Stephen P. Bradley

William Ziegler Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus

Professor Bradley is the William Ziegler Professor of Business Administration Emeritus at the Harvard Business School. In addition to teaching Management and Strategy in the Owner President Management Program and leading an Immersion Experience Program (IXP) in Turkey this year, he is the faculty chair of two executive programs, Strategy: Building and Sustaining Competitive Advantage and Designing and Executing Strategy.  In the past, he has served as the Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Development, Chairman of the Program for Management Development, Chairman of the Competition and Strategy Area, Chairman of the Managerial Economics Area, Course Head for Managerial Economics, and Associate Director of Research. In the MBA program, he created a course, Competing in the Information Age, which focused on the impact of the Internet on business strategy.

Professor Bradley's research interests center on the impact of technology on industry structure and competitive strategy. His most recent book, The Broadband Explosion: Leading Thinkers on the Promise of a Truly Interactive World, published by Harvard Business School Press (2005), argues that cheap and abundant bandwidth has the potential for creating new capabilities, markets, and strategies that will forever alter the business landscape. An earlier book, Sense and Respond: Capturing the Value in the Network Era, Harvard Business School Press (1998), dealt with the shift from “make and sell” strategies to “sense and respond” strategies driven by the explosion of information technology and the use of the Internet.  Related books, Globalization, Technology, and Competition, Harvard Business School Press (1993), dealt with the fusion of computers and telecommunications in the 1990s, and Future Competition in Telecommunications, Harvard Business School Press (1989) delt with the emerging competitive landscape for telecommunications.  He has written three other books: Quantitative Methods in Management, Richard D. Irwin, Inc., Applied Mathematical Programming, Addison-Wesley, Inc., and Management of Bank Portfolios, John Wiley and Sons as well as numerous case studies and articles for academic journals.

In his outside activities, Professor Bradley has worked on a variety of strategy initiatives in both the private and public sectors.  He serves as a member of the board of directors of CIENA Corporation, Transatlantic Reinsurance Company, the Risk Management Foundation, Inc. and Zuma360 Software, Inc. as well as on several advisory boards of nonpublic companies.  In the past, he was a member of the board of directors of i2 Technologies, Inc., Roadmaster Industries, Inc., and XcelleNet, Inc. and also a member of the editorial board of the Harvard Business Review.

Professor Bradley received his BE in Electrical Engineering from Yale University where he was elected to TAU BETA PI, and his MS and PhD in Operations Research from the University of California, Berkeley. Prior to coming to Harvard, he was with the Center for Exploratory Studies of the IBM Corporation.

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Books

  1. The Broadband Explosion: Leading Thinkers on the Promise of a Truly Interactive World

    Keywords: Technology; Leadership; Cognition and Thinking; Interactive Communication;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., and Stephen P. Bradley, eds. The Broadband Explosion: Leading Thinkers on the Promise of a Truly Interactive World. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2005. View Details
  2. Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era

    Keywords: Value; Networks;

    Citation:

    Bradley, S. P., and R. L. Nolan, eds. Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era. Harvard Business School Press, 1998. View Details
  3. Globalization, Technology, and Competition: The Fusion of Computers and Telecommunications in the 1990s

    Keywords: Economic History; Computer Industry; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, S. P., J. A. Hausman, and R. L. Nolan, eds. Globalization, Technology, and Competition: The Fusion of Computers and Telecommunications in the 1990s. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1993, Korean ed. View Details
  4. Future Competition in Telecommunications

    Keywords: Forecasting and Prediction; Competition; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Jerry A. Hausman, eds. Future Competition in Telecommunications. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 1989. View Details
  5. Quantitative Methods in Management: Text and Cases

    Keywords: Management Practices and Processes;

    Citation:

    Vatter, Paul A., Stephen P. Bradley, Sherwood C. Frey Jr., and Barbara B. Jackson. Quantitative Methods in Management: Text and Cases. Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin, 1978. View Details
  6. Applied Mathematical Programming

    Keywords: Mathematical Methods;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Arnoldo C. Hax, and Thomas L. Magnanti. Applied Mathematical Programming. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1977. View Details
  7. Management of Bank Portfolios

    Keywords: Management; Investment Portfolio;

    Citation:

    Bradley, S. P., and D. B. Crane. Management of Bank Portfolios. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1975. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. NTT DoCoMo: The Future of the Wireless Internet?

