Robert J. Dolan

MBA Class of 1952 Baker Foundation Professor of Business Administration

Robert J. Dolan is the Baker Foundation Professor at Harvard Business School and currently teaches the first year Marketing course in the MBA program. He rejoined HBS in 2012, having served as the Stephen M. Ross Professor and Edward J. Frey Dean at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan from 2001 to 2012. Previously, he was on the HBS faculty from 1980 to 2001 and served as the Edward W. Carter Professor of Business Administration. He has also held faculty appointments at the University of Chicago and IESE in Barcelona, Spain.

Robert J. Dolan is the Baker Foundation Professor at Harvard Business School. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Rochester and began his academic career in 1976 as a faculty member at the Graduate School of Business of the University of Chicago. He joined the Harvard Business School faculty in 1980 and became the Edward W. Carter Professor of Business Administration. He served as the Chairman of the Marketing area from 1986 to 1994. He has also been a visiting professor at IESE in Barcelona, Spain.

In 2001, he became the Dean of the University of Michigan Business School in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The School offered the broadest portfolio of degree programs among the leading business schools with the following degrees: Bachelor's of Business Administration, MBA (offered in five different formats - Day, Evening, Weekend, Executive and Global), Master's in Supply Chain Management, Master's in Accounting, and Ph.D.  In addition, the School collaborated with two schools at the University to offer two joint Master's programs - the Erb Program in Sustainability (joint with the School of Natural Resources and Environment) and the Tauber Program on Global Operations (joint with the College of Engineering).

Under Dolan's leadership, the School embarked on a strategy of differentiation via a focus on action-based learning where teams of students undertook field-based projects under the supervision of the faculty. For MBA students, this took the form of the Multidisciplinary Action Project (MAP) program in which two months at the end of the first year required courses were dedicated to working on high level projects with leading companies around the world. To afford students an opportunity for a global experience, over half the projects were outside the United States. These projects were deliberately not pre-defined for the students, affording them the opportunity to define issues and operate in an "opportunity sensing" rather just "problem solving" mode. As a result of these investments in innovative action-learning programs, the School was twice named the Best MBA Program in the world by the Wall Street Journal, based on their polling of recruiters. The Aspen Institute recognized the school as the best in training on issues of sustainability. To obtain the financial resources to support this strategy and the needed infrastructure, the School embarked on a Capital Campaign, raising nearly $400 million, including the $100 million dollar gift obtained by Dolan from Stephen M Ross, a New York real estate developer. At the time, it was the largest gift ever made to a business school and still is the largest ever given to the University of Michigan. The Schools is now known as the Ross School of Business. While at Michigan, Dolan was also President of the William Davidson Institute for Global Economies and the Zell-Lurie Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies. He was also special counsel to the Provost on Visioning the future at the University.

An expert in marketing and, in particular, issues of pricing and new product development, Dolas has authored or coauthored eight books and has published in a wide variety of journals including the Harvard Business Review, Marketing Science and the Journal of Marketing. His case studies and technical notes developed at Harvard Business School are among the most widely used in academia, selling over 2.5 million copies. One of his cases, Sealed Air Corporation, with sales of over 300,000 copies, was recently designated by Harvard as one of the three "classics" in the Harvard collection. He has consulted with and provided executive education for leading firms throughout the world including General Electric, IBM and Henkel. He also was the marketing expert in several of the landmark cases tried in the United States including for Polaroid in its award of over $1 billion for patent infringement from Kodak and for the Justice Department of the United States in its actions against the tobacco companies. He has been on the board of directors of four publicly traded companies. He is currently working on his ninth book on contemporary marketing issues.

Books

  1. Power Pricing: How Managing Price Transforms the Bottom Line

    Citation:

    Dolan, R. J., and H. Simon. Power Pricing: How Managing Price Transforms the Bottom Line. NY: Free Press, 1996.
  2. Marketing Management

    Citation:

    Quelch, J. A., R. J. Dolan, and T. Kosnik. Marketing Management. Homewood, IL: Irwin, 1993.
  3. Managing the New Product Development Process

    Citation:

    Dolan, R. J. Managing the New Product Development Process. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1992.
  4. Strategic Marketing Management

    Citation:

    Dolan, R. J. Strategic Marketing Management. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1991.
  5. Marketing Management: Readings from Theory to Practice

    Keywords: Marketing; Management; Theory; Practice;

    Citation:

    Shapiro, B. P., R. J. Dolan, and J. A. Quelch. Marketing Management: Readings from Theory to Practice. Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin, 1985.
  6. Marketing Management: Principles, Analysis and Applications

    Keywords: Marketing; Management; Theory;

    Citation:

    Shapiro, B. P., R. J. Dolan, and J. Quelch. Marketing Management: Principles, Analysis and Applications. Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin, 1985.
  7. Marketing Management: Strategy, Planning and Implementation

    Keywords: Marketing; Management; Strategy; Planning;

    Citation:

    Shapiro, B. P., R. J. Dolan, and J. A. Quelch. Marketing Management: Strategy, Planning and Implementation. Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin, 1985.

