Doug J. Chung

Assistant Professor of Business Administration

Doug J. Chung is an assistant professor of business administration in the Marketing unit and teaches Personal Selling & Sales Force Management and Business-to-Business Marketing in the second year MBA Elective Curriculum. He also teaches Marketing Models in the DBA Curriculum. He has previously taught the core Marketing course in the first year MBA Required Curriculum and Business Marketing in Executive Education.

Professor Chung focuses his research primarily on sales force management and incentive compensation. His work has been published in Marketing Science, Management Science, Journal of Marketing Research, Harvard Business Review, and the European Financial Review. His current work examines how different elements of an incentive compensation plan affect the performance of varying types of sales agents.

Professor Chung earned his Ph.D. in management at Yale University, where he also earned an M.A. and M.Phil. in management. He is the recipient of the ISMS Doctoral Dissertation Award, ISBM Doctoral Support Award, and the Mary Kay Doctoral Dissertation Award, and he was the finalist for the 2014 John D. C. Little Award and the 2015 Frank M. Bass Award. He is also a member of the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society. He completed his undergraduate studies at Korea University. Prior to pursuing a career in academics, Professor Chung served as an officer and platoon commander in the South Korean Special Forces. He also held a variety of industry positions with several multinational companies.

  1. MBA Elective Curriculum Personal Selling and Sales Force Management

    by Doug J. Chung

    Personal selling is the primary (and sometimes the only) form of marketing activity for many firms, especially in a business-to-business context. The course focuses on the tactical component of managing a salesforce and on the strategic element of linking sales force management with business strategy. The case studies used in the course will cover a variety of industries ranging from door-to-door selling to professional services firms (e.g., a law firm).

    A key element of the course is a graded team project—either a field project sourced by the student(s) or a library project—that makes use of the content learned in the course to analyze a business situation and provide recommendations. 

  2. MBA Elective Curriculum Business-to-Business Marketing

    by Doug J. Chung

    Business markets differ from consumer markets in important ways. Typically, the buying process is more complex, the buying units and purchase criteria differ, and marketing decisions are more closely interrelated with firm-wide strategic choices. In addition, personal selling (sales) is often a core part of go-to-market activities in B2B contexts. The course focuses on both the strategic and field implementation aspects of managing these issues in business markets.

    A key element of the course is a graded team project—either a field project sourced by the student(s) or a library project—that makes use of the content learned in the course to analyze a business situation and provide recommendations.
  3. Marketing Models Doctoral Seminar

    by Doug J. Chung

    This course is a doctoral level course on Quantitative Marketing. We will cover methodological as well as substantive topics this semester. Methodological topics include: Choice models, Entry and Exit models, Dynamic structural models, Bayesian estimation methods and Game theoretical models. Substantive topics include: Advertising, Word of Mouth, Sales Force Compensation, Channels of Distribution and Customer Lifetime Value.

    Students will be in charge of presenting and discussing the assigned articles. They will be expected to come to class prepared, having thoroughly read all papers in each session. Each student is required to give one presentation (maximum 15 pages) during the semester on the paper assigned to them, that will include a discussion of the key ideas of the paper, the theoretical analysis, empirical tests (if any), limitations, and directions for future research that build on the issues raised by the articles. In addition, for all sessions each student will prepare a brief written summary and evaluation of the papers that are not assigned to him/her but which will be covered that day.

  4. MBA Elective Curriculum Business Marketing and Sales

    by Doug J. Chung

    Business markets differ from consumer markets in important ways. Typically, the buying process is more complex, the buying units and purchase criteria differ, and marketing decisions are more closely interrelated with firm-wide strategic choices. In addition, personal selling and sales management are often core parts of go-to-market activities in B2B contexts. The course focuses on both the strategic and field implementation aspects of managing these issues in business markets. An important theme in both case discussions and field projects (see below) is linking strategy with sales in B2B markets.

    Rather than our standard case exam, a key element of the course is a field projecteither sourced by the student(s) or linked to projects sponsored by our alumni or members in our executive programsand a paper analyzing the situation and articulating the recommendations and learnings. Students will be organized in teams for the projects.

  5. MBA Required Curriculum Marketing

    by Doug J. Chung

    Marketing

    The objectives of this course are to demonstrate the role of marketing in the company; to explore the relationship of marketing to other functions; and to show how effective marketing builds on a thorough understanding of buyer behavior to create value for customers.

    Students learn how to:

    • Make marketing decisions in the context of general management.
    • Control the elements of the marketing mix—product policy, channels of distribution, communication, and pricing—to satisfy customer needs profitably.
    • Use this knowledge in a brand management simulation.

    The course culminates in an examination of the evolution of marketing, particularly focusing on opportunities presented by the Internet.