    Keywords: Technology; Internet;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "NTT DoCoMo: The Future of the Wireless Internet?" Journal of Interactive Marketing (spring 2002). View Details
  2. eBay, Inc.

    Keywords: Online Technology; Auctions; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "eBay, Inc." Journal of Interactive Marketing 14, no. 4 (autumn 2000). (Reprint of Harvard Business Case No. 700-007.) View Details
  3. The Light at the End of the Pipe

    Citation:

    Bane, P.W., and S. P. Bradley. "The Light at the End of the Pipe." Scientific American (October 1999). View Details
  4. Outsourcing and Industrial Decline

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing;

    Citation:

    Bettis, R.A., Stephen P. Bradley, and G. Hamel. "Outsourcing and Industrial Decline." Academy of Management Executive 6, no. 1 (February 1992). View Details
  5. Simulation of Bond Portfolio Strategies: Laddered vs. Barbell Maturity Sturctures

    Keywords: Bonds; Investment; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Crane, D. B., and Stephen P. Bradley. "Simulation of Bond Portfolio Strategies: Laddered vs. Barbell Maturity Sturctures." Journal of Bank Research 6, no. 2 (summer 1975). View Details
  6. Management of Commercial Bank Government Security Portfolios: An Optimization Approach Under Uncertainty

    Keywords: Management; Banks and Banking; Government and Politics; Investment; Risk and Uncertainty;

    Citation:

    Crane, D. B., and Stephen P. Bradley. "Management of Commercial Bank Government Security Portfolios: An Optimization Approach Under Uncertainty." Journal of Bank Research 4, no. 1 (spring 1973). View Details
  7. A Dynamic Model for Bond Portfolio Management

    Keywords: Bonds; Investment; Management;

    Citation:

    Crane, D. B., and S. P. Bradley. "A Dynamic Model for Bond Portfolio Management." Management Science 19, no. 2 (October 1972). View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Wi-Fi: Complement or Substitute for 3G?

    Keywords: Wireless Technology; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Wi-Fi: Complement or Substitute for 3G?" In The Broadband Explosion, edited by Robert D. Austin and Stephen P. Bradley. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2005. View Details
  2. The Broadband Explosion

    Keywords: Information Technology; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Robert D. Austin. "The Broadband Explosion." In The Broadband Explosion, edited by Robert D. Austin and Stephen P. Bradley. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2005. View Details
  3. Strategic Uncertainty and the Future of Electronic Consumer Interaction: Developing Scenarios, Adapting Strategies

    Keywords: Online Technology; Risk and Uncertainty; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Eric K. Clemons. "Strategic Uncertainty and the Future of Electronic Consumer Interaction: Developing Scenarios, Adapting Strategies." Chap. 4 in Digital Marketing: Global Strategies from the World's Leading Experts, edited by Jerry Wind and Vijay Mahajan, 78–101. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2002. View Details
  4. Capturing Value in the Network Era

    Keywords: Value; Networks;

    Citation:

    Bradley, S. P., and R. L. Nolan. "Capturing Value in the Network Era." In Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era, edited by Stephen P. Bradley and Richard L. Nolan. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1998. View Details
  5. The Converging Worlds of Telecommunications, Computing, and Entertainment

    Keywords: Communication Technology; Information Technology; Entertainment; Trends; Transition; Telecommunications Industry; Computer Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Bane, P. W., S. P. Bradley, and D. J. Collins. "The Converging Worlds of Telecommunications, Computing, and Entertainment." In Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era, edited by Stephen P. Bradley and Richard L. Nolan. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1998. View Details
  6. The Converging Worlds of Telecommunications, Computing and Entertainment