Journal Articles

  1. Incentive Mechanisms for Priority Queuing Problems

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Incentive Mechanisms for Priority Queuing Problems." Bell Journal of Economics (Fall 1978): 421–436.
  2. Experience Curves and Dynamic Demand Models: Implications for Optimal Pricing Strategies

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Experience Curves and Dynamic Demand Models: Implications for Optimal Pricing Strategies." Journal of Marketing (Winter 1981).
  3. A Simulation Analysis of Alternative Pricing Strategies for Dynamic Environments

    Researchers of the strategic implications of the well-known demand (e.g., adoption and diffusion) and supply (e.g., experience effects) dynamics have typically sought analytical solutions. Their success in this has been achieved partly by limiting the richness of the dynamics considered. This paper describes a simulation modeling capability. SIMSTRAT, which trades off analytical solutions for richer, more realistic representations of supply and demand. We present the model and then the results of our initial investigations using SIMSTRAT. When joined with new computer graphics capabilities, the model is successful in identifying conditions conducive to skim- and penetration-pricing strategies.

    Keywords: Demand and Consumers; Price; Mathematical Methods; Supply and Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "A Simulation Analysis of Alternative Pricing Strategies for Dynamic Environments." Journal of Business 57, no. 1 (January 1984).
  4. Quantity Discounts: Managerial Issues and Research Opportunities

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Quantity Discounts: Managerial Issues and Research Opportunities." Marketing Science (Winter 1987). (First Runner-Up for TIMS/ORSA Best Marketing Paper of the Year Award.)
  5. Price Customization: The Higher Art of Power Pricing

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Price Customization: The Higher Art of Power Pricing." Marketing Management 7, no. 3 (Fall 1998): 10–17.
  6. Pricing and Market Making on the Internet

    Keywords: Price; Markets; Web; Online Technology;

    Citation:

    Dolan, R., and Y. Moon. "Pricing and Market Making on the Internet." Journal of Interactive Marketing 14, no. 2 (spring 2000): 56–73.
  7. Marketing Turnarounds

    Citation:

    Dolan, R. J. "Marketing Turnarounds." European Management Journal 13, no. 3 (September 1995).
  8. How Do You Know When the Price Is Right?

    Citation:

    Dolan, R. J. "How Do You Know When the Price Is Right?" Harvard Business Review 73, no. 5 (September–October 1995): 174–181.
  9. Maximizing the Utility of Customer Product Testing: Beta Test Design and Management

    Citation:

    Dolan, R. J., and J. Matthews. "Maximizing the Utility of Customer Product Testing: Beta Test Design and Management." Journal of Product Innovation Management 10, no. 4 (September 1993): 318–330.
  10. Dynamic Pricing

    Keywords: Price;

    Citation:

    Rangan, V. K., Pil Hwa Yoo, and Robert J. Dolan. "Dynamic Pricing." Zeitschrift für Betriebswirtschaft 10 (1987).

Book Chapters

  1. Marketing Planning and Organization

    Keywords: Marketing; Planning; Organizational Design;

    Citation:

    Dolan, R. J., and A. J. Silk. "Marketing Planning and Organization." In Strategic Marketing Management, by R. J. Dolan. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1991.

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. StepSmart Fitness, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., Benson P. Shapiro, and Alisa Zalosh. "StepSmart Fitness, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 914-512, January 2014.
  2. StepSmart Fitness, Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., Benson P. Shapiro, and Alisa Zalosh. "StepSmart Fitness, Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 914-511, January 2014.
  3. StepSmart Fitness (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., Benson P. Shapiro, and Alisa Zalosh. "StepSmart Fitness (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 914-510, January 2014.
  4. StepSmart Fitness

    StepSmart Fitness, a manufacturer of exercise equipment, is undergoing a sweeping reorganization. The new CEO has terminated the District Sales Director and Regional VP and promoted 30-year-old Benjamin Cooper to manage the underperforming New England district. A first-time manager with no one to train him or explain the causes of the district's underperformance, Cooper has 10 weeks to diagnose the problems and make recommendations that will ensure a turnaround in the territory in less than 16 months. Left to his own devices, Cooper must review the sales data, the incomplete notes left by his predecessor, and his own thoughts after spending a day in the field with each sales person. Then he must make decisions about termination or probation for current employees, the hiring of additional salespeople, ways to increase productivity, and potential new methods of evaluating salesperson performance. He is set to present his conclusions to his also-newly-appointed manager, the Regional VP for the Northeast, in a few days.

    Keywords: Analysis; Restructuring; Salesforce Management; Management Succession; Performance Improvement; Manufacturing Industry; Sports Industry; New England;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., Benson P. Shapiro, and Alisa Zalosh. "StepSmart Fitness." Harvard Business School Brief Case 914-509, January 2014.
  5. In a Bind: AccuAdhere's Product Line Extension Dilemma, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Heather Beckham. "In a Bind: AccuAdhere's Product Line Extension Dilemma, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 914-536, January 2014.
  6. In a Bind: AccuAdhere's Product Line Extension Dilemma, Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Heather Beckham. "In a Bind: AccuAdhere's Product Line Extension Dilemma, Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 914-535, January 2014.
  7. In a Bind: AccuAdhere's Product Line Extension Dilemma (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Heather Beckham. "In a Bind: AccuAdhere's Product Line Extension Dilemma (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 914-534, January 2014.
  8. In a Bind: AccuAdhere's Product Line Extension Dilemma

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Heather Beckham. "In a Bind: AccuAdhere's Product Line Extension Dilemma." Harvard Business School Brief Case 914-533, January 2014.
  9. Outotec (B): Action Plan

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Doug J. Chung. "Outotec (B): Action Plan." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-065, October 2013.
  10. Outotec: Project Capture

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Doug J. Chung. "Outotec: Project Capture." Harvard Business School Case 514-064, October 2013.
  11. Kiehl's Since 1851: Pathway to Profitable Growth (B)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Leslie K. John. "Kiehl's Since 1851: Pathway to Profitable Growth (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-046, October 2013.
  12. Kiehl's Since 1851: Pathway to Profitable Growth

