Stephen A. Greyser

Richard P. Chapman Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus

Stephen A. Greyser is Richard P. Chapman Professor (Marketing/Communications) Emeritus, Harvard Business School, where he specializes in brand marketing, advertising, corporate communications, the business of sports, and nonprofit management.  A graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Business School, he has been active in research and teaching at HBS since 1958.  He was also an editor at the Harvard Business Review and later its Editorial Board Secretary and Board Chairman.  He is responsible for 16 books, numerous journal articles, several special editions of journals, and over 300 published HBS case studies. Recent publications are Revealing the Corporation with John Balmer (on identity, reputation, corporate branding, etc.) and co-authored articles on “Monarchies as Corporate Brands,” Heritage Brands (a concept he co-created), “Aligning Identity and Strategy” (CMR lead article 2009), a 2011 Journal of Business Ethics article on ethical corporate marketing and BP, “Building and Maintaining Reputation Through Communications”, and a book chapter on “Corporate Communication and the Corporate Persona” (2013).  He wrote the award-winning “Corporate Brand Reputation and Brand Crisis Management” in his co-edited “Corporate Marketing and Identity,” a special 2009 issue of Management Decision.  At HBS, he developed the Corporate Communications elective, creating over 40 cases and articles on issues management, corporate sponsorship, relations among business-media-publics, etc. 

He created and teaches Harvard’s Business of Sports course, has served on the Selection Committee for the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame, is on the board of The Sports Museum, and has authored numerous Business of Sports cases and articles.  The latter include “Winners and Losers in the Olympics” (2006) and several on sponsorship, most recently (2012) on Sponsorship-Linked Internal Marketing (co-author), and an HBS case on Bank of America’s Sports Sponsorship. Two HBS working papers (2013) examined NBC and the 2012 London Olympics and How MLB Clubs Have Commercialized Their Japanese Top Stars. He has organized seminars on Fifty Years of Change in Intercollegiate Athletics, the Business of the Olympics, Sports in China, and “Fenway Park Comes to HBS,” on the business of Fenway Park for its 2012 Centennial.  His comments on the meaning of the Olympics for China were seen by tens of millions in China on CCTV after the 2008 Opening Ceremonies.  At Doha GOALS 2012 he moderated a private conference session of global sports leaders (including Lord Coe) on improving the Olympics.  He received the American Marketing Association’s 2010 Sports Marketing lifetime achievement award for “distinguished career contributions to the scientific understanding of sports business.”

He is past executive director of the Marketing Science Institute and the charter member of its Hall of Fame, and also an elected Fellow of the American Academy of Advertising for career contributions to the field.  He received the Institute for Public Relations 2009 special award for “lifetime contributions to public relations education and research,” and Lipscomb University’s 2011 MediaMasters award for a “body of [communications] work that stands as a model and inspiration for the next generation.” He was recognized by IE University (Spain) for his pioneering work in corporate communication. He twice was a public member of the National Advertising Review Board for U.S. advertising self-regulation.  He has served on numerous corporate and nonprofit boards.  He was the first academic trustee of the Advertising Research Foundation and of the Advertising Educational Foundation.  He is a past national vice chairman of PBS and an overseer at WGBH and at the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), where he was the founding chair of its Trustees Marketing Committee.  He served as Alumni Association president of Boston Latin School, America’s oldest school (1635), and conducted its 350th and 375th Founder’s Day ceremonies as magister eventuum; he received its 2005 Distinguished Graduate Award (previous honorees include Leonard Bernstein, Sumner Redstone, and Theodore White).  He was made an Honorary Fellow (2012) of Brunel University, where he has been a Visiting Professor and a member of its Business School’s Advisory Board.

Known as "the Cal Ripken of HBS," in over 45 years of teaching at Harvard he has never missed a class.

Copyright©2008 President and Fellows of Harvard College

Books

Journal Articles

Book Chapters

  1. Marketing Practice: Source of Problems and Insights for Advancing Marketing Knowledge

    S. A. Greyser

    Keywords: Marketing; Practice; Knowledge Acquisition; Knowledge Dissemination; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Greyser, S. A. "Marketing Practice: Source of Problems and Insights for Advancing Marketing Knowledge." In Enhancing Knowledge Development in Marketing: Perspectives and Viewpoints, edited by P. R. Varadarajan and A. Menon. Chicago: American Marketing Association, 1993. View Details
  2. Executives' Attitudes toward Advertising Regulation: A Survey

    B. B. Reece and S. A. Greyser

    Keywords: Management Teams; Advertising; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Government and Politics; Attitudes; Business and Government Relations; Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    Reece, B. B., and S. A. Greyser. "Executives' Attitudes toward Advertising Regulation: A Survey." In Marketing and Advertising Regulation: The Federal Trade Commission in the 1990s, edited by P. Murphy and W. L. Wilkie. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame, 1990. View Details

Working Papers

  1. The Nobel Prize: A 'Heritage-based' Brand-oriented Network

    Mats Urde and Stephen A. Greyser

    Purpose — Understanding the Nobel Prize as a 'true' heritage brand in a networked situation and its management challenges, especially regarding identity and reputation.

    Methodology — The Nobel Prize serves as an in-depth case study and is analysed within an extended corporate brand identity framework that incorporates reputation.

    Findings — The Nobel Prize is a 'true' corporate heritage brand (in this case, organizational brand). It is the 'hub' of a linked network of brands—"a federated republic". The brand core of the Nobel Prize is its set of core values supporting and leading to its promise; "for the benefit of mankind". The core constitutes a hub around which the essential award-granting institutions, as well as the Nobel Foundation and other related entities and stakeholders gravitate. The laureates represent the Nobel Prize track record. The Will of Alfred Nobel, described as "The Nobel Prize federation's constitution" is interpreted by us as indicating a brand-oriented approach within a network of interrelated institutions and organisations.