    Keywords: Communication Technology; Information Technology; Entertainment; Telecommunications Industry; Computer Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Collis, David J., Stephen P. Bradley, and P. William Bane Jr. "The Converging Worlds of Telecommunications, Computing and Entertainment." In Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era, edited by Stephen P. Bradley and Richard L. Nolan, 31–62. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1998. View Details
  7. Winners and Losers--Industry Structure in the Converging World of Telecommunications, Computing, and Entertainment

    Keywords: Supply and Industry; Communication; Information Technology; Entertainment; Competition; Conflict and Resolution; Telecommunications Industry; Information Technology Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Collis, D. J., P. W. Bane, and S. P. Bradley. "Winners and Losers--Industry Structure in the Converging World of Telecommunications, Computing, and Entertainment." In Competing in the Age of Digital Convergence, edited by D. B. Yoffie. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1997. View Details
  8. Global Competition in Technology

    Keywords: Globalized Markets and Industries; Competition; Technology; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., R. L. Nolan, and J. A. Hausman. "Global Competition in Technology." In Globalization, Technology, and Competition: The Fusion of Computers and Telecommunications in the 1990s, edited by S. P. Bradley, J. A. Hausman, and R. L. Nolan. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1993, Korean ed. View Details
  9. The Role of IT Networking in Sustaining Competitive Advantage

    Keywords: Information Technology; Technology Networks; Competitive Advantage;

    Citation:

    Bradley, S. P. "The Role of IT Networking in Sustaining Competitive Advantage." In Globalization, Technology, and Competition: The Fusion of Computers and Telecommunications in the 1990s, edited by S. P. Bradley, J. A. Hausman, and R. L. Nolan. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1993, Korean ed. View Details
  10. Managing a Bank Bond Portfolio over Time

    Keywords: Bonds; Investment Portfolio; Financial Management; Banks and Banking; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Crane, D. B., and S. P. Bradley. "Managing a Bank Bond Portfolio over Time." In Stochastic Programming, edited by M. A. H. Dempster. London: Academic Press, 1978. View Details

Working Papers

  1. The Converging Worlds of Telecommunication, Computing and Entertainment

    Citation:

    Bane, P. William, Stephen P. Bradley, and David J. Collis. "The Converging Worlds of Telecommunication, Computing and Entertainment." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 97-084, April 1997. View Details
  2. Capturing Value in the Network Era

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Richard L. Nolan. "Capturing Value in the Network Era." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 97-061, February 1997. View Details
  3. Winners and Losers--Industry Structure in the Converging World of Telecommunications,

    Citation:

    Collis, David J., P. William Bane, and Stephen P. Bradley. "Winners and Losers--Industry Structure in the Converging World of Telecommunications,." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 96-003, July 1995. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Book Publishing in 2010

    Legacy book publishers wrangled with ebook retailers over royalty rates, release strategy, and distribution rights as customer demand for cheaper ebooks eroded publishers' profitable print formats. E-readers like Kindle, as well as Apple's iPad that invigorated the digital book market is discussed. Also includes a general overview of book publishing including the K-12 and College market.

    Keywords: Price; Information Publishing; Books; Disruptive Innovation; Demand and Consumers; Distribution; Strategy; Technology; Internet; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "Book Publishing in 2010." Harvard Business School Background Note 711-419, October 2010. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  2. Crown Cork & Seal in 1989

    Describes the structure and recent trends of the metal container industry, Crown's successful strategy for competing in the industry, and John Connelly's leadership over more than 20 years. In 1989, William Avery succeeded Connelly as CEO and is forced to consider new strategic options in the face of industry change.

    Keywords: Leadership; Five Forces Framework; Management Succession; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Structure; Competitive Strategy;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Crown Cork & Seal in 1989." Harvard Business School Case 793-035, March 1993. (Revised December 2011.) View Details
  3. Everyone and Everything is Online

    The twenty-first century digital world enabled mobile, empowered, content-hungry individuals to capture the value of enabling technologies and applications to manage, create, share, and influence content across the creation and delivery spectrum. Users were online in record numbers, spending a greater percentage of their time, and conducting more and more activities including communications, learning, entertainment, and social interaction. Digital technologies and broadband radically revolutionized the value equation for many industries, giving more influence and power to the individual.

    Keywords: Communication Technology; Learning; Entertainment; Power and Influence; Web; Value; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "Everyone and Everything is Online." Harvard Business School Background Note 711-494, March 2011. (Revised September 2011.) View Details
  4. Retail Shopping in 2007: The Net Versus the Mall

    Provides an overview of the retail sector within the United States as online shopping captures an increased percentage of consumer spending. The role of enabling technologies and applications, including comparison shopping sites and recommendation systems, are covered. Additionally, the strategies, specifically the evolution of multi-channeling retail, are discussed.

    Keywords: Spending; Marketing Channels; Demand and Consumers; Technology; Online Technology; Web Sites; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Nancy Bartlett, and James Weber. "Retail Shopping in 2007: The Net Versus the Mall." Harvard Business School Background Note 707-566, May 2007. (Revised July 2011.) View Details
  5. eBay, Inc. (B)

    Updates development at eBay, Inc. through June 2002.

    Keywords: Web Services Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Erin Sullivan. "eBay, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 703-499, April 2003. (Revised July 2011.) View Details
  6. AT&T 2000-2004

    Provides an update on CEO Michael Armstrong's "Project Grand Slam" strategy to build the value of AT&T by offering a complete, integrated telecommunications solution to both corporate and residential customers, including wireless and wire line telephone, Internet, cable television, and network management. By July 2004, AT&T sold its cable business to Comcast, sold its wireless business to Cingular, and was downgraded to junk bond status. Soon thereafter, AT&T announced that it would abandon its local telephone service due to a ruling by the FCC that made them uncompetitive as resellers. The strategic question is whether AT&T can find ways to grow and create value for its shareholders, or is it time to sell out to one of the RBOCs?

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Customers; Business or Company Management; Failure; Business and Shareholder Relations; Networks; Corporate Strategy; Internet; Wireless Technology; Value Creation; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kerry Herman. "AT&T 2000-2004." Harvard Business School Case 705-425, October 2004. (Revised July 2011.) View Details
  7. Television Competes for a Digital Audience

    In the face of major disruption in the industry television networks have sought new revenue sources, implemented cost-cutting measures and strategized on ways to monetize online access to content. Programming changes, new advertising strategies, and deals via online distribution platforms are presented as means to capture the value of online video consumption.

    Keywords: Television Entertainment; Marketing Strategy; Media and Broadcasting Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "Television Competes for a Digital Audience." Harvard Business School Background Note 710-476, April 2010. (Revised June 2011.) View Details
  8. Social Networks: The Portals of Web 2.0

    Social networks have evolved into influential, compelling and persuasive systems, the portals of Web 2.0 and one of the most powerful media phenomena in 2008. This note provides a brief background and description of various social network sites including MySpace, Facebook, and YouTube. We also discuss recent trends and strategies stemming from the social network phenomena including widgets and online advertising.

    Keywords: Web; Technology; Networks; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "Social Networks: The Portals of Web 2.0." Harvard Business School Background Note 708-488, February 2008. (Revised June 2011.) View Details
  9. It's a Social World

    Social media had fashioned the lives of individuals and communities by 2010, providing an opportunity and a challenge for companies of all sizes. This note provides background on various social media (e.g. social networks, forums, games and communication services) and how people and groups utilize them. With an appreciation of the range of options, frequency of use, and typical activities, companies can better understand how social media impacts their branding, customer service, and selling model.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Media; Service Operations; Sales; Opportunities; Corporate Strategy; Web;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "It's a Social World." Harvard Business School Background Note 711-544, June 2011. View Details
  10. News in the Digital World: Who Pays?