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Leslie K. John. "Kiehl's Since 1851: Pathway to Profitable Growth." Harvard Business School Case 514-044, October 2013.
  13. Catalina In the Digital Age

    Keywords: marketing;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Uma R. Karmarkar. "Catalina In the Digital Age." Harvard Business School Case 514-021, August 2013.
  14. Altius Golf and the Fighter Brand, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Sunru Yong. "Altius Golf and the Fighter Brand, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 913-581, May 2013.
  15. Altius Golf and the Fighter Brand, Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Sunru Yong. "Altius Golf and the Fighter Brand, Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 913-580, May 2013.
  16. Altius Golf and the Fighter Brand (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Sunru Yong. "Altius Golf and the Fighter Brand (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 913-579, May 2013.
  17. Altius Golf and the Fighter Brand

    Altius Golf is the clear leader in the golf ball market despite a long-term decline in the number of golfers and a drop in sales following the financial crisis. The firm has maintained its position by introducing generations of advanced, super-premium golf balls that allow their customers to emulate professional golfers. The company has been losing market share to lower-priced competitors and the CEO wants to introduce a new program called Elevate to foster the next generation of golfers. With Elevate, the firm will introduce a ball that is more forgiving and easier to drive for distance and offer it at a price 40% below the company's flagship brand. Elevate will be available through "off-course" channels such as golf specialty stores and big box retailers instead of "on-course" pro shops where the firm typically sells its products. The board of directors is divided on whether to support the decision. Students must perform a quantitative analysis of the CEO's proposal to understand the potential risks and gains before making a final recommendation.

    Keywords: Governing and Advisory Boards; Competitive Advantage; Decision Choices and Conditions; Distribution Channels; Sports; Financial Crisis; Brands and Branding; Segmentation; Sports Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Sunru Yong. "Altius Golf and the Fighter Brand." Harvard Business School Brief Case 913-578, May 2013.
  18. Principles of Pricing

    Presents the basic principles of pricing, including value pricing, price sensitivity, and price customization/discrimination. A rewritten version of an earlier note.

    Keywords: Price; Marketing Strategy; Value;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and John T. Gourville. "Principles of Pricing." Harvard Business School Background Note 506-021, September 2005. (Revised April 2009.)
  19. Milford Industries (A)

    The new district sales manager for a tool company must determine how to get his district "back on track." The case presents various qualitative and quantitative information on the salespeople. Teaching objectives include the specification of the tasks of a district sales manager and the sales analysis helpful to him in his job. A rewritten version of an earlier case series.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Salesforce Management; Resignation and Termination; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Benson P. Shapiro. "Milford Industries (A)." Harvard Business School Case 584-012, August 1983. (Revised May 2007.)
  20. Pricing: A Value-Based Approach

    Presents a framework for determining prices for products and services in concert with the value provided to customers. Discusses methodologies for estimating customer value.

    Keywords: Price; Customers;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Pricing: A Value-Based Approach." Harvard Business School Background Note 500-071, December 1999. (Revised November 2003.)
  21. Mike Winsor: A Career in Marketing

    An MBA student has received an offer to join Kraft Foods, a leading consumer packaged goods firm. This unit is a wholly owned subsidiary of a holding company whose other major subsidiary is a leading cigarette manufacturer. The case raises ethical issues of marketing.

    Keywords: Marketing; Ethics;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Mike Winsor: A Career in Marketing." Harvard Business School Case 599-065, November 1998. (Revised October 2003.)
  22. Launching the BMW Z3 Roadster

    James McDowell, vice president of marketing at BMW North America, Inc., must design Phase II communication strategies for the launch of the new BMW Z3 Roadster. The program follows an "out-of-the-box" prelaunch campaign centered on the placement of the product in the November 1996 James Bond hit movie, "GoldenEye", and including other "nontraditional" elements such as a product appearance on Jay Leno's Tonight Show, an offering of a Bond Edition Roadster in the Neiman Marcus Christmas Catalog, and large-scale public relations activities. McDowell must assess the effectiveness of the prelaunch activities and design marketing tactics that can sustain product excitement until product availability in March. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Brands and Branding; Product Launch; Product Positioning; Innovation and Invention; Auto Industry; North America;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Susan M. Fournier. "Launching the BMW Z3 Roadster." Harvard Business School Case 597-002, February 1997. (Revised January 2002.)
  23. Analyzing Consumer Perceptions

    Describes the perceptual mapping techniques in a non-technical fashion. The procedure is useful for the depiction of the structure of the market. Discusses alternative methods, presents examples of each, and shows how the maps can be used in marketing decision making.

    Keywords: Industry Structures; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Analyzing Consumer Perceptions." Harvard Business School Background Note 599-110, March 1999. (Revised December 2001.)
  24. Analyzing Consumer Preferences

    Presents a non-traditional description of the conjoint analysis methodology. Discusses the process by which a study is done and cites areas of application.

