Regina E. Herzlinger

Nancy R. McPherson Professor of Business Administration

Regina E. Herzlinger is the Nancy R. McPherson Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. She was the first woman to be tenured and chaired at Harvard Business School and the first to serve on a number of corporate boards. She is widely recognized for her innovative research in health care, including her early predictions of the unraveling of managed care and the rise of consumer-driven health care, a term that she coined. Money has dubbed her the “Godmother” of consumer-driven health care.

Regina E. Herzlinger is the Nancy R. McPherson Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. She was the first woman to be tenured and chaired at Harvard Business School and the first to serve on many established and start up corporate health care /medical technology boards. All of her health care books have been best sellers in their categories, recognized for their innovative research. Money dubbed her the “Godmother” of consumer-driven health care. Her work was key to introducing consumer-driven health plans and “focused health factories”, such as centers for orthopedics, cardiology, or cancer care.  She has frequently been named as one of the 40 smartest people in healthcare by Becker’s Hospital Review and other industry journals.

She teaches two HBS MBA courses, Innovating in Health Care and Innovating Biomedical Technology, and two related Field Study courses. Based on that work, she is currently completing two text and cases books on Innovating in Health Care for the life sciences, health insurance, and health care delivery. In 2014, she launched a Harvard MOOC (Massive Open Online Course), BUS5.1x: Innovating in Health Care (IHC) https://www.edx.org/course/harvardx/harvardx-bus5-1x-innovating-health-care-1405#.UzrUO_m9md8; in 2013 , a new  HBS Executive Education program “Business Innovations in Global Health Care”; and in 2012, a continuing series of conferences, “21st-Century Health Care Management Education: Confronting Challenges for Innovation with a Modern Curriculum”. 

Books

  1. Who Killed Health Care? America's $2 Trillion Medical Problem—and the Consumer-Driven Cure

    A best seller in its category, with many printings. It has been recognized by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce as one of the books that made a difference in public policy in 2008.

    Keywords: Policy; Government Administration; Health Care and Treatment; Information Publishing; Books; United States;

  2. Market-Driven Health Care

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, R. E. Market-Driven Health Care. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1996. (Winner of James A. Hamilton Award Given annually to the author of a management or healthcare book judged outstanding by the American College of Healthcare Executives' Book of the Year Committee presented by American College of Healthcare Executives. Reviewed in The Economist, Fortune, Journal of the AMA, New England Journal of Medicine, Wall Street Journal, among many others. Ingram's Current Events best seller.) View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Why Economic Conservatives Should Support the Individual Mandate in Health Care

    Although many conservatives are gnashing their teeth about the Supreme Court's upholding the individual mandate, had it not been upheld, their worst nightmares would have occurred: government would have required hundreds of billions in additional taxes to pay for the health care of the sick.

    Why We Need an Individual Mandate

    Keywords: health care; health care industry; health insurance; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry;

  2. Health Care Transparency: The Fox Is Guarding the Chicken Coop in Washington Again

    Now that more people can shop directly for their own health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, they have been transformed from potential patients to consumers, and like any other consumers of goods or services, they want to know if what they're buying is any good. They want to compare the prices and value of what's on offer. In our notoriously inefficient and uneven health care system, this is a desperately needed shift. Theoretically, the best providers should win the greater market share.

    But transparency can only happen if consumers have access to credible, accurate, and well-sourced information. The market for this kind of data is potentially enormous, so it's no surprise that information companies are rushing to fill the gap. There's big money to be made.

    Keywords: transparency; health care; health insurance; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry;

  3. Has the Glass Ceiling Been Shattered for Women Leading Major Companies?

    With all the talk recently about the need for women to "lean in," the phrase that has gained instant currency with the publication of Sheryl Sandberg's book about how women should act more aggressively in pursuing their careers, it is worth asking: Has the glass ceiling been shattered when it comes to women leading major companies in America?

    Keywords: women and leadership; women; glass ceiling; Leadership; Personal Development and Career; Gender Characteristics;

  4. Barriers to Health Care Innovation: Regina Herzlinger Warns That Innovators Need to Know What Obstacles They Face and How to Overcome Them

    Health care in the United States and in most other developed countries is ailing, says Regina E. Herzlinger. A chaired professor of business administration specializing in health care at Harvard Business School, Herzlinger says that although the world has witnessed astonishing advances in medical treatment in recent years, the packaging and delivery of health care is still inefficient, ineffective, and not very consumer friendly.

    Keywords: healthcare; healthcare IT; innovation; health; Health Care and Treatment; Health; Technology; Innovation and Invention; Health Industry; Technology Industry; United States;

  5. Applying KISS to Healthcare Information Technology

    Current public and private healthcare information technology initiatives have failed to achieve secure integration among providers. Applying the "keep it simple, stupid" principle offers the key guidance for solving this problem.

    Keywords: technology; health care; public health; information technology industry; Standards; computer networks; computer services industries; software; hardware; medical services; Health Care and Treatment; Technology; Information Technology; Software; Hardware; Standards; Health Industry; Technology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Margo Seltzer, and Mark Gaynor. "Applying KISS to Healthcare Information Technology." Computer 46, no. 11 (November, 2013): 72–74. View Details
  6. Health Care Challenges for Leaders

    From ancient times to today, perceptive leaders have galvanized people by appealing to commonly shared values. Indeed, a discussion of leadership is virtually impossible without talking about values. As the articles in this issue demonstrate,Values are what animate much of human action-from the values of financial security, love, and friendship to the ideals of justice and freedom. From ancient times to today, perceptive leaders have galvanized people by appealing to commonly shared values. Indeed, a discussion of leadership is virtually impossible without talking about values. As the articles in this issue demonstrate, values and leadership are inseparable.