    Models to monetizing news in the digital landscape, which is real-time, searchable, sharable, multi-sourced, anytime, and any screen, were emerging in 2010. Could content creators get people to pay for what they watched, read, listened to, and shared online? Were news aggregators riding on the backs of the new content generators? Or were they providing a new stream of audience directly to new sites that needed to create innovative models to monetize their content? As more delivery models were on the horizon (location-based breaking headlines via cell phones) and more content production unhinged from a commercial entity (images captured and uploaded from personal cell phone cameras), the news industry landscape became freewheeling and individualistic. The straight-line model of content generator to distributor to reader was gone.

    Keywords: Business Model; Newspapers; Disruptive Innovation; Technological Innovation; Online Technology; Journalism and News Industry; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "News in the Digital World: Who Pays?" Harvard Business School Background Note 710-456, January 2010. (Revised October 2010.) View Details
  11. The Risk Management Foundation of the Harvard Medical Institutions, Inc.

    Through its uniquely proactive approach to medical malpractice risk management, the Risk Management Foundation (RMF) has decreased claims—and premiums—for the Harvard hospitals it insures. The RMF is the captive medico-legal insurer of the Harvard medical institutions and affiliated physicians. Over the last two decades, through a combination of active legal defense and medical error prevention, the RMF has successfully controlled the medico-legal costs of physicians practicing at the Harvard teaching hospitals; consequently, its insured physicians pay notably lower premiums than similar specialists outside the Harvard system. The RMF's success has been due, in large part, to the close working relationships it has cultivated with the insured physicians and hospitals. However, as the hospitals expand their networks into Boston's suburbs, new, less tightly affiliated doctors whose medico-legal risk is higher than those practicing at the hospitals are coming under the RMF's umbrella. This case describes RMF's approach to risk management and the challenges its managers face in accommodating these new physicians.

    Keywords: Cost Management; Insurance; Health Care and Treatment; Risk Management; Performance Improvement; Safety; Health Industry; Insurance Industry; Boston;

    Citation:

    Bohmer, Richard M.J., Stephen P. Bradley, and Natalie Kindred. "The Risk Management Foundation of the Harvard Medical Institutions, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 610-014, September 2009. View Details
  12. How to Crack a Strategy Case

    Addresses a common concern among strategy students: "How should I tackle this case?" Describes a process for diagnosing a strategic situation, then generating, evaluating, and choosing among strategic options.

    Keywords: Decisions; Management Practices and Processes; Situation or Environment; Strategy; Valuation;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., David J. Collis, Kevin P. Coyne, Andrei Hagiu, Mikolaj Jan Piskorski, Jan W. Rivkin, and John R. Wells. "How to Crack a Strategy Case." Harvard Business School Background Note 707-549, March 2007. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  13. Live Nation Faces the Music (B)

    In 2008, concert producer and promoter Live Nation, faces a decision about its strategy in light of the tumultuous changes in the music industry and the increasing power of the major artists. As the music business once again recreates itself in response to new technologies and consumer needs, this major player is considering focusing on its principal business of concert booking and related revenue, or moving forward with its efforts to take advantage of new opportunities in the music industry by forging comprehensive, and often expensive, relationships with artists and other clients. The (B) case picks up Live Nation's activities from July 2008 through January 2009, as a supplement to Live Nation (A).

    Keywords: Arts; Transformation; Revenue; Framework; Five Forces Framework; Demand and Consumers; Industry Structures; Relationships; Opportunities; Power and Influence; Business Strategy; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Frank V. Cespedes, and Kerry Herman. "Live Nation Faces the Music (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 709-465, January 2009. View Details
  14. Welcome to a Wireless World

    Wireless technologies and mobile devices have played crucial roles in the evolution of the digital ecosystem. This note looks at cell phones, smartphones, mobile technologies, and popular applications noting companