with new Foreword, Epilogue, and Appendix.) View Details
  4. Confidence: How Winning and Losing Streaks Begin and End

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. Confidence: How Winning and Losing Streaks Begin and End. New York: Crown; London: Random House, 2004. (September) (Also audio-book edition from Random House, e-book editions, and foreign translations: Chinese from Commonwealth; Hebrew from Pecker Publishing; Indonesian from Binarupa; Italian from Guerini; Japanese from Kobunsha; Korean from Golden Bough; Mandarin from Citic; Polish from MT Biznes; Russian from Olymp Business Press; Turkish from BZD Yayincilik; and Spanish from Editorial Norma.) View Details
  5. Evolve!: Succeeding in the Digital Culture of Tomorrow

    Keywords: Information Technology; Success;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Evolve!: Succeeding in the Digital Culture of Tomorrow. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2001. (Also audio-book edition and e-book editions. Foreign Translations include Chinese (Complex Characters) Yuan-Lio Publishing Company, Taiwan); Chinese (Simplified characters) (China Machine Press, China); Danish: Borsens Forlag; Dutch: Scriptum Books; German: Financial Times/Prentice Hall Germany; Italian: ETAS Libri; Japanese: Shoeisha Co.: Korean: Sejong Books; Spanish: Ediciones Deusto, SA (Spain; worldwide Spanish); Turkish: BZD YAYINCiLIK.) View Details
  6. Business Leadership in the Social Sector

    Keywords: Leadership; Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Business Leadership in the Social Sector. Social Enterprise Video Series. Harvard Business School Publishing, 1998. Video. (Nine Videotapes.) View Details
  7. Innovation: Breakthrough Thinking at 3M, GE, DuPont, Pfizer, and Rubbermaid

    Keywords: Innovation and Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., J. Kao, and F. Wiersema, eds. Innovation: Breakthrough Thinking at 3M, GE, DuPont, Pfizer, and Rubbermaid. New York: HarperCollins, 1997. (Translated into Japanese, Korean, Italian and Hebrew.) View Details
  8. Leveraging Human Assets

    Keywords: Assets;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Leveraging Human Assets. The Business Channel. Public Broadcasting Service (PBS), 1997. Video. View Details
  9. Rosabeth Moss Kanter on the Frontiers of Management

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Rosabeth Moss Kanter on the Frontiers of Management. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1997. (Spanish, Ediciones Paidos Iberica s.a.; German, Carl Hanser Verlag; Dutch, Uitgeverij Contact; Polish, Business Press Sp. ZO.o, Warsaw; Russian, State University of Management in Moscow. Reprinted as Ch. 25 in The Futurist, June 1998.) View Details
  10. Partnering

    Keywords: Partners and Partnerships;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Partnering. Best Practice Series. Harvard Business School, 1995. Video. View Details
  11. World Class: Thriving Locally in the Global Economy

    Keywords: Globalized Economies and Regions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. World Class: Thriving Locally in the Global Economy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995. (German, Veberreuter; Portuguese, Editora Campus; Spanish; Korean, KPI Publishing; Thai; Chinese, Shanghai People's Publishing House. Other reprinting information available from the publisher.) View Details
  12. Global Strategy

    Keywords: Strategy;

    Citation:

    Barnevik, P., and R. M. Kanter, eds. Global Strategy. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1994. View Details
  13. The Tale of "O": On Being Different

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. The Tale of "O": On Being Different. Goodmeasure, Inc., 1993. Video. View Details
  14. Men and Women of the Corporation

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Men and Women of the Corporation. NY: Basic Books, 1993. View Details
  15. The Challenge of Organizational Change: How Companies Experience It and Leaders Guide It

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., B. Stein, and T. D. Jick. The Challenge of Organizational Change: How Companies Experience It and Leaders Guide It. New York: Free Press, 1992. (Dutch, Scriptum Books; French, Editions Dunod; Italian, Edizioni Olivares. Selections in Sources: Notable Selections in Sociology, edited by K. Finsterbusch and J.S. Schwartz, Dushkin Publishing, 1995. Other reprinting information available from the publisher.) View Details
  16. The Great Corporate Balancing Act

    Keywords: Balance and Stability; Corporate Strategy;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. The Great Corporate Balancing Act. BBC, 1991. Video. (Two Videotapes.) View Details
  17. Rosabeth Moss Kanter on Syngeries, Alliances, & New Ventures

    Keywords: Alliances;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Rosabeth Moss Kanter on Syngeries, Alliances, & New Ventures. Nathan/Tyler Productions. Nathan/Tyler Productions, 1990. Video. (Two Videotapes.) View Details
  18. When Giants Learn to Dance: Mastering the Challenges of Strategy, Management, and Careers in the 1990s

    Keywords: Business History;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. When Giants Learn to Dance: Mastering the Challenges of Strategy, Management, and Careers in the 1990s. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1989. (Dutch, Swedish, French, Italian, Spanish, Finnish, Korean, Japanese, Portuguese, Norwegian. Chapters 3 & 4 in Strategic Synergy, edited by S.L. Yeung. London: Butterworth Heinemann, 1982. Chapters 5 & 6 in Planning Review.) View Details
  19. Managing Change: Dr. Kanter Plays Atlanta

    Keywords: Management; Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Managing Change: Dr. Kanter Plays Atlanta. BBC, 1988. Video. View Details
  20. Creating the Future: The Massachusetts Comeback and Its Promise for America

    Keywords: Economics; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Dukakis, M. S., and Rosabeth M. Kanter. Creating the Future: The Massachusetts Comeback and Its Promise for America. New York: Summit Books, 1988. View Details
  21. The Change Masters

    Keywords: Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. The Change Masters. Newstrack, 1986. Audio. (Two Audio-cassettes.) View Details
  22. The Art of Innovation: How to Be a Change Master

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. The Art of Innovation: How to Be a Change Master. Nightingale-Conant, 1986. Audio. (Six Audio-cassettes.) View Details
  23. Change Masters: Putting the Theory into Action

    Keywords: Change; Theory;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Change Masters: Putting the Theory into Action. Encyclopedia Britannica Films, 1986. Video. View Details
  24. Change Masters: Understanding the Theory

    Keywords: Change; Theory;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Change Masters: Understanding the Theory. Encyclopedia Britannica Films, 1986. Video. View Details
  25. The Middle Manager as Innovator

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. The Middle Manager as Innovator. Harvard Business Review Video Series. MTI Teleprograms, 1984. Video. View Details
  26. The Change Masters

    Keywords: Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. The Change Masters. Advanced Management Reports, 1984. Audio. View Details
  27. Managing Change, The Human Dimension

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Managing Change, The Human Dimension. Goodmeasure, Inc., 1984. Video. View Details
  28. The Change Masters: Innovation for Productivity in the American Corporation

    Keywords: Innovation and Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. The Change Masters: Innovation for Productivity in the American Corporation. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1983. (Translated in Japanese. Reprintings include Chapter 10 in The Political Environment of Public Management, edited by Pollins, 1993. Chapter 9 in Quality and Productivity Management vol. 9, no. 4, 1992, pp. 33-59. Chapter 10 in Contemporary Ideas on Management, edited by J.W. Newstrom and J.L. Pierce. Duluth: University of Minnesota, 1985. Chapter 9 in Readings in Human Resource Management, edited by M. Beer and B. Spector. New York: Free Press, 1985. Chapter 10 in Organizations Close Up, edited by J.L. Gibson, J.M. Ivancevich, and J.H. Donnelly. Plano, TX: Business Publications, Inc., 1985. Chapter 2 in The Handbook of Research on Educational Administration, edited by D. Griffiths. 1985. Chapters 2 and 6 in The Leader Manager, edited by J. Williamson. Eden Prairie, MN: Wilson Learning Corporation, 1984. Portions of Ch. 12 in Directors and Boards, 1984. Ch. 10 in Management Review.) View Details
  29. PQWL: The Productivity-Quality of Work Life Program

    Keywords: Quality; Work-Life Balance; Programs;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. PQWL: The Productivity-Quality of Work Life Program. Goodmeasure, Inc., 1981. Video. (Slide-tape and Videotape.) View Details
  30. Life in Organizations: Workplaces as People Experience Them

    Keywords: Working Conditions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and B. A. Stein. Life in Organizations: Workplaces as People Experience Them. New York: Basic Books, 1979. View Details
  31. Financial Support of Women's Programs in 1970s

    Keywords: Money; Programs;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Financial Support of Women's Programs in 1970s. New York: Ford Foundation, 1979. (Prepared by a committee of the Ford Foundation.) View Details
  32. The Tale of "O": On Being Different

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. The Tale of "O": On Being Different. Goodmeasure, Inc., 1979. Video. (Slide-tape, Videotape & Film.) View Details
  33. Work and Family in the United States: A Critical Review and Policy Agenda

    Keywords: Work-Life Balance; Policy; Information; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Work and Family in the United States: A Critical Review and Policy Agenda. Social Science Frontiers. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 1977. (Reprintings: Chapters 1-3 in Family Business Review (featured classic), vol. 2, spring 1989, pp. 77-114.) View Details
  34. Men and Women of the Corporation

    Keywords: Gender Characteristics; Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. Men and Women of the Corporation. New York: Basic Books, 1977. (Italian, Edizioni Olivares; Japanese, Japan Productivity Center. Excerpts in Working in America, edited by A.S. Wharton, Mountain View, Calif.: Mayfield, 1998. Other reprinting information available from publisher.) View Details
  35. Another Voice: Feminist Perspectives on Social Life and Social Science

    Keywords: Gender Characteristics; Perspective; Society; Science;

    Citation:

    Millman, M., and R. M. Kanter, eds. Another Voice: Feminist Perspectives on Social Life and Social Science. New York: Doubleday, 1975. View Details
  36. Communes: Creating and Managing the Collective Life

    Keywords: Civil Society or Community; Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., ed. Communes: Creating and Managing the Collective Life. New York: Harper & Row, 1973. View Details
  37. Commitment and Community: Communes and Utopias in Sociological Perspective

    Keywords: Civil Society or Community; Happiness; Science; Perspective;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. Commitment and Community: Communes and Utopias in Sociological Perspective. Boston, MA: Harvard University Press, 1972. (Reprintings: chapter 2 in The Meaning of Sociology, edited by J.M Charn. Palo Alto, Calif.: Mayfield, 1985; portions in Small Groups and Social Interaction, edited by H.H. Blumberg et al., vol. 2. London: Wiley, 1983; portions in Sociology, edited by R. Perrucci. Minneapolis: Wets, 1983; chapter 3 in Perspectives on the American Community, edited by Roland Warren. Chicago: Rand McNally, 1973 and 1976; chapter 1 in The Family: Its Structure and Functions, edited by Rose Coser. New York: St. Martin's, 1974; chapter 1 in Sociology, Society, and People, edited by R.M. Koss. C.V. Mosby, 1975; and selections in Community and Education, edited by Donald Oliver. San Francisco, 1976.) View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Rosabeth Moss Kanter on How Corporations of the Future Will Behave

  2. Is Tribalism Inevitable?

  3. Jobs and Social Innovation

    Keywords: innovation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Jobs and Social Innovation." Stanford Social Innovation Review 11, no. 2 (Spring 2013): 34–36. View Details
  4. Revitalizing America: Whatever the Question, National Service Is an Answer

  5. Evolve (Again)

    Frenzy over social networks and interactive media can produce equally overhyped predictions that everything will change, not to mention money-losing investments in silly ventures. Separating enduring strategic lessons from the hype can help avoid a new crash. Hint: the lessons don't include rushing to fund start-ups on the basis of back-of-the-envelope calculations. The tools are changing, but not the rules about change. Encouraging self-organizing networks to let them investigate whatever they want to through company channels can produce new business ideas, as IBM found in the early days of virtualization. When talented employees leave to start ventures, smart companies keep them in the family through seed-capital investments or alumni groups. Experiments with other models, whether internal or with partners, provide experience and readiness for future change. Learning from partners, or from corporate venture capital investments, is a strategic capability.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Venture Capital; Investment; Technological Innovation; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Partners and Partnerships;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Evolve (Again)." Harvard Business Review 89, nos. 7-8 (July – August 2011): 36. View Details
  6. Enriching the Ecosystem

    To remain a leader in innovation, the United States needs the support of foundational institutions that help seed, grow, and renew enterprises. Historically, these institutions-such as universities, venture creators, labor markets, and job-training programs-have tended to operate in silos. But they are far more effective when they're networked. By collaborating to bridge the gaps between them, business, academic, and policy leaders can help generate more ideas, start-ups, company growth, global competitors, and prosperity. In this article, I outline an agenda for strengthening the links between key institutions. Leaders, I argue, should focus on four goals: 1) linking knowledge creation to venture creation to speed the conversion of ideas into market-ready enterprises; 2) linking small and large enterprises to promote the growth of younger companies and revitalize large corporations through partnerships with innovative SMEs; 3) improving the match between education and employment opportunities, through apprenticeship programs and other education-industry links; and 4) linking leaders across sectors to develop regional strategies and produce scalable models. In all four of these areas, promising models have already begun to emerge. By highlighting the most successful institutions and what can be learned from them, I show how America can create a richer, more competitive business ecosystem.

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Organizations; Research and Development; Social and Collaborative Networks; Growth and Development Strategy; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Enriching the Ecosystem." Harvard Business Review 90, no. 3 (March 2012). View Details
  7. Courage in the C-Suite

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Courage in the C-Suite." Harvard Business Review 89, no. 12 (December 2011). View Details
  8. How Great Companies Think Differently

    Corporate leaders have long subscribed to the belief that the sole purpose of business is to make money. That narrow view, deeply embedded in the American capitalist system, molds the actions of most corporations, constraining them to focus on maximizing short-term profits and returns to shareholders at the expense of worker safety and health, the environment, and society in general. In this article, I argue that a very different logic informs the practices of most high-performing and sustainable companies: institutional logic. These companies believe that they are more than money-making machines: they are a vehicle for advancing societal goals. They deliver more than just financial returns; they also build enduring institutions. At great companies researched for this article, institutional logic takes its place beside financial logic in managerial decision making. Six facets of institutional logic—a common purpose, a long-term focus, emotional engagement, partnering with the public, innovation, and self-organization—radically alter leadership and corporate behavior and form the building blocks of a more sustainable competitive advantage.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Profit; Leadership; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Business and Shareholder Relations; Behavior; Social Issues; Competitive Advantage;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "How Great Companies Think Differently." Harvard Business Review 89, no. 11 (November 2011). View Details
  9. The Cure for Horrible Bosses

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "The Cure for Horrible Bosses." Harvard Business Review 89, no. 10 (October 2011). View Details
  10. Book review of Learning by Example: Imitation and Innovation at a Global Bank, by David Strang.

    Keywords: Learning; Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Book review of Learning by Example: Imitation and Innovation at a Global Bank, by David Strang." American Journal of Sociology 116, no. 6 (May 2011). View Details
  11. Zoom In, Zoom Out

    Zoom buttons on digital devices let us examine images from many viewpoints. They also provide an apt metaphor for modes of strategic thinking. Some people prefer to see things up close, others from afar. Both perspectives have virtues. But they should not be fixed positions, says Harvard Business School's Kanter. To get a complete picture, leaders need to zoom in and zoom out. A close-in perspective is often found in relationship-intensive settings. It brings details into sharp focus and makes opportunities look large and compelling. But it can have significant downsides. Leaders who prefer to zoom in tend to create policies and systems that depend too much on politics and favors. They can focus too closely on personal status and on turf protection. And they often miss the big picture. When leaders zoom out, they can see events in context and as examples of general trends. They are able to make decisions based on principles. Yet a far-out perspective also has traps. Leaders can be so high above the fray that they don't recognize emerging threats. Having zoomed out to examine all possible routes, they may fail to notice when the moment is right for action on one path. They may also seem too remote and aloof to their staffs. The best leaders can zoom in to examine problems and then zoom out to look for patterns and causes. They don't divide the world into extremes-idiosyncratic or structural, situational or strategic, emotional or contextual. The point is not to choose one over the other but to learn to move across a continuum of perspectives.

    Keywords: Strategy; Cognition and Thinking; Perspective; Leadership; Opportunities; Decisions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Zoom In, Zoom Out." Harvard Business Review 89, no. 3 (March 2011). View Details
  12. Values, Purpose, Meaning, and Expectations: Why Culture and Context Matter

    The "rational person" standard, based on assumptions of economic self-interest, has long prevailed in legal reasoning. But understanding of decision making, behavioral choices, and possibilities for action must be enlarged to include a variety of factors that give meaning to any circumstance and thus shape behavior: past experience, expectations about the future, group membership, and cultural values. This article opens with a series of thought experiments to explore the potential behavioral implications of a hypothetical $1,000 to introduce the idea that context, history, and values shape perceptions and expectations. These phenomena can propel behaviors that can lead to circumstances improving or deteriorating-upward or downward spirals, or winning and losing streaks. Empirical evidence is drawn from research on companies and teams that have sustained success or deteriorated in their performance, as well as research on the leadership and culture in organizations that endure over time. The focus is on complex interactions unfolding over time rather than the reasoning of particular individuals. But the article also shows how individuals behave in concert because of the self-fueling trajectory in which response provokes response, in either positive or negative directions, in what are more popularly termed winning streaks and losing streaks. Upward spirals produce confidence that motivates effort. Because the positive upward cycle is attributed to one's own actions, people begin to believe that it will never end: assertions are made that the laws of the universe have changed, that business cycles have disappeared, and that success is inevitable. Conversely, when things are going down, people start believing they will always go down. Success breeds success, and failure or loss breeds loss. The article argues for a broader explanation of behavior beyond economic instrumentality. It is time to turn again to psychology, sociology, and anthropology to explain and predict human behavior. Then we can understand that rationality also includes things that were once considered irrational, such as altruism or sacrifice in the interest of the greater good.

    Keywords: Standards; Interests; Decision Making; Behavior; Value; Groups and Teams; Performance Expectations; Organizational Culture; Leadership; Business Cycles; Forecasting and Prediction; Motivation and Incentives;

  13. Work Pray Love

    This article identifies five problematic issues in the intersection of work and life that create human resource challenges for organizations and their employees. These include work overload, the slow pace of adopting telecommuting, gender-related pay gaps, a household division of labor that still saddles women with a disproportionate share of caretaking chores, and the question of religious expression in the workplace.

    Keywords: Wages; Work-Life Balance; Religion; Technology Adoption; Problems and Challenges; Human Resources; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Work Pray Love." Harvard Business Review 88, no. 12 (December 2010). View Details
  14. How to Do Well and Do Good

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "How to Do Well and Do Good." MIT Sloan Management Review 51, no. 2 (September 2010). View Details
  15. Powerlessness Corrupts

    Powerlessness damages organizations--especially in the middle ranks, says HBR columnist Rosabeth Moss Kanter. Hemmed in by rules and treated as unimportant, people get even with management by overcontrolling their own turf. Kanter urges leaders to give employees opportunities to make meaningful contributions, because small wins along those lines can propel big changes.

    Keywords: Employee Relationship Management; Opportunities; Behavior; Motivation and Incentives; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Powerlessness Corrupts." Harvard Business Review 88, nos. 7-8 (July–August 2010). View Details
  16. Block-by-Blockbuster Innovation

    Executives often find themselves debating the merits of incremental innovations versus game-changers, but that's a false dichotomy, says HBR columnist Rosabeth Moss Kanter. Even if a company is lucky enough to come up with the next Kindle, Swiffer, or smartphone, blockbuster products don't spring to life or work in the marketplace without the many small changes that make breakthroughs possible, such as tweaks to processes and market development. Kanter proposes a systemic approach to generating all kinds and levels of innovation.

