Doug J. Chung

Assistant Professor of Business Administration

Doug J. Chung is an assistant professor of business administration in the Marketing Unit and teaches the Marketing course in the MBA required curriculum and Business Marketing in Executive Education. Professor Chung focuses his research primarily on sales force management and incentive compensation. His current work examines how different components of an incentive compensation plan affect the performance of varying types of sales agents. Professor Chung earned his Ph.D. in management at Yale University, where he also earned an MA and M. Phil in management. He is the recipient of the ISMS Doctoral Dissertation Award, ISBM Doctoral Support Award, and the Mary Kay Doctoral Dissertation Award. He is also a member of the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society. He completed his undergraduate studies at Korea University. Prior to pursuing a career in academics, Professor Chung served as an officer and platoon commander in the South Korean Special Forces. He also held a variety of industry positions with several multinational companies.

  1. Motivating Diverse Salespeople Through a Common Incentive Plan

    For practical reasons, many companies offer a common incentive plan to an entire sales force rather than offering customised plans for each individual. Doug J. Chung, Thomas Steenburgh, and K. Sudhir address how companies can design a single plan that motivates everyone to work to the best of their abilities.
  2. The Dynamic Advertising Effect of Collegiate Athletics

    I measure the spillover effect of intercollegiate athletics on the quantity and quality of applicants to institutions of higher education in the United States, popularly known as the "Flutie Effect." I treat athletic success as a stock of goodwill that decays over time, similar to that of advertising. Overall, athletic success has a significant long-term goodwill effect on future applications and quality. However, students with lower than average SAT scores tend to have a stronger preference for athletic success, while students with higher SAT scores have a greater preference for academic quality.

  3. Do Bonuses Enhance Sales Productivity? A Dynamic Structural Analysis of Bonus-Based Compensation Plans

    We estimate a dynamic structural model of sales force response to a bonus based compensation plan. Substantively, the paper sheds insights on how different elements of the compensation plan enhance productivity. We find evidence that: (1) bonuses enhance productivity across all segments; (2) overachievement commissions help sustain the high productivity of the best performers even after attaining quotas; and (3) quarterly bonuses help improve performance of the weak performers by serving as pacers to keep the sales force on track to achieve their annual sales quotas. The paper also introduces two main methodological innovations to the marketing literature: First, we implement empirically the method proposed by Arcidiacono and Miller (2011) to accommodate unobserved latent class heterogeneity using a computationally light two-step estimator. Second, we illustrate how discount factors can be estimated in a dynamic structural model using field data through a combination of (1) an exclusion restriction separating current and future payoff and (2) a finite horizon model in which there is no forward looking behavior in the last period.