    Research implications — The concept of 'brand-oriented networks' is introduced. An individual organisation's approach to its marketplace, brand-resources and strategy may to varying degrees be brand-oriented. This study suggests that brand-orientation also applies to a network of brands. Separately, the extended version of the "corporate brand identity matrix" provides a corporate brand framework for identity and reputation management, including networked brands.

    Practical implications — The new extended framework and the definition of a brand network with a 'hub' provide logic for managing the network. Essential managerial questions on how to leverage brand heritage or not are placed in perspective. Identifying and understanding one's brand heritage and the importance of brand stewardship are reinforced.

    Suggestions for further research — The investigation of brand networks (market-oriented and/or brand oriented) and the application of the new "Corporate Brand Identity and Reputation Matrix".

    Originality / Value — The first case study of the Nobel Prize from a strategic brand management perspective. The articulation and characterisation of it as a 'brand-oriented network'. The development and application of the new CBIRM.

    Keywords: Nobel Prize; heritage brand; brand network; networked brand; brand within a network; brand orientation; brand stewardship; corporate brand identity; reputation; Networks; Organizations; Giving and Philanthropy; Brands and Branding;

    Citation:

    Urde, Mats, and Stephen A. Greyser. "The Nobel Prize: A 'Heritage-based' Brand-oriented Network." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 15-010, August 2014. View Details
  2. Conflicts of College Conference Realignment: Pursuing Revenue, Preserving Tradition, and Assessing the Future

    Vadim Kogan and Stephen A. Greyser

    Over the past two years, conference realignment has taken a front seat in the college sports landscape. Economic incentives were too attractive to overlook for some universities. College football programs across the country have a lot at stake, because for many, football is an integral component of the community's, as well as the university's, culture. With conference realignment already being discussed extensively in the college sports arena as well as in the media, what should these universities do? Passively waiting to see what happens to one's conference is risky, as it may be on the verge of collapse—taking your program with it. On the other hand, boldly applying to a different conference is not a safe bet either, as the future of other conferences may be uncertain. The conflicts between the economic incentives of the program and the emotional desires of sports fans, alumni, and athletes themselves are at the crossroads of these realignment decisions.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Motivation and Incentives; Higher Education; Sports; Revenue; Emotions; Sports Industry; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Kogan, Vadim, and Stephen A. Greyser. "Conflicts of College Conference Realignment: Pursuing Revenue, Preserving Tradition, and Assessing the Future." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 14-073, February 2014. View Details
  3. How Major League Baseball Clubs Have Commercialized Their Investment in Japanese Top Stars

    Isao Okada and Stephen A. Greyser

    When a Major League Baseball club signs a Japanese star player, it obviously tries to commercialize its investment in the player. The initial focus is on home attendance (ticket sales) and television audiences, plus merchandise sales. These elements are similar to those considered for any high-performing players. However, for Japanese stars, there is also the potential to attract significant fandom from the local Japanese community. This represents an opportunity for truly incremental local revenue for the team. In addition, teams try to attract revenue from Japan—such as from corporate sponsors, advertising signage at the home field, and visiting Japanese fans traveling to the U.S. to see these stars perform. In addition to treating team efforts at growing local Japanese community support, this paper examines seven factors for success in attracting revenues from Japanese companies and fans: pitcher or position player, player's popularity, non-stop flights from Japan, distance from Japan, non-sport tourist attractions in a city, size of Japanese community in the city and player's and team's performance. The most important factor, however, is the player's talent and popularity in terms of performance in both Japan and the U.S. and his media exposure in Japan including endorsement contracts. In addition, if a MLB club signs a Japanese position star player and is based in a city which is endowed with a variety of non-baseball tourist attractions, this would have a further advantage for the team.

    The field-based research reported here is derived largely from analysis of team experiences with five principal Japanese baseball stars—Hideo Nomo, Ichiro Suzuki, Hideki Matsui, Daisuke Matsuzaka, and Kosuke Fukudome.

    The paper's "2013 Reflections" (pp. 15-17) includes analysis of Yu Darvish of the Texas Rangers.

    Keywords: Commercialization; Sports; Revenue; Sports Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Okada, Isao, and Stephen A. Greyser. "How Major League Baseball Clubs Have Commercialized Their Investment in Japanese Top Stars." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 14-029, September 2013. View Details
  4. NBC and the 2012 London Olympics: Unexpected Success

    Stephen A. Greyser and Vadim Kogan

    "The 2010 Vancouver Winter Games lost $223 million, astonishing for a 17-day event. Next year's London Summer Games, which cost a record Olympic rights fee of $1.18 billion, are expected to lose at least as much..." wrote Richard Sandomir in The New York Times. "NBC Could Lose $100 Million On London Olympics; Ratings Not Expected To Beat Beijing" chimed in John Clarke with Forbes. Sandomir and Clarke were not alone in their damning prediction. Analysts and media put forth similar commentary following NBC's embarrassing loss in Vancouver. The media had prepared a grave for NBC as the 2012 London Olympics approached. Indeed, critics created #NBCFail to characterize their expectations. Yet, as the Games wound down, it was NBC that was smiling. Their forecast had paid off. They found that not only were the Games profitable that year, they had achieved record viewership. How could they have gone from one extreme of failure to another extreme of success so quickly? The network began analyzing factors that helped—as well as decisions that had received much criticism—so that it could begin its planning of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia and 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Keywords: Success; Profit; Sports; Failure; Television Entertainment; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Sports Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Vancouver; Beijing; London; Brazil; Russia;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Vadim Kogan. "NBC and the 2012 London Olympics: Unexpected Success." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 14-028, September 2013. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Peter Guber: The 'Me' vs. 'We' Brand