    Keywords: Innovation and Management; Resource Allocation; Product; Business Processes; Risk and Uncertainty;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Block-by-Blockbuster Innovation." Harvard Business Review 88, no. 5 (May 2010): 38. View Details
  17. Think Outside the Building

    Keywords: Cognition and Thinking;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Think Outside the Building." Harvard Business Review 88, no. 3 (March 2010). View Details
  18. What Would Peter Say?

    Heeding the wisdom of Peter Drucker might have helped us avoid - and will help us solve - numerous challenges, from restoring trust in business to tackling climate change. He issued early warnings about excessive executive pay, the auto industry's failure to adapt and innovate, competitive threats from emerging markets, and the perils of neglecting nonprofit organizations and other agents of societal reform. If he were still here, a century after his birth, what would he say about the path forward? The essential Drucker can be summarized in three themes: First, management should be a profession, and executives and managers should remember that their primary job is to look out for the long-term health of their organizations. That means taking responsibility for social well-being, not just wealth. Second, knowledge workers cannot be controlled; they must be motivated. Such employees must see a purpose more meaningful than personal profit. And third, nonprofits are necessary ingredients for producing a good society, one in which businesses can thrive. It is critical to invest in them. Drucker was not a revolutionary. He merely asked that we constantly challenge our assumptions. He preached steadiness and vision, recognizing that leading in turbulent times requires foresight about where things are heading as well as judgment about what not to change.

    Keywords: Judgments; Employee Relationship Management; Leadership; Goals and Objectives; Management Practices and Processes; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Business and Community Relations; Business and Government Relations; Business and Shareholder Relations;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "What Would Peter Say?" Harvard Business Review 87, no. 11 (November 2009). View Details
  19. Mergers That Stick

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Mergers That Stick." Harvard Business Review 87, no. 10 (October 2009). View Details
  20. Transforming Giants

    Keywords: Transformation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Transforming Giants." Special Issue on HBS Centennial. Harvard Business Review 86, no. 1 (January 2008): 43–52. View Details
  21. Innovation: The Classic Traps

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Innovation: The Classic Traps." Harvard Business Review 84, no. 11 (November 2006). View Details
  22. The Matter with the Mainstream

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "The Matter with the Mainstream." U.S. News & World Report (October 30, 2006), pp. 93–94. View Details
  23. From White Collar to White Coat

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Health;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "From White Collar to White Coat." CommonWealth 11, no. 3 (spring 2006): 52–57. View Details
  24. What Theories Do Audiences Want? Exploring the Demand Side

    Keywords: Theory;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "What Theories Do Audiences Want? Exploring the Demand Side." Academy of Management Learning & Education 4, no. 1 (March 2005): 93–95. View Details
  25. How Leaders Gain (and Lose) Confidence: An Interview with Rosabeth Moss Kanter

    Keywords: Leadership; Information;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "How Leaders Gain (and Lose) Confidence: An Interview with Rosabeth Moss Kanter." Leader to Leader 35 (winter 2005): 21–27. View Details
  26. Retrospective: Rosabeth Moss Kanter's Men and Women of the Corporation and The Change Masters," and "Changing Organizational Structures: An Interview with Rosabeth Moss Kanter

    Keywords: Information; Employees; Business Ventures; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. Retrospective: Rosabeth Moss Kanter's Men and Women of the Corporation and The Change Masters," and "Changing Organizational Structures: An Interview with Rosabeth Moss Kanter. Academy of Management Executive 18 (May 2004): 92–111. View Details
  27. Exploring the Innovation Pyramid

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Exploring the Innovation Pyramid." European Business Forum 16 (winter 2003/2004). View Details
  28. Leadership and the Psychology of Turnarounds

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Leadership and the Psychology of Turnarounds." Harvard Business Review 81, no. 6 (June 2003). View Details
  29. Strategy As Improvisational Theater

    Keywords: Strategy;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Strategy As Improvisational Theater." MIT Sloan Management Review 43, no. 2 (winter 2002). View Details
  30. Rising to Rising Expectations

    Keywords: Performance Expectations;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Rising to Rising Expectations." Strategy for Living in a Changing World. World Link XV, no. i (January/February 2002): 70–74. View Details
  31. See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil" - Leaders Must Respond to Employee Concerns About Wrongdoing

    Keywords: Employee Relationship Management;

    Citation:

    Gandossy, Bob, and Rosabeth M. Kanter. See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil" - Leaders Must Respond to Employee Concerns About Wrongdoing." Business and Society Review 107, no. 4 (winter 2002): 415–422. View Details
  32. The Ten Deadly Mistakes of Wanna-Dots

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Ten Deadly Mistakes of Wanna-Dots." Harvard Business Review 79, no. 1 (January 2001): 91–100. View Details
  33. The Webbed Wheels of Commerce

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Webbed Wheels of Commerce." World Link (January–February 2001). View Details
  34. How E-Smart Are You?

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "How E-Smart Are You?" World Link (January–February 2000). View Details
  35. Change is Everyone's Job: Managing the Extended Enterprise in a Globally-Connected World

    Keywords: Change; Jobs and Positions; Management; Global Range; Business Ventures; Networks;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Change is Everyone's Job: Managing the Extended Enterprise in a Globally-Connected World." Organizational Dynamics 28, no. 1 (summer 1999). (Reprintings include The Organizational Behavior Reader, edited by Osland, Kolb, and Rubin. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 2000; Annual Editions: Entrepreneurship, Guilford, Conn.: Dushkin/McGraw-Hill, 2000; Harvard-Deusto Business Review, spring 2000. (Spanish translation)) View Details
  36. The Enduring Skills of Change Leaders

    Keywords: Change; Leadership; Competency and Skills;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Enduring Skills of Change Leaders." Leader to Leader 13 (summer 1999). (Reprinted in Ivey Business Journal, May-June 2000, pp. 1-6.) View Details
  37. The Social Sector as Beta Site for Business Innovation

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Social Sector as Beta Site for Business Innovation." Harvard Business Review 77, no. 3 (May–June 1999). View Details
  38. From Spare Change to Real Change: The Social Sector as Beta Site for Business Innovation

    Keywords: Change; Innovation and Invention; Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "From Spare Change to Real Change: The Social Sector as Beta Site for Business Innovation." Harvard Business Review 77, no. 3 (May–June 1999). (Reprinted in Harvard Business Review on Innovation, Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2001.) View Details
  39. Global Competitiveness Revisited

    Keywords: Global Range; Competition;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Global Competitiveness Revisited." Washington Quarterly 22, no. 1 (winter 1999): 39–58. View Details
  40. Global Strategy and Its Impact on Local Operations: Lessons from Gillette Singapore

    Keywords: Global Range; Strategy; Local Range; Operations; Learning; Production; Consumer Products Industry; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Thomas D. Dretler. "Global Strategy and Its Impact on Local Operations: Lessons from Gillette Singapore." Academy of Management Executive 12, no. 4 (November 1998): 60–68. (Reprinted in Cross-Cultural Management, edited by R. Redding and B. Stening. Celtenham, U.K.: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2002.) View Details
  41. Six Strategic Challenges

    Keywords: Strategy; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Six Strategic Challenges." World Link (January–February 1998): 28–34. View Details
  42. Using Networking for Competitive Advantage: The Lippo Group of Indonesia and Hong Kong

    Keywords: Networks; Competition; Indonesia; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Using Networking for Competitive Advantage: The Lippo Group of Indonesia and Hong Kong." Strategy & Business 2 (summer 1996): 51–65. View Details
  43. The Good Corporation and How to Get It

    Keywords: Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "The Good Corporation and How to Get It." Business and Society Review, no. 96 (1996): 7–9. View Details
  44. How Locals Can Win Global Contests

    Keywords: Local Range; Global Range;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "How Locals Can Win Global Contests." Leader to Leader 1, no. 1 (1996): 25–29. View Details
  45. Nice Work if You Can Get It: The Software Industry as a Model for Tomorrow's Jobs

    Keywords: Software; Business Ventures; Jobs and Positions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Nice Work if You Can Get It: The Software Industry as a Model for Tomorrow's Jobs." American Prospect (fall 1995): 52–58. View Details
  46. The New Business Cosmopolitans

    Keywords: Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The New Business Cosmopolitans." Strategy & Business (fall 1995). View Details
  47. Thriving Locally in the Global Economy

    Keywords: Economy; Global Range; Local Range;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Thriving Locally in the Global Economy." Harvard Business Review 73, no. 5 (September–October 1995): 151–160. (Reprinted in World View: Global Strategies for the New Economy, edited by J. Garten. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2000, pp. 227-243.) View Details
  48. When Local Goes Global

    Keywords: Global Range; Local Range;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "When Local Goes Global." World Link (September–October 1995). View Details
  49. Put People First

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Put People First." World Link (September–October 1995). View Details
  50. Globalization: A New World for Social Inquiry

    Keywords: Globalization; Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and T. Pittinsky. "Globalization: A New World for Social Inquiry." Berkeley Journal of Sociology 40 (1995–1996): 1–20. View Details
  51. Collaborative Advantage: The Art of Alliances

    Keywords: Alliances;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Collaborative Advantage: The Art of Alliances." Harvard Business Review 72, no. 4 (July–August 1994): 96–108. View Details
  52. Ice Dancing: The Perils of Alliances

    Keywords: Alliances;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and P. A. Yatsko. "Ice Dancing: The Perils of Alliances." Global Competitor 1 (May 1994). View Details
  53. Change in the Global Economy

    Keywords: Change; Economy; Global Range;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Change in the Global Economy." European Management Journal 12 (March 1994): 1–9. View Details
  54. Do Cultural Differences Make a Business Difference? Contextual Factors Affecting Cross-cultural Relationship Success

    Keywords: Culture; Success;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and R. I. Corn. "Do Cultural Differences Make a Business Difference? Contextual Factors Affecting Cross-cultural Relationship Success." Journal of Management Development 13, no. 2 (1994): 5–23. (Reprintings include: Organizational Development and Organizational Learning for Global Business, edited by J.B. Keys and R.M. Fulmer. Binghamton, N.Y.: International Business Press, 1998; Executive Development and Organizational Learning for the Global Economy, edited by J.B. Keys and R.M. Fulmer. Haworth Press, 1995; Managerial Insights from Literature, edited by S. Puffer. Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell, 1996.) View Details
  55. Employability Security

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Employability Security." Business and Society Review 87 (fall 1993): 11–14. (Reprintings include: Ethical Issues in Business, edited by T. Donaldson and P.H. Werthane. Prentice-Hall, 1995; Ethics in the Workplace, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995.) View Details
  56. Why Good People Do Bad Things: A Retrospective on the Hubble Fiasco

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and B. Stein. "Why Good People Do Bad Things: A Retrospective on the Hubble Fiasco." Academy of Management Executive 7 (fall 1993): 58–62. View Details
  57. Leadership for Change: The Rest of the Story

    Keywords: Leadership; Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and B. A. Stein. "Leadership for Change: The Rest of the Story." Frontiers of Health Services Management 10 (winter 1993): 28–32. View Details
  58. Engines of Progress V: New England Electric Systems NEES Energy

    Keywords: Energy Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., G. Quinn, and J. North. "Engines of Progress V: New England Electric Systems NEES Energy." Journal of Business Venturing 7 (January 1992): 73–89. View Details
  59. Engines of Progress: Designing and Running Entrepreneurial Vehicles in Established Companies: The Enter-Prize Program at Ohio Bell, 1985-90

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Telecommunications Industry; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and L. Richardson. "Engines of Progress: Designing and Running Entrepreneurial Vehicles in Established Companies: The Enter-Prize Program at Ohio Bell, 1985-90." Journal of Business Venturing 6 (May 1991): 209–229. View Details
  60. Transcending Business Boundaries: Twelve Thousand World Managers View Change

    Keywords: Boundaries; Management; Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Transcending Business Boundaries: Twelve Thousand World Managers View Change." Harvard Business Review 69, no. 3 (May–June 1991): 151–164. View Details
  61. Engines of Progress: Designing and Running Entrepreneurial Vehicles in Established Companies: Raytheon's New Product Center, 1969-89

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Business or Company Management; Entrepreneurship; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., J. North, L. Richardson, C. Ingols, and J. Zolner. "Engines of Progress: Designing and Running Entrepreneurial Vehicles in Established Companies: Raytheon's New Product Center, 1969-89." Journal of Business Venturing 6 (March 1991): 145–163. View Details
  62. Championing Change: An Interview with Bell Atlantic's CEO Raymond Smith

    Keywords: Change; Information; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Championing Change: An Interview with Bell Atlantic's CEO Raymond Smith." Harvard Business Review 69, no. 1 (January–February 1991): 118–130. (Reprintings include Leaders on Leadership, edited by W. Bennis. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1992; The Challenge of Organizational Change, edited by R.M. Kanter, B.A. Stein, and T.D. Jick. N.Y.: Free Press, 1992.) View Details
  63. Engines of Progress: Designing and Running Entrepreneurial Vehicles in Established Companies: The New Venture Process at Eastman Kodak, 1983-89

    Keywords: Design; Entrepreneurship; Business Ventures; Business History; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., L. Richardson, J. North, and E. Morgan. "Engines of Progress: Designing and Running Entrepreneurial Vehicles in Established Companies: The New Venture Process at Eastman Kodak, 1983-89." Journal of Business Venturing 6 (January 1991): 63–82. View Details
  64. Engines of Progress: Designing and Running Entrepreneurial Vehicles in Established Companies: Analog Devices Enterprises

    Keywords: Design; Entrepreneurship; Business Ventures; Technology;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., J. North, A. P. Bernstein, and A. Williamson. "Engines of Progress: Designing and Running Entrepreneurial Vehicles in Established Companies: Analog Devices Enterprises." Journal of Business Venturing 5 (November 1990): 415–427. View Details
  65. Foreword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Foreword." Special Issue on Women and Economic Empowerment. New England Journal of Public Policy 6 (spring/summer 1990). View Details
  66. Navigating the '90s

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Navigating the '90s." Best of Business Quarterly 11 (January 1990): 80–85. View Details
  67. The New Managerial Work

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The New Managerial Work." Harvard Business Review 67, no. 6 (November–December 1989). (Reprintings include: Ultimate Rewards: What Really Motivates People to Achieve, edited by S. Kerr. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1997; Managing People and Organizations, edited by J.J. Gabarro. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1992.) View Details
  68. Swimming in Newstreams: Mastering Innovation Dilemmas

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Swimming in Newstreams: Mastering Innovation Dilemmas." California Management Review 31, no. 4 (summer 1989): 45–69. View Details
  69. Three Tiers for Innovation Research

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Research;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Three Tiers for Innovation Research." Journal of Communications Research 15 (October 1988): 509–23. View Details
  70. The Attack on Pay

    Keywords: Compensation and Benefits;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Attack on Pay." Harvard Business Review 65, no. 2 (March–April 1987). View Details
  71. Quality Leadership and Change

    Keywords: Quality; Leadership; Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Quality Leadership and Change." Quality Progress (February 1987). (Reprintings include: Goodmeasure, Solving Quality and Productivity Problems. Milwaukee: ASQC Quality Press, 1988; Foundations of Total Quality Management, edited by J.G. Van Matre. Fort Worth, Tex.: Dryden Press, 1995.) View Details
  72. From Status to Contribution: Organizational Implications of the Changing Basis for Pay

    Keywords: Compensation and Benefits; Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "From Status to Contribution: Organizational Implications of the Changing Basis for Pay." Personnel (January 1987). (Reprinted as "How the New Pay Plans Stack Up." Best of Business Quarterly (fall 1987). Reprintings inlcude: Selected Readings in Strategic Human Resources Management, edited by F.K. Foulkes Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1989; Current Approaches to Pay and Benefits, edited by J.N. Matzer Washington, D.C.: International City Management Association, 1988.) View Details
  73. Supporting Innovation and Venture Development in Established Companies

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Growth and Development; Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Supporting Innovation and Venture Development in Established Companies." Journal of Business Venturing 1 (fall 1985). View Details
  74. Managing the Human Side of Change

    Keywords: Management; Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Managing the Human Side of Change." Management Review (April 1985): 52–56. (Reprinted in Readings in Management, edited by P. DuBose. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1989. Other reprintings on request.) View Details
  75. Reorganizing Part of Honeywell: From Strategy to Structure

    Keywords: Strategy; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and J. Buck. "Reorganizing Part of Honeywell: From Strategy to Structure." Organizational Dynamics 13 (winter 1985): 4–25. View Details
  76. Innovation: Our Only Hope for Times Ahead?