    Keywords: Leadership; Values and Beliefs;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, R. E. "Health Care Challenges for Leaders." Leader to Leader 47 (winter 2008): 39–45. View Details
  7. Specialization and Its Discontents: The Pernicious Impact of Regulations Against Specialization and Physician Ownership on U.S. Health Care

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Ownership; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Health Industry; United States;

Book Chapters

  1. Consumer-Driven Health Care: Conquering Health Care Cost and Quality Demons

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Cost Management; Quality; Demand and Consumers; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Consumer-Driven Health Care: Conquering Health Care Cost and Quality Demons." In Accountability and Responsibility in Health Care: Issues in Addressing an Emerging Global Challenge. Vol. 1, edited by Bruce Rosen, Avi Israeli, and Stephen Shortell. World Scientific Series in Global Healthcare Economics and Public Policy. World Scientific, 2012. View Details
  2. Consumer-Driven Universal Health Care is the Best Solution

    The best way to achieve universal health insurance coverage is to implement a consumer-controlled system rather than a government-controlled system.

    Keywords: Insurance; Customers; System;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Consumer-Driven Universal Health Care is the Best Solution." In Current Controversies: Health Care, edited by Noel Merino. Farmington Hills, MI: Greenhaven Press, 2010. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Hospital for Special Surgery (A)

    Hospital for Special Surgery, a focused factory for orthopedics and joint disease, is contemplating various growth options: further growth in the United Kingdom's National Health Services, management of hospitals in the United States, and/or hospital consulting. Reviews the issues surrounding growth of a nonprofit institution and the United Kingdom's socialized health care system.

    Keywords: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Growth and Development Strategy; Nonprofit Organizations; Expansion; Health Industry; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Hospital for Special Surgery (A)." Harvard Business School Case 315-012, August 2014. View Details
  2. La Ribera Health Department

    La Ribera was a privately managed, publicly funded health department in the Valencia region of Spain. The model began in 1999, when a new hospital was opened to cover the secondary health care needs of the health department’s inhabitants. In 2003, the model was extended to also cover primary care. The health department received a capitation fee for each registered inhabitant of the health department, and provided health services at a 25% lower cost than public hospitals in the region. However, profits for the private operators remained low, in the region of 1%. In order for La Ribera to remain a viable option the hospital began working with a consulting firm to look into future options for growth, and potentially higher returns. A key factor for any of the options considered was the public perception that tax-financed access to care was a longstanding public good in Spain, and allowing private operators to profit from health care delivery was a thorny issue.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Government Administration; Innovation Strategy; Vertical Integration; Business Model; Health Industry; Europe; Spain;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Emer Moloney, and Daniela Beyersdorfer. "La Ribera Health Department." Harvard Business School Case 315-006, September 2014. View Details
  3. Health Care Accountability: Examples in Cancer Treatment

    This case is designed to support a discussion of the importance of outcomes evidence in empowering the public to make better health care decisions, the desired level of transparency and accountability for health care providers, and the issues with current measuring and reporting practices that undermine the quality and comparability of outcomes data. The case describes two approaches to measuring cancer treatment outcomes. First, it describes a prostate cancer outcomes study conducted by Radiotherapy Clinics of Georgia, a subsidiary of Vantage Oncology, including a senior Vantage Oncology executive's views on the distinctive merits of this study's design. Second, the case describes treatment outcomes research by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) that compares cancer survival rates and costs of MSKCC and various comparator groups. The case briefly introduces a third approach, taken by Cancer Treatment Centers of America, in an Appendix.

    Keywords: accountability; health care; cancer; cancer treatment; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Cancer Treatment Centers of America; Vantage Oncology; radiology; risk adjustment; treatment outcomes; health care outcomes; prostate cancer; transparency; Health Care and Treatment; Risk Management; Outcome or Result; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Natalie Kindred. "Health Care Accountability: Examples in Cancer Treatment." Harvard Business School Case 314-109, May 2014. View Details
  4. Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (B)

    This case, a follow-up to Cancer Treatment Centers of America (A), HBS No. 313-012, begins with the debate over New Hampshire's certificate-of-need (CON) law, which restricts hospital expansion. This debate ignited significant public criticism of Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA), a for-profit chain of five cancer-focused hospitals that had previously won a CON exception in Georgia, over its for-profit status and low acceptance of government-insured patients. The case also introduces the controversy over CTCA's cancer treatment outcomes-reporting practices, as well as the disparities in outcomes-reporting practices by cancer treatment providers generally. By providing perspectives on both sides of the issues, the case allows students to debate and draw their own conclusions about whether organizations like CTCA should be granted CON exceptions and whether the criticisms of its patient-acceptance and outcomes-reporting practices are well founded.

    Keywords: cancer; cancer treatment; accountability; outcomes; outcomes reporting; outcomes measurement; survival; for-profit hospitals; health care; healthcare; hospital; certificate of need; Health Care and Treatment; Outcome or Result; Corporate Accountability; Policy; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Natalie Kindred. "Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 314-003, March 2014. (Revised September 2014.) View Details
  5. Reinventing Brainlab (B)

    The management of Germany's Brainlab AG, a leading provider of software-driven oncology and surgery solutions, needs to evaluate strategic options for proceeding without an exclusive hardware partner in its most profitable business segment.

    Keywords: Strategy; Hardware; Software; Medical Specialties; Information Technology Industry; Health Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Karol Misztal. "Reinventing Brainlab (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 314-054, December 2013. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  6. PAREXEL International Corp.: Stages of Innovation

    Through the lens of biopharmaceutical contract research organization (CRO) PAREXEL, this case traces the evolution of the firm as it reinvents itself in response to the transformation of the CRO sector from a small, secondary cluster of firms into a major player with essential capabilities for global drug development. The case begins as PAREXEL is pursuing an expensive globalization and IT strategy while many of its competitors focus on cost cutting. Over the prior 20 years, CEO Josef von Rickenbach had grown PAREXEL into a billion-dollar company by taking calculated risks and making bold investments based on anticipated industry trends and client demand. Now, despite slowing demand for CRO services, PAREXEL is betting that a global footprint and technology capabilities will become its key future competitive advantage. Near the end of the case, the timing transitions to a decade after Rickenbach made this strategic decision, describing the development of the industry and PAREXEL's place within it.

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Natalie Kindred. "PAREXEL International Corp.: Stages of Innovation." Harvard Business School Case 314-056, September 2013. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  7. Fortis Healthcare: Transnational Hospital Network

    Fortis, India's largest for-profit hospital chain, must decide if its expensive expansion into the South East Asia market makes sense.

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Pushwaz Virk, and Natalie Kindred. "Fortis Healthcare: Transnational Hospital Network." Harvard Business School Case 314-047, September 2013. (Revised July 2014.) View Details
  8. OdontoPrev

    Brazil's largest dental insurer, a successful and innovative firm, has saturated the corporate market and faces stiffer competition. It must decide whether to enter a new market in Brazil or to expand into other parts of Central and South America.

    Keywords: health; Brazil; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Matthew Lingenbrink, Joshua Turnbull, and Ricardo Reisen De Pinho. "OdontoPrev." Harvard Business School Case 314-038, September 2013. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  9. AxSys

    AxSys, a Scottish health information exchange firm which can provide connectivity among the Electronic Medical Record systems of different vendors, must decide how best to enter the U.S. market.

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina. "AxSys." Harvard Business School Case 314-039, September 2013. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  10. Population Health Management—Techniques and Tools

    Companion note to "Amil and the Health Care System in Brazil," Harvard Business School Case No. 312-029, January 2014

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Kyle Bertke. "Population Health Management—Techniques and Tools." Harvard Business School Technical Note 314-041, August 2013. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  11. Aon Hewitt's Private Health Insurance Exchange

    Aon Hewitt, a leading health insurance broker and consultant, is one of the first movers in forming exchanges to sell health insurance. What kinds of products should it offer on this exchange?

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Aiden Y. Feng, and Meghan D. Oliver. "Aon Hewitt's Private Health Insurance Exchange." Harvard Business School Case 314-037, August 2013. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  12. Innovating in Health Care—Framework

    Contains the framework for the second-year Innovating in Health Care course. Delineates the role of six exogenous forces on new ventures: structure, financing, regulations, consumers, accountability, technology, and public policy and presents the essential elements of business models for new health care ventures.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Management; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Innovating in Health Care—Framework." Harvard Business School Background Note 314-017, July 2013. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  13. Reinventing Brainlab (A)

    The management of Germany's Brainlab AG, a leading provider of software-driven oncology and surgery solutions, needs to evaluate strategic options for proceeding without an exclusive hardware partner in its most profitable business segment.

    Keywords: Strategy; Hardware; Software; Medical Specialties; Health Care and Treatment; Information Technology Industry; Health Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Vincent Dessain, and Karol Misztal. "Reinventing Brainlab (A)." Harvard Business School Case 313-069, September 2012. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  14. Philips-Visicu

    Would the advent of global payment models and ACOs create sufficient demand for a telemedicine offering covering the care continuum, from hospitals to the home? This was the decision facing Royal Philips Electronics (Philips), the Netherlands-based producer of lighting, consumer electronics, and health care products, in 2012. Philips already offered several remote monitoring systems for hospitals, including the eICU, which it obtained through the 1998 acquisition of Visicu. In the eICU model, patients in hospital ICUs were monitored using bedside devices, which transmitted patient data to a remote station from which clinicians monitored and directed care as needed. The model aimed to improve care quality by enabling early interventions and reducing adverse events, and to cut costs by allowing clinicians to care for a larger number of patients. Building on this and other offerings in its portfolio, including numerous home care devices, Philips could extend this model to create an integrated remote monitoring offering managed through a centralized clinician-staffed station. In doing so, it could gain a deep and early foothold with ACOs and position itself as a leader in telemedicine-enabled care. However, U.S. telemedicine adoption to date was slow, in part due to insufficient cost-effectiveness evidence, and ACOs—the likely target customer—remained underdeveloped. Philips would also contend with a complex selling process and numerous operational challenges. Was it too early to invest? And, if not, who were the ideal ACO beta sites?

    Keywords: health care; Philips; Visicu; telemedicine; eICU; accountable care organization; ACO; bundled payment; hospital to home; patient monitoring devices; home health care; Health Care and Treatment; Communication Technology; Quality; Safety; Performance Productivity; Performance Capacity; Performance Efficiency; Consumer Behavior; Emerging Markets; Health Industry; Telecommunications Industry; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Natalie Kindred, and Sara M. McKinley. "Philips-Visicu." Harvard Business School Case 313-015, September 2012. (Revised March 2014.) (As companion reading for this case, see Regina E. Herzlinger and Charles Huang, "Note on Bundled Payment in Health Care," HBS No. 312-032 (Boston: Harvard Business Publishing, 2012).) View Details
  15. Shanghai Pharmaceuticals

    Shanghai Pharmaceuticals (SPH), a vertically integrated Chinese pharmaceutical conglomerate, was considering its strategic options in the context of a rapidly evolving industry, policy, and economic environment. The company—essentially a collection of subsidiaries operating under a unified management structure—was formed through the 2009 merger of several state-owned enterprises, part of a broad policy effort in China to streamline state assets, consolidate the fragmented pharmaceutical sector, and enhance the global competitiveness of domestic firms. As it competed with other large domestic firms to become one of the few national champions that the government hoped to create, SPH was also considering an acquisition in the U.S. or Europe. This case allows students to consider the broad trends sweeping China's pharmaceutical industry and health care sector and assess future opportunities there for domestic and foreign businesses.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Business Conglomerates; Vertical Integration; Decision Choices and Conditions; Mergers and Acquisitions; Consolidation; Health Care and Treatment; Global Strategy; State Ownership; Pharmaceutical Industry; Health Industry; Shanghai; United States; Europe;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Natalie Kindred. "Shanghai Pharmaceuticals." Harvard Business School Case 313-016, September 2012. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  16. Note on Health Insurance Coverage, Coding, and Payment

    This note explains how health care innovators receive payment from government insurers, in the U.S. and abroad, and from private insurers. It explains each of the three steps needed to obtain reimbursement: coverage, coding, and payment. It also discusses how technology assessment techniques are used to reach coverage and payment decisions.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Private Sector; Public Sector; Insurance; Innovation and Invention; Information Technology; Health Industry; Insurance Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Jo Ellen Slurzberg. "Note on Health Insurance Coverage, Coding, and Payment." Harvard Business School Background Note 313-042, August 2012. (Revised January 2013.) View Details
  17. ABC Pharmaceuticals

    This case asks students to price a new drug which is in Stage II of its clinical trials. It contains detailed estimates of the time required and costs for all the steps needed to commercialize a drug in the U.S.

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Earnings Management; Business Model; Health Care and Treatment; Outcome or Result; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Erik R. Sparks. "ABC Pharmaceuticals." Harvard Business School Case 313-041, August 2012. (Revised August 2013.) View Details
  18. Public Health Insurance Exchanges: The Massachusetts Experience

    The CEO of Tufts Health Plan, James Roosevelt, is wondering whether to offer insurance products on the Massachusetts Connector, the first U.S. exchange. He wonders if he should enter these uncharted waters at all. And, if yes, with a broad network or a narrow network product. Complicating the decision is that he is the most politically visible scion of the Roosevelt family. Franklin D. Roosevelt, the four term U.S. president, had long espoused the universal coverage this Connector enabled. But was it the right thing for the insurance company he led? The health care reform act of 2010 introduced exchanges on which health insurance could be purchased. This case describes the first such Exchange, created in Massachusetts in 2006.

    Keywords: health insurance exchange; healthcare reform; public health insurance exchange; Decision Making; Market Entry and Exit; Emerging Markets; Health Care and Treatment; Insurance Industry; Health Industry; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina, and Jordan Bazinsky. "Public Health Insurance Exchanges: The Massachusetts Experience." Harvard Business School Case 313-043, August 2012. (Revised January 2013.) View Details
  19. Hub and Spoke, HealthCare Global, and Additional Focused Factory Models for Cancer Care

    This case compares and contrasts four different models for delivering cancer care in India and the US. Students are asked to select the best model in its alignment with the Six Forces in those two countries and Africa, to which one of the models is considering expansion, and intrinsic business characteristics. The Indian models are all focused factories, but one is a hub and spoke model, with a radiology hub and ambulatory spokes, while the other offers only ambulatory services. The U.S. models are all focused factory hospitals, one academic and the other a private, for-profit firm located on the grounds of teaching hospitals.

    Keywords: Cancer care services; Focused factories for cancer care; Hub and Spoke cancer care; Cancer care in the U.S.; Cancer care in Africa; Cancer care in India; Six Sigma; Business Model; Health Disorders; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; United States; India; Africa;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Amit Ghorawat, Meera Krishnan, and Naiyya Saggi. "Hub and Spoke, HealthCare Global, and Additional Focused Factory Models for Cancer Care." Harvard Business School Case 313-030, August 2012. (Revised July 2014.) View Details
  20. Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (A)

    Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA), a U.S. network of four privately owned oncology focused factory hospitals, was weighing options for growth. CTCA was entirely cancer focused and specialized in treating patients with complex and advanced-stage cancers, who were reached through advertising its integrative, team-based approach to care. CEO Stephen Bonner needed to decide whether to focus future expansion on building additional full-scale hospitals or pursuing a hub-and-spoke model, in which numerous oncology outpatient centers would be built in the region of each CTCA hospital. His decision would be made in the context of CTCA's unique business model and treatment philosophy and the public policy landscape, including certificate-of-need laws and the advent of Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) and bundled payments. CTCA's for-profit status and direct-to-consumer advertising made it a target, he knew.

    Keywords: cancer; cancer treatment; health care; healthcare; accountability; outcomes; outcomes measurement; outcomes reporting; Hub and Spoke cancer care; hub and spoke; hub-and-spoke; focused factory; Mission and Purpose; Private Ownership; For-Profit Firms; Health Disorders; Medical Specialties; Policy; Business Model; Expansion; Decision Choices and Conditions; Advertising; Health Care and Treatment; Innovation and Invention; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Natalie Kindred. "Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (A)." Harvard Business School Case 313-012, August 2012. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  21. McKesson

    McKesson, a large, diversified drug distribution and health care IT company, is considering development of new business offerings to help private practice physicians remain independent. The company, with $122 billion in 2010 revenues, just made its first foray into health care services with the acquisition of U.S. Oncology, an integrated cancer care company, whose expertise it could leverage in offerings catered to other physician specialties. With a vast portfolio of products and services serving a wide spectrum of health care stakeholders, McKesson appears uniquely positioned to understand and capitalize on the needs of health care businesses. With the recent passage of health care reform adding to the pressures already squeezing the health care industry—including new payment models requiring significant coordination and IT capabilities—independent physicians are migrating in droves to large health care organizations, abandoning the private practice model. McKesson could potentially provide them with an alternative. McKesson is an exceedingly large company with somewhat autonomous business units, making the prospect of collaborating to create a "cross-disciplinary" offering for independent practices difficult. Moreover, doing so would potentially extend McKesson into the clinical health services (and potentially risk-sharing) business, the strategic merits of which can be debated. Given the uncertainty surrounding the physician practice environment, the ideal shape of a solution to help these customers remains unclear, and competitors with a different product mix could be better positioned than McKesson to provide it. Finally, it could be too late altogether to reverse the trends eroding the private practice model.

    Keywords: health care industry; pharmaceutical industry; information technology; health care policy; change management; corporate strategy; organizational transformations; health services; Health Care and Treatment; Business Model; Service Operations; Change Management; Corporate Strategy; Information Technology; Policy; Pharmaceutical Industry; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Natalie Kindred. "McKesson." Harvard Business School Case 312-002, May 2012. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  22. Note on Telemedicine

    This note provides background in all the modalities of telemedicine. It accompanies the cases "Medtronic: Patient Management Initiative" (A) and (B), HBS Nos. 302-005 and 309-064.

    Keywords: Interactive Communication; Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Technological Innovation; Information Technology; Health Industry; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Jillian Copeland. "Note on Telemedicine." Harvard Business School Background Note 310-075, January 2010. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  23. Note on Bundled Payment in Health Care

    The note explains how bundled health care payment differs from fee-for-service payment; provides examples of the difference between the two; describes early innovators in bundling and their results; provides guidance on how to make it happen; and elucidates the legal issues bundling raises. Bundled payment will replace virtually all other health care payment formats. This note explains how and why.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Charles C. Huang. "Note on Bundled Payment in Health Care." Harvard Business School Background Note 312-032, September 2011. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  24. Social Media in Health Care

    This note reviews the social media firms in health care that help providers and consumers to interact and their nascent business models.

    Keywords: Business Model; Health Care and Treatment; Market Platforms; Social and Collaborative Networks; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Selin Gunal Tyler, and Charles C. Huang. "Social Media in Health Care." Harvard Business School Background Note 311-093, March 2011. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  25. Amil and the Health Care System in Brazil

    Dr. Edson Bueno created Amil, Brazil's largest health insurer. Unlike many others, it is vertically integrated. Dr. Bueno has two opportunities for growth. Which, if any, should he pursue?

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Innovation and Invention; Opportunities; Insurance; Vertical Integration; Insurance Industry; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Ricardo Reisen de Pinho. "Amil and the Health Care System in Brazil." Harvard Business School Case 312-029, August 2011. (Revised July 2014.) View Details
  26. Connectivity in Health Care

    This note describes the current state of information technology connectivity in the health care sector.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Business and Government Relations; Health Industry; Information Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Alfred Martin. "Connectivity in Health Care." Harvard Business School Background Note 307-047, August 2006. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  27. Health Stop Retail Medical Centers (A): Strategy

    Reviews the different business models of for-profit chains that provide ambulatory health care services and asks the students to evaluate which is most likely to do good and do well. It is an effective case for introducing the framework for how to evaluate health care innovations.

    Keywords: For-Profit Firms; Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Strategy; Valuation; Health Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Joyce Lallman, and Nancy Kane. "Health Stop Retail Medical Centers (A): Strategy." Harvard Business School Case 185-084, February 1985. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  28. HealthAllies (A)

    This case describes a "do good and do well" firm that enables individuals to buy health care services at discounted prices. It delineates the characteristics of the uninsured and others who are the primary targets for the firm. "HealthAllies (B)" provides information about subsequent events.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Marketing Channels; Demand and Consumers; Commercialization; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Michael Sherman. "HealthAllies (A)." Harvard Business School Case 302-019, August 2012. (Revised from original August 2001 version.) View Details
  29. Cardinal Health (A): The Medicine Shoppe Acquisition

    Robert Walter, the founder and CEO of Cardinal Health, a pharmaceutical distributor, is contemplating the purchase of Medicine Shoppe, a chain of apothecaries. The purchase might be construed as competition against his own drugstore customers. But one of its many advantages is the window it provides on the turbulent outside environment, with consolidation of his customers and managed care pressure on the pharmaceutical industry.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Business Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Distribution Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Miguel Abecasis, and Brenda Cheng. "Cardinal Health (A): The Medicine Shoppe Acquisition." Harvard Business School Case 303-043, September 2002. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  30. Hospital for Special Surgery (B): Continuing Challenges of Growth

    After its successful new U.K. venture, the Hospital for Special Surgery wants to do more of the same, without decimating its core New York City facility. The case provides considerable details about the different options it is exploring.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Medical Specialties; Growth and Development Strategy; Service Delivery; Nonprofit Organizations; Health Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Hospital for Special Surgery (B): Continuing Challenges of Growth." Harvard Business School Supplement 310-077, April 2011. (Revised from original January 2010 version.) View Details
  31. Battle of the Bulge—Innovations in Obesity Treatment

    Morbid obesity is a problem worldwide, causing illness and excessive health care costs; but effective solutions are notable for their absence. This case discusses most of the remedies for obesity and asks the students to select those with the greatest promise to affect positive change. It is an effective case for introducing the framework for how to evaluate health care innovations. ("Innovating in Health Care—Framework," Harvard Business School Case 306-042)

    Keywords: Business Model; Private Sector; Public Sector; Health Care and Treatment; Health Disorders; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and John McDonough. "Battle of the Bulge—Innovations in Obesity Treatment." Harvard Business School Case 304-009, August 2003. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  32. Battle of the Bulge: Innovating in Obesity Treatment

    Teaching Note for #304-009 and #305-027.

    Keywords: Cost; Health Disorders; Health Care and Treatment; Performance Evaluation; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Battle of the Bulge: Innovating in Obesity Treatment." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 311-095, March 2011. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  33. The Global Sight Initiative

    How to replicate a 'one of' social entrepreneurship effort: To cure blindness, Seva took the Aravind Eye Hospital & scaled it up to 100 hospitals globally.

    Keywords: Social Entrepreneurship; Nonprofit Organizations; Medical Specialties; Health Care and Treatment; Globalization; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "The Global Sight Initiative." Harvard Business School Case 311-034, September 2010. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  34. Vitalia Franchise

    Cathy Hoffmann has rapidly grown her novel facilities for day care therapy for elders with mild cognitive and physical problems. But she needs to decide whether to franchise or own the next expansion.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Growth and Development Strategy; Ownership Stake; Franchise Ownership; Expansion; Health Industry; Spain;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Beatriz Munoz-Seca. "Vitalia Franchise." Harvard Business School Case 311-035, August 2010. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  35. Boston Scientific Corporation (A)

    Boston Scientific Corporation just bought Guidant at a record breaking price to expand their cardiovascular franchise. They need to rationalize their product portfolio to make the acquisition work. What should they sell and why?

    Keywords: Acquisition; Decision Choices and Conditions; Growth and Development; Product Marketing; Product Development; Franchise Ownership; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Charlie Attlan. "Boston Scientific Corporation (A)." Harvard Business School Case 310-079, March 2010. (Revised May 2010.) View Details
  36. WellSpace Treatment Centers for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (A)

    How should WellSpace, a venture capital-backed purveyor of alternative health services, expand? Although it was nearing breakeven in its first location, the right business model remained unclear.

    Keywords: Business Model; Entrepreneurship; Venture Capital; Health Care and Treatment; Innovation and Invention; Service Delivery; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Jun HuangPu, and Bing Lin. "WellSpace Treatment Centers for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (A)." Harvard Business School Case 303-017, July 2002. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  37. The Vitality Group: Paying for Self-Care

    Vitality is part of a $2 billion start-up South African and U.K. health insurance firm. It has achieved excellent results in rewarding people for promoting their health. It is now contemplating how to enter the U.S. market.

    Keywords: Insurance; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Market Entry and Exit; Insurance Industry; South Africa; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "The Vitality Group: Paying for Self-Care." Harvard Business School Case 310-071, February 2010. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  38. WellSpace Treatment Centers for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (B) - The Marino Center

    The Marino Center provides complementary traditional and alternative health care services. It wants to grow, but how and where?

    Keywords: Business Model; Decision Choices and Conditions; Growth and Development; Health Care and Treatment; Medical Specialties; Growth and Development Strategy; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "WellSpace Treatment Centers for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (B) - The Marino Center." Harvard Business School Supplement 310-082, March 2010. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  39. Phreesia: The Patient Check-In Company

    Phreesia is successful with a tablet for patients to sign in at the doctor's office which can also be used for billing. But what is the next market opportunity for them? And is their ad-based revenue model sustainable?

    Keywords: Advertising; Social Entrepreneurship; Revenue; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Phreesia: The Patient Check-In Company." Harvard Business School Case 310-066, December 2009. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  40. MedVal Ventures, Fortis Healthcare (A), Fortis Healthcare (B), and Note on Medical Travel (TN)

    Teaching Note for [308087], [308030], [308080], and [308084].

    Keywords: Health Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "MedVal Ventures, Fortis Healthcare (A), Fortis Healthcare (B), and Note on Medical Travel (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-076, January 2010. View Details
  41. Note on Flexible Spending Accounts, Health Reimbursement Arrangements, and Health Savings Accounts

    Describes the current use of Flexible Savings Accounts, Health Savings Accounts, and how Reimbursement Account vendors are shaping the market. Identifies current and future market players, third-party administrators and processors, and includes a discussion of the current political situation as it applies to these vehicles.

    Keywords: Insurance; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Health Care and Treatment; Market Participation; Business and Government Relations; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Note on Flexible Spending Accounts, Health Reimbursement Arrangements, and Health Savings Accounts." Harvard Business School Background Note 307-034, August 2006. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  42. Note on Accountability in the U.S. Health Care System

    This note explains how health care providers, health insurers, and consumers are held accountable for their performance and the entrepreneurial opportunities thus created.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Ethics; Insurance; Corporate Accountability; Health Care and Treatment; Demand and Consumers; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Michael Millenson. "Note on Accountability in the U.S. Health Care System." Harvard Business School Background Note 308-111, March 2008. (Revised January 2010.) View Details
  43. MedVal Ventures

    Is medical travel a viable business opportunity? A group of MBA students consider the pros and cons of starting a business that would send people from the U.S. to India for elective non-emergency surgeries.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Cost Management; Globalized Markets and Industries; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; Travel Industry; India; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "MedVal Ventures." Harvard Business School Case 308-087, February 2008. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  44. Medtronic: Patient Management Initiative (B)

    The (B) case provides the denouement to the (A) case about Medtronic's introduction of the Chronicle and remote monitoring business.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Measurement and Metrics; Outcome or Result; Technology; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Medtronic: Patient Management Initiative (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 309-064, September 2008. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  45. Consumer-Driven Health Care: Medtronic's Health Insurance Options

    Describes the variety of health insurance plans that Medtronic offers, including a high-deductible, consumer-driven health plan with a health reimbursement account that also enables health care providers to quote their own prices. Asks students to consider the choices facing the firm's human resources manager and its employees and the viability of the new consumer-driven models.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Insurance; Health Care and Treatment; Compensation and Benefits; Demand and Consumers;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., John Hurwitch, and Seth Bokser. "Consumer-Driven Health Care: Medtronic's Health Insurance Options." Harvard Business School Case 302-006, August 2001. (Revised July 2014.) View Details
  46. Note on Medical Travel

    Background notes for MedVal and Fortis case studies.

    Keywords: Cost; Health Care and Treatment; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Health Industry; Tourism Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Sara Green. "Note on Medical Travel." Harvard Business School Background Note 308-084, August 2012. (Revised from original February 2008 version.) View Details
  47. Note on Managed Care Reimbursement of Health Care Providers: Case-Based, Per Diem, and Capitation Payments

    Explains how managed care organizations use capitation as a payment method for providers.

    Keywords: Accounting; Financial Management; Insurance; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; Insurance Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Tom Nagle. "Note on Managed Care Reimbursement of Health Care Providers: Case-Based, Per Diem, and Capitation Payments." Harvard Business School Background Note 194-141, May 1994. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  48. THG Management Services

    The two entrepreneurial founders of a Medicaid managed-care firm are considering how and where to expand and whether they should manage risk for hospitals that want to enter the managed-care sector or own it.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Insurance; Health Care and Treatment; Risk Management; Motivation and Incentives; Expansion; Health Industry; Insurance Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and D. Scott Lurding. "THG Management Services." Harvard Business School Case 197-011, July 1996. (Revised July 2014.) View Details
  49. WellPoint, Inc.

    Describes the U.S. Health Care industry and WellPoint's background, market growth strategies, and potential as an investment option.

    Keywords: Investment; Growth and Development Strategy; Industry Structures; Organizations; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "WellPoint, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 307-051, August 2006. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  50. Immusol and Novartis

    Should Immusol strive to become a fully integrated pharmaceutical company? How should a small pharmaceutical company structure a deal for its novel technology with the giant Novartis?

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Rights; Negotiation Deal; Negotiation Participants; Alliances; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Keyne M. Monson, and Juan D. Betancourt. "Immusol and Novartis." Harvard Business School Case 303-038, April 2009. (Revised from original October 2002 version.) View Details
  51. Diagnostic Genomics

    Should this gene detection firm enter the business of providing tests for the detection of genetic diseases? If so, how should it prioritize the tests it could develop?

    Keywords: Health Testing and Trials; Market Entry and Exit; Product Development; Genetics; Strategy; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Mark P. Allyn. "Diagnostic Genomics." Harvard Business School Case 309-040, October 2008. View Details
  52. Note on Financing of the U.S. Health Care Sector

    This course describes the public and private sources of financing of the U.S. health-care sector,and identifies the characteristics of insurance policies, their costs, the structure of the insurance industry, and the role of consultants and brokers. The insurance characteristics include financial, premiums, risk, self-funding, individual U.S. group plans, the underwriting cycle, etc.

    Keywords: Economic Sectors; Financing and Loans; Insurance; Industry Structures; Health Industry; Insurance Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Jeff Grahling. "Note on Financing of the U.S. Health Care Sector." Harvard Business School Background Note 304-039, August 2003. (Revised September 2008.) View Details
  53. Background on the Technology of Molecular Diagnostics

    To be used as background reading for the "EXACT Sciences Corp.: Commercializing a Diagnostic Test" and "Diagnostic Genomics" cases, HBS nos. 308-090 and 309-040.

    Keywords: Health Testing and Trials; Technology; Biotechnology Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Jason Sanders. "Background on the Technology of Molecular Diagnostics." Harvard Business School Background Note 309-050, September 2008. View Details
  54. Circle Gastroenterology Products (A)

    A new, minimally invasive medical device has achieved only one-third of its budget. Was the problem one of marketing strategy, sales, reimbursement, and/or clinical trials?

    Keywords: Health Testing and Trials; Marketing Strategy; Product Marketing; Sales; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and James Weber. "Circle Gastroenterology Products (A)." Harvard Business School Case 304-052, November 2003. (Revised September 2008.) View Details
  55. EXACT Sciences Corp.: Commercializing a Diagnostic Test

    This case addresses the challenges of commercializing molecular diagnostics. Along the way, it explains the technology, payment system, and the measures used to assess the value of a diagnostic test.

    Keywords: Health Testing and Trials; Genetics; Science-Based Business; Commercialization; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "EXACT Sciences Corp.: Commercializing a Diagnostic Test." Harvard Business School Case 308-090, February 2008. (Revised August 2008.) View Details
  56. Helios Health (A)

    Helios PC system provides personalized drug information to the patients in the doctor's waiting room. It has met with considerable consumer acceptance and a very high return for the drug companies that sponsor it. What price should it charge them for the service?

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Price; Health Care and Treatment; Information Publishing; Innovation and Invention; Product Marketing; Demand and Consumers; Health Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Alfred Martin. "Helios Health (A)." Harvard Business School Case 302-022, August 2001. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  57. The Multiple Sclerosis Center of Atlanta

    The Multiple Sclerosis Center of Atlanta wishes to expand beyond Georgia. The factors influencing this decision are discussed, including drug treatments currently available, and the impact of future drugs in the FDA pipeline as well as financing issues.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Financing and Loans; Health Care and Treatment; Health Disorders; Medical Specialties; Expansion; Health Industry; Atlanta;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Alfred Martin. "The Multiple Sclerosis Center of Atlanta." Harvard Business School Case 308-085, March 2008. View Details
  58. BestDoctors, Inc.

    Upon learning the news of a critical illness, patients and their families are shocked, saddened, fearful, and angry all at once. And just as soon as they catch their collective breath, they all ask the same question--a question that has the potential to infuse hope into darkness and order into emotional chaos--"What do we do next?" They need health care information. Greg Smith, a cancer survivor, and Steve Naifeh founded BestDoctors Inc. to link health care consumers to the medical knowledge they need to make the best health care choices for themselves and their loved ones. This case, which begins in a venture capitalist firm's conference room, details the business plan of a company that sought to meet consumers' urgent demand for personalized information that will lead them to quality medical care.

    Keywords: Business Model; Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Medical Specialties; Knowledge Sharing; Demand and Consumers; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Seth Bokser. "BestDoctors, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 302-018, August 2001. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  59. Salick Cardiovascular Centers: Business Plan

    A seasoned health services entrepreneur develops a business plan for a cardiovascular-focused factory. Will it work?

    Keywords: Factories, Labs, and Plants; Business Plan; Business Startups; Entrepreneurship; Medical Specialties; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Kaushik Sen, Alex Tkachenko, and Carolyn Wolff. "Salick Cardiovascular Centers: Business Plan." Harvard Business School Case 304-007, October 2003. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  60. MedCath Corporation (B)

    Supplements the (A) case. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Medical Specialties; Market Entry and Exit; Service Delivery; Conflict and Resolution; Horizontal Integration; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Louisa Neissa. "MedCath Corporation (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 305-102, April 2005. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  61. Schering-Plough and Genome Therapeutics: Discovering an Asthma Gene

    Personalized medicine requires the identification of mutated genes. Schering-Plough's search for the one related to asthma requires finding families with the disease. Examines the industry that helps conduct such research, including contract research organizations.

    Keywords: Health Disorders; Research and Development; Genetics; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Marc Aquino. "Schering-Plough and Genome Therapeutics: Discovering an Asthma Gene." Harvard Business School Case 303-044, June 2003. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  62. MedCath Corporation (A)

    MedCath is a horizontally integrated chain of heart hospitals that partners with local cardiologists. It claims that its focus leads to better and cheaper results than those of an everything-for-everybody general hospital. Community hospitals generally vehemently oppose their entry into a new area. What options does MedCath have?

    Keywords: Medical Specialties; Market Entry and Exit; Service Delivery; Conflict and Resolution; Horizontal Integration; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Pete Stavros. "MedCath Corporation (A)." Harvard Business School Case 303-041, September 2002. (Revised January 2013.) View Details
  63. Health Stop (B): The Medical Offices

    Describes the long waiting time experienced by customers in Health Stops and asks students to specify the changes in its business model which could help solve the problem.

    Keywords: For-Profit Firms; Customer Focus and Relationships; Customer Satisfaction; Health Care and Treatment; Service Delivery; Health Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Health Stop (B): The Medical Offices." Harvard Business School Supplement 196-051, August 1995. (Revised July 2014.) View Details
  64. Retail Sales of Health Insurance: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida

    The BCBS of Florida is contemplating whether to enter the consumer-driven health care market and if so, whether to target such groups--and individuals--and in which of its geographic markets, and how.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Nonprofit Organizations; Strategy; Insurance; Insurance Industry; Florida;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Grady Clouse. "Retail Sales of Health Insurance: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida." Harvard Business School Case 308-089, January 2008. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  65. Identify the Nonprofit

    This case presents financial statements and selected ratios for seven unidentified nonprofit organizations and asks that each set of financial information be matched with one of the following nonprofit entities: a public television station, a suburban hospital, a metropolitan art museum, a health insurer, a municipal government, a social service organization, and a private college.

    Keywords: Nonprofit Organizations; Financial Statements;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Ramona Hilgenkamp. "Identify the Nonprofit." Harvard Business School Case 195-215, April 1995. (Revised December 2006.) View Details
  66. Scopie's Enlarged Gland Shrinker

    Describes a firm that markets a laser for a fictional problem. Asks readers to evaluate Scopie's marketing and production strategy (it plans to start in India and then expand to the United States) and its long-term viability.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Marketing Strategy; Expansion; India; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Scopie's Enlarged Gland Shrinker." Harvard Business School Case 307-035, August 2006. (Revised September 2006.) View Details
  67. New Sector Alliance (A): An Entry into Health Care?

    Describes the structure of the U.S. health care system and presents a study of a nonprofit consulting firm that hopes to enter the health care system. Includes descriptions of hospitals, doctors, insurers, medical technology providers, medical devices, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and pharmaceutical benefit managers. Also discusses patients and their diseases and causes of death.

    Keywords: Health; Health Care and Treatment; Health Disorders; Nonprofit Organizations; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Stacy Smollin Schwartz, and Jeffrey Cronin. "New Sector Alliance (A): An Entry into Health Care?" Harvard Business School Case 304-004, August 2003. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  68. HealthSouth Corporation

    Delineates how a for-profit health services business was created. Focuses on sources of financing, the impact of Medicare reimbursement, and Stark laws against fraud and abuse.

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Finance; Health Care and Treatment; Law; Rights; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Ivan Cheung. "HealthSouth Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 304-006, August 2003. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  69. I've Got Rhythm: Selling Cardiac Rhythm Management Devices

    The head of sales and marketing in a large medical devices firm must decide how to assign his sales force. He compares selling in the pharma, specialty pharma, and device industries and analyzes the reasons for the differences.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Marketing Strategy; Industry Structures; Sales; Salesforce Management;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., William Lagor, Christopher Perry, and Scott St. Germain. "I've Got Rhythm: Selling Cardiac Rhythm Management Devices." Harvard Business School Case 304-012, August 2003. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  70. Old Tex College

    Requires student to choose among the following health insurance options for employers: number of plans offered, managed care and consumer-driven options, and self-funding vs. full insurance. Teaching purpose: To Understand the design of health insurance. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Insurance; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Compensation and Benefits; Employees;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Ray Herschman. "Old Tex College." Harvard Business School Case 304-014, August 2003. (Revised April 2005.) View Details
  71. New Frontiers in Target Discovery and Validation

    Explains Immusol and Novartis's technology.

    Keywords: Technology; Technological Innovation; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., Niv Caviar, Jon Chatterton, and Andrea Lynn. "New Frontiers in Target Discovery and Validation." Harvard Business School Background Note 303-054, October 2002. (Revised June 2003.) View Details
  72. Scios, Inc.

    Scios, filled with distinguished scientists and experienced managers, nevertheless fails to clear the FDA Phase III process for an important biotechnology drug. This case asks the students to analyze the social costs and benefits of the regulatory process.

    Keywords: Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Health Care and Treatment; Cost Management; Cost vs Benefits; Social Issues; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Scios, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 302-034, August 2001. View Details
  73. University of Trent

    Focuses on two issues: 1) technical systems that can be employed in nonprofit organizations for control and motivational purposes. Systems discussed range from payroll monitoring systems to zero-base budgeting and 2) the managerial environment needed for serious control efforts to take place.

    Keywords: Technology; Motivation and Incentives; Business or Company Management; Nonprofit Organizations; Governance Controls; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "University of Trent." Harvard Business School Case 177-245, June 1977. (Revised May 1997.) View Details
  74. Empire Blue Cross and Blue Shield (A)

    Mounting financial losses and increasing public scrutiny present many challenges to the board of directors of a large nonprofit health insurer. This case series presents chronologically the increasing problems of the company.

    Keywords: Governing and Advisory Boards; Corporate Governance; Financial Condition; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Nonprofit Organizations; Insurance Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Ramona Hilgenkamp. "Empire Blue Cross and Blue Shield (A)." Harvard Business School Case 195-216, April 1995. (Revised August 1995.) View Details
  75. Hospital Replacement Decision, Hospital Corp. of America: Financial Analysis, and Humana, Inc., Teaching Note

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Decision Making; Finance; Insurance Industry; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Hospital Replacement Decision, Hospital Corp. of America: Financial Analysis, and Humana, Inc., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 192-120, June 1992. View Details
  76. Novel Combination of Two Drugs (B) and (C) and Technology Transfer Anti-Inflammatory Drug (B) and (C), Teaching Note

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Technology; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Novel Combination of Two Drugs (B) and (C) and Technology Transfer Anti-Inflammatory Drug (B) and (C), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 192-124, June 1992. View Details
  77. International Harvester: Purchasing Inflation Offset System

    Keywords: Inflation and Deflation; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E., and Kenneth A. Merchant. "International Harvester: Purchasing Inflation Offset System." Harvard Business School Case 181-090, February 1981. (Revised January 1984.) View Details

Presentations

Other Publications and Materials

  1. Benchmarks For Confronting The Challenges For Innovation In Health Care With A Modern Curriculum: 21st-Century Health Care Management Education: Confronting Challenges for Innovation with a Modern Curriculum

    21st-Century Health Care Management Education: Confronting Challenges for Innovation with a Modern Curriculum

    Keywords: health care industry; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Herzlinger, Regina E. "Benchmarks For Confronting The Challenges For Innovation In Health Care With A Modern Curriculum: 21st-Century Health Care Management Education: Confronting Challenges for Innovation with a Modern Curriculum." White Paper Series, Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, January 2013. View Details