    Stephen A. Greyser, William Ellet and Nelson Gayton

    Well-known film producer Peter Guber must decide whether to commit to a time-consuming personal project. He is about to sign a contract for a business book in which he will share what he has learned in his long career. At the same time, he is keenly aware of problems and uncertainties affecting Mandalay Entertainment, a privately owned company in which he is principal. Mandalay produces movies and television content, owns minor league baseball teams, and is pushing into digital content. Mandalay is trying to reinvigorate its core movie and television businesses, maintain growth in the sports business, and be prepared for the opportunity to buy a major league professional sports franchise. Does Guber eliminate all personal projects and stay tightly focused on guiding his company? On the other hand, there may never be a good time to write a book. He also has to consider the potential impact of a book project on his personal brand and the Mandalay company brand.

    Keywords: Work-Life Balance; Entrepreneurship; Brands and Branding; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., William Ellet, and Nelson Gayton. "Peter Guber: The 'Me' vs. 'We' Brand." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 915-402, August 2014. View Details
  2. Peter Guber: The 'Me' vs. 'We' Brand

    Stephen A. Greyser, William Ellet and Nelson Gayton

    Well-known film producer Peter Guber must decide whether to commit to a time-consuming personal project. He is about to sign a contract for a business book in which he will share what he has learned in his long career. At the same time, he is keenly aware of problems and uncertainties affecting Mandalay Entertainment, a privately-owned company in which he is principal. Mandalay produces movies and television content, owns minor league baseball teams, and is pushing into digital content. Mandalay is trying to reinvigorate its core movie and television businesses, maintain growth in the sports business, and be prepared for the opportunity to buy a major league professional sports franchise. Does Guber eliminate all personal projects and stay tightly focused on guiding his company? On the other hand, there may never be a good time to write a book. He also has to consider the potential impact of a book project on his personal brand and the Mandalay company brand.

    Keywords: Work-Life Balance; Entrepreneurship; Brands and Branding; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., William Ellet, and Nelson Gayton. "Peter Guber: The 'Me' vs. 'We' Brand." Harvard Business School Case 915-401, August 2014. View Details
  3. Bank of America Sports Sponsorship

    Stephen A. Greyser and John L. Teopaco

    A major sports sponsor must decide on new, renewal, or withdrawal from significant relations with teams/leagues/events, using a distinctive approach to assessment.

    Keywords: Cost vs Benefits; Decision Choices and Conditions; Partners and Partnerships; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Performance Evaluation; Financing and Loans; Marketing Strategy; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and John L. Teopaco. "Bank of America Sports Sponsorship." Harvard Business School Case 910-406, August 2009. View Details
  4. Major League Soccer--1996-1998: Now, Later...Never?

    Stephen A. Greyser and Kirk A. Goldman

    Major League Soccer (MLS) has entered the U.S. "big league" sports arena. This case reviews its first several years. Students must determine the basic business model of MLS in the context of changes in the fan acceptance of soccer in the United States. A comparison should be made with the experience of the North American Soccer League. Students must assess the progress made by MLS in each of its early seasons. Several new (1998) issues for MLS are included for further student discussion. The ultimate question is whether MLS can be successful long-term.

    Keywords: Business Model; Success; Performance Evaluation; Sports; Sports Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Kirk A. Goldman. "Major League Soccer--1996-1998: Now, Later...Never?" Harvard Business School Case 599-023, December 1998. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  5. The National Hockey League's New Television Contract for 2004 and Beyond

    Stephen A. Greyser and Elizabeth (Lisa) Smyth

    The National Hockey League (NHL) has negotiated a new television contract at record rights-fee levels for hockey. The NHL will be shifting its principal television partner from Fox to ESPN/ABC. Students are asked to analyze the current and future contracts in terms of revenue yield and visibility. The case also raises continuing questions about the roles of a sports league's television partner--especially in fan development.

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Television Entertainment; Contracts; Marketing Communications; Agreements and Arrangements; Partners and Partnerships; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Elizabeth (Lisa) Smyth. "The National Hockey League's New Television Contract for 2004 and Beyond." Harvard Business School Case 599-108, June 1999. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  6. NFL-Network Television Contracts, 1998-2005, The

    Stephen A. Greyser

    The National Football League (NFL) is negotiating its next round of national television contracts with its broadcast and cable TV partners. The revenues from these contracts constitute a major source of income for the individual NFL teams. The case provides information on the history of the NFL on television, TV ratings for major sports, TV rights fees for major sports (including the recent new NBA TV contract), and the current contract with each broadcast partner. Ideas proposed to the NFL by rights-holders and rights-seekers are also included.

    Keywords: History; Rights; Contracts; Business Earnings; Negotiation; Partners and Partnerships; Budgets and Budgeting; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "NFL-Network Television Contracts, 1998-2005, The." Harvard Business School Case 599-039, June 1999. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  7. Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA)

    Stephen A. Greyser

    Chronicles the background of the founding of the WNBA, its basic business concept, some of the key research information used by the NBA in launching it, and other related information. Students must analyze the "basic business model" involved and compare it to that of the American Basketball League (another women's professional league). Students must consider whether both leagues ultimately can be successful, only one, or neither.