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Innovation: Our Only Hope for Times Ahead?" MIT Sloan Management Review 25, no. 4 (summer 1984): 51–55. View Details
  77. The Middle Manager as Innovator

    Keywords: Management; Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Middle Manager as Innovator." Harvard Business Review 60, no. 4 (July–August 1982): 95–105. (Reprintings include: Entrepreneurship, Creativity, and Organization, edited by J. Kao. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1989; Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation, edited by R. Burgelman and M. Maidique. Homewood, Ill.: Irwin, 1988; The Entrepreneur in Local Government, edited by B.H. Moore. Washington, D.C.: International City Management Association, 1983; Trials and Rewards of the Entrepreneur. Boston: Harvard Business Review Reprint Series, 1983; Strategic Management, edited by Richard G. Hamermesh. N.Y.: Wiley, 1983.) View Details
  78. Dilemmas of Managing Participation

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Dilemmas of Managing Participation." Organizational Dynamics 2 (summer 1982): 3–21. View Details
  79. Power, Leadership, and Participatory Management

    Keywords: Power and Influence; Leadership; Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Power, Leadership, and Participatory Management." Theory into Practice 21 (autumn 1981): 219–28. View Details
  80. Organizational Performance: Recent Developments in Measurement

    Keywords: Organizations; Performance; Measurement and Metrics;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and D. Brinkerhoff. "Organizational Performance: Recent Developments in Measurement." Annual Review of Sociology 7 (1981): 321–49. View Details
  81. Appraising the Performance of Performance Appraisal

    Keywords: Performance; Valuation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and D. Brinkerhoff. "Appraising the Performance of Performance Appraisal." MIT Sloan Management Review 21, no. 3 (spring 1980): 3–16. View Details
  82. The Politicization of Organizational Life

    Keywords: Organizations;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Politicization of Organizational Life." OD Practitioner (1980). (Reprinted in Organization Development Classics, edited by D. Van Eynde, J. Hoy, et al. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997.) View Details
  83. Power Failure in Management Circuits

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Power Failure in Management Circuits." Harvard Business Review 57, no. 4 (July–August 1979): 65–75. (Reprintings include Organization Theory: Selected Readings, edited by D.S. Pugh. London: Penguin, 1989; Classics of Organization Theory, edited by J.M. Shafritz. Chicago, Ill.: Dorsey Press, 1986; Harvard Business Review, The Executive Dilemma. N.Y.: Wiley, 1985; The Dynamics of Organization, edited by J.N. Yanouzas 1984; Readings in Organizational Behavior and Performance. Chicago: Scott-Foresman, 1983. Organizational Influence Processes, edited by Porter and Allen. Chicago: Scott-Foresman, 1983; Coping with Difficult Employees. Boston, Mass.: Harvard Business Review Reprint Series, 1983; Perspectives on Public Bureaucracy, edited by F.A. Kramer (Third edition). Cambridge, Mass.: Winthrop, 1981; Executive Success, edited by E.G. Collins N.Y.: Wiley, 1983. McKinsey Award Winners, 1970-1980. Boston: Harvard Business School, 1982.) View Details
  84. A Good Job is Hard to Find

    Keywords: Jobs and Positions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "A Good Job is Hard to Find." Working Papers for a New Society 7 (May–June 1979): 44–50. View Details
  85. Reflections on Women and the Legal Profession: A Sociological Perspective

    Keywords: Law; Jobs and Positions; Gender Characteristics; Science; Legal Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Reflections on Women and the Legal Profession: A Sociological Perspective." Harvard Womens Law Journal 1 (spring 1978): 1–18. View Details
  86. Work in a New America

    Keywords: Jobs and Positions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Work in a New America." Daedalus 107 (winter 1978): 47–78. (Also in A New American?, edited by S. Graubard. N.Y.: Norton, 1980. Reprintings include: Essential Sociology, edited by R.L. Ellis and M.J. Lipetz. Chicago: Scott-Foresman, 1979; (Italian) Quaderni di Rassegna Syndicale, Journal of the Italian Confederation of Workers (CGIL), (excerpts); Sourcebook on Individual Rights in the Corporation, edited by A. Westin N.Y.: Educational Foundation on Individual Rights, 1979; Individual Rights in the Corporation, edited by A. Westin. N.Y.: Pantheon, 1980.) View Details
  87. Families, Family Processes, and Economic Life

    Keywords: Family and Family Relationships;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Families, Family Processes, and Economic Life." Supplementary Issue. American Journal of Sociology 82 (January 1978). (Also in Turning Points: Historical and Sociological Essays on the Family, edited by S. Boocock and J. Demos. University of Chicago Press, 1978.) View Details
  88. Climbing the Pyramid Alone

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Climbing the Pyramid Alone." Wharton Magazine 2 (fall 1977): 38–44. (Reprinted in Managing Organizational Careers, edited by M.A. Morgan. N.Y.: Van Nostrand, 1980.) View Details
  89. Some Effects on Proportions on Group Life: Skewed Sex Ratios and Responses to Token Women

    Keywords: Groups and Teams; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Some Effects on Proportions on Group Life: Skewed Sex Ratios and Responses to Token Women." American Journal of Sociology 82 (March 1977): 965–90. (Reprintings include: Representative Bureaucracy, edited by J. Dolan and D. Rosenbloom. M.E. Sharpe, 2002; Readings in Sociology, edited by R. Curtis. Kendall-Hunt Publishing, 1988; Women and Symbolic Interaction, edited by M.J. Deegan and M. Hill. N.Y.: Allen Unwin, 1986; The Gender Gap and Psychotherapy, edited by E. Carmen and P. Ricker. N.Y.: Plenum, 1984; The Substance of Social Deviance, edited by R.A. Farrell and V.L. Swigert. Alfred Publishing, 1978; Sociological Inventory, Vol. 1, 1979; Reader in Complex Organizations, edited by A. Etzioni and E.W. Lehman. N.Y.: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1980; Sociology: Contemporary Introductory Readings, edited by J. And A. Stimson. Ithaca, N.Y.: Peacock, 1983.) View Details
  90. The Differentiation of Life Styles

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and B. Zablocki. "The Differentiation of Life Styles." Annual Review of Sociology 2 (fall 1976): 269–98. View Details
  91. Couple Strain in Communal Households: A Four Factor Model of the Separation Process

    Keywords: Relationships;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and D. Jaffe. "Couple Strain in Communal Households: A Four Factor Model of the Separation Process." Journal of Social Issues 32 (July 1976): 169–91. (Reprinted in Divorce and Separation, edited by G. Levinger and O.C. Moles. N.Y.: Basic, 1979.) View Details
  92. The Job Makes the Person

    Keywords: Jobs and Positions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Job Makes the Person." Psychology Today (May 1976). (Reprintings include: Breaking Through, edited by B.D. Smith. Addison Wesley Longman, 2001; Organizational Behavior, edited by. D. Kolb. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1989; Management Pragmatics, edited by R.A. Webber. Homewood, Ill.: Richard D. Irwin, 1979.) View Details
  93. Comment VI: Research Styles and Intervention Strategies--An Argument for a Social Structural Model

    Keywords: Research; Strategy; Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Comment VI: Research Styles and Intervention Strategies--An Argument for a Social Structural Model." Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 2 (spring 1976): 282–91. (Also in Women and the Workplace: The Implications of Occupational Segregation, edited by M. Blazall and B. Reagan. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1976.) View Details
  94. The New Utopian Vision? Bringing Community to the Family

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The New Utopian Vision? Bringing Community to the Family." Journal of Contemporary Social Issues (1976). (Reprintings include: Marriage and Family: Coping with Change, edited by L. Cargan. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth, 1984.) View Details
  95. Women and the Structure of Organizations: Explorations in Theory and Behavior

    Keywords: Behavior; Organizations; Theory; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Women and the Structure of Organizations: Explorations in Theory and Behavior." Sociological Inquiry 45, nos. 2-3 (1975). (Also in Another Voice, edited by M. Millman and R.M. Kanter. N.Y.: Doubleday Anchor, 1975; Reprintings include: The Management of Libraries: Basic Readings, edited by B.P. Lynch. Neil Schuman, 1985; The Sociology of Organizations: Basic Studies, edited by O. Grusky and G.A. Miller (Rev. ed.) N.Y.: Free Press, 1980;.) View Details
  96. Communes in Cities

    Keywords: Relationships;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Communes in Cities." Working Papers for a New Society 2 (summer 1974): 36–44. (Reprintings include: Sociology Full Circle, edited by W. Feigelman. Second Edition. N.Y.: Praeger, 1976; Co-ops, Communes, and Collectives, edited by J. Case and R. Taylor. N.Y.: Pantheon, 1979.) View Details
  97. Intimate Oppression

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Intimate Oppression." Sociological Quarterly 15 (spring 1974): 302–14. View Details
  98. Evaluating Alternatives and Alternative Values

    Keywords: Values and Beliefs;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and L. Zurcher. "Evaluating Alternatives and Alternative Values." Journal of Applied Behavioral Science 9 (May 1973): 381–97. View Details
  99. Utopian Communities

    Keywords: Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Utopian Communities." Sociological Inquiry 43, nos. 3-4 (1973): 263–90. (Also in The Community: Approaches and Applications, edited by M.P. Effrat N.Y.: Free Press, 1974.) View Details
  100. Commitment and the Internal Organization of Millenial Movements

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Commitment and the Internal Organization of Millenial Movements." American Behavioral Scientist 16 (November–December 1972): 219–43. View Details
  101. Symbolic Interactionism and Politics in Systemic Perspective

    Keywords: Society; System;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Symbolic Interactionism and Politics in Systemic Perspective." Sociological Inquiry 42, nos. 3-4 (1972). (Also in Perspectives on Political Sociology, edited by A. Effrat. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill, 1972.) View Details
  102. Communes

    Keywords: Relationships;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Communes." Psychology Today (July 1970). (Reprintings: Psychologie (France); The Nuclear Family in Crisis, by M. Gordon. N.Y.: Harper and Row, 1972; Readings in Society Today, CRM Books; Sociology and Youth, by P.K. Manning and M. Truzzi. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1972; Japanese Psychology Today; SIMSOC: A Manual for Participants, by W.A. Gamson. Second Edition. N.Y.: Free Press.) View Details
  103. Commitment and Social Organization: A Study of Commitment Mechanisms in Utopian Communities

    Keywords: Organizations; Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Commitment and Social Organization: A Study of Commitment Mechanisms in Utopian Communities." American Sociological Review 35 (August 1968): 499–517. (Sociology: Students and Society, by J. Rabow. Los Angeles: Goodyear, 1972; Currents of Unrest: An Introduction to Collective Behavior, by O.E. Klapp. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall (Tables); Social Psychology for Sociologists, by D. Field. London: Nelson, 1974; The Sociology of Religion, by S. Bruce. Cheltenham, U.K.: Edward Elgar, 1994.) View Details

Book Chapters

  1. The Institutional Logic of Great Global Firms

    Keywords: management; change management; global organizations;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "The Institutional Logic of Great Global Firms." Chap. 3 in Towards a New Theory of the Firm: Humanizing the Firm and the Management Profession, edited by Joan Enric Ricart Costa and Josep Maria Rosanas Marti, 84–108. Bilbao: Fundación BBVA, 2012. View Details
  2. Re-Developing Leaders: The Harvard Advanced Leadership Experiment in Even Higher Education

    Keywords: Leadership Development; Higher Education; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Re-Developing Leaders: The Harvard Advanced Leadership Experiment in Even Higher Education." In The Handbook for Teaching Leadership: Knowing, Doing, and Being, edited by Scott Snook, Nitin Nohria, and Rakesh Khurana, 507–524. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2011. View Details
  3. Leadership in a Globalizing World

    In this chapter, world-renowned business expert, author, and Harvard Business School professor Rosabeth Moss Kanter asks the question, "Is leadership different in a globalizing world--one of broadening horizons and burgeoning sources of ideas and supplies--than in other contexts?" The answer is a resounding yes. Kanter identifies three aspects of globalization--increased uncertainty, complexity, and diversity--that fundamentally reshape the work leaders must perform. Based on field observations of leaders in large global firms, she finds that these forces shape the context of three distinctive tasks leaders face as they guide their organizations and influence the constituencies that surround them: 1) institutional work to deal with uncertainty, 2) integrative work to deal with complexity, and 3) identity work to deal with diversity. With compelling examples of global leadership within international companies such as IBM, Cemex, Procter & Gamble, and Paris-based advertising and communications giant Publicis Groupe, Kanter builds a strong case for making these organizations and their leaders the focus of further research and study.

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Globalized Firms and Management; Leadership; Research; Complexity; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Leadership in a Globalizing World." Chap. 20 in Handbook of Leadership Theory and Practice, edited by Nitin Nohria and Rakesh Khurana. Harvard Business Press, 2010. View Details
  4. Creating Common Ground: Propositions about Effective Intergroup Leadership

    Keywords: Groups and Teams; Leadership; Organizational Design;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Creating Common Ground: Propositions about Effective Intergroup Leadership." In Crossing the Divide: Intergroup Leadership in a World of Difference, edited by T. Pittinsky. Harvard Business Press, 2009. View Details
  5. Position and Emotion: The Significance of Georg Simmel's Structural Theories for Leadership and Organizational Behavior

    Keywords: Leadership; Rank and Position; Status and Position; Organizational Culture;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Rakesh Khurana. "Position and Emotion: The Significance of Georg Simmel's Structural Theories for Leadership and Organizational Behavior." In Oxford Handbook of Sociology and Organization Studies, edited by Paul S. Adler. Oxford, U.K.: Oxford University Press, 2009. View Details
  6. The Corporate Conduct Continuum: From 'Do No Harm' to 'Do Lots of Good'

    Keywords: Ethics; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "The Corporate Conduct Continuum: From 'Do No Harm' to 'Do Lots of Good'." Chap. 14 in The Virtuous Organization: Insights from Some of the World's Leading Management Thinkers, edited by Charles C. Manz, Kim S. Cameron, Karen P. Manz, and Robert D. Marx, 279–286. Singapore, New Jersey, and London: World Scientific, 2008. View Details
  7. When Giants Discover the Disadvantaged

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "When Giants Discover the Disadvantaged." In Business Solutions for the Global Poor: Creating Social and Economic Value, edited by V. Kasturi Rangan, John A. Quelch, Gustavo Herrero, and Brooke Barton. John Wiley & Sons, 2007. View Details
  8. How Cosmopolitan Leaders Build Confidence: A Profile of the Future

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Trust;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "How Cosmopolitan Leaders Build Confidence: A Profile of the Future." In The Leader of the Future, edited by F. Hesselbein, M. Goldsmith, and R. Beckhard. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996. View Details
  9. Beyond the Myth of Separate Worlds

    Keywords: Personal Characteristics; Attitudes; Perspective; Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Beyond the Myth of Separate Worlds." Foreword to The Work and Family Handbook, edited by M. Pitt-Catsouphes, E.E. Kossek, and S. Sweet. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2006. View Details
  10. How Leaders Restore Confidence

    Keywords: Leadership; Trust;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "How Leaders Restore Confidence." In Leadership and Governance from the Inside Out, edited by Robert Gandossy and Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, 39 – 49. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2004. View Details
  11. Can Higher Education 'Evolve'?

    Keywords: Higher Education; Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Can Higher Education 'Evolve'?" In The Internet and the University, edited by M. Devlin, R. Larson, and J. Meyerson, pp. 39–80. Boulder, CO: EDUCAUSE, 2003. View Details
  12. Getting the Best from Best Practices

    Keywords: Management Practices and Processes; Practice; Performance Effectiveness;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Getting the Best from Best Practices." Introduction to Best Practice: Ideas and Insights from the World's Foremost Business Thinkers, edited by Tom Brown and Robert Heller. Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 2003. View Details
  13. Creating the Culture for Innovation

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Organizational Culture; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Creating the Culture for Innovation." In Leading for Innovation: And Organizing for Results, edited by Frances Hesselbein, Marshall Goldsmith, and Iain Somerville. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2001. View Details
  14. Kaleidoscope Thinking

    Keywords: Cognition and Thinking;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Kaleidoscope Thinking." In Management 21C, Someday We'll All Manage This Way, edited by S. Chowdhury, 250–61. Financial Times Prentice Hall, 2000. View Details
  15. Why the Battle Was Won, but the War Was Lost: An Organizational Change Perspective

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Why the Battle Was Won, but the War Was Lost: An Organizational Change Perspective." In Car Launch: The Human Side of Managing Change, edited by G. Roth and A. Kleiner, 137–47. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999. View Details
  16. Foreword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Foreword." Common Interest, Common Good, edited by Shirley Sagawa and Eli Segal. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1999. View Details
  17. Small Business and Economic Growth

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Economic Growth;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Small Business and Economic Growth." In The Rising Tide, edited by J. J. Jasinowski. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998. View Details
  18. The Politicization of Organizational Life

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Politicization of Organizational Life." In Organization Development Classics: The Practice and Theory of Change, edited by D. F. Van Eynde, J. C. Hoy, and C. D. VanEynde. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997. View Details
  19. The Imagination to Innovate, the Professionalism to Perform, and the Openness to Collaborate: The Leading the Change-Adept Organization

    Keywords: Creativity; Innovation and Invention; Performance Expectations; Cooperation; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "The Imagination to Innovate, the Professionalism to Perform, and the Openness to Collaborate: The Leading the Change-Adept Organization." In Rosabeth Moss Kanter on the Frontiers of Management, by R. M. Kanter. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1997. View Details
  20. Restoring People to the Heart of the Organization of the Future

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Restoring People to the Heart of the Organization of the Future." In The Organization of the Future, edited by F. Hesselbein, M. Goldsmith, and D. Beckhard, 139–50. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997. View Details
  21. World Class Leaders: The Power of Partnering

    Keywords: Leadership; Partners and Partnerships;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "World Class Leaders: The Power of Partnering." In The Leader of the Future, edited by F. Hesselbein, M. Goldsmith, and R. Beckhard, 89–98. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996. View Details
  22. Preface

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Preface." Preface to Mary Parker Follett--Prophet of Management: A Celebration of Writings from the 1920s , edited by Pauline Graham. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1995. View Details
  23. Foreword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Foreword." Innovative Reward Systems for Changing Companies, edited by Thomas Wilson. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1994. View Details
  24. Afterword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Afterword." Afterword to Global Strategy, edited by P. Barnevik and R. M. Kanter. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1994. View Details
  25. U.S. Competitiveness and the Aging Workforce: Toward Organizational and Institutional Change

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Human Capital; Age Characteristics; Competition; Trade; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "U.S. Competitiveness and the Aging Workforce: Toward Organizational and Institutional Change." In Aging and Competition: Rebuilding the U.S. Workforce, edited by J. A. Auerbach and J.C. Welch. Washington, D.C.: National Planning Association, 1994. View Details
  26. Foreword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Foreword." Reach for the Top: Women and the Changing Facts of Work Life, edited by Nancy Nichols. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1994. View Details
  27. Comprehensive Change Strategies: Beyond Piecemeal Projects

    Keywords: Change Management; Strategy; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Comprehensive Change Strategies: Beyond Piecemeal Projects." In Manufacturing Europe 1994: The International Review of Advanced Manufacturing Technology and Management, edited by Peter Dempsey, 167–69. London: Sterling Publications, 1993. View Details
  28. The View from the 1990s: How the Global Economy is Reshaping Corporate Power and Careers

    Keywords: Globalized Economies and Regions; Personal Development and Career; Transformation; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The View from the 1990s: How the Global Economy is Reshaping Corporate Power and Careers." In Men and Women of the Corporation, by R. M. Kanter. New York: Basic Books, 1977. View Details
  29. Foreword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Foreword." The 100 Best Companies for Minorities, edited by Lawrence Otis Graham and Pamela Thomas Graham. New York: Plume, 1993. View Details
  30. The Global Manager

    Keywords: Globalized Markets and Industries; Managerial Roles;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Global Manager." In The Portable MBA in Management, edited by A. R. Cohen. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1993. View Details
  31. Foreword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Foreword." Church Leadership, edited by Lowell Weems. New York: Abingdon Press, 1993. View Details
  32. The Relevance of Network Research for Practitioners

    Keywords: Networks; Research;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Relevance of Network Research for Practitioners." In Networks and Organizations: Structure, Form and Action, edited by N. Nohria and R. C. Eccles. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1992. View Details
  33. Making Network Research Relevant to Practice

    Keywords: Networks; Research; Practice;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and R. G. Eccles. "Making Network Research Relevant to Practice." In Networks and Organizations: Structure, Form and Action, edited by N. Nohria and R. C. Eccles. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1992. View Details
  34. Foreword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Foreword." The Management of Participation, edited by Laura Spencer. Kendall/Hunt Publishing, 1991. View Details
  35. The Future of Bureaucracy and Hierarchy in Organizational Theory: A Report from the Field

    Keywords: Organizational Structure; Rank and Position;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Future of Bureaucracy and Hierarchy in Organizational Theory: A Report from the Field." In Social Theory for a Changing Society, edited by P. Bourdieu and J. Coleman. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1991. (University of Chicago/Russell Sage Foundation Conference on "Social Theory and Emerging Issues for a Changing Society," April 1989.) View Details
  36. Improving the Acceptance and Use of New Technology: Organizational and Inter-organizational Challenges

    Keywords: Technology Adoption; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Design; Attitudes;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Improving the Acceptance and Use of New Technology: Organizational and Inter-organizational Challenges." In Designing for Technological Change, edited by B. Guile, E. Laumann, and G. Nadler. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press, 1991. View Details
  37. Banc One Corporation, 1989

    Keywords: Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Banc One Corporation, 1989." In The Service Management Course, by C. Hart, J. Heskett, and W. E. Sasser Jr.. NY: Free Press, 1990. (Reprintings include Leaders on Leadership, edited by W. Bennis. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1992; The Challenge of Organizational Change, edited by R.M. Kanter, B.A. Stein, and T.D. Jick. N.Y.: Free Press, 1992.) View Details
  38. Inter-organizational Bonds and Intra-organizational Behavior: How Alliances and Partnerships Change the Organizations Forming Them