    Keywords: Marketing; Mathematical Methods; Product Marketing;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Analyzing Consumer Preferences." Harvard Business School Background Note 599-112, March 1999. (Revised December 2001.)
  25. HP Consumer Products Business Organization: Distributing Printers via the Internet TN

    Teaching Note for (9-500-021).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "HP Consumer Products Business Organization: Distributing Printers via the Internet TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 501-081, April 2001.
  26. The Black & Decker Corporation (A): Power Tools Division

    Presents Black & Decker's performance against a Japanese competitor and others in the power tools market. Black & Decker is anxious to regain its market share leadership in particular segments of the market.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Product Positioning; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Competition; Globalization; Construction Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "The Black & Decker Corporation (A): Power Tools Division." Harvard Business School Case 595-057, March 1995. (Revised March 2001.)
  27. net.Genesis, Inc. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-500-009).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "net.Genesis, Inc. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 501-062, January 2001.
  28. Abgenix and the XenoMouse

    Abgenix has a unique method for generating antibodies useful in treating a number of diseases, including cancer. In early 2000, the company's cancer has performed very well in animal testing and is moving to early stage human testing. Abgenix must decide whether to sell the product development program to a large pharmaceutical company or to enter into a joint venture to push the product ahead.

    Keywords: Product Development; Marketing Strategy; Health Testing and Trials; Risk and Uncertainty; Technological Innovation; Innovation Strategy; Science-Based Business; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Abgenix and the XenoMouse." Harvard Business School Case 501-061, January 2001.
  29. Priceline.com: Name Your Own Price TN

    Teaching Note for (9-500-070).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Priceline.com: Name Your Own Price TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 501-046, January 2001.
  30. Product Policy Decisions

    Provides an introduction to key product policy issues.

    Keywords: Product Development;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Product Policy Decisions." Harvard Business School Background Note 501-049, October 2000. (Revised December 2000.)
  31. Pricing and Market Making on the Internet

    Considers the impact of the Internet on how market exchanges will take place. Discusses the role of shopping agents and alternatives to fixed prices such as negotiations, auctions, and exchanges.

    Keywords: Price; Marketing Strategy; Auctions; Market Platforms; Negotiation; Internet;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Youngme E. Moon. "Pricing and Market Making on the Internet." Harvard Business School Background Note 500-065, December 1999. (Revised November 2000.)
  32. Note on Marketing Strategy

    Describes the major elements of marketing strategy: the decisions to be made and the underlying analysis to support that decision making.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Note on Marketing Strategy." Harvard Business School Background Note 598-061, October 1997. (Revised November 2000.)
  33. Going to Market

    Describes the major issues in deciding how to reach the market. Covers issues of channel design and channel management.

    Keywords: Marketing Channels; Marketing Strategy;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Going to Market." Harvard Business School Background Note 599-078, January 1999. (Revised October 2000.)
  34. Sustaining Value

    Describes the challenges a firm faces in building and sustaining a value proposition over time. Describes major ways in which the marketing environment changes over time and the methods a firm can use to protect its market position.

    Keywords: Price; Marketing Strategy; Competition; Situation or Environment;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Sustaining Value." Harvard Business School Background Note 501-045, October 2000.
  35. Priceline.com: Name Your Own Price

    Priceline.com is a new concept shifting the setting of price from sellers to buyers. The company aspires to use its patented process of advertising units of demand at named prices to suppliers in many categories. This case focuses on its initial use in the airline industry.

    Keywords: Price; Internet; Marketing; Emerging Markets; Consumer Products Industry; Travel Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Priceline.com: Name Your Own Price." Harvard Business School Case 500-070, February 2000. (Revised August 2000.)
  36. Integrated Marketing Communications

    Describes the major communication vehicles and the process via which they can be brought together in an integrated marketing communications plan.

    Keywords: Marketing Communications;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Integrated Marketing Communications." Harvard Business School Background Note 599-087, February 1999. (Revised June 2000.)
  37. Launching the BMW Z3 Roadster

    Contains two BMW Z3 television commercials used at launch, a Jay Leno Tonight Show segment, a Bryant Gumbel Today Show segment, Central Park PR event coverage, and Go: An American Road Story (promotional video from BMW).

    Keywords: Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Brands and Branding; Product Launch; Product Positioning; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Susan M. Fournier. "Launching the BMW Z3 Roadster." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 500-502, May 2000.
  38. net.Genesis, Inc.

    Net.Genesis is planning a strategy for the developing Internet market. In particular, it is creating the category of e-business intelligence and striving to be the brand leader in it.

    Keywords: Emerging Markets; Strategic Planning; Expansion; Brands and Branding; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Marketing Communications; Internet; Change Management;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., Rajiv Lal, and Perry Fagan. "net.Genesis, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 500-009, November 1999.
  39. Eastman Kodak Company

    Eastman Kodak has suffered significant declines in film market share at the hands of lower-priced branded producers and private label products. The case presents Kodak's proposal to launch a new economy brand of film to combat these rivals. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Segmentation; Product Positioning; Price; Brands and Branding; Product Launch; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Eastman Kodak Company." Harvard Business School Case 599-106, March 1999.
  40. Note on Low-Tech Marketing Math

    Describes basic calculations useful in marketing analysis, break-even analysis, and price-volume relationships.

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods; Finance;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Note on Low-Tech Marketing Math." Harvard Business School Background Note 599-011, December 1998.
  41. Time Warner, Inc.: New Business Opportunity

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Time Warner, Inc.: New Business Opportunity." Harvard Business School Case 599-068, December 1998.
  42. National Aids Fund

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "National Aids Fund." Harvard Business School Case 599-069, December 1998.
  43. An Internet Strategy Task Force

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "An Internet Strategy Task Force." Harvard Business School Case 599-071, December 1998.
  44. L'Oreal of Paris: Bringing "Class to Mass" with Plenitude TN

    Teaching Note for (9-598-056).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. L'Oreal of Paris: Bringing "Class to Mass" with Plenitude TN. Harvard Business School Teaching Note 599-017, July 1998.
  45. Black & Decker Corporation Series TN

    Teaching Note for (9-595-057), (9-595-060), (9-595-061), (9-595-062), and (9-596-511).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Black & Decker Corporation Series TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 598-106, February 1998.
  46. L'Oreal of Paris: Bringing 'Class to Mass' with Plenitude

    L'Oreal's strategy is to "trickle down" technology over time from high-end outlets like department stores to mass-markets, such as drugstores. The mass market brand Plenitude has become the market leader in France, but even eight years after introduction in the United States, the product continues to lose money. The case presents qualitative market research data to enable students to diagnose the problem and develop an action plan. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Marketing Strategy; Brands and Branding; Globalization; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; Retail Industry; France; United States;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "L'Oreal of Paris: Bringing 'Class to Mass' with Plenitude." Harvard Business School Case 598-056, October 1997.
  47. Northern Telecom (A): AdVantage & DisadVantage

    Mike Ennis, general manager of Northern Telecom's Business Products Division, recommends a new solution for replacing Vantage, an unsuccessful product for Northern Telecom. The case documents in detail the voice of the customer. Students are required to discuss the merits of Ennis's proposal.

    Keywords: Demand and Consumers; Product Launch; Management Teams; Product Development; Telecommunications Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Sylvie Ryckebusch. "Northern Telecom (A): AdVantage & DisadVantage." Harvard Business School Case 596-063, November 1995. (Revised June 1997.)
  48. Northern Telecom (B)

    Documents two problems in the product development process of Northern Telecom's new Greenwich key systems product line. These problems are due to the conflicting goals of the marketing, design, and manufacturing groups in the product development team. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Product Development; Goals and Objectives; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Sylvie Ryckebusch. "Northern Telecom (B)." Harvard Business School Case 596-064, February 1996. (Revised June 1997.)
  49. Northern Telecom (C): Norstar Is Born

    Documents the successful launch of Northern Telecom's Norstar Key Systems product line. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Product Launch; Success; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Sylvie Ryckebusch. "Northern Telecom (C): Norstar Is Born." Harvard Business School Case 596-065, November 1995. (Revised June 1997.)
  50. Eastman Kodak Company: Funtime Film TN

    Teaching Note for (9-594-111).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Eastman Kodak Company: Funtime Film TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 597-080, April 1997.
  51. Marketing a President: Advertising in the 1996 U.S. Presidential Election Campaign

    Citation:

    Arnold, David J., and Robert J. Dolan. "Marketing a President: Advertising in the 1996 U.S. Presidential Election Campaign." Harvard Business School Case 597-069, January 1997. (Revised February 1997.)
  52. San Fabian Supply Co. (Philippines), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-582-104).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "San Fabian Supply Co. (Philippines), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-112, September 1984. (Revised January 1996.)
  53. The Black & Decker Corporation (B): "Operation Sudden Impact"

    Describes Black & Decker's strategy for the tradesmen market.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Product Positioning; Competition; Globalization; Construction Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. The Black & Decker Corporation (B): "Operation Sudden Impact". Harvard Business School Supplement 595-060, March 1995. (Revised June 1995.)
  54. Eastman Kodak Co.: Funtime Film

    Eastman Kodak has suffered significant declines in film market share at the hands of lower priced branded producers and private label products. The case presents Kodak's proposal to launch a new economy brand of film to combat these rivals.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Competition; Price; Product Launch; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Eastman Kodak Co.: Funtime Film." Harvard Business School Case 594-111, February 1994. (Revised May 1995.)
  55. NIKE Inc. in the 1990s (A): New Directions

    Describes the transition of Nike from 1990 to 1993 as it sees major growth opportunities in foreign markets.

    Keywords: Transition; Brands and Branding; Product Launch; Globalization; Opportunities;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "NIKE Inc. in the 1990s (A): New Directions." Harvard Business School Case 595-102, March 1995. (Revised April 1995.)
  56. NIKE Inc. in the 1990s (B): Strategy and Management Changes, 1993-1994

    Describes Nike's performance to 1994 and describes challenges facing the new president and COO, Thomas Clarke.

    Keywords: Performance; Problems and Challenges; Management Teams;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "NIKE Inc. in the 1990s (B): Strategy and Management Changes, 1993-1994." Harvard Business School Case 595-103, March 1995. (Revised April 1995.)
  57. The Black & Decker Corporation (C): "Operation Sudden Impact" Results, 1992-94

    Describes the initial results of Black & Decker's strategy in the United States.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Product Positioning; Competition; Globalization; Construction Industry; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. The Black & Decker Corporation (C): "Operation Sudden Impact" Results, 1992-94. Harvard Business School Supplement 595-061, March 1995.
  58. The Black & Decker Corporation (D): DeWalt Opportunities in Europe and Japan

    Describes Black & Decker's challenges in international markets, particularly in Europe and Japan.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Product Positioning; Competition; Globalization; Problems and Challenges; Construction Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Japan; Europe;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "The Black & Decker Corporation (D): DeWalt Opportunities in Europe and Japan." Harvard Business School Supplement 595-062, March 1995.
  59. Northern Telecom (A): Greenwich Investment Proposal (Condensed)

    The business products division has developed a business proposal asking for $50 million to fund the creation of a new telephone system for the small business market. The company's last entry into this marketplace lost $70 million. The new product would face 100 competitors in a market believed to be at zero growth rate. Should the investment proposal be accepted?

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Communication Technology; Market Entry and Exit; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Investment; Product Development; Telecommunications Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Northern Telecom (A): Greenwich Investment Proposal (Condensed)." Harvard Business School Case 594-051, October 1993. (Revised September 1994.)
  60. Bayerische Motoren Werke AG (BMW) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-593-082).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Bayerische Motoren Werke AG (BMW) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 594-107, February 1994.
  61. Northern Telecom (B): The Norstar Launch

    Northern Telecom has spent $50 million to develop a new family of telephone systems for small businesses. The investment proposal was justified on the basis of appreciable market share impact. Now, the project team must develop the appropriate supporting marketing program for the launch of the product in two markets--the United States and Canada.

    Keywords: Communication Technology; Investment; Product Launch; Product Development; Telecommunications Industry; Canada; United States;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Northern Telecom (B): The Norstar Launch." Harvard Business School Case 593-104, April 1993. (Revised June 1993.)
  62. Bayerische Motoren Werke AG (BMW)

    In 1992, BMW attempts to revive its position in the United States market. In 1991, unit sales had fallen to 53,000 from 88,000 in 1987. The new CEO of North America considers a multifaceted plan to turn around the situation.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Marketing Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Market Entry and Exit; Sales; Manufacturing Industry; Auto Industry; Germany; North America;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Bayerische Motoren Werke AG (BMW)." Harvard Business School Case 593-082, April 1993. (Revised June 1993.)
  63. Northern Telecom (A): Greenwich Investment Proposal

    The business products division has developed a business proposal asking for $50 million to fund the creation of a new telephone system for the small business market. The company's last entry into this marketplace lost $70 million. The new product would face 100 competitors in a market believed to be at zero growth rate. Should the investment proposal be accepted?

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Communication Technology; Market Entry and Exit; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Investment; Product Development; Telecommunications Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Northern Telecom (A): Greenwich Investment Proposal." Harvard Business School Case 593-103, April 1993. (Revised May 1993.)
  64. Marketing Planning and Organization

    Presents guidelines for effective marketing planning. Provides a general outline of the contents of a typical marketing plan, the process by which the plan is developed, and considers the benefits successful firms reap from their planning efforts and the problems that mark the efforts of the not-so-successful users of marketing planning. Provides a framework for examining the relationship between a firm's strategy and the design of its marketing organization. Discusses how marketing organizations are structured and some basic principles of organization design.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Planning; Design;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Marketing Planning and Organization." Harvard Business School Background Note 585-106, September 1984. (Revised March 1993.)
  65. Federated Industries (A)

    The market leader in an overcapacity industry with a commodity product is trying to restore industry price levels. Price cutting has hurt overall industry price levels and the leader must determine whether (and how) to bring up price levels or exit the market.

    Keywords: Supply and Industry; Market Entry and Exit; Price; Goods and Commodities; Competition; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Federated Industries (A)." Harvard Business School Case 585-104, September 1984. (Revised December 1992.)
  66. Distribution Policy

    Presents some fundamental principles of channels of distribution management.

    Keywords: Distribution Channels;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Distribution Policy." Harvard Business School Background Note 585-045, September 1984. (Revised October 1992.)
  67. Pricing Policy

    Presents fundamental pricing principles.

    Keywords: Price;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Pricing Policy." Harvard Business School Background Note 585-044, September 1984. (Revised October 1992.)
  68. Strategic Industry Model: Emergent Technologies

    Describes computer model and output from conjoint analysis and perceptual mapping for product line planning.

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Strategic Industry Model: Emergent Technologies." Harvard Business School Background Note 592-086, March 1992. (Revised June 1992.)
  69. General Mills, Inc.: Yoplait Custard-Style Yogurt (A) and (B), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-586-087) and (9-586-088).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "General Mills, Inc.: Yoplait Custard-Style Yogurt (A) and (B), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 592-099, June 1992.
  70. MSA: The Software Company--Planning the AMAPs Product Line, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-590-069).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "MSA: The Software Company--Planning the AMAPs Product Line, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 592-102, June 1992.
  71. Techsonic Industries, Inc.: HUMMINBIRD - New Products, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-591-007).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Techsonic Industries, Inc.: HUMMINBIRD - New Products, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 592-103, June 1992.
  72. Strategic Industry Model: Emergent Technologies, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-592-086).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Strategic Industry Model: Emergent Technologies, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 592-100, June 1992.
  73. Johnson Wax: Enhance (A) and (B), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-583-046) and (9-584-009).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Johnson Wax: Enhance (A) and (B), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 592-101, June 1992.
  74. Barco Projection Systems (A): Worldwide Niche Marketing, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-591-133).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Barco Projection Systems (A): Worldwide Niche Marketing, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 592-098, June 1992.
  75. Henkel Group: Umbrella Branding and Globalization Decisions, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-585-185).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Henkel Group: Umbrella Branding and Globalization Decisions, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 592-056, May 1992.
  76. Concept Testing

    Describes concept testing products. Presents guidelines for effective design, execution, and interpretation of test procedures. Discusses limitations of these techniques and sets out the situations for which they are appropriate.

    Keywords: Marketing; Mathematical Methods; Forecasting and Prediction;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Concept Testing." Harvard Business School Background Note 590-063, November 1989. (Revised March 1992.)
  77. Marketing Information Industry

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Marketing Information Industry." Harvard Business School Background Note 588-027, October 1987. (Revised March 1992.)
  78. Matching the Process of Product Development to Its Context

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Matching the Process of Product Development to Its Context." Harvard Business School Background Note 592-009, July 1991. (Revised March 1992.)
  79. Researching and Monitoring Consumer Markets

    Describes the major research techniques for consumer goods new product development, i.e. pre-test markets and electronic purchase monitoring. Provides students with information on availability and utility of these services.

    Keywords: Demand and Consumers; Product Marketing; Product Development; Research;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Researching and Monitoring Consumer Markets." Harvard Business School Background Note 592-088, March 1992.
  80. New York Life Insurance Co.: Pension Department, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-591-051).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "New York Life Insurance Co.: Pension Department, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 592-082, January 1992.
  81. Market Research

    Describes the major classes of market research. Provides students with an overview of methods available enabling them to select the proper set for their purposes.

    Keywords: Research; Markets;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Market Research." Harvard Business School Background Note 592-034, October 1991.
  82. Industrial Market Research: Beta Test Site Management

    Describes the role of BETA tests in the new product development process and presents guidelines for effective test program development.

    Keywords: Product Development; Mathematical Methods; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Industrial Market Research: Beta Test Site Management." Harvard Business School Background Note 592-010, August 1991.
  83. Managing the New Product Development Process

    Describes how the new product development program is most efficiently managed.

    Keywords: Product Development; Management;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Managing the New Product Development Process." Harvard Business School Background Note 592-011, August 1991.
  84. New York Life Insurance Co.: Pension Department

    Analyzes competition in the pension fund industry. In particular, New York Life must decide whether to compete head-to-head with mutual fund giants by offering record-keeping services or to just continue to focus on selling investment products. Presents the results of market research studies conducted to answer the question.

    Keywords: Competition; Financial Instruments; Insurance Industry; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "New York Life Insurance Co.: Pension Department." Harvard Business School Case 591-051, March 1991. (Revised May 1991.)
  85. Perceptual Mapping: A Manager's Guide

    Describes the perceptual mapping technique in a non-technical fashion. The procedure is useful for the depiction of the structure of the market. Discusses alternative methods, presents examples of each, and shows how the maps can be used in marketing decision making.

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods; Industry Structures; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Perceptual Mapping: A Manager's Guide." Harvard Business School Background Note 590-121, July 1990.
  86. Conjoint Analysis: A Manager's Guide

    Presents a non-technical description of the conjoint analysis methodology. Discusses the process by which such a study is done and cites areas of application.

    Keywords: Marketing; Mathematical Methods; Forecasting and Prediction;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Conjoint Analysis: A Manager's Guide." Harvard Business School Background Note 590-059, May 1990.
  87. Clark Material Handling Group-Overseas: Brazilian Product Strategy (A&B) (Condensed)

    Assumes some knowledge of conjoint analysis. Permits analysis of basic results and dynamic market simulations in one class session.

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Clark Material Handling Group-Overseas: Brazilian Product Strategy (A&B) (Condensed)." Harvard Business School Case 590-081, April 1990.
  88. MSA: The Software Company--Planning the AMAPs Product Line

    MSA has commissioned a major market research study to assess demand potential for a computer software system designed for aerospace and defense contractors. Students must evaluate the results of the study (including a conjoint analysis) to assess whether MSA should invest in R&D to upgrade the technology or build a sales organization.

    Keywords: Product; Marketing; Mathematical Methods; Software;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "MSA: The Software Company--Planning the AMAPs Product Line." Harvard Business School Case 590-069, January 1990. (Revised February 1990.)
  89. Performance Curves: Costs, Prices, and Value

    Explains the concept of a family of performance curves. The most well known is the price/performance curve relating the prices of items in a product line to their performance. Also discusses the cost/performance curve and its impact on product positioning, product line length, and technological options. Also introduces a reservation price or value/performance curve. All are considered in the context of competitive behavior.

    Keywords: Cost vs Benefits; Price; Product Positioning; Performance; Competition; Value;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Benson P. Shapiro. "Performance Curves: Costs, Prices, and Value." Harvard Business School Background Note 590-010, September 1989.
  90. Perkin-Elmer: Data Systems Group, Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Perkin-Elmer: Data Systems Group, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 583-030, August 1982. (Revised January 1989.)
  91. Milford Industries (A) and (B), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-584-012) and (9-584-013).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Milford Industries (A) and (B), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 584-147, May 1984. (Revised January 1989.)
  92. U.S. Pioneer Electronics Corp., Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-579-079).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "U.S. Pioneer Electronics Corp., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-113, September 1984. (Revised January 1989.)
  93. Cumberland Metal Industries: Engineered Products Division--1980, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-580-104).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Cumberland Metal Industries: Engineered Products Division--1980, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-115, September 1984. (Revised January 1989.)
  94. Atlantic Aviation Corp.: Westwind Division, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-581-142).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Atlantic Aviation Corp.: Westwind Division, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-119, September 1984. (Revised January 1989.)
  95. Sealed Air Corp., Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-582-103).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Sealed Air Corp., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-110, September 1984. (Revised November 1988.)
  96. Note on the Motorcycle Industry--1975, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-578-210).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Note on the Motorcycle Industry--1975, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-118, September 1984. (Revised November 1988.)
  97. Note on Pretest Market Models

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Note on Pretest Market Models." Harvard Business School Background Note 588-052, January 1988.
  98. Note on Industry/Market Strategy

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Note on Industry/Market Strategy." Harvard Business School Background Note 585-107, September 1984. (Revised October 1987.)
  99. Research Methods in Marketing: Survey Research

    Presents basic issues in survey research, covering both measurement and sampling error. The intention is to consider each element of the survey process: problem statement, questionnaire design, sampling, and data analysis.

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods; Surveys; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Research Methods in Marketing: Survey Research." Harvard Business School Background Note 582-055, December 1981. (Revised September 1986.)
  100. Basic Quantitative Analysis for Marketing

    Shows how to calculate and use the break-even volume in marketing decision making.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Mathematical Methods;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Basic Quantitative Analysis for Marketing." Harvard Business School Background Note 584-149, May 1984. (Revised September 1986.)
  101. U.S. Retail Coffee Market (A) & (B) and Brim (A) & (B) Coffee Series, Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "U.S. Retail Coffee Market (A) & (B) and Brim (A) & (B) Coffee Series, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-108, September 1984. (Revised April 1986.)
  102. Vicks Health Care Division: Project Scorpio (A), (B), (B1), (C), and (C), Student Assignment, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-582-039), (9-582-040), (9-582-041), (9-582-042), and (9-583-009).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Vicks Health Care Division: Project Scorpio (A), (B), (B1), (C), and (C), Student Assignment, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-109, September 1984. (Revised November 1985.)
  103. Computer Devices, Inc.: Selling Intelligent Terminals, Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Computer Devices, Inc.: Selling Intelligent Terminals, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-121, September 1984. (Revised November 1985.)
  104. Sealed Air Corporation

    Market leadership and technological innovation have marked Sealed Air's participation in the U.S. protective packaging market. Several small regional producers have introduced products which are less effective than Sealed Air's but similar in appearance and cheaper. The company must determine its response to this new competition. Feasible options range from doing nothing to introducing a new product. Raises product line management issues, particularly cannibalization, and affords the opportunity for the development of a marketing plan for any new product introduction. Software for this case is available (9-587-513).

    Keywords: Product Marketing; Product; Technological Innovation; Supply and Industry; Competitive Advantage; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Sealed Air Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 582-103, March 1982. (Revised September 1985.)
  105. Perkin-Elmer: Data Systems Group

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Perkin-Elmer: Data Systems Group." Harvard Business School Case 582-101, March 1982. (Revised August 1985.)
  106. Milford Industries (B)

    Supplements the (A) case. A rewritten version of part of an earlier series.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Salesforce Management; Resignation and Termination; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Benson P. Shapiro. "Milford Industries (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 584-013, August 1983. (Revised June 1985.)
  107. Henkel Group: Umbrella Branding and Globalization Decisions

    Henkel's adhesive group is considering a major change in the international selling of its two major adhesives products for households. The proposed strategy is based on two concepts: umbrella branding and global standardization.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Globalization; Expansion; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Henkel Group: Umbrella Branding and Globalization Decisions." Harvard Business School Case 585-185, June 1985.
  108. Milford Industries (C)

    Supplements the (A) case. A rewritten version of part of an earlier series.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Salesforce Management; Resignation and Termination; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Benson P. Shapiro. "Milford Industries (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 584-014, August 1983. (Revised June 1985.)
  109. Federated Industries (A) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-585-104).

    Keywords: Supply and Industry; Market Entry and Exit; Price; Goods and Commodities; Competition; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Federated Industries (A) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-105, September 1984. (Revised May 1985.)
  110. Milford Industries (A1)

    Presents the salesforce performance data of the Milford (A) case in a format suitable for spreadsheet analysis using a personal computer.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Salesforce Management; Resignation and Termination; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Milford Industries (A1)." Harvard Business School Supplement 585-138, May 1985.
  111. National Electric Supply Co., Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "National Electric Supply Co., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-120, September 1984. (Revised May 1985.)
  112. Tyler Abrasives, Inc., Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-573-039).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Tyler Abrasives, Inc., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-116, September 1984. (Revised November 1984.)
  113. Henkel Corp.: International Sealants Brand SISTA (A), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-585-099).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Henkel Corp.: International Sealants Brand SISTA (A), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-117, September 1984.
  114. Dunfey Hotels Corp., Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-581-114).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Dunfey Hotels Corp., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-122, September 1984.
  115. Great American Knitting Mills: Gold Toe Socks, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-581-144).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Great American Knitting Mills: Gold Toe Socks, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-111, September 1984.
  116. Dunfey Hotels Corp., Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-581-114).

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J., and Christopher H. Lovelock. "Dunfey Hotels Corp., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 585-057, September 1984.
  117. Marketing Research: An Overview of Research Methods

    Broadly describes the scope of marketing research, and describes experiments, non-survey methods, and internal data.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Mathematical Methods;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Marketing Research: An Overview of Research Methods." Harvard Business School Background Note 585-039, September 1984.
  118. Henkel Corp.: International Sealants Brand SISTA (A)

    Corporate headquarters wishes to expand sales of a sealant product currently sold only in the West German market. Regional affiliates, operating on a profit center basis, are not enthusiastic about taking on the new product. The case describes the company's standardization plan in which the same product would be marketed with a standardized strategy throughout Europe.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Globalization; Expansion; Profit; Conflict Management; Consumer Products Industry; Construction Industry; Europe; West Germany;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Henkel Corp.: International Sealants Brand SISTA (A)." Harvard Business School Case 585-099, September 1984.
  119. Henkel Corp.: International Sealants Brand SISTA (B)

    Describes the outcome of implementation of the standardized plan described in Henkel (A).

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Globalization; Expansion; Profit; Conflict Management; Outcome or Result; Consumer Products Industry; Construction Industry; Europe; West Germany;

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Henkel Corp.: International Sealants Brand SISTA (B)." Harvard Business School Case 585-100, September 1984.
  120. Pricing: Basic Principles

    Citation:

    Dolan, Robert J. "Pricing: Basic Principles." Harvard Business School Background Note 584-150, May 1984.