    Keywords: Business Model; Research; Outcome or Result; Sports; Gender; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA)." Harvard Business School Case 599-032, February 1999. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  8. Friendly Fenway Program, The: The Value of Experience Enhancement

    Stephen A. Greyser

    The marketing head of the Boston Red Sox is reviewing the team's "Friendly Fenway" fan satisfaction program. The program is described in the context of the team's on-the-field performance, the ballpark's character, and team marketing and fan-building in general. The revenue implications of increased customer satisfaction are also raised, within the framework of team economics.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Revenue; Framework; Management; Marketing Reference Programs; Performance; Boston;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "Friendly Fenway Program, The: The Value of Experience Enhancement." Harvard Business School Case 599-035, June 1999. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  9. I Lost My Volvo in New Haven: Tennis Event Sponsorship

    Stephen A. Greyser, Brian R. Harris and Mitchell Truwit

    Focuses on event management and sponsorship from the perspective of the event owner (rather than that of the sponsorship company). Describes in depth the search by one of the tennis tournaments on the professional circuit for a principal sponsor. Detailed economics of tournament management are included, as well as information on the linkage between tournament sponsorship and television. Students must decide among several specific interested companies as the best sponsor for the tournament. The event owner must also consider how, if at all, his tournament can be differentiated from the many others on the calendar.

    Keywords: Marketing Communications; Decision Choices and Conditions; Management; Product Positioning; Television Entertainment; Sports; Partners and Partnerships; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., Brian R. Harris, and Mitchell Truwit. "I Lost My Volvo in New Haven: Tennis Event Sponsorship." Harvard Business School Case 599-037, February 1999. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  10. The American Basketball League: The Last Chapter

    Stephen A. Greyser and Elizabeth (Lisa) Smyth

    Provides information on the demise of the American Basketball League (ABL) in December 1998. Reviews the League's attendance, television activity, and competitive positioning versus the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). In conjunction with earlier cases on the ABL and the WNBA, students are asked to assess the reasons why the league was not financially successful. A chronology of the ABL's history is included.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Failure; Finance; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Elizabeth (Lisa) Smyth. "The American Basketball League: The Last Chapter." Harvard Business School Case 599-109, June 1999. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  11. Women's Professional Basketball and the American Basketball League

    Stephen A. Greyser and Natalie Zakarian

    Chronicles the growth and development of women's professional basketball. Particular emphasis is on the impact of Title IX, the 1996 women's gold medal Olympic team, and the advent of the American Basketball League (ABL). The structure and "basic business model" of the ABL are described along with its various revenue sources. Encourages discussion of the conditions that favor women's professional sports in the late 1990s.

    Keywords: Business Model; Problems and Challenges; Sports; Gender; Planning; Growth and Development; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Natalie Zakarian. "Women's Professional Basketball and the American Basketball League." Harvard Business School Case 599-031, April 1999. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  12. Tarnished Rings? Olympic Games Sponsorship Issues

    John A. Clendenin and Stephen A. Greyser

    Focuses on the impacts for Olympic sponsor companies of the bribery allegations related to the Salt Lake City Olympic Committee's successful bid for the 2002 Winter Games. The spread of the scandal to the International Olympic Committee board members and the recent bids of other cities threaten the value of Olympic sponsorship to key companies involved.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Crisis Management; Marketing Channels; Consumer Behavior; Value Creation; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Clendenin, John A., and Stephen A. Greyser. "Tarnished Rings? Olympic Games Sponsorship Issues." Harvard Business School Case 599-107, April 1999. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  13. Life as a Minor League CEO Frank Burke and The Chattanooga Lookouts

    Stephen A. Greyser and Kirk A. Goldman

    A "slice of life" depiction of the range of issues and activities experienced by Frank Burke (HBS MBA 1987), the president of a minor league baseball team (the Chattanooga Lookouts). Raises questions of the applicability of MBA skills in this role and the "quotient of contentment" an HBS MBA can have in this situation. The similarities and differences of minor league versus major league operations are an important analytic component. Among the specific issues Burke confronts are finding additional revenue streams, considering ticket price increases, and the pros and cons of a new stadium.

    Keywords: Happiness; Managerial Roles; Entrepreneurship; Business or Company Management; Marketing; Cost Management; Cost vs Benefits; Operations; Sports; Business Education; Sports Industry; Tennessee;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Kirk A. Goldman. "Life as a Minor League CEO Frank Burke and The Chattanooga Lookouts." Harvard Business School Case 599-029, February 1999. (Revised July 2004.) View Details
  14. The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston/Fleet Financial Group Sponsorship of Monet in the 20th Century

    Stephen A. Greyser and David Crockett

    The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and Fleet Financial Group's sponsored the Monet in the 20th Century exhibition, the world's largest, in 1998. The case chronicles the solicitation of a large corporate sponsor, as well as the growth and development of their partnership. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Nonprofit Organizations; Finance; Product Development; For-Profit Firms; Partners and Partnerships; Arts; Brands and Branding; Innovation and Invention; Fine Arts Industry; Financial Services Industry; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and David Crockett. "The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston/Fleet Financial Group Sponsorship of Monet in the 20th Century." Harvard Business School Case 502-059, March 2002. (Revised October 2002.) View Details
  15. Introducing ... The XFL!

    Susan M. Fournier, Stephen A. Greyser and Seth Schulman

    When the XFL professional football league debuted on February 3, 2001, it generated a Nielsen rating of 10.1, higher than any nationally televised program in a Saturday evening time slot. The next week, ratings plummeted, and by week nine the XFL game earned the title as the lowest rated sports event in television history. Co-owners WWFE and NBC officially disbanded the XFL on May 10, 2001. What went wrong? How could two seasoned and respected figures in entertainment--WWFE's Vince McMahon and NBC's Dick Ebersol--have miscalculated so badly?

    Keywords: Advertising; Forecasting and Prediction; Product Positioning; Consumer Behavior; Product Development; Culture; Commercialization;

    Citation:

    Fournier, Susan M., Stephen A. Greyser, and Seth Schulman. "Introducing ... The XFL!" Harvard Business School Case 503-015, July 2002. View Details
  16. Major League Baseball--1999

    Stephen A. Greyser and Elizabeth (Lisa) Smyth

    Major League Baseball (MLB) has experienced a very positive 1998 season and must assess its situation and consider new initiatives for 1999. The latter include building, a fan base, television coverage, etc.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Business and Stakeholder Relations; Situation or Environment;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Elizabeth (Lisa) Smyth. "Major League Baseball--1999." Harvard Business School Case 599-121, June 1999. View Details
  17. Sports Agents: Is There a Firm Advantage?

    Stephen A. Greyser and Brian R. Harris

    Focuses on the decision of a young tennis player on what kind of agent to have as his representative. The choice is between someone in a large sports management/marketing firm and an independent agent representing a small number of individual athletes. Outlines the roles and duties of agents and sports management firms.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Knowledge Management; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Organizational Structure;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Brian R. Harris. "Sports Agents: Is There a Firm Advantage?" Harvard Business School Case 599-038, February 1999. View Details
  18. John Hancock Sports Sponsorship: 1993-2000 and Beyond

    Stephen A. Greyser and John Teopaco

    Examines sports sponsorship at John Hancock through 1998 and prospectively beyond. From its early sponsorship of the legendary Boston Marathon, the company had expanded its activities substantially. It was one of the worldwide "Top Sponsor" companies of the Olympics, a very significant expenditure. The company also sponsors the U.S. Tour of World Gymnastics Champions and Figure Skating Champions. Students must analyze the company's activities in the context of benefits to John Hancock and its constituencies. Considerable description is included of ways the company tries to "leverage" its sponsorships. The company's principles of sports sponsorships are included.

    Keywords: Opportunities; Values and Beliefs; Marketing Strategy; Sports;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and John Teopaco. "John Hancock Sports Sponsorship: 1993-2000 and Beyond." Harvard Business School Case 599-027, December 1998. View Details
  19. NHL 1998: "The Coolest Game in Nagano"

    Stephen A. Greyser and Kirk A. Goldman

    Explores the National Hockey League's participation in the 1998 Winter Olympics, for which a "winter break" was taken from the regular schedule. The benefits and risks associated with the NHL's Olympic participation are one specific focus. In addition, the case address fan development and league growth, including franchise expansion to the U.S. Sun Belt, the role of national television for the NHL, and the impact of Grassroots Programs.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Brands and Branding; Marketing Communications; Opportunities; Competitive Strategy; Expansion;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Kirk A. Goldman. NHL 1998: "The Coolest Game in Nagano". Harvard Business School Case 599-024, December 1998. View Details
  20. Note on Dedicated Sports Stadium Revenues

    Stephen A. Greyser and Kirk A. Goldman

    An overview of the rapid growth of stadium development in professional sports in the 1990s. The range of special stadium revenue streams is described along with specific examples of stadiums for the Washington Redskins and Carolina Panthers.

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Development Economics; Decisions; Growth and Development; Revenue; Sports; Buildings and Facilities; Sports Industry; District of Columbia; North Carolina;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Kirk A. Goldman. "Note on Dedicated Sports Stadium Revenues." Harvard Business School Background Note 599-026, December 1998. View Details
  21. CUC and HFS: Corporate Identity for a "Merger of Equals"

    Stephen A. Greyser and Robert J. Crawford

    In the wake of a major $20 billion market capitalization "merger of equals," two large consumer service firms must determine a new name for the new entity. Neither CUC nor HFS is well known among consumers. The CUC Services (e.g., shopping, travel, credit card insurance, etc.) and the HFS brands (e.g., Avis, Century 21, Ramada Inns) are well known. Among the key issues are the "publics" to which the new name is important, whether the name should link to either or both merging firms, and whether the new name should suggest the lines of business the firms operate (principally consumer services).

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Capital; Brands and Branding; Identity; Customization and Personalization; Value; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Robert J. Crawford. CUC and HFS: Corporate Identity for a "Merger of Equals". Harvard Business School Case 598-028, December 1997. (Revised May 1998.) View Details
  22. Historical Society of Pennsylvania, The

    Stephen A. Greyser and Stephanie L. Woerner

    The Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP) runs one of the nation's most important research libraries and a museum focusing on colonial history. Financial analysis shows that the society has absorbed increased costs of operation over the past decade through slow but steady depletion of its endowment and deferment of capital investments. Now the board is faced with three options: 1) continue to operate both the research library and the museum on a dwindling resource base; 2) continue to operate the research library, but deaccess the museum, using proceeds to fortify the research library; and 3) continue to operate the research library, but turn over the artifact collection to a new Philadelphia-wide museum to be created in collaboration with three other organizations.

    Keywords: Finance; Cost; Human Resources; Leadership Style; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Managerial Roles; Mission and Purpose; Corporate Strategy; Pennsylvania;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Stephanie L. Woerner. "Historical Society of Pennsylvania, The." Harvard Business School Case 597-062, November 1996. (Revised February 1997.) View Details
  23. Brent Spar Incident, The: "A Shell of a Mess"

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    Seeking to dispose of an outmoded oil drilling platform in the North Sea, Shell finds itself confronted by Greenpeace and other environmentalists. The protesters land 12 people onto the rig and initiate media coverage of their "occupation." The case follows the events during the spring and summer of 1995, focusing on the United Kingdom and Continent countries. Students are confronted with the need to recommend communication approaches and actions at various stages of the developments.

    Keywords: Communication; Media; Social Issues; Technology Platform; Mining Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. Brent Spar Incident, The: "A Shell of a Mess". Harvard Business School Case 597-013, December 1996. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  24. Siemens Corporation (A): Corporate Advertising for 1992

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    Describes the approach of the German-based multinational company, Siemens Corp., to establishing an identity in the United States. The specific goals for the 1991-92 corporate advertising campaign are described. Examples of print and television messages are included, using the core theme "That was then--This is now." Target audiences are identified, and the program's media, budget, and methods of evaluating the campaign are also described. Acquaints students with the objective and detailed program specifics of corporate advertising campaigns. Examines how a non-U.S. based company seeks to build corporate awareness and identity in the U.S. despite very limited product exposure to consumers.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Trade; Marketing Strategy; Market Entry and Exit; Performance Evaluation; Germany; United States;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. "Siemens Corporation (A): Corporate Advertising for 1992." Harvard Business School Case 593-022, December 1992. (Revised June 1996.) View Details
  25. Siemens Corporation (B): Corporate Advertising for 1996

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    Describes the television advertising and presents examples of the comparable print ads, then documents new measurement tools and presents the results of key surveys that address audience awareness. Also includes other relevant activities to support Siemens USA's corporate identity. These include umbrella activities, such as a presence in Atlanta for the Summer Olympics, joint trade activities, work with colleagues in Munich to support major projects in China, and the introduction of a Web page.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Learning; Balanced Scorecard; Operations; Outcome or Result; Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. "Siemens Corporation (B): Corporate Advertising for 1996." Harvard Business School Case 596-106, June 1996. View Details
  26. Exxon: Communications After Valdez

    Stephen A. Greyser and Nancy Langford

    Focuses on the communications in the period immediately following the March 24, 1989 Alaska oil spill caused by the Exxon Valdez. Includes the text of Exxon Chairman Rawl's "open letter" in an April 3 newspaper advertisment. Addresses the timing and content of corporate communications and actions following crisis.

    Keywords: Advertising; Communication; Crisis Management; Marketing Communications;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Nancy Langford. "Exxon: Communications After Valdez." Harvard Business School Case 593-014, September 1992. (Revised October 1995.) View Details
  27. Intel's Pentium: When the Chips Are Down (A)

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    Intel, the largest-selling manufacturer of microprocessor computer chips, finds itself in a brand-threatening situation when a flaw is revealed in its top-of-the-line Pentium chip. The story is front-page news for weeks. The company invested tens of millions of dollars in advertising its branded Pentium chip as a high-quality component via the campaign slogan "Intel Inside." Issues include salience of the problem, when Intel knew of the problem, how it was revealed, and what actions should be undertaken. Teaching Purpose: Students analyze consequences of a company miscue that becomes a much bigger story than initially anticipated. Analogies may be made to other company crisis situations involving brands and communications.

    Keywords: Advertising; Engineering; Crisis Management; Brands and Branding; Production; Failure; Semiconductor Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. "Intel's Pentium: When the Chips Are Down (A)." Harvard Business School Case 595-058, December 1994. View Details
  28. Cunard Line Ltd.: Managing Integrated Marketing Communications

    Stephen A. Greyser

    Cunard, the world's oldest luxury line company, is confronted with several key issues involving its marketing and marketing communications strategy. One concerns the balance between image/positioning advertising and short-term-oriented promotional advertising/communications on behalf of each individual Cunard ship (i.e., "pull" vs. "push" communications). Related to this is the overall mix of marketing communications tools used by Cunard--media advertising, direct marketing, etc. Another issue is the emphasis in marketing communications between focus on the Cunard corporate identity and focus on the identity of the individual ships. The organizational setting is one of integrating marketing communications for the company and its products. Impacting consideration of the issues is a period of economic conditions adversely affecting sales, along with the effects of the U.S.-Iraq conflict on consumer leisure travel.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Product Positioning; Consumer Behavior; Organizational Structure; Identity; Balance and Stability; Shipping Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "Cunard Line Ltd.: Managing Integrated Marketing Communications." Harvard Business School Case 594-046, June 1994. (Revised August 1994.) View Details
  29. British Airways: ""Go for It, America!"" Promotion (B)

    Stephen A. Greyser

    Provides details on the results of the campaign for British Airways (BA) in terms of expenditure by BA, press coverage, effect on bookings, and effect on overall market share.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Cost Management; Information Publishing; Marketing Strategy; Market Participation; Aerospace Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. British Airways: ""Go for It, America!"" Promotion (B). Harvard Business School Supplement 592-050, November 1991. (Revised October 1993.) View Details
  30. BMW: The Ultimate Driving Machine Seeks to De-Yuppify Itself

    Stephen A. Greyser and Wendy Smith Schille

    Tracks changes in the luxury auto market during the 1980s and early 1990s. Shifts in target consumer behavior--particularly the yuppie lifestyle--serve as the basis for manufacturer modifications of product line, positioning, and advertising. The climax of the case is the 1991 overt effort by BMW to "de-yuppify" itself in the minds of the target market.

    Keywords: Advertising; Change Management; Transformation; Brands and Branding; Product Positioning; Production; Luxury; Segmentation; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Wendy Smith Schille. "BMW: The Ultimate Driving Machine Seeks to De-Yuppify Itself." Harvard Business School Case 593-046, December 1992. (Revised October 1993.) View Details
  31. Sunkist Growers, Inc.

    Stephen A. Greyser and John A. Quelch

    A new media strategy for lemon advertising involving the concentration of the entire budget in a single-print vehicle, is under consideration.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Marketing Communications; Advertising;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and John A. Quelch. "Sunkist Growers, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 577-051, October 1976. (Revised June 1993.) View Details
  32. BASF: Corporate Advertising for 1992

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    Describes BASF's corporate advertising program in the United States. In 1992, BASF's U.S. companies extended an existing corporate advertising campaign to continue to build awareness of the German-based multinational's corporate identity. The core theme of the campaign is "We don't make the products you buy ... we make the products you buy better." The campaign appears only on television. The goals, target audiences, messages, media, budget, and approaches to evaluation are described. Acquaints students with the objectives and detailed program specifics of corporate advertising campaigns. Examines how a non-U.S. based company seeks to build corporate awareness and identity in the U.S. despite having only a single company-branded consumer product.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Marketing Communications; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Corporate Strategy; Consumer Products Industry; United States; Germany;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. "BASF: Corporate Advertising for 1992." Harvard Business School Case 593-021, December 1992. View Details
  33. Du Pont: Corporate Advertising for 1992

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    Describes Du Pont's 1992 corporate advertising campaign, and its objectives and key messages. The campaign is set in the context of Du Pont's historical corporate positioning ("better things for better living"). Includes target audiences, budget considerations, and the role of print and television advertising as well as events sponsorship. Also includes Du Pont's approach to evaluating its corporate advertising. Acquaints students with the objectives and detailed program specifics of corporate advertising campaigns, to examine the continuity of corporate image position of a major high-visibility diversified firm.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Brands and Branding; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Chemical Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. "Du Pont: Corporate Advertising for 1992." Harvard Business School Case 593-023, December 1992. View Details
  34. Johnson & Johnson: The Tylenol Tragedy

    Stephen A. Greyser

    In October 1982, Johnson & Johnson was confronted with a major crisis when seven deaths were attributed to poisoned Tylenol. The case reviews the facts as known a week after the incident occurred, and raises a wide range of questions regarding consumer behavior, corporate responsibility, and competitive reaction.

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Competitive Strategy; Crisis Management; Health Care and Treatment; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "Johnson & Johnson: The Tylenol Tragedy." Harvard Business School Case 583-043, October 1982. (Revised May 1992.) View Details
  35. Archdiocese of New York

    Stephen A. Greyser and John A. Quelch

    A print media campaign to improve attitudes toward the Catholic priesthood and to indirectly increase vocations is evaluated through a comparison of pretest and post-test data.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Measurement and Metrics; Media; Public Opinion; Valuation; Media and Broadcasting Industry; New York (state, US);

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and John A. Quelch. "Archdiocese of New York." Harvard Business School Case 579-123, December 1978. (Revised March 1992.) View Details
  36. G. Heileman Brewing Co. (A): Power Failure At PowerMaster

    Stephen A. Greyser

    In June 1991, Heileman announced plans to introduce a high-alcohol malt liquor under the name PowerMaster (PM). Although the company claimed PM would be positioned as an upscale product and marketed on the basis of its superior taste, minority advocates and alcohol foes quickly assailed the company for targeting lower-income, inner-city black consumers. In the wake of protests, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (BATF), which had previously approved the PM product, initiated a review of PM and several other high-alcohol malt liquor products that BATF considered to be in violation of federal law prohibiting brewers from stating or even implying the alcohol content of their products. Shortly after, BATF requested that Heileman remove the word "power" from PM's label. Heileman cancelled plans to launch the product. The case encompasses both target marketing and ethical issues. Illustrates a problem faced by many American brewers: How can these companies increase beer sales in a slow-growing, increasingly saturated market, which is completely dominated by the Anheuser-Busch companies?

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Ethics; Lawfulness; Brands and Branding; Product Positioning; Demand and Consumers; Market Entry and Exit; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "G. Heileman Brewing Co. (A): Power Failure At PowerMaster." Harvard Business School Case 592-017, September 1991. (Revised December 1991.) View Details
  37. British Airways: ""Go for It, America!"" Promotion (A)

    Stephen A. Greyser

    Senior marketing executives of a major international airline are deciding on a strategy to address a crisis situation precipitated by a series of terrorist acts. The company is experiencing the worst downturn ever in its U.S.-U.K. travel business due to media reports and resulting consumer perceptions that Europe is under a "reign of terror." Alternative strategies range from doing nothing to staging an ambitious sales promotion. Major issues include: the role of sales promotion in addressing consumer perceptions of a life-and-death issue (i.e., terrorism), and the implementation and integration of advertising, sales promotion, and public relations efforts within a compressed time frame.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Crime and Corruption; Crisis Management; Management Teams; Time Management; Marketing Strategy; Perception; Value Creation; Travel Industry; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. British Airways: ""Go for It, America!"" Promotion (A). Harvard Business School Case 589-089, January 1989. (Revised December 1991.) View Details
  38. Magic Johnson: Endorsements ""After""...?

    Stephen A. Greyser

    On Thursday, November 7, 1991, Los Angeles Lakers star Earvin "Magic" Johnson announced his retirement from basketball in the wake of having tested positive for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Magic Johnson was one of the most popular figures in sports, both nationally and internationally. Among the many affected by Johnson's sudden retirement were his commercial sponsors, a group of companies comprising both sporting goods and other consumer products. The case looks at the situation through the lens of the sponsors. Should they retain their association with Johnson? If so, for how long and in what ways? Provides students with the opportunity to put themselves in the shoes of a marketing director, faced with the sudden reversal of fortune of one of the company's key endorsers. Allows for role playing from various perspectives: that of the MD of a sporting goods company compared to the MD of some other consumer product for example.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Value; Sports; Advertising; Alliances; Problems and Challenges; Decision Choices and Conditions; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; Sports Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. Magic Johnson: Endorsements ""After""...? Harvard Business School Case 592-057, November 1991. View Details
  39. Volkswagen of America: Audi 5000 (A)

    Stephen A. Greyser

    Audi marketing executives and their advertising agency colleagues must decide which of several advertising executions should be employed for the introductory campaign for the Audi 5000, their new car entry scheduled to replace the Audi 100LS in the United States in the fall of 1977. The positioning of the 5000 focused on engineering and design superiority. Two alternative executions based on this strategy were being considered. Background information is provided on Audi's German and U.S. marketing experiences, on competitive car positionings in the United States, and on the new campaigns.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Auto Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "Volkswagen of America: Audi 5000 (A)." Harvard Business School Case 591-065, January 1991. View Details
  40. Volkswagen of America: Audi 5000 (B)

    Stephen A. Greyser

    Six months after the launch in the United States of Audi 5000, Audi marketing executives and their advertising agency must appraise the introductory advertising for the car. Three alternative campaigns to replace the current one are under consideration.

    Keywords: Advertising; Advertising Campaigns; Product Launch; Performance Evaluation; Auto Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "Volkswagen of America: Audi 5000 (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 591-066, January 1991. View Details
  41. NASA After Challenger: Restoring an Image

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    In the days following the loss of the space shuttle Challenger and its crew in January of 1986, NASA officials were unwilling to communicate with the media or the public. A siege mentality took hold, and the press and public responded with intense criticism and inquiry. The case describes NASA's harmonious relationship with the media before Challenger, and the many obstacles William Sheehan faced when he stepped in to attempt to restore NASA's image and relationship with the media after Challenger. The issues include the special problems faced by a public institution with a history of poor internal communication, and the compounded difficulties of attempting to create effective internal policy while also trying to restore credibility with the media and deal with investigative probes.

    Keywords: Communication Strategy; Policy; Business and Community Relations; Situation or Environment; Conflict Management;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. "NASA After Challenger: Restoring an Image." Harvard Business School Case 591-009, August 1990. View Details
  42. Philip Morris Companies' ""Bill of Rights"" Sponsorship Program

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    Describes the new policy of the National Archives of inviting corporate cosponsorship of historic exhibits and commemorations. In November 1989, Philip Morris Companies (PM) became the first cosponsor of the bicentennial commemoration of the Bill of Rights, and used the announcement of the cosponsorship as the foundation of a major corporate identity and image campaign in mass media. Also describes other current PM initiatives to sustain and improve its corporate image. Students are encouraged to think through the potential benefits and risks of PM's corporate campaigns, and then to examine the dimensions of this particular campaign.

    Keywords: Policy; Brands and Branding; Decisions; Advertising; Marketing Strategy; Risk and Uncertainty; Financing and Loans; Reputation; Nonprofit Organizations;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. Philip Morris Companies' ""Bill of Rights"" Sponsorship Program. Harvard Business School Case 590-108, April 1990. View Details
  43. Philip Morris Companies' ""Bill of Rights"" Sponsorship Program, Responses

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    Describes the reactions of public interest groups, members of the House of Representatives, and others. Further documents reactions to the choice of Philip Morris (PM) as a sponsor. Invites students to weigh the corporate pluses and minuses for PM, given these reactions.

    Keywords: Marketing Channels; Behavior; Public Opinion; Segmentation;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. Philip Morris Companies' ""Bill of Rights"" Sponsorship Program, Responses. Harvard Business School Supplement 590-109, April 1990. View Details
  44. Perrier Recall: A Source of Trouble

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    When a laboratory discovered traces of the carcinogen benzene in bottles of Perrier, Group Perrier of America immediately announced a voluntary U.S. recall of all Perrier brand imported water. This case describes press coverage of the U.S. recall and the worldwide recall that followed. Also presents key statements by company officials (some presented in the form of advertisements) and various experts. Students are encouraged to explore the several kinds of issues that emerged as the company attempted to explain its problems and advocate the purity of its product. Concludes with the announcement of the relaunch of the brand with "nouvelle production."

    Keywords: Crisis Management; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. "Perrier Recall: A Source of Trouble." Harvard Business School Case 590-104, April 1990. View Details
  45. News and No Comment at Emery Air Freight

    Stephen A. Greyser and Norman Klein

    A reporter from a regional newspaper examines several major news stories that address significant recent developments at Emery Air Freight. His concerns invite discussion of the implications of Emery's apparent "no comment" policy and other factors that can lead to negative press coverage of company news.

    Keywords: Reputation; Newspapers; Communication Strategy; Shipping Industry;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and Norman Klein. "News and No Comment at Emery Air Freight." Harvard Business School Case 589-104, April 1989. View Details
  46. John Hancock Financial Services: Sports Sponsorship

    Stephen A. Greyser

    Senior corporate communications executives of a major financial services firm are reviewing the company's sports sponsorship program and are considering expanding it. Hancock already is the corporate sponsor of the Boston Marathon and has the opportunity to sponsor the Sun Bowl (football game). Major questions include the role and evaluation of sports sponsorship as part of Hancock's image enhancement initiatives.

    Keywords: Communication Strategy; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A. "John Hancock Financial Services: Sports Sponsorship." Harvard Business School Case 588-051, December 1987. View Details