    Keywords: Alliances; Partners and Partnerships; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and P. S. Myers. "Inter-organizational Bonds and Intra-organizational Behavior: How Alliances and Partnerships Change the Organizations Forming Them." In Socio-Economics: Toward a New Synthesis, edited by P. R. Lawrence and A. Etzione. Armonk, NY: M.E. Sharpe, 1991. View Details
  39. Careers and the Wealth of Nations: A Macro-Perspective on the Structure and Implications of Careers

    Keywords: Welfare or Wellbeing; Macroeconomics;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Careers and the Wealth of Nations: A Macro-Perspective on the Structure and Implications of Careers." In Handbook of Career Theory, edited by M. Arthur, D. T. Hall, and B. Lawrence. Cambridge University Press, 1989. View Details
  40. The New Alliances: How Strategic Partnerships are Reshaping American Business

    Keywords: Alliances; Partners and Partnerships; Corporate Strategy; Business Ventures; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The New Alliances: How Strategic Partnerships are Reshaping American Business." In Business in the Contemporary World, edited by H. Sawyer. University Press of America, Inc., 1988. View Details
  41. Managing Change in Innovative Organizations

    Keywords: Change Management; Innovation and Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Managing Change in Innovative Organizations." In Productivity and Quality Through Science and Technology, edited by Y. K. Shetty and V. M. Buehler. Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1988. (Reprinted in The Quest for Competitiveness, edited by Y.K. Shetty and V.M. Buehler. Westport, Conn.: Quorum Books, 1991.) View Details
  42. When a Thousand Flowers Bloom: Structural, Collective, and Social Conditions for Innovation in Organizations

    Keywords: Innovation and Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Design;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "When a Thousand Flowers Bloom: Structural, Collective, and Social Conditions for Innovation in Organizations." In Research in Organizational Behavior. Vol. 22, edited by B. Staw and R. Sutton. Elsevier Science, 2000. (Reprintings include: The Evolution and Adaptation of Organizations, edited by B. Staw and L.L. Cummings. Greenwich, Conn: JAI Press, 1990; Knowledge Management and Organizational Design, edited by P.S. Myers. Boston: Butterworth-Heinemann, 1996, pp. 93-132; Entrepreneurship: The Social Science View, edited by R. Swedberg. Oxford University Press, 2000.) View Details
  43. Change Master Skills: What it Takes to be Creative

    Keywords: Creativity; Competency and Skills;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Change Master Skills: What it Takes to be Creative." In Handbook for Creative and Innovative Managers, edited by R. L. Kuhn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1988. View Details
  44. Change Master Companies: Environments in which Innovations Flourish

    Keywords: Innovation and Management; Leading Change; Innovation Leadership;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Change Master Companies: Environments in which Innovations Flourish." In Handbook for Creative and Innovative Managers, edited by R. L. Kuhn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1988. View Details
  45. Encouraging Innovation and Entrepreneurs in Bureaucratic Companies

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Design;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Encouraging Innovation and Entrepreneurs in Bureaucratic Companies." In Handbook for Creative and Innovative Managers, edited by R. L. Kuhn. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1988. View Details
  46. Doing Well While Doing Good: Dilemmas of Performance Measurement in Nonprofit Organizations and the Need for a Multiple Constituency Approach

    Keywords: Nonprofit Organizations; Performance Evaluation; Performance Productivity;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Doing Well While Doing Good: Dilemmas of Performance Measurement in Nonprofit Organizations and the Need for a Multiple Constituency Approach." In Handbook of Nonprofit Organizations, edited by W. Powell and P. DiMaggio. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1986. View Details
  47. Providing the Corporate Environment to Foster Innovation

    Keywords: Innovation and Management; Organizational Design; Organizational Culture;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Providing the Corporate Environment to Foster Innovation." In How to Compete beyond the 1980's: Perspectives from High Performance Companies. Westport, CT: Quorum Books, 1985. (edited by the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.) View Details
  48. Stimulating and Managing Corporate Entrepreneurship: The Auto Industry Connection

    Keywords: Corporate Entrepreneurship; Leadership; Business or Company Management; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Stimulating and Managing Corporate Entrepreneurship: The Auto Industry Connection." In Entrepreneurship in a "Mature Industry", edited by J. Campbell.Michigan Papers in Japanese Studies. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan, Center for Japanese Studies, 1985. (Keynote address for the U.S.-Japan Auto Industry Conference.) View Details
  49. Mastering Change: The Skills we Need

    Keywords: Change Management; Competency and Skills;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Mastering Change: The Skills we Need." In Not as Far as You Think: The Realities of Working Women, edited by L. Moore. Lexington, MA: Lexington Books, 1985. View Details
  50. Variations in Managerial Career Structures in High Technology Firms: The Impact of Organizational Characteristics on Internal Labor Market Patterns

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Organizational Design; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Variations in Managerial Career Structures in High Technology Firms: The Impact of Organizational Characteristics on Internal Labor Market Patterns." In International Labor Markets, edited by P. Osterman. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1984. View Details
  51. Managing Transitions in Organizational Culture: The Case of Participative Management at Honeywell

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Change Management; Transition;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Managing Transitions in Organizational Culture: The Case of Participative Management at Honeywell." In New Futures: The Challenge of Managing Corporate Transitions, edited by J. Kimberly and R. Quinn. Homewood, IL: Dow Jones-Irwin, 1984. View Details
  52. Power and Enterprise in Action: Corporate Middle Managers as Entrepreneurs

    Keywords: Corporate Entrepreneurship; Power and Influence; Business or Company Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Power and Enterprise in Action: Corporate Middle Managers as Entrepreneurs." In Work and Occupations: Autonomy, Power and Control, edited by M. Cantor and P. Steward. Los Angeles: Sage Publications, 1982. View Details
  53. The Social Psychology of Organizations

    Keywords: Social Psychology; Organizations;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and M. G. Cox. "The Social Psychology of Organizations." In A Social Problems Perspective on Social Psychology, edited by D. Perlman and C. Cozby. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1982. View Details
  54. Notes on the Meaning of Commitment to Organizations

    Keywords: Organizations; Emotions; Attitudes;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Notes on the Meaning of Commitment to Organizations." In Goodmeasure Publications. Cambridge, MA: Goodmeasure, Inc., 1980. View Details
  55. Defining and Experiencing Organizational Structure

    Keywords: Organizational Structure;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Defining and Experiencing Organizational Structure." In Advances in Experiential Social Processes. Vol. 2, edited by C. Alderfer and C. Cooper. London and New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1980. View Details
  56. Dilemmas of Participation: Issues in Organization Design and Management

    Keywords: Organizational Design; Management Systems; Decision Making;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Dilemmas of Participation: Issues in Organization Design and Management." In Proceedings of the Second National Seminar on Individual Rights in the Corporation, edited by Alan F. Westin and Stephan Salisbury. New York: Educational Fund for Individual Rights, 1979. (Also in National Forum, spring 1982.) View Details
  57. Changing Organizational Constraints: Toward Promoting Equal Opportunity and Treatment for Women in Public Service Systems

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Equality and Inequality; Public Sector; Service Operations; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Changing Organizational Constraints: Toward Promoting Equal Opportunity and Treatment for Women in Public Service Systems." In The United Nations and Decision-Making: The Role of Women. Vol. 2, edited by D. Nicol and M. Croke. New York: United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), 1978. View Details
  58. The Context for the Individual Rights Issues: Labor Force Trends and Their Implication

    Keywords: Rights; Labor and Management Relations; Trends;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Context for the Individual Rights Issues: Labor Force Trends and Their Implication." In Proceedings of the First National Seminar on Individual Rights in the Corporation, edited by Alan F. Westin and Stephan Salisbury. New York: Educational Fund for Individual Rights, 1978. View Details
  59. The Romance of Community: Intentional Communities as Intensive Group Experience

    Keywords: Civil Society or Community; Groups and Teams; Emotions;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Romance of Community: Intentional Communities as Intensive Group Experience." In The Intensive Group Experience, edited by M. Rosenbaum and A. Snadowsky. New York: Free Press, 1976. View Details
  60. Women in Organizations: Sex Roles, Group Dynamics, and Change Strategies

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Groups and Teams; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Women in Organizations: Sex Roles, Group Dynamics, and Change Strategies." In Beyond Sex Roles, edited by A. Sargent. St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Company, 1976. View Details
  61. Foreword

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Foreword." Workplace Democracy, edited by Daniel Zwerdling. New York: Harper & Row, 1975. View Details
  62. Some Social Issues in the Community Development Corporations Proposal

    Keywords: Social Issues; Civil Society or Community;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Some Social Issues in the Community Development Corporations Proposal." In The Case for Participatory Democracy, edited by C. G. Bennello and D. Rousseopoulos. New York: Grossman Publishers, 1971. View Details
  63. Neo-Freudian Views of Maturity and Bureaucratic Norms

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Social Issues;

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "Neo-Freudian Views of Maturity and Bureaucratic Norms." In Vital Problems for American Society, edited by J. A. Winter, J. Rabow, and M. Chesler. New York: Random House, 1968. View Details

Working Papers

  1. The Institutional Logic of Great Global Firms

    Theories of the firm have been dominated by a legacy of ideas from early industrialization that pose zero-sum opposition between capital and labor (or capital and nearly everything else), differentiating the economy from society and often posing irreconcilable conflicts. The search for mathematical models has turned the negotiated order of organizational activities, which necessarily include particularistic elements, into abstract generalizations that favor quantifiable variables. This paper offers another logic, a social or institutional logic, to let practice provoke the creation of new theory. It provides examples that show how social logic guides the practices of widely admired, high-performing companies, and why people and society are not an after-thought to be used or discarded, but core to the purpose and definition of the firm. It builds on in-depth, ongoing global field research on admired companies from four continents, followed in over 20 countries, to derive six propositions about the role of humanistic institutional logic.

    Keywords: Economy; Capital; Globalized Firms and Management; Labor; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Practice; Conflict of Interests; Social Issues; Theory;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "The Institutional Logic of Great Global Firms." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 11-119, May 2011. View Details
  2. Informed and Interconnected: A Manifesto for Smarter Cities

    The need for a fresh approach to U.S. communities is more urgent than ever because of the biggest global economic crisis since the Great Depression. Through examination of the barriers to solving urban problems (and the ways they reinforce each other), this paper offers a new approach to community transformation which calls for leaders to use technology to inform and connect people. We need to convert the social safety net into a social safety network through the creation of smarter communities that are information-rich, interconnected, and able to provide opportunities to all citizens. This process has already begun through such programs as Harlem Children's Zone, Baltimore's CitiStat, Elevate Miami, and others. And they can be replicated. But technology alone is not the answer. Realization of the vision requires leaders to invest in the tools, guide their use, and pave the way for transformation. Perhaps the urgency of the current economic crisis can provide the impetus to overcome resistance to change and turn problems into an opportunity to reduce costs, improve services to communities, and make our cities smarter.

    Keywords: Transformation; Investment; Urban Scope; Leadership; Safety; Civil Society or Community; Technology Networks; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Stanley S. Litow. "Informed and Interconnected: A Manifesto for Smarter Cities." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 09-141, June 2009. View Details
  3. Moving Higher Education to the Next Stage: A New Set of Societal Challenges, a New Stage of Life, and a Call to Action for Universities

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, Rakesh Khurana, and Nitin Nohria. "Moving Higher Education to the Next Stage: A New Set of Societal Challenges, a New Stage of Life, and a Call to Action for Universities." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 06-021, November 2005. View Details
  4. Principals As Innovators: Identifying Fundamental Skills for Leadership of Change in Public Schools

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "Principals As Innovators: Identifying Fundamental Skills for Leadership of Change in Public Schools." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 05-076, June 2005. View Details
  5. The Measurement of Organizational Effectiveness, Productivity, Performance, and Success: Issues and Dilemmas in Service and Non-Profit Organizations

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M. "The Measurement of Organizational Effectiveness, Productivity, Performance, and Success: Issues and Dilemmas in Service and Non-Profit Organizations." PONPO Working Paper, No. 9, September 1979. View Details
  6. Formal Systems of Appraisal of Individual Performance: Some Considerations, Critical Issues, and Applications to Non-Profit Organizations

    Citation:

    Kanter, R. M., and D. Brinkerhoff. "Formal Systems of Appraisal of Individual Performance: Some Considerations, Critical Issues, and Applications to Non-Profit Organizations." PONPO Working Paper, No. 10, September 1979. (Yale University, Program on Non-Profit Organizations (PONPO), Institution for Social and Policy Studies.) View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. The Weather Company

    New CEO David Kenny transformed The Weather Company in less than two years from a primary identity as a cable television channel to a multi-platform digital company innovating in the uses of weather data. He assesses progress and considers strategic choices and organizational challenges ahead. He created a new narrative for the company in the era of Big Data, putting science at the center (great forecasts) and stressing services, stories (the ability to communicate the data to users), and safety (preparation for severe weather, including using social media). Now he has questions about how much to invest in the declining but still important television business; how to build and hold audiences beyond severe weather events, when audiences spike; how to stay ahead of growth of digital platforms, especially mobile, when current partners (such as Google) could easily turn into competitors; and how to build organizational capabilities, culture, and talent to be ready for ongoing and future change, including global growth. Kenny grapples with a number of strategic tensions: between innovations and the traditional business, between global and local, and about increased partnering or proprietary advantages. He must continue to lead and develop the team to support a vision that is still unfolding.

    Keywords: leadership; change management; strategic change; technology; digital; weather; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Technology Platform; Change Management; Leading Change; Growth and Development Strategy; Information Industry; Service Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "The Weather Company." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 314-125, March 2014. View Details
  2. The Information Superhighway Meets the Highway: Technology and Mobility Trends and Opportunities

    Technological innovation is considered a competitive strength for America, but the nation does not score as high in deploying its technology. U.S. transportation systems are in need of repair and renewal, and the sector is at the cusp of a technological revolution. The Information Superhighway could reinvent the highway—and airways, railroads, vehicles, and more—by making aspects of the system "smarter" and more connected, cost-effective, fuel-efficient, safer, and more convenient for consumers, businesses, and communities. This paper discusses five trends in technology-enabled transportation innovation: connected vehicles; connected roads; big data analytics in air transportation; Intelligent Transportation Systems; and innovation in information infrastructure.

    Keywords: technology; transportation; infrastructure;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Kevin Rosier. "The Information Superhighway Meets the Highway: Technology and Mobility Trends and Opportunities." Harvard Business School Background Note 314-093, February 2014. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  3. Finding the Money: An Overview of Infrastructure Finance Challenges and Opportunities

    This overview describes how the United States funds and finances infrastructure investment to maintain its economic competitiveness. It considers the roles of taxpayers, users, government allocators and lenders, and private investors in the infrastructure funding system and shows that there are creative tools that can be used. It focuses on five major areas: the problematic state of fuel taxes; the increasing promise of user fees; innovations in debt financing; the challenges of privatization; and the promise (and challenges) of public-private partnerships, with particular attention to a model project in Miami, the Port Tunnel. The overview concludes with a call for cross-sector coalitions to develop strategies with long-term impact goals and short-term visible improvements for users.

    Keywords: finance; infrastructure; technology; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Daniel Fox. "Finding the Money: An Overview of Infrastructure Finance Challenges and Opportunities." Harvard Business School Background Note 314-094, February 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  4. Flying High, Landing Low: Strengths and Challenges for U.S. Air Transportation

    The U.S. air transportation system flies high on some indicators, mostly involving capacity to take to the air, but lands low on others, mostly involving ground facilities and processes. This note provides an overview of the history and current state of air transportation in the U.S., covering industry costs; types of airlines, including passenger and cargo (e.g., Delta, Southwest, Alaska, and Frontier); airport issues; and the role of technology. It reviews some opportunities for innovation that will solve the pain points and bottlenecks facing the system and outlines high-priority policy areas. It becomes clear that individual airlines have often been managed back to health and focus on innovation, but the overall system itself and its governmental connections need attention, including the desire for NextGen air traffic control and revisiting Open Skies agreements.

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, Aditi Jain, and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Flying High, Landing Low: Strengths and Challenges for U.S. Air Transportation." Harvard Business School Background Note 314-098, February 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  5. Dr. Benjamin Hooks and Children's Health Forum

    The case includes law, business, and public health perspectives on an African American leader's social entrepreneurship and leadership in other social movements. Later in his life, Dr. Benjamin Hooks championed the eradication of lead poisoning. Prior to that Hooks travelled down several distinct career paths as a pioneering civil rights activist. His positions ranged from lawyer, judge, preacher, entrepreneur to the first African American commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to the head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to the co-founder of the non-profit Children's Health Forum (CHF). CHF's mission was to eradicate lead poisoning in children in the United States, which involved a complex web of interactions of different sectors and different interests including real estate developers, paint manufacturers, landlords, healthcare providers, and more. The case provides an overview of lead poisoning in the U.S., including how it is measured, its causes, and legislation enacted to prevent it. It reflects on Hooks' leadership and choices. It explores why Hooks, as a lawyer and judge, did not chose litigation as his vehicle to tackle the issue of lead poisoning and why he chose to get involved. This case may be used for courses related to leadership, management for change, and social enterprise.

    Keywords: Leading Change; Health Disorders; Social Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Social Issues; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ai-Ling Malone. "Dr. Benjamin Hooks and Children's Health Forum." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 314-092, January 2014. View Details
  6. Rail Transportation in the United States

    In the 20th century, automobiles and airlines pushed rail into the background as an often-troubled and neglected mode. After a review of the long history of rail in the U.S., this paper examines the situation in the 21st century, including the rail market structure, and discusses key players like BNSF, CSX, and Norfolk Southern. Today, by most measures, freight rail is doing better than ever, while passenger rail faces significant challenges—though it is clear that numerous pain points and bottlenecks interfere with optimal use of rail to move both people and goods. This note offers a structured way of thinking through the issues facing rail transportation and discusses three recent freight rail infrastructure projects that hold promise for the future: the National Gateway, the Keystone Corridor, and the CREATE decongestion project in Chicago.

    Keywords: railroad history;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Guilford. "Rail Transportation in the United States." Harvard Business School Background Note 314-084, January 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  7. The Weather Company

    New CEO David Kenny transformed The Weather Company in less than two years from a primary identity as a cable television channel to a multi-platform digital company innovating in the uses of weather data. He assesses progress and considers strategic choices and organizational challenges ahead. He created a new narrative for the company in the era of Big Data, putting science at the center (great forecasts) and stressing services, stories (the ability to communicate the data to users), and safety (preparation for severe weather, including using social media). Now he has questions about how much to invest in the declining but still important television business; how to build and hold audiences beyond severe weather events, when audiences spike; how to stay ahead of growth of digital platforms, especially mobile, when current partners (such as Google) could easily turn into competitors; and how to build organizational capabilities, culture, and talent to be ready for ongoing and future change, including global growth. Kenny grapples with a number of strategic tensions: between innovations and the traditional business, between global and local, and about increased partnering or proprietary advantages. He must continue to lead and develop the team to support a vision that is still unfolding.

    Keywords: innovation; strategy; strategic change; change management; weather; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "The Weather Company." Harvard Business School Case 314-083, January 2014. View Details
  8. Rethinking Cities: Chicago on the Move

    It is impossible to discuss national competitiveness without considering cities and the regions they anchor. Cities are transportation hubs, centers of commercial exchange, and the locus of lives. They thrive by the ways they connect to the world. Demographic changes in recent years—such as the decreasing popularity of cars and increasing urban populations—have implications for 21st century transportation and infrastructure. This is apparent in the case of Chicago, a global city in the vanguard of change. This paper focuses on five major 21st century transportation and infrastructure projects in Chicago: rail decongestion; airport modernization; mass transit modernization; a complete streets plan; and an infrastructure trust as a financing innovation. It also discusses leadership by Mayor Rahm Emanuel to create an integrated strategy that includes technology and education, and how he executes on it.

    Keywords: innovation; management; strategy; infrastructure; Technology Industry; Transportation Industry; Chicago;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Rethinking Cities: Chicago on the Move." Harvard Business School Case 314-079, January 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  9. Teaching Note IBM and the Reinvention of High School (B): Replicating & Scaling P-TECH and Partners

    Keywords: education; innovation; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Leading Change; Education; Innovation and Invention; Education Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Teaching Note IBM and the Reinvention of High School (B): Replicating & Scaling P-TECH and Partners." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 314-063, October 2013. View Details
  10. Teaching Note IBM and the Reinvention of High School (A): Proving the P-TECH Concept

    Keywords: innovation; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Leading Change; Education; Innovation and Invention; Education Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Teaching Note IBM and the Reinvention of High School (A): Proving the P-TECH Concept." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 314-062, October 2013. View Details
  11. IBM and the Reinvention of High School (A): Proving the P-TECH Concept Video Supplement

    Video supplement includes P-TECH principal, staff, a parent, and a student.

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "IBM and the Reinvention of High School (A): Proving the P-TECH Concept Video Supplement." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 314-702, October 2013. View Details
  12. IBM and the Reinvention of High School (B): Replicating & Scaling P-TECH and Partners

    IBM's Corporate Citizenship office created an innovation in public education through a business-school partnership for widespread replication and diffusion. In 2012, while P-TECH (Pathways in Technology Early College High School) was still in its first year operating, Stanley Litow, IBM's Vice President of Corporate Citizenship and Corporate Affairs and President of the IBM International Foundation, found himself overwhelmed by interested parties who wanted to replicate the model. Chicago Mayor Emanuel, the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation in Idaho, the New York City Department of Education, and New York Governor Cuomo were all in various stages of implementing the concept. Chicago launched five schools in 2012 that were inspired by the P-TECH model, with IBM partnering with one school. New York City developed five more schools; two were scheduled to open in fall 2013 and three more in fall 2014. New York launched a Request for Proposal with plans to open 16 of these schools in fall 2014. Meanwhile IBM remained engaged at the federal level to help accelerate the replication through policy changes. This case explores the challenges and complications of replication.

    Keywords: leadership; social enterprise; partnerships; innovation; entrepreneurship; New York (city, NY); New York (state, US); Chicago; Idaho; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "IBM and the Reinvention of High School (B): Replicating & Scaling P-TECH and Partners." Harvard Business School Supplement 314-050, September 2013. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  13. IBM and the Reinvention of High School (A): Proving the P-TECH Concept

    IBM's Corporate Citizenship office created a social and organizational innovation in public education through a business-school partnership. IBM's Stanley Litow was the key architect in designing Pathways in Technology Early College High School, known as P-TECH. The open enrollment high school located in New York City's Brooklyn was launched in 2011 through a joint partnership between IBM, City University of New York (CUNY), and the New York City Department of Education (NYCDOE). The innovative design incorporated Career and Technical Education (CTE), STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), and early college. Students could graduate with an associate's degree (essentially two free years of college) and be "first in line" for jobs at IBM. The school was already seeing remarkable results; one third of the inaugural class entered P-TECH below grade level and nearly all students were promoted to the 10th grade and more than half of them took college courses before the end of their sophomore year. This case explores the motivation behind P-TECH (a growing skills gap), how it was developed along with the challenges, and the attention generated by the unique school design.

    Keywords: leadership; education; innovation; partnerships; Technology Industry; Education Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "IBM and the Reinvention of High School (A): Proving the P-TECH Concept." Harvard Business School Case 314-049, September 2013. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  14. Advanced Leadership Pathways: David Weinstein and Write the World

    David Weinstein, a lawyer and former Chief Administrative Officer of mutual fund giant Fidelity Investments, launched Write the World, a proprietary online platform that included a writing curriculum, essay prompts in distinct subject matter, and access to expert reviewers. By July 2013, Weinstein had completed his first writing competition in partnership with a school, where students submitted essays through Write the World. While Weinstein was eager to host future competitions, he also considered a number of other models to expand the program.

    Keywords: Technology Platform; Online Technology; Expansion; Social Entrepreneurship; Education; Business Startups; Giving and Philanthropy;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, Juliane Calingo Schwetz, and Patricia Bissett Higgins. "Advanced Leadership Pathways: David Weinstein and Write the World." Harvard Business School Case 314-030, September 2013. View Details
  15. Grupo ABC and Nizan Guanaes

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Grupo ABC and Nizan Guanaes." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 313-151, June 2013. View Details
  16. The Levees Repaired, a System Still Broken (A) and (B)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ai-Ling Malone. "The Levees Repaired, a System Still Broken (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 313-141, May 2013. View Details
  17. Milwaukee: Making of a World Water Hub (A) and (B) - (B9)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Milwaukee: Making of a World Water Hub (A) and (B) - (B9)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 313-140, May 2013. View Details
  18. Hillary Clinton & Partners: Leading Global Social Change from the U.S. State Department

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ai-Ling Malone. "Hillary Clinton & Partners: Leading Global Social Change from the U.S. State Department." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 313-145, April 2013. View Details
  19. Advanced Leadership Pathways: Gilberto Dimenstein Opens Connections in Brazil

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Advanced Leadership Pathways: Gilberto Dimenstein Opens Connections in Brazil ." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 313-128, April 2013. View Details
  20. Advanced Leadership Pathways: Gilberto Dimenstein Opens Connections in Brazil

    In 2011, Gilberto Dimenstein, a well-known Brazilian journalist, created a new model that connected disparate resources to revitalize Sao Paulo. He wanted his model to expand across Brazil and the world. Dimenstein covered many of the social issues facing Brazil as a journalist and became determined to create solutions. Dimenstein started two social ventures, ANDI and Escola Aprendiz, before creating and developing Catraca Livre (meaning "open turnstile" in Portuguese) while he was an Advanced Leadership fellow at Harvard. Dimenstein pursued his idea of "learning neighborhoods", which meant a localized, low cost and effective way to leverage the existing available resources as educational opportunities. The resources were underutilized because of a lack of awareness. He believed that education should not be limited to the classroom and instead should be expanded to the entire city. Catraca Livre enabled Sao Paulo's residents to utilize untapped resources by aggregating all of the available resources and disseminating the information through multiple avenues including a website, subways, restaurants, workplaces, and more. This case shows how Dimenstein spearheads his solution to improve his city and offers a model for revitalizing cities around the world.

    Keywords: leadership; social change; social entrepreneurship; Leadership; Social Enterprise; Social Entrepreneurship; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, Alexandre Naghirniac, and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Advanced Leadership Pathways: Gilberto Dimenstein Opens Connections in Brazil." Harvard Business School Case 313-116, April 2013. View Details
  21. Monique Leroux: Leading Change at Desjardins (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Monique Leroux: Leading Change at Desjardins (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 313-135, April 2013. View Details
  22. Grupo ABC and Nizan Guanaes's Path from Brazil to the World

    Internationally recognized Brazilian Nizan Guanaes, co-founder of Grupo ABC, a rapidly growing global advertising firm ranked 18th in 2011, had aspirations to be in the top 10 by 2015. Grupo ABC thrived by identifying national (Brazilian) challenges and incorporating them in creative messages. Guanaes steered the group toward thinking big while acting locally, tackling societal challenges and building partnerships, as he entered the world stage; serving as an informal ambassador for Brazil; playing important roles in international forums as the Clinton Global Initiative, UNESCO, and the Cannes Lions Advertising Festival. Guanaes needed to determine the best growth strategy, how to seize opportunities, and/or how to adapt to meet his ambitious goal.

    Keywords: management; global business; advertising agency; Opportunities; Globalized Firms and Management; Advertising; Global Strategy; Business Strategy; Advertising Industry; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, Gustavo Herrero, and Ricardo Reisen De Pinho. "Grupo ABC and Nizan Guanaes's Path from Brazil to the World." Harvard Business School Case 313-095, March 2013. View Details
  23. Monique Leroux: Leading Change at Desjardins

    Monique Leroux led a major transformation, overcoming resistance, at a large Canadian financial cooperative based in Quebec that competed with top Canadian banks. Leroux was elected in 2008 as Chairman, President, and CEO of Desjardins Group. In order to compete effectively in a demanding and changing financial services industry and survive the global financial crisis, Desjardins needed to integrate, consolidate, and determine how to preserve traditional values while preparing for the future and emerging as a less provincial financial group. In 2012 she reflected on the change efforts and the opportunities and challenges ahead.

    Keywords: change management; change barriers; leadership; women and leadership; Cooperatives; transformation; social enterprise; financial firms; communication; Communication strategy; Change Management; Transformation; Communication; Financial Services Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Monique Leroux: Leading Change at Desjardins." Harvard Business School Case 313-107, February 2013. (Revised April 2013.) View Details
  24. Hillary Clinton & Partners: Leading Global Social Change from the U.S. State Department

    As U.S. Secretary of State, Hillary Rodham Clinton acted on a long-standing interest in public-private partnerships to elevate and activate an Office of Global Partnerships reporting directly to her. One major initiative that also addressed her interest in women's empowerment was to create an alliance for clean cookstoves, a significant environmental and public health issue in developing countries. This case examines the change process within the State Department and across the federal government as well as the process of developing partnerships, and looks at what happens on the ground to deploy resources. It raises the question of whether the alliances are sustainable when Sec. Clinton leaves office.

    Keywords: leadership; collaboration; partnerships; global collaboration; innovation; Leadership; Leading Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ai-Ling Jamila Malone. "Hillary Clinton & Partners: Leading Global Social Change from the U.S. State Department." Harvard Business School Case 313-086, November 2012. View Details
  25. The Levees Repaired, a System Still Broken: Post Katrina Turnaround at the Orleans Public Defenders (B)

    Keywords: innovation; New Orleans;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Olivia Leskinen. "The Levees Repaired, a System Still Broken: Post Katrina Turnaround at the Orleans Public Defenders (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-027, November 2012. (Revised April 2013.) View Details
  26. The Levees Repaired, a System Still Broken: Post Katrina Turnaround at the Orleans Public Defenders (A)

    Law Professor Ronald Sullivan was asked to lead a turnaround of the Orleans Public Defenders as a one-year assignment following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The office was underfunded and had perverse incentives embedded throughout the system. Sullivan's new vision to rectify the challenges was not readily accepted by judges and lawyers who benefitted from the flawed system and put up resistance. The case follows Sullivan and his team in their efforts to bring about positive systemic change to the Orleans Public Defenders and at a minimum live up to the principles provided by the American Bar Association.

    Keywords: innovation; Management; New Orleans;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Olivia Leskinen. "The Levees Repaired, a System Still Broken: Post Katrina Turnaround at the Orleans Public Defenders (A)." Harvard Business School Case 313-026, November 2012. (Revised June 2013.) View Details
  27. Milwaukee (B9): Julia Taylor, President, Greater Milwaukee Committee

    Keywords: Management; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B9): Julia Taylor, President, Greater Milwaukee Committee." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-068, August 2012. (Revised May 2013.) View Details
  28. Milwaukee (B8): Richard Meeusen, CEO, Badger Meter and Co-chair, Water Council

    Keywords: Management; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B8): Richard Meeusen, CEO, Badger Meter and Co-chair, Water Council." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-067, August 2012. (Revised October 2012.) View Details
  29. Milwaukee (B7): Rocky Marcoux, Commissioner of City Development, City of Milwaukee

    Keywords: Management; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B7): Rocky Marcoux, Commissioner of City Development, City of Milwaukee." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-066, August 2012. View Details
  30. Milwaukee (B6): Michael Lovell, Chancellor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

    Keywords: Management; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B6): Michael Lovell, Chancellor, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-065, August 2012. View Details
  31. Milwaukee (B5): James Godsil, Co-Founder, Sweet Water Organics

    Keywords: Management; Change; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B5): James Godsil, Co-Founder, Sweet Water Organics." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-064, August 2012. View Details
  32. Milwaukee (B4): David Garman, Dean, School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

    Keywords: Management; Change; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B4): David Garman, Dean, School of Freshwater Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee." Harvard Business School Case 313-063, August 2012. View Details
  33. Milwaukee (B3): Paul Jones, CEO, A. O. Smith and Co-chair, Water Council

    Keywords: Management; Change; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B3): Paul Jones, CEO, A. O. Smith and Co-chair, Water Council." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-062, August 2012. (Revised October 2012.) View Details
  34. Milwaukee (B2): Thomas Barrett, Mayor of City of Milwaukee

    Keywords: Management; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B2): Thomas Barrett, Mayor of City of Milwaukee." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-061, August 2012. View Details
  35. Milwaukee (B1): Dean Amhaus, President, Water Council

    Keywords: Management; Change; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B1): Dean Amhaus, President, Water Council." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-060, August 2012. (Revised October 2012.) View Details
  36. Milwaukee (B): Civic Leaders

    Keywords: Change; Management; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (B): Civic Leaders." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-058, August 2012. (Revised May 2013.) View Details
  37. Milwaukee (A): Making of a World Water Hub

    Starting in 2007 Milwaukee leaders from different areas (large established companies, civic organizations, public sector, academia, and entrepreneurs) negotiated a path for converting the region into a global water hub to address economic and environmental concerns. The leaders with various stakes in the change managed to work together to re-arrange and support existing pieces to maximize the collective potential. Their actions exemplified "advanced leadership" in a complex social system such as a community or region. There was no central leader; instead there was a collection of coalitions and collaborative activities that contributed to the end result.

    Keywords: Change Management; Growth Management; Business or Company Management; Leading Change; Wisconsin;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Milwaukee (A): Making of a World Water Hub." Harvard Business School Case 313-057, August 2012. (Revised May 2013.) View Details
  38. Evergreen Natural Markets 2012

    Evergreen Natural Markets is a successful food retailer located in the Rocky Mountain region of the U.S. Having grown through acquisition, it has a reputation for improving the companies it purchases while retaining previous management. This strategy has succeeded due to the Evergreen formula of community knowledge, common core values, carefully developed control measures, and consistent operating principles. In April 2012, Evergreen makes its first purchase outside its home territory: a seven-store natural foods chain in Las Vegas, Nevada. CEO Kathleen Norton wonders whether the model will remain effective outside the Evergreen base or if this newest acquisition will seriously test her leadership skills and, in particular, her ability to swiftly convert the new chains’ managers, employees, and systems to the Evergreen way.

    Keywords: United States; operating systems; organizational culture; business processes; Acquisitions; strategy; human resource management; consolidations; retail trade; food; Food; Growth Management; Organizational Culture; Consolidation; Acquisition; Business Processes; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Las Vegas; Western United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Paul S. Myers. "Evergreen Natural Markets 2012." Harvard Business School Brief Case 124-450, May 2012. View Details
  39. Pierre Frankel in Moscow (A): Unfreezing Change

    A young and upcoming French executive in a global technology company is sent to Moscow as deputy managing director to turn around the Russia subsidiary. He must report to the subsidiary's managing director (a large reason for the organization's underperformance) and to corporate. In his first three months, he had taken steps to prepare the organization for change. Yet the lack of more tangible actions and results left him open to criticism from subsidiary employees and pressure from corporate executives. How could the young executive unfreeze the situation and get movement?

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Selection and Staffing; Change Management; Restructuring; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Moscow;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Pierre Frankel in Moscow (A): Unfreezing Change." Harvard Business School Case 312-070, December 2011. (Revised April 2012.) View Details
  40. Piramal e-Swasthya: Attempting Big Changes for Small Places - in India and Beyond

    Anand Piramal and his team sought to "democratize healthcare" in India through the development of a new service delivery model. If Henry Ford could build and deliver cars to everyone in the United States, Piramal thought, then why can't India deliver healthcare to the 70% of its citizens who lack access to it? They began pilots in 2008 but soon ran into unexpected difficulties. After a second round of pilots in early 2010, they had to decide whether to proceed and if so how.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Service Delivery; Business Model; Health Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Piramal e-Swasthya: Attempting Big Changes for Small Places - in India and Beyond." Harvard Business School Case 310-134, June 2010. (Revised May 2011.) View Details
  41. City Year: The Journey

    Throughout its first two decades, City Year, a non-profit organization, was dedicated to recruiting young adults to give a year of public service. It had passed through several growth phases but by 2010 a new challenge, and opportunity, had arisen when City Year and its partners in a school turnaround collaboration – Diplomas Now – won a prestigious Department of Education Investing in Innovation grant. This accelerated City Year's role in turning around low performing schools, but added pressure on the organization. New systems and practices had been developed, but more needed to be done to ensure that City Year became efficient in deploying its limited resources, in maintaining its funding sources, and employing the right interventions in schools. In November 2011, Jim Balfanz, City Year President, and Michael Brown, CEO and co-founder, wondered what else the changes would mean for City Year.

    Keywords: Education; Service Operations; Nonprofit Organizations; Growth and Development Strategy; Performance Efficiency; Resource Allocation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and James Weber. "City Year: The Journey." Harvard Business School Case 311-080, April 2011. (Revised May 2012.) View Details
  42. Piramal e-Swasthya: Attempting Big Changes for Small Places - in India and Beyond (TN)

    Teaching Note for 311132.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Nonprofit Organizations; Change; India;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Piramal e-Swasthya: Attempting Big Changes for Small Places - in India and Beyond (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 311-132, May 2011. View Details
  43. PepsiCo Peru Foods: More than Small Potatoes (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "PepsiCo Peru Foods: More than Small Potatoes (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-137, May 2012. View Details
  44. City Year: The Journey (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "City Year: The Journey (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-090, June 2012. View Details
  45. Pierre Frankel in Moscow (A): Unfreezing Change (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Pierre Frankel in Moscow (A): Unfreezing Change (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-085, June 2012. View Details
  46. Cynthia Hogan and the Birth of Novartis (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Cynthia Hogan and the Birth of Novartis (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-113, June 2012. View Details
  47. Gillette Company (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E ) (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Gillette Company (A), (B), (C), (D) and (E ) (TN) ." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-114, June 2012. View Details
  48. Pierre Frankel in Moscow (B): Plowing Ahead (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Pierre Frankel in Moscow (B): Plowing Ahead (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-086, June 2012. View Details
  49. Pierre Frankel in Moscow (C): Results (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Pierre Frankel in Moscow (C): Results (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-087, June 2012. View Details
  50. Transforming Verizon: A Platform for Change (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Transforming Verizon: A Platform for Change (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-099, March 2012. (Revised June 2012.) View Details
  51. Cancer Treatment Centers of America: Scaling the Mother Standard of Care (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Cancer Treatment Centers of America: Scaling the Mother Standard of Care (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-089, June 2012. View Details
  52. Transforming Verizon: A Platform for Change

    A new CEO steps into the shoes of his long-time predecessor who had created the U.S. telecommunications giant via a series of acquisitions and, before departing, had initiated the company's strategic repositioning. The new CEO reflected on Verizon's recent successes, some of which he led, and considered how to ensure the team would continue to rise to new challenges. He knew change was both energizing and difficult, and that every victory had to be followed by the next play. He paused in his New York City office to think about how his team had handled recent challenges and whether the culture was in place to continue Verizon's transformation from a traditional telecommunications provider to a global services and technology firm.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Globalized Firms and Management; Groups and Teams; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Transforming Verizon: A Platform for Change." Harvard Business School Case 312-082, December 2011. (Revised April 2012.) View Details
  53. PepsiCo Peru Foods: More than Small Potatoes

    The regional head of supply chain for PepsiCo South America Foods and his team had worked for 10 years to realize their dream of creating an agricultural research center in Peru that could provide more productive and healthier varieties of potatoes for the Frito-Lay businesses not only in Peru but also throughout the tropical regions where much of its future growth would come. They were denied several times but kept the idea alive through other projects until conditions presented themselves, aligning their work with the company's "Performance with Purpose" growth strategy. But now that they had secured initial funding for the center, the hard work would begin. Was the project too long-term to succeed? How could they ensure success as the company faced shorter-term pressures?

