Rohit Deshpande

Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing

Rohit Deshpandé is Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing at Harvard Business School, where he currently teaches in the Program for Leadership Development, Owner/President Management Program and in other executive education offerings. He has also taught global branding, international marketing, and first year marketing in the MBA program as well as a doctoral seminar in marketing management. He is the faculty chair of the Global Colloquium for Participant-Centered Learning, Leadership and Corporate Accountability China and India programs and coordinator for Marketing faculty recruiting. He has previously been coordinator for Marketing doctoral program admissions, and faculty chair of the Strategic Marketing Management executive program. In addition to teaching marketing, he was a part of the design and delivery team that created the Leadership and Corporate Accountability MBA required course at HBS focusing on ethics and corporate governance. In 2008-2009 Deshpande was the Henry B. Arthur Fellow for Business Ethics.

Rohit Deshpandé is Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing at Harvard Business School, where he currently teaches in the Program for Leadership Development, Owner/President Management Program and in other executive education offerings. He has also taught global branding, international marketing, and first year marketing in the MBA program as well as a doctoral seminar in marketing management. He is the faculty chair of the Global Colloquium for Participant-Centered Learning, Leadership and Corporate Accountability China and India programs and coordinator for Marketing faculty recruiting. He has previously been coordinator for Marketing doctoral program admissions, and faculty chair of the Strategic Marketing Management executive programl. In addition to teaching marketing, he was a part of the design and delivery team that created the Leadership and Corporate Accountability MBA required course at HBS focusing on ethics and corporate governance. In 2008-2009 Deshpande was the Henry B. Arthur Fellow for Business Ethics.

Deshpandé introduced the concept of “customer-centricity” at an American Marketing Association meeting talk in 1998. His primary research interest concerns the creation and implementation of customer centric corporate culture, a topic on which he pioneered published work over 15 years ago, well before the term "customer-centricity" became the strategic focus of leading corporations worldwide. In a series of research papers he has profiled high performance, customer-centric companies in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. He has published several technical articles, cases, and monographs and was cited in an American Marketing Association study as one of the most highly published full professors in the marketing field. His most recent books include Developing a Market Orientation, Using Market Knowledge, and The Global Market: Managing the Challenges and Opportunities of Globalization.

Before coming to Harvard, Deshpandé was the E. B. Osborn Professor of Marketing at the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration at Dartmouth College. He has also held appointments as Associate and Assistant Professor of Marketing at the University of Texas, Visiting Professor and Scholar at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and Thomas Henry Carroll Ford Foundation Visiting Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He served as Executive Director of the Marketing Science Institute from 1997-1999. He has a B.Sc. (Hons. Dist.) and M.M.S. from the University of Bombay, an M.B.A. from Northwestern University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh, where he received the Distinguished Alumnus Award in 2008.

 

  1. The Ordinary Heroes of the Taj Hotel

    On the 26th of November 2008, a group of terrorists struck a dozen targets in Mumbai, India including the iconic, 103-year old Taj Palace Hotel. The siege at the hotel  lasted two days and three nights and was covered extensively by international media. But there is an amazing, inspirational back story about the heroic actions of the Taj staff couched in the culture of the Taj Hotels company. What can the staff, who saved lives while endangering their own, teach American companies about ethical behavior?

  2. Provenance Paradox and Country of Origin Branding

    Since a product's country of origin of the product establishes its authenticity, companies from emerging markets are unable to price products comparably to similar firms from developed markets. This problem of establishing authenticity, called the "provenance paradox," represents the biggest marketing challenge for emerging markets in the next decade, as companies in emerging markets try to compete in product categories for which their countries are not known.
  3. A Global Leader's Guide to Managing Business Conduct

    Managers working outside their home environments often find that their companies’ norms are inconsistent with practices followed by other businesses in the area. In response, many follow the time-honored advice given in the fourth century by the bishop of Milan to Augustine of Hippo: When in Rome, do as the Romans do.