    Keywords: Food; Supply Chain; Planning; Growth and Development Strategy; Leading Change; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Peru;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Rakesh Khurana, Rajiv Lal, and Matthew Bird. "PepsiCo Peru Foods: More than Small Potatoes." Harvard Business School Case 311-083, February 2011. (Revised April 2012.) View Details
  54. PepsiCo, Performance with Purpose, Achieving the Right Global Balance

    Keywords: Corporate Strategy; Globalized Firms and Management; Strategic Planning; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, Rakesh Khurana, Rajiv Lal, and Eric Baldwin. "PepsiCo, Performance with Purpose, Achieving the Right Global Balance." Harvard Business School Case 412-079, October 2011. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  55. Pierre Frankel in Moscow (B): Plowing Ahead

    After several months into his turnaround of a global technology company's Russia subsidiary, a young and upcoming French executive reflected on how to institutionalize the subsidiary's transformation by further driving cultural change and breaking down internal silos. He realized that to complete the change he may need to continue into a second year. Yet the physical separation from his family had begun to take a toll. Had the executive done enough to institutionalize change or was it still too dependent on his personal relationships and the ability to build an internal coalition and exchange favors?

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Organizational Structure; Business Subsidiaries; Leadership; Manufacturing Industry; Russia;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Pierre Frankel in Moscow (B): Plowing Ahead." Harvard Business School Supplement 312-071, December 2011. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  56. Pierre Frankel in Moscow (C): Results

    After 18 months as the deputy managing director of a global technology company's Russia subsidiary, a young and upcoming French executive prepared to hand over leadership. The executive reflected on what he had achieved and how as he considered next steps. He wanted to return to his native France, but the company requested that he go turn around another emerging market subsidiary. Should he go to India, ask for another assignment, or look at other opportunities outside the company?

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry; Moscow;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Pierre Frankel in Moscow (C): Results." Harvard Business School Supplement 312-072, December 2011. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  57. Cancer Treatment Centers of America: Scaling the Mother Standard of Care

    The CEO of a private and growing national network of specialty care hospitals focusing on advanced-stage and complex cancer treatments reflected on the firm's past phase of growth before meeting with the company's Chairman and founder to discuss how to further scale what they called the Mother Standard of Care and, in the process, change the face of cancer care.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Business Growth and Maturation; Medical Specialties; Service Delivery; Innovation and Invention; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Cancer Treatment Centers of America: Scaling the Mother Standard of Care." Harvard Business School Case 312-073, December 2011. (Revised December 2011.) View Details
  58. IBM Values and Corporate Citizenship

    IBM's transformation into a globally integrated enterprise (GIE) began with a conviction about what should never change. Since its founding in 1911, the company operated under a set of principles articulated by founder Thomas Watson and became known for a strong culture and a commitment to fairness and social responsibility. As IBM entered its second century, it was appropriate to take a fresh look at its values while remaining unwavering in ethics, integrity, and-to use the twenty-first century word-the highest standards of corporate citizenship. All of this could be done with strategic use of IBM technology and innovation. Yet IBMers in a variety of businesses and geographies also wanted the company to do even more. Members of the fifth Integration and Values Team (IVT5) pondered this and other global citizenship possibilities, reviewing how people were developed and worked as the transition to the GIE was underway .

    Keywords: Values and Beliefs; Globalized Firms and Management; Technological Innovation; Leading Change; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Integration;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "IBM Values and Corporate Citizenship." Harvard Business School Case 308-106, March 2008. (Revised December 2011.) View Details
  59. IBM Values and Corporate Citizenship (TN)

    Teaching Note for [308106].

    Keywords: Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Transformation; Fairness; Innovation and Invention; Value; Global Range; Organizational Culture; Information Technology Industry; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "IBM Values and Corporate Citizenship (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-007, September 2009. (Revised December 2011.) View Details
  60. PepsiCo India: Performance with Purpose

    In 2010, PepsiCo India's management is working to translate PepsiCo's new mission, "Performance with Purpose," into practice in the India market. The mission calls for continued financial performance and market leadership, as well as greater emphasis on healthy products, natural resource management, and employee empowerment. PepsiCo India and other regional PepsiCo business units have significant discretion over how to implement Performance with Purpose in their local markets. PepsiCo India has made progress under the mission but continues to be challenged by the inherent tension between short-term financial performance and long-term investments in socially responsible initiatives.

    Keywords: Corporate Strategy; Mission and Purpose; Food and Beverage Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Rakesh Khurana, Rajiv Lal, and Natalie Kindred. "PepsiCo India: Performance with Purpose." Harvard Business School Case 512-041, December 2011. View Details
  61. The Change Wheel: Elements of Systemic Change and How to Get Change Rolling

    Keywords: Change Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss. "The Change Wheel: Elements of Systemic Change and How to Get Change Rolling." Harvard Business School Background Note 312-083, November 2011. View Details
  62. Gillette Singapore: Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground (A)

    The general manager of Gillette Singapore faces issues of managing change during the company's global integration with Parker Pen.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Change Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Integration; Retail Industry; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Thomas Dretler. "Gillette Singapore: Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground (A)." Harvard Business School Case 897-102, March 1997. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  63. Gillette Singapore: Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Change Management; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Problems and Challenges; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Thomas Dretler. "Gillette Singapore: Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 897-116, March 1997. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  64. Gillette Singapore: Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Globalization; Integration; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Thomas Dretler. "Gillette Singapore: Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 897-117, March 1997. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  65. Advanced Leadership Note: An Institutional Perspective and Framework for Managing and Leading

    Large-scale societal issues increasingly appear on the agenda of business leaders, including poverty, health, education, business-government relations, and the degradation of the environment. These problems are not entirely new, but the forces of globalization and the economic crisis have made them more visible and increase their urgency. They share several characteristics that signal the need for new kinds of societal leadership and academic scholarship. From the perspective of leadership, one common characteristic of these global problems is that they include both technical and political components. The political context surrounding any problem must be understood and managed, and a variety of institutions across sectors must be mobilized before technical solutions can be applied. Along similar lines, technical knowledge of solutions alone is not enough to scale successful demonstration projects that address these complex problems. That step involves resources and skills centered on forging appropriate systemic connections to effectively distribute solutions. Thus, these challenges cannot be dealt with by one profession or institution acting alone; indeed, effective action most often occurs at the intersections of professional and institutional fields. Holistic solutions, however, can be difficult to implement because of the complex interactions (or failures to interact) among many participants who deal with just one piece of an issue. Finally, solutions to these problems require concurrent actions at several system levels and/or among many stakeholders. This means that social capital as well as financial capital is required to forge relationships, influence opinion leaders and gatekeepers, and ensure cultural appropriateness. This note incorporates these concepts under the rubric of institutional leadership. This introductory note covers the following: (1) key dimensions of the institutional environment surrounding organizations, including the role of stakeholders and the need for new collaborations in creating new markets and solving critical societal problems; (2) the core assumptions of the institutional perspective on organizations and markets, especially in contrast to assumptions of neoclassical economics; and (3) managerial implications—analytics, skills, and success factors.

    Keywords: Change Management; Framework; Global Range; Leadership; Business and Stakeholder Relations; Social Enterprise; Social Issues; Complexity;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Rakesh Khurana. "Advanced Leadership Note: An Institutional Perspective and Framework for Managing and Leading." Harvard Business School Background Note 410-076, January 2010. (Revised August 2010.) View Details
  66. IBM: The Corporate Service Corps

    Describes the conception, development, and implementation of the Corporate Services Corps (CSC), an international community service assignment for high-potential IBM employees. The year 2008 was the pilot year of the CSC program, and 100 of IBM's best global employees were deployed to work for local partners, frequently non-governmental organizations (NGOs), in locations such as Ghana, Tanzania, Romania, Philippines, and Vietnam. The case provides data for students to assess the first year of operation and recommend what changes IBM should make to the program moving forward. Also considered is how the CSC fits into IBM's broader corporate citizenship portfolio and IBM's globalization strategy.

    Keywords: Developing Countries and Economies; Global Strategy; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Mission and Purpose; Organizational Structure; Partners and Partnerships; Non-Governmental Organizations;

    Citation:

    Marquis, Christopher, and Rosabeth M. Kanter. "IBM: The Corporate Service Corps." Harvard Business School Case 409-106, March 2009. (Revised July 2010.) View Details
  67. Akin Ongor's Journey (TN)

    Teaching Note for [306072].

    Keywords: Education Industry; Turkey; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Akin Ongor's Journey (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-067, January 2010. View Details
  68. Diageo and East African Breweries Ltd.: Tapping New Markets for Social Good

    James Musyoki, Lemmy Mutahi, and Ken Kariuki, all from East African Breweries Limited (EABL), a subsidiary of London-based Diageo, heard the disheartening news in the first week of December 2008. For the second time in six months, the Kenyan Finance Ministry had raised excise taxes on alcoholic beverages in an effort to plug the country's budget deficit; the bill was awaiting the President's signature. The price increase would put EABL's Allsops, Citizen, and President Beers out of the reach of their target markets, and Musyoki, Kariuki, and Mutahi hoped that the increase would not affect the excise-exempt Senator Keg lager - a lower-income brew which had created significant social and economic gains in Kenya since its launch in 2004. What would it take to save Senator Beer?

    Keywords: Change Management; Innovation and Management; Emerging Markets; Taxation; Price; Food and Beverage Industry; Kenya; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Diageo and East African Breweries Ltd.: Tapping New Markets for Social Good." Harvard Business School Case 310-010, July 2009. (Revised December 2009.) View Details
  69. Diageo and East African Breweries Ltd.: Tapping New Markets for Social Good (TN)

    Teaching Note for [310010].

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry; Kenya; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Diageo and East African Breweries Ltd.: Tapping New Markets for Social Good (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-020, December 2009. View Details
  70. IBM in the 21st Century: The Coming of the Globally Integrated Enterprise

    Members of IBM's fifth Integration and Values Team (IVT5) were close to finishing their deliberations. Convened by Sam Palmisano, Chairman and CEO, and sponsored by Jon Iwata, Senior VP of Corporate Communications and Marketing, and John E. Kelly III, Senior VP and Director of Research, the IVT5's focus was on "the global IBMer"—define and develop global leaders; make the "globally integrated enterprise" relevant to all employees through corporate citizenship initiatives reflective of the company's values; and help IBM compete globally by ensuring market access. The scope was all 170 countries in which IBM operated. As leaders who had risen to their positions as systems thinkers committed to innovation, the team knew it was necessary to stand back and look at the big picture—to see how IBM worked now and operate at its best in order to understand the gaps, dilemmas, and opportunities.

    Keywords: Global Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Innovation and Management; Leadership Development; Management Teams; Organizational Culture; Integration;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "IBM in the 21st Century: The Coming of the Globally Integrated Enterprise." Harvard Business School Case 308-105, March 2008. (Revised October 2009.) View Details
  71. IBM in the 21st Century: The Coming of the Globally Integrated Enterprise (TN)

    Teaching Note for [308105].

    Keywords: Opportunities; Value; Competition; System; Innovation and Invention; Multinational Firms and Management; Leadership Development; Information Technology Industry; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "IBM in the 21st Century: The Coming of the Globally Integrated Enterprise (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-006, September 2009. View Details
  72. CEMEX (A): Building the Global Framework (1985-2004)

    CEMEX grew through acquisitions from a Latin American to a global company under the leadership of a CEO who believed in the importance of a "one enterprise" culture and benchmarking against world standards. As the CEO ponders an acquisition that would double the company's size and take it to new geographies, he wonders if the right capabilities are in place for what should be changed to manage the integration process effectively.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Competency and Skills; Globalized Firms and Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Integration; Latin America;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Pamela Yatsko, and Ryan Raffaelli. "CEMEX (A): Building the Global Framework (1985-2004)." Harvard Business School Case 308-022, July 2007. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  73. CEMEX (B): Cementing Relationships (2004-2007)

    Keywords: Relationships;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Pamela Yatsko, and Ryan Raffaelli. "CEMEX (B): Cementing Relationships (2004-2007)." Harvard Business School Supplement 308-023, July 2007. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  74. CEMEX's Foundations for Sustainability

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Competitive Strategy; Change Management; Emerging Markets; Construction Industry; Mexico; Egypt; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Pamela Yatsko, and Ryan Raffaelli. "CEMEX's Foundations for Sustainability." Harvard Business School Case 308-024, July 2007. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  75. IBM's Dynamic Workplace

    IBM already competed for talent by being a best workplace. It was one of the first companies to provide paid vacations, health insurance, sick leave, job sharing, and domestic partner benefits. Its human resources portfolio included a full array of progressive policies and programs. There was increasing flexibility in how people were employed, including alumni. But in its quest to become a globally integrated enterprise, IBM needed to continue to develop new ways of working. The company's response to the Asian Tsunami showed it at its best-values-driven, self-organizing, able to move at lightning speed connecting global and local resources. This was the kind of global leadership and citizenship the fifth Integration and Values Team (IVT5) was charged with enhancing. But how could IBM provide a tsunami-relief-like experience to everyone, without a disaster?

    Keywords: Values and Beliefs; Globalized Firms and Management; Leading Change; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Organizational Culture; Social Enterprise;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "IBM's Dynamic Workplace." Harvard Business School Case 308-107, May 2008. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  76. Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (A): Becoming Truly Global

    Since the 1980s, Procter & Gamble had leveraged its purpose, values, and principles (PVP) to create a global company. When P&G faced difficult times in 2000, the new CEO, A.G. Lafley, leveraged the PVP to drive P&G's turnaround, integrate global operations, and guide decision making in all facets of the business. But the Gillette acquisition posed a new challenge.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Values and Beliefs; Globalized Firms and Management; Leading Change; Growth Management; Mission and Purpose; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (A): Becoming Truly Global." Harvard Business School Case 309-030, October 2008. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  77. Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (B): Welcoming Gillette

    A.G. Lafley and P&G leaders decided to approach the Gillette integration differently from previous mergers. Using P&G's purpose, values, and principles (PVP) it treated the acquisition as a merger that sought to take the "best of both" from each company. In the integration's first phase, prior to the change of control, the strategy achieved successes while creating some unexpected challenges. How should the integration leaders address these challenges moving forward?

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Change Management; Decision Choices and Conditions; Management Skills; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Integration;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (B): Welcoming Gillette." Harvard Business School Supplement 309-031, October 2008. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  78. Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (C): Integrating Gillette

    P&G had used its purpose, values, and principles (PVP) to prepare for the physical integration of Gillette prior to the change of control. The execution of these plans posed numerous challenges in global business units as well as in individual country organizations. While managers sought to maintain business momentum during the transition, corporate leaders were intent on continuing to use Gillette as a catalyst of change.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Change Management; Globalized Firms and Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Conflict and Resolution; Business Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Integration;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (C): Integrating Gillette." Harvard Business School Supplement 309-032, October 2008. (Revised September 2009.) View Details
  79. Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (A): Becoming Truly Global (TN)

    Teaching Note for [309030].

    Keywords: Mission and Purpose; Value; Multinational Firms and Management; Change Management; Mergers and Acquisitions; Problems and Challenges; Decision Making; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (A): Becoming Truly Global (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-009, August 2009. View Details
  80. Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (C): Integrating Gillette (TN)

    Teaching Note for [309032].

    Keywords: Integration; Mission and Purpose; Value; Problems and Challenges; Transition; Business Units; Governance Controls; Multinational Firms and Management; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (C): Integrating Gillette (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-019, August 2009. View Details
  81. Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (B): Welcoming Gillette (TN)

    Teaching Note for [309031].

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Mergers and Acquisitions; Mission and Purpose; Value; Problems and Challenges; Integration; Success; Governance Controls; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (B): Welcoming Gillette (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-018, August 2009. View Details
  82. Dr. Benjamin Hooks and Children's Health Forum

    "Dr. Benjamin Hooks and Children's Health Forum" charts the many different career paths of Hooks, a civil rights activist and pioneer. Hooks' positions ranged from lawyer, judge, preacher, entrepreneur to the first African American commissioner of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and to the head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to the co-founder of the non-profit Children's Health Forum (CHF). CHF's mission was to eradicate lead poisoning in children in the United States. The case provides an overview of lead poisoning in the U.S., including how it is measured, its causes, and legislation enacted to prevent it. The case asks students to reflect on Hooks' leadership choices and his decision to launch CHF. How would they assess Hooks as a leader? What made him a strong leader? Given Hooks' past experiences, do they think that Hooks made the right decision to focus on lead poisoning after leaving the NAACP? Is this an area where he could have the most impact?

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Health Care and Treatment; Leadership; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Personal Development and Career; Nonprofit Organizations; Social Issues;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Charles J. Ogletree Jr, Abbye Atkinson, Carmel Salhi, and Aldo Sesia. "Dr. Benjamin Hooks and Children's Health Forum." Harvard Business School Case 309-111, April 2009. (Revised June 2009.) View Details
  83. Procter & Gamble Brazil (TN) (A) and (B)

    Teaching Note for [308081] and [308083].

    Keywords: Consumer Products Industry; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble Brazil (TN) (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 308-098, February 2008. (Revised March 2009.) View Details
  84. Publicis Groupe 2009: Toward a Digital Transformation

    After a series of acquisitions, Maurice Levy, the Chairman and CEO of Publicis Groupe, had created the fourth largest marketing and communications company in the world. His next major challenge was managing the firm's digital transformation. In December 2006, the company acquired Boston-based Digitas, a leading digital agency headed by David Kenny. After the initial merger, which included the unbundling of Digitas capabilities and the global expansion of its agency network, Publicis Groupe launched VivaKi, a new company-wide digital platform, to spearhead the firm's total transformation. But since the June 2008 launch, the global economy had taken a turn for the worse. Could Levy, Kenny, and other leaders change the holding company quickly and effectively enough to make the new model work?

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Transformation; Financial Crisis; Globalized Firms and Management; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Expansion; Information Technology; Advertising Industry; Communications Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Publicis Groupe 2009: Toward a Digital Transformation." Harvard Business School Case 309-085, February 2009. (Revised March 2009.) View Details
  85. Publicis Groupe 2009: Toward a Digital Transformation (TN)

    Teaching Note for [309085].

    Keywords: Transition; Mergers and Acquisitions; Problems and Challenges; Globalization; Expansion; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Business Model; Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Publicis Groupe 2009: Toward a Digital Transformation (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 309-099, March 2009. View Details
  86. Omron: Sensing Society

    "Leading profitable growth is only part of the goal. We cannot live without breathing, but we do not live in order to take a breath,” said Omron's President and CEO, Hisao Sakuta, in 2008. Omron, a $7B global supplier of sensors, control system components, advanced electronics, and related services, had thrived on its ability to spot social needs and innovate. By May 10, 2008 (Omron's 75th Anniversary), Sakuta had led Omron out of a difficult time and into 6 years of consistently strong results, on the foundation of Omron's unique, socially-focused values: "At work for a better life, a better world for all." His goal now was “continuing to lead profitable, globally-distributed growth” in spite of major shifts in Omron's markets: from components to systems; from products to solutions; from standardized to ‘mass customized' products; from longer-cycle to shorter-cycle technologies; from home-country dominated innovation to distributed innovation mediated by the center; and from ‘quality' meaning producing a quality input for the next step of the value chain to being held responsible for the quality of the final product (end-to-end responsibility). In each case, management believed customers no longer felt that they were just buying a product. Rather, they were buying expectations of Omron's commitment to solving their problems. In part, they were buying Omron's philosophy. And, Sakuta reflected, “As the company grows larger with a larger number of employees on a global scale, people tend to have more tenuous recognition of who Omron is or why Omron exists.” On Omron's 75th anniversary, Sakuta celebrated Omron's past, but also recognized that successfully addressing Omron's next challenges involved a further journey along Omron's current path of change. How could Omron maintain the core Principles of the past while making them applicable to the glob

    Keywords: Change Management; Transformation; Competitive Advantage; Leadership; Goals and Objectives; Globalized Firms and Management; Innovation and Invention; Values and Beliefs; Mission and Purpose; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ethan S Bernstein. "Omron: Sensing Society." Harvard Business School Case 309-066, November 2008. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  87. Publicis Groupe: Leading Creative Acquisitions

    The CEO of a French-based advertising agency network led a series of high-profile acquisitions that created the world's 4th largest global communications company, after a failed strategic alliance taught him lessons about leadership and business relationships.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Leadership; Management Succession; Partners and Partnerships; Cooperation; Integration; France;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ryan Raffaelli. "Publicis Groupe: Leading Creative Acquisitions." Harvard Business School Case 506-010, November 2005. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  88. Publicis Groupe: Leading Creative Acquisitions (TN)

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ryan Leo Raffaelli. "Publicis Groupe: Leading Creative Acquisitions (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 506-066, May 2006. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  89. Gillette Company (E): Procter & Gamble

    After arriving in 2001 as the first outsider Chairman and CEO in Gillette history, Jim Kilts led a remarkable turnaround. But by late 2004 he had to make a difficult decision. To better position the 104-year-old, Boston-based company, he opted to sell it to Cincinnati-based Procter & Gamble. How should Kilts lead the transition?

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Decision Choices and Conditions; Leading Change; Growth and Development Strategy; Managerial Roles; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Gillette Company (E): Procter & Gamble." Harvard Business School Supplement 309-033, October 2008. (Revised December 2008.) View Details
  90. Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (B): Welcoming Gillette (Abridged)

    A.G. Lafley and P&G leaders decided to approach the Gillette integration differently from previous mergers. Using P&G's purpose, values, and principles (PVP) it treated the acquisition as a merger which sought to take the "best of both" from each company. In the integration's first phase, prior to the change of control, the strategy achieved successes while creating some unexpected challenges. How should the integration leaders address these challenges moving forward?

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Integration; Mission and Purpose; Values and Beliefs; Change Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble in the 21st Century (B): Welcoming Gillette (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Supplement 309-084, December 2008. View Details
  91. Banco Real: Banking on Sustainability (TN)

    Keywords: Investment Funds; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ryan Leo Raffaelli. "Banco Real: Banking on Sustainability (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 306-067, February 2006. (Revised November 2008.) View Details
  92. Banco Real: Banking on Sustainability

    ABN AMRO REAL made corporate social responsibility central to its brand, adding to customer focus and reflecting its values. Leaders developed the Bank of Value theme and implemented it through activities such as microfinance in poor communities, environmentally oriented lending products, socio-environmental screening of customers and suppliers, employee diversity, and reduction of waste and recycling. Now the fourth largest private bank in Brazil, its top leaders are assessing the first four years and wondering what to do next, as competitors adopt similar practices, reducing its competitive advantage, and as it wants to ensure its impact on social change in a country with daunting social problems.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ricardo Reisen de Pinho. "Banco Real: Banking on Sustainability." Harvard Business School Case 305-100, April 2005. (Revised November 2008.) View Details
  93. Shinhan Financial Group (A)

    Mr. Young Hwi Choi, president and CEO of Shinhan Financial Group, embarked on an unconventional post-merger integration strategy with recently acquired Chohung Bank. The strategy focused on integrating traditional operations while attending to employees' reactions to change, especially the unionized workers at Chohung, an older bank that had recently fallen into decline, compared with the success of younger, more entrepreneurial Shinhan Bank. Once complete, the new bank would make Shinhan Financial Group the second largest bank in South Korea. Managing change involved a period called "dual bank" in which Shinhan and Chohung operated in parallel while undergoing an "emotional integration."

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Change Management; Employees; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Emotions; Integration; South Korea;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ryan Raffaelli. "Shinhan Financial Group (A)." Harvard Business School Case 305-075, February 2005. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  94. Innovation at Timberland: Thinking Outside the Shoe Box (TN)

    Teaching Note for [306064].

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Organizational Culture; Sales; Customer Value and Value Chain; Brands and Branding; Expansion; Growth and Development Strategy; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Innovation at Timberland: Thinking Outside the Shoe Box (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 308-099, February 2008. View Details
  95. Shinhan Financial Group (A) (TN)

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ryan Leo Raffaelli. "Shinhan Financial Group (A) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 306-024, November 2005. (Revised February 2008.) View Details
  96. Innovation at Timberland: Thinking Outside the Shoe Box

    Innovation was linked to Timberland's heritage. In 2005, CEO Jeff Swartz and COO Ken Pucker hoped the Invention Factory, an advanced concept lab, would develop new breakthrough products and reinvigorate the company's culture of innovation. Since the 1960s, Timberland had relied on innovation, developing the world's first waterproof boot and, in the 1980s, category-defining boat shoes and day hiking boots. Creating variations of these core products, along with expansion into apparel, had sustained Timberland's business for more than 30 years. Timberland's growth in the past six years was due to increased international sales and new customer segments. As Timberland's leaders looked to the future, they hoped Doug Clark, a biomechanist, and his Invention Factory team would bring a scientific approach toward building the next generation of Timberland products and ideas. The team had to convince those in the mainstream business to accept their new ideas and integrate them back into the product line.

    Keywords: Innovation and Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Product Development; Organizational Culture; Science-Based Business;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ryan Raffaelli. "Innovation at Timberland: Thinking Outside the Shoe Box." Harvard Business School Case 306-064, January 2006. (Revised February 2008.) View Details
  97. Shinhan Financial Group (B)

    By 2007, there were many signs that the merger of Chohung and Shinhan banks to form the Shinhan Financial Group in 2003 had met its goals. Shinhan Financial Group's stock price had increased from $31 a share at its opening on the New York Stock Exchange in September 2003, soon after the merger had been announced, to $91 in April 2006 after the legal merger occurred. Employees were also exhibiting increasing identification with the new bank. Looking into the future, the financial group hopes to expand overseas. In addition to pursuing opportunities in regional Asian markets, European and former Soviet markets as well as the large Korean immigrant community in the United States provide valuable expansion possibilities. The successful Chohung merger was an important first step in Shinhan's plans to become a global player in the financial services industry.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Global Strategy; Expansion; Markets; Strategic Planning; South Korea;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew J. Morgan. "Shinhan Financial Group (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 308-095, February 2008. View Details
  98. Procter & Gamble Brazil (A): 2 1/2 Turnarounds

    Juliana Azevedo Schahin, a local marketing director for Procter & Gamble in Sao Paulo, had worked closely with Tarek Fahahat, a regional executive based in Caracas, to solve the growth and profitability problems of P&G Brazil. They did so through the creation of lower-cost versions of two premium products which reached BOP (bottom of the pyramid) consumers--an approach not considered then as a company strategy. The case follows Azevedo and Farahat through their steps in helping to conceive the change, sell it to senior management, and implement it. The true test comes when the subsidiary wants to extend the model to its third and largest category, laundry care, which had also struggled. But Azevedo did not oversee that business in Brazil, and Farahat worked in another category in Caracas. Her country colleagues go to her to learn more about the success of the first two products. Now the question is whether this is a one-time wonder or an innovation that should be diffused to other products and geographies.

    Keywords: Innovation and Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Brands and Branding; Demand and Consumers; Product Development; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Expansion; Consumer Products Industry; Caracas;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble Brazil (A): 2 1/2 Turnarounds." Harvard Business School Case 308-081, January 2008. View Details
  99. Procter & Gamble Brazil (B): Turning to Success

    Supplements with the (A) Case.

    Keywords: Change Management; Competency and Skills; Consumer Products Industry; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss, and Matthew Bird. "Procter & Gamble Brazil (B): Turning to Success." Harvard Business School Supplement 308-083, January 2008. View Details
  100. Still Leading (A): Issues in Transitioning to New Forms of Service Later in Life

    Identifies the challenges for experienced leaders who transition from their primary income-earning careers to a next phase of public service or social-purpose work, based on interviews and published sources.

    Keywords: Leadership Development; Personal Development and Career; Transition; Social Entrepreneurship; Social Enterprise; Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (A): Issues in Transitioning to New Forms of Service Later in Life." Harvard Business School Case 308-047, September 2007. (Revised September 2007.) View Details
  101. Still Leading (B1): Hon. Michael Bloomberg - From Mogul to Mayor

    Describes how New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg took his leadership skills from the business world to the challenges of government.

    Keywords: Leadership; Leading Change; Personal Development and Career; Government and Politics; Transformation; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B1): Hon. Michael Bloomberg - From Mogul to Mayor." Harvard Business School Case 308-043, September 2007. View Details
  102. Still Leading (B2): Colonel Robert Gordon: New Service, New Sector

    Describes how Colonel Gordon made the transition from military officer to an executive in a small nonprofit dedicated to young people in civilian national service.

    Keywords: Leading Change; Nonprofit Organizations; Employment; Transition; Personal Development and Career; Transformation; National Security; Real Estate Industry; Construction Industry; Miami;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B2): Colonel Robert Gordon: New Service, New Sector." Harvard Business School Case 308-039, September 2007. View Details
  103. Still Leading (B3): Gerry House - Impact of a Different Scale

    Describes how Gerry House made the transition from head of a large school district to leader of a small nonprofit.

    Keywords: Transition; Teaching; Secondary Education; Leading Change; Nonprofit Organizations; Transformation; Personal Development and Career; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B3): Gerry House - Impact of a Different Scale." Harvard Business School Case 308-038, September 2007. View Details
  104. Still Leading (B4): Lee Iacocca - Driving Impact

    Lee Iacocca, a successful CEO of an auto company, devoted himself after retirement to several social causes. Describes issues in the transition.

    Keywords: Transition; Transformation; Retirement; Work-Life Balance; Problems and Challenges; Civil Society or Community; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B4): Lee Iacocca - Driving Impact." Harvard Business School Case 308-046, September 2007. View Details
  105. Still Leading (B5): General Claudia Kennedy - In Command of Life

    Describes the transition issues for General Kennedy after she left the army and tried to apply her leadership to social causes.

    Keywords: Transition; Problems and Challenges; Social Issues; Personal Development and Career; Leadership; Public Administration Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B5): General Claudia Kennedy - In Command of Life." Harvard Business School Case 308-037, September 2007. View Details
  106. Still Leading (B6): Sherry Lansing - Producing Social Change

    Sherry Lansing, head of a Hollywood studio, left to start a foundation. Describes the issues in her transition.

    Keywords: Transition; Problems and Challenges; Personal Development and Career; Nonprofit Organizations; Motion Pictures and Video Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B6): Sherry Lansing - Producing Social Change." Harvard Business School Case 308-036, September 2007. View Details
  107. Still Leading (B7): Dr. Evelyn Murphy - The Next Campaign

    Describes how a former public official became an advocate who started a nonprofit organization after losing her campaign for governor.

    Keywords: Government and Politics; Personal Development and Career; Nonprofit Organizations;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B7): Dr. Evelyn Murphy - The Next Campaign." Harvard Business School Case 308-040, September 2007. View Details
  108. Still Leading (B8): Paul Newman - Newman's Own Script

    Well known actor Paul Newman started a business to give profits to charity. Summarizes his experience in making the transition from one kind of leadership to another.

    Keywords: Transition; Giving and Philanthropy; Social Entrepreneurship; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B8): Paul Newman - Newman's Own Script." Harvard Business School Case 308-045, September 2007. View Details
  109. Still Leading (B9): Hon. Colin Powell - A Portfolio for Powerful Impact

    Describes the post-career leadership issues for former General and Secretary of State Colin Powell.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Transition; Public Administration Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Lance P. Pierce. "Still Leading (B9): Hon. Colin Powell - A Portfolio for Powerful Impact." Harvard Business School Case 308-041, September 2007. View Details
  110. ABN AMRO Bank N.V.: Global Change Agents

    ABN AMRO Global Banking Group developed its risk management function in response to expansion, and increasingly focused on environmental and social risks. The head of the function needed to influence policies and business decisions in a highly decentralized context in which major country business units such as Brazil, India, and the United States operated relatively independently. Highlights the history of environmental and social responsibility at the bank, links to business performance, and the leadership skills required for a corporate staff head to influence change.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Banks and Banking; Expansion; Change; Governing and Advisory Boards; Social Enterprise; Leadership Development; History; Banking Industry; Service Industry; Brazil; India; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Lance P. Pierce, and Ryan Leo Raffaelli. "ABN AMRO Bank N.V.: Global Change Agents." Harvard Business School Case 307-050, April 2007. View Details
  111. Akin Ongor's Journey

    A retired bank CEO, one of Turkey's most admired leaders, wants to start a leadership institute to develop emerging leaders in the eastern Mediterranean region. Describes his biography and values, the models he established for excellent financial performance and corporate social and environmental responsibility at the bank, and his attempt to partner with an American university to establish the institute. His first approach did not work; what should he do now?

    Keywords: Leadership Development; Values and Beliefs; Partners and Partnerships; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Business Startups; Environmental Sustainability; Retirement; Education Industry; Turkey; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Akin Ongor's Journey." Harvard Business School Case 306-072, January 2006. (Revised May 2006.) View Details
  112. "The Case of Leadership Inertia"

    The CEO of an international bank has raised the bank's performance by emphasizing a new culture of leadership that empowers people at all levels. Managers are rated both on their business results and their leadership--how they model new behaviors--but 12 senior managers with good business results have yet to embrace the new culture. The CEO is concerned that their inertia will undermine the culture change, especially as the bank is about to consummate a major merger and a new strategic alliance. He solicits proposals from three consultancies with different approaches to change to determine which might help him solve the problem presented by the 12 laggards. A fictional case based on real situations.

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Leadership Style; Leading Change; Performance Evaluation; Employee Relationship Management;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. The Case of Leadership Inertia"." Harvard Business School Case 303-125, April 2006. View Details
  113. Medical Innovation Beyond MedStar: Mobilizing for National Impact

    Dr. Craig Feied, director of MedStar Health's Medical Informatics programs, wanted his innovations to influence national health care. Since joining Washington Hospital Center's Emergency Department in 1995 with Dr. Mark Smith, their information system had become the world's largest real-time data system. The September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the Pentagon had highlighted the system's potential national impact, garnering attention from senior White House officials. Now Feied had to ask several questions about how he could effect an even bigger change: What organization vehicle should the use to manage his innovations? How can he take the projects to scale beyond MedStar? Taking the system to scale would require finding a new path involving a complex matrix of parties involved in medicine, government, and the private sector.

    Keywords: Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Innovation Strategy; Technological Innovation; Policy; Government and Politics; Innovation and Management; Projects; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Health Industry; Washington (state, US);

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Ryan Leo Raffaelli, and Michelle Heskett. "Medical Innovation Beyond MedStar: Mobilizing for National Impact." Harvard Business School Case 306-096, April 2006. View Details
  114. First Community Bank (A)

    First Community Bank, a bank-within-a-bank at Bank of Boston, was established in 1990 as a unique venture to serve urban communities. By 1995 it has achieved profitability but must manage relationships with the mainstream at Bank of Boston, serve as a change agent and role model, and face the challenge of reexamining its mission and structure.

    Keywords: Banks and Banking; Business Ventures; Business and Community Relations; Agency Theory; Change Management; Leadership; Balanced Scorecard; Mission and Purpose; Organizational Structure; Problems and Challenges; Banking Industry; Boston;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "First Community Bank (A)." Harvard Business School Case 396-202, January 1996. (Revised December 2005.) View Details
  115. Garanti Bank: Transformation in Turkey

    Discusses the complete transformation and turnover in every division of Garanti Bank. Describes the multiple change projects managed and cross-cultural issues confronted during the 1990s and the organizational challenge of transforming Garanti Bank into one of Turkey's premier financial institutions.

    Keywords: Banks and Banking; Private Ownership; Restructuring; Business Divisions; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Culture; Change Management; Expansion; Corporate Strategy; Problems and Challenges; Projects; Banking Industry; Financial Services Industry; Turkey;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Maximilian Martin, and Daniel Galvin. "Garanti Bank: Transformation in Turkey." Harvard Business School Case 300-114, April 2000. (Revised December 2005.) View Details
  116. Leadership for Change: Enduring Skills for Change Masters

    Leaders use seven leadership skills in conceiving and managing change projects, whether innovations in established organizations, culture and process changes, or entrepreneurial ventures for industry or social change. The skills leaders need are different at various phases of change projects. Offers details and also discusses the rhythm of change and resistance to change. Supported by examples drawn from empirical research.

    Keywords: Change Management; Leading Change;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Leadership for Change: Enduring Skills for Change Masters." Harvard Business School Background Note 304-062, November 2003. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  117. British Broadcasting Corporation (A): One BBC

    Greg Dyke, the new director general of the British Broadcasting Corp. (BBC) must decide whether to extend an already ambitious change effort at the world's largest public service broadcaster. The initial results of the effort are very positive: audience numbers are up, overhead costs are significantly reduced, and the organization has reduced management layers to bring the BBC closer to its viewers. However, employees say they do not feel their views are heard and feel that there is little cooperation between members of different divisions. Dyke wonders what more, if anything, can be done to address these other problems and unlock the unrealized creative potential he feels exists within the BBC. As the leader of an organization with a public service mandate but private sector competition, what can Dyke do to boost morale and creativity while satisfying his multiple constituencies?

    Keywords: Change Management; Media; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Leadership Development; Competition; Creativity; Relationships; Media and Broadcasting Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Douglas A Raymond. "British Broadcasting Corporation (A): One BBC." Harvard Business School Case 303-075, February 2003. (Revised July 2005.) View Details
  118. British Broadcasting Corporation (B): Making it Happen

    Greg Dyke, the new director general of the British Broadcasting Corp. (BBC), has launched an ambitious change program, called Making It Happen, with the objective of unlocking creativity, building a sense of common purpose, and encouraging collaboration throughout the BBC. Using unorthodox techniques, management has created a massively collaborative process that has overcome much of the natural skepticism within the organization and allowed the employees of the BBC to create a shared set of objectives for the change effort. After 10 months, employees feel that things are changing and that the culture of the BBC has improved. However, there are signs of change fatigue and Dyke must decide how much further to go while ensuring that the gains that have been made will not be lost.

    Keywords: Change Management; Media; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Leadership Development; Competition; Creativity; Relationships; Media and Broadcasting Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Douglas A Raymond. "British Broadcasting Corporation (B): Making it Happen." Harvard Business School Case 303-076, February 2003. (Revised July 2005.) View Details
  119. Even Bigger Change: A Framework for Getting Started at Changing the World

    Presents a framework for leading change in institutions or society, showing leaders how to manage political, economic, or social change by mapping their targets (policy, programs, or people/culture) and choice of action vehicle (single organizations or coalitions of organizations).

    Keywords: Change Management; Leading Change; Society;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Even Bigger Change: A Framework for Getting Started at Changing the World." Harvard Business School Background Note 305-099, March 2005. (Revised May 2005.) View Details
  120. Gillette Company (A): Pressure for Change

    After years of strong performance with market-dominating brands, Gillette's performance slips and a new CEO is selected from outside the company to lead a turnaround. This case describes the business and financial situation he inherited and asks what he should do during his first day and week on the job.

    Keywords: Business History; Performance Consistency; Product Positioning; Selection and Staffing; Change Management; Leading Change; Competitive Strategy; Planning; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and James Weber. "Gillette Company (A): Pressure for Change." Harvard Business School Case 303-032, August 2002. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  121. Gillette Company (B): Leadership for Change

    Describes the actions and behavior of a new CEO in his first days and weeks as he sets expectations for his top management team and introduces processes and disciplines to begin the turnaround of a global consumer products company.

    Keywords: Business Strategy; Policy; Change Management; Leading Change; Motivation and Incentives; Strategic Planning; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and James Weber. "Gillette Company (B): Leadership for Change." Harvard Business School Case 303-033, August 2002. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  122. Gillette Company (C): Strategies for Change

    Examines the strategic change agenda set by a new CEO as the initial priorities in the turnaround of this leading global consumer products company.

    Keywords: Business History; Global Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Competitive Strategy; Leading Change; Change Management; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and James Weber. "Gillette Company (C): Strategies for Change." Harvard Business School Case 303-034, August 2002. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  123. Gillette Company (D): Implementing Change

    How a strategic change agenda is implemented depends on leaders below the top in every function and geographic region translating the agenda into actions. But those actions do not always unfold as planned. This case examines the first 16 months of a turnaround from the perspective of implementers in the field. It describes business issues, organizational design dilemmas, and the cultural and behavioral challenges of implementing change in a global company.

    Keywords: Business History; Competitive Strategy; Strategic Planning; Change Management; Organizational Design; Organizational Culture; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Behavior; Leading Change; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Gillette Company (D): Implementing Change." Harvard Business School Case 303-035, August 2002. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  124. First Community Bank (A) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-396-202).

    Keywords: Banks and Banking; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "First Community Bank (A) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 399-002, August 1998. (Revised September 2004.) View Details
  125. E-Commerce at Williams-Sonoma (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-300-086).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry; Retail Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Brooke Bartletta. "E-Commerce at Williams-Sonoma (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-123, June 2001. (Revised September 2004.) View Details
  126. The Making of Verizon

    Through a series of mergers, Ivan Seidenberg, Verizon chairman and CEO, successfully shared the co-CEO title twice while building the largest telecom company in the United States. The strong and complementary cultures of the companies that Seidenberg and a key group of executives had merged was a major factor in their success. However, in the steps leading up to this, decreased revenues in their traditional wireline business intensified their dependence on the growth of wireless and broadband services. As Verizon moved into this less familiar territory, the culture that had sustained them through change would have to be evaluated as they embarked on a new wave of growth. As the future of Verizon become more dependent on business in areas that bore little resemblance to the Baby Bells, were the lessons from past successful mergers less applicable?

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Change Management; Transition; Leading Change; Organizational Culture; Risk Management; Telecommunications Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Douglas A Raymond, and Ryan Raffaelli. "The Making of Verizon." Harvard Business School Case 303-131, February 2004. View Details
  127. Troubled Marriages

    Compilation of articles looking at merger integration strategies: "business marriages." Problems of culture, management style, and business goals are revealed.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Goals and Objectives; Management Style; Mission and Purpose; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Troubled Marriages." Harvard Business School Background Note 300-072, December 1999. (Revised December 2003.) View Details
  128. Driving Change at Seagate

    A new CEO, Steve Luczo, together with COO Bill Watkins, have led a turnaround of Seagate, raising productivity dramatically and increasing innovation through teamwork, cross-functional collaboration, and other transformations in the culture of this manufacturer of disk drives for computers. After going private as part of the turnaround, Seagate executed a successful public offering in 2002. Several months later, the CEO wonders how to convince investors that the capabilities built in Seagate's turnaround will help the company flourish and innovate in a demanding technology industry.

    Keywords: Growth and Development; Transformation; Business and Shareholder Relations; Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Groups and Teams; Performance Productivity; Initial Public Offering; Going Public; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Douglas A Raymond, and Lyn Baranowski. "Driving Change at Seagate." Harvard Business School Case 304-002, September 2003. View Details
  129. Nelson Mandela, Turnaround Leader

    Nelson Mandela was the first democratically elected president of South Africa. He had to shift the culture of a country after the end of the apartheid regime, which enforced separation of the races and stifled freedom of the press. He established more open dialogue, encouraged communication about past abuses without taking revenge, created new relationships among people, and focused on economic empowerment for the black majority. Data on South Africa's economic and social performance can be used to weigh the accomplishments of this leader and leadership style.

    Keywords: Government and Politics; Governance; Policy; Political Elections; Culture; Communication Intention and Meaning; Relationships; Leadership Style; Welfare or Wellbeing; South Africa;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Euvin Naidoo. "Nelson Mandela, Turnaround Leader." Harvard Business School Case 304-035, September 2003. View Details
  130. Peabody Elementary School (B)

    After six months as principal of the school, Marty Pettigrew has commenced a series of reform initiatives to improve its academic performance and culture. As the school year ends, he must assess his progress and decide on his strategies for the following year. He deliberates about how quickly he is able to push his reform agenda.

    Keywords: Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Performance Improvement; Middle School Education; Personal Development and Career; Strategy; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Kevin Morris. "Peabody Elementary School (B)." Harvard Business School Case 303-135, June 2003. (Revised September 2003.) View Details
  131. Union City Schools: Sustaining The Turnaround

    Under the leadership of Superintendent Thomas Highton, Union City Schools, New Jersey, underwent a 14-year turnaround. In 1989, the Union City School District was the second-worst-performing district in New Jersey. As Mr. Highton prepared to retire, 2002 student test scores had increased to the point where Union City was the highest among New Jersey cities with a population of 50,000 or more. Teachers, parents, and administrators pondered whether his district would be able to sustain the changes after his departure.

    Keywords: Leadership; Leading Change; Performance Consistency; Change Management; New Jersey;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Ryan Raffaelli. "Union City Schools: Sustaining The Turnaround." Harvard Business School Case 303-137, June 2003. (Revised July 2003.) View Details
  132. Booker T. Washington High School

    For over a decade, Principal Elsie Bailey has led a turnaround of this inner-city high school in Memphis. Although she's made progress, some problems have arisen for this "school of last resort" that deals with some of the more difficult student populations, and changes in district leadership and approach have posed additional challenges.

    Keywords: Secondary Education; Social Issues; Social Psychology; Policy; Problems and Challenges; Education Industry; Tennessee;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Michelle Heskett. "Booker T. Washington High School." Harvard Business School Case 303-136, June 2003. View Details
  133. Peabody Elementary School (A)

    A new principal, Marty Pettigrew, has just joined this inner-city optional school--which offers special programs in international studies to attract children from all over the city. Entering mid-way through the school year, he observes a number of areas of concern, including declining student academic achievement. In December 2002, a week or so into his term, he has to determine a plan of action to lead a turnaround.

    Keywords: Change Management; Leading Change; Early Childhood Education; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Kevin Morris. "Peabody Elementary School (A)." Harvard Business School Case 303-134, June 2003. View Details
  134. Memphis City Schools

    Associate Superintendent Marieta Harris needs a plan for continuing the momentum of systemic change in this urban school district while facing shifts of leadership and curriculum philosophy, uneven progress on reforms, new tests that put a high proportion of schools on the list of low performers, and political controversy. She must determine which elements of system change need attention and how to get stakeholder support in the eight months before the superintendent is selected.

    Keywords: Curriculum and Courses; Leading Change; Transition; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Kevin Morris. "Memphis City Schools." Harvard Business School Case 303-133, June 2003. View Details
  135. Cynthia Hogan and the Birth of Novartis

    An American woman heads an integration office for merger transition activities between two giant Swiss pharmaceutical companies. She needed to develop an implementation plan to shape the new global powerhouse.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Global Strategy; Organizational Design; Strategic Planning; Pharmaceutical Industry; Switzerland; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Cynthia Hogan and the Birth of Novartis." Harvard Business School Case 897-126, December 1996. (Revised June 2003.) View Details
  136. Deloitte & Touche (A): A Hole in the Pipeline

    Deloitte & Touche was losing talented women, and CEO Mike Cook wanted to stop the loss, especially as the accounting and consulting fields became more competitive. The firm commissioned an analysis of the situation; now it had to consider the results and develop a plan change.

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Organizational Culture; Accounting; Gender Characteristics; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Loss; Change Management; Jobs and Positions; Resignation and Termination; Accounting Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Jane Roessner. "Deloitte & Touche (A): A Hole in the Pipeline." Harvard Business School Case 300-012, September 1999. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  137. Deloitte & Touche (B): Changing the Workplace

    Deloitte & Touche women's initiative changed the workplace culture at the firm, solved retention problems, and brought external benefits. Now a new CEO must decide how to take this a step further as competition for talent was even stronger, young people had different needs and aspirations, and the firm's global offices had not yet embraced this U.S. initiative.

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Organizational Culture; Accounting; Gender Characteristics; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Loss; Change Management; Jobs and Positions; Resignation and Termination; Accounting Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Jane Roessner. "Deloitte & Touche (B): Changing the Workplace." Harvard Business School Case 300-013, September 1999. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  138. Management and Creativity in Television Broadcasting

    Management and creativity are sometimes assumed to be unrelated or even conflicting concepts. In the best cases, management controls enable artistic success by gathering resources and providing discipline. However, if pushed too far, the same discipline can stifle creativity. The best managers in the industry have learned to strike a fine balance between the need for operational control and respect for their employees' artistic freedom.

    Keywords: Governance Controls; Leadership Development; Management; Managerial Roles; Creativity;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Douglas A Raymond. "Management and Creativity in Television Broadcasting." Harvard Business School Background Note 303-108, March 2003. View Details
  139. Teaching Old Companies New Tricks: The Challenge of Managing New Streams Within the Mainstream

    Describes the challenge of starting new ventures or new activities in established companies, especially if they diverge from the mainstream of ongoing commitments. Fledgling ventures require a different kind of management that acknowledges their uncertainty, intensity, and need/desire for freedom from mainstream constraints. One challenge is how integrated or not the new activity should be with the rest of the organization. Provides criteria for making this choice and offers some examples.

    Keywords: Business Units; Teaching; Entrepreneurship; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Business or Company Management; Organizations; Problems and Challenges; Risk and Uncertainty; Corporate Strategy;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Teaching Old Companies New Tricks: The Challenge of Managing New Streams Within the Mainstream." Harvard Business School Background Note 303-083, December 2002. View Details
  140. Washington Hospital Center (A): Rescuing Emergency Medicine

    Dr. Craig Feied and Dr. Mark Smith, recruited to turn around the Washington Hospital Center Emergency Department, prepare to roll out their most revolutionary change yet--an information system that could radically improve the practice of emergency medicine. A review of the process and philosophical changes they have brought to the department provides the context for considering how to overcome institutional and cultural resistance to innovation and new technologies.

    Keywords: Change Management; Health Care and Treatment; Nonprofit Organizations; Medical Specialties; Organizational Culture; Crisis Management; Technological Innovation; Higher Education; Health Industry; District of Columbia;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Michelle Heskett. "Washington Hospital Center (A): Rescuing Emergency Medicine." Harvard Business School Case 303-019, July 2002. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  141. Washington Hospital Center (B): The Power of Insight

    Dr. Craig Feied considers how to take a major technical innovation beyond his own department into a large hospital system. Reviews how proprietary information systems became indispensable in the department of emergency medicine and what it took to introduce the change in that area of the hospital successfully.

    Keywords: Change Management; Health Care and Treatment; Nonprofit Organizations; Medical Specialties; Organizational Culture; Crisis Management; Technological Innovation; Higher Education; Adoption; Health Industry; District of Columbia;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Michelle Heskett. "Washington Hospital Center (B): The Power of Insight." Harvard Business School Case 303-020, July 2002. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  142. Washington Hospital Center (C): Progress and Prospects, 1995-2001

    Dr. Craig Feied and Dr. Mark Smith have already transformed a "worst-in-area" emergency medicine department into the best in the area. Industry-wide and hospital system-specific challenges remain, including their newest project of national importance--creating an all-risks-ready emergency room. This case describes the successful philosophical, process, personnel, and technological changes and how they were introduced; it then asks how these could apply to the industry and system dilemmas. Will the same tools and approaches work, or do the problems require a fundamentally different approach?

    Keywords: History; Higher Education; Organizational Culture; Medical Specialties; Technological Innovation; Change Management; Nonprofit Organizations; Expansion; Crisis Management; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; District of Columbia;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Michelle Heskett. "Washington Hospital Center (C): Progress and Prospects, 1995-2001." Harvard Business School Case 303-021, July 2002. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  143. Washington Hospital Center (D): Emergency Medicine After September 11

    The all-risks-ready emergency room prototype project becomes widely accepted as a need after September 11, 2001. The already operational medical informatics system, Insight, comes under heavy demand after its strong performance during crises and is noticed by various agencies and officials involved in emergency management. This case considers how to support rapid, wide-scale adoption of a successful technological innovation across the boundaries of private and public organizations, including huge government agencies.

    Keywords: Change Management; Health Care and Treatment; Nonprofit Organizations; Medical Specialties; Organizational Culture; Crisis Management; Technological Innovation; Higher Education; Performance Productivity; Health Industry; District of Columbia;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Michelle Heskett. "Washington Hospital Center (D): Emergency Medicine After September 11." Harvard Business School Case 303-022, July 2002. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  144. MassEnvelopePlus

    Describes the challenges Steve Grossman, a fourth-generation owner of a small commercial printing company, must face amid industry consolidation, technological changes, and his own run for public office.

    Keywords: Family Business; Family Ownership; Problems and Challenges; Leadership; Change Management; Technology; Personal Development and Career; Service Delivery; Service Industry; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Brooke Bartletta, and Michelle Heskett. "MassEnvelopePlus." Harvard Business School Case 302-103, August 2002. View Details
  145. CNBC (A): NBC and Its Startup Friends

    NBC expands further on to the Internet with CNBC.com. NBC's Internet strategy, supported by corporate parent General Electric, involves numerous investments as well as new ventures like CNBC.com. Soon after CNBC.com is launched in 1999, NBC brings in a new CEO, Pamela Thomas-Graham, who must manage a start-up within a corporate giant.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Change Management; Management Teams; Corporate Strategy; Leadership Development; Internet; Expansion; Media; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "CNBC (A): NBC and Its Startup Friends." Harvard Business School Case 300-090, December 1999. (Revised May 2002.) View Details
  146. Garanti Bank: Transformation in Turkey (Abridged)

    Discusses the complete transformation and turnover in every division of Garanti Bank. Describes the multiple change projects managed and cross-cultural issues confronted during the 1990s and the organizational challenge of transforming Garanti Bank into one of Turkey's premier financial institutions.

    Keywords: Banks and Banking; Restructuring; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Banking Industry; Turkey;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., Daniel Galvin, and Maximilian Martin. "Garanti Bank: Transformation in Turkey (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 302-117, May 2002. (Revised May 2002.) View Details
  147. IBM's Reinventing Education (B): West Virginia

    Describes IBM's ongoing Reinventing Education initiative to improve K-12 public education via information technology developed by IBM's engineers and consultants. Focuses on one site, West Virginia, to reveal how IBM and the state created a mutually beneficial partnership that provided the basis for the next step of the initiative--Reinventing Education 3.

    Keywords: Programs; Partners and Partnerships; Information Technology; Education; Information Technology Industry; Education Industry; West Virginia;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Daniel Galvin. "IBM's Reinventing Education (B): West Virginia." Harvard Business School Case 302-076, January 2002. View Details
  148. iSteelAsia (A) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-301-025).

    Keywords: Steel Industry; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "iSteelAsia (A) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 302-048, January 2002. View Details
  149. Elsie Y. Cross Associates, Inc. and CoreStates Financial Corp. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-897-065).

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Elsie Y. Cross Associates, Inc. and CoreStates Financial Corp. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 302-060, January 2002. View Details
  150. iSteelAsia (A)

    The chairman of a Hong Kong-based steel distributor starts an online Asian steel trading portal and contemplates different paths to profitability and growth. Barriers include industrial culture, weakened markets in the spring of 2000, and vulnerability to takeover by O.S. players.

    Keywords: Commercialization; Distribution Channels; Business Growth and Maturation; Horizontal Integration; Transformation; Corporate Strategy; Business Strategy; Mergers and Acquisitions; Steel Industry; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M., and Pamela A. Yatsko. "iSteelAsia (A)." Harvard Business School Case 301-025, November 2000. (Revised December 2001.) View Details
  151. Gillette Singapore (A): Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground TN

    Teaching Note for (9-897-102).

    Keywords: Integration; Change Management; Globalization; Consumer Products Industry; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Gillette Singapore (A): Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 302-056, October 2001. View Details
  152. Gillette Singapore (B): Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground TN

    Teaching Note for (9-897-116).

    Keywords: Singapore;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Gillette Singapore (B): Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 302-057, October 2001. View Details
  153. Gillette Singapore (C): Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground TN

    Teaching Note for (9-897-117).

    Keywords: Singapore;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "Gillette Singapore (C): Managing Global Business Integration on the Ground TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 302-058, October 2001. View Details
  154. First Community Bank (B): Community Banking Group TN

    Teaching Note for (9-301-086).

    Keywords: Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "First Community Bank (B): Community Banking Group TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 302-059, October 2001. View Details
  155. IBM's Reinventing Education (A)

    Describes IBM's national innovation strategy to transform K-12 public education through new solutions developed by IBM engineers and consultants using information technology. Examples are: data warehousing in Broward County, FL schools, tracking software for the Cincinnati schools, and teacher development networks in San Jose and Philadelphia.

    Keywords: Information Technology; Learning; Social Enterprise; Innovation Strategy; Technological Innovation; Information Technology Industry; Education Industry; San Jose; Philadelphia; Florida; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "IBM's Reinventing Education (A)." Harvard Business School Case 399-008, September 1998. (Revised September 2001.) View Details
  156. IBM's Reinventing Education (A) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-399-008).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry; Education Industry; San Jose; Philadelphia; Florida; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "IBM's Reinventing Education (A) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 302-045, September 2001. View Details
  157. IBM Ireland: Reinventing Education Crosses the Atlantic TN

    Teaching Note for (9-300-034).

    Keywords: Technology Industry; Education Industry; United States; Republic of Ireland;

    Citation:

    Kanter, Rosabeth M. "IBM Ireland: Reinventing Education Crosses the Atlantic TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 302-046, September 2001. View Details
  158. Garanti Bank: Transformation in Turkey TN

    Teaching Note for (9-300-114).

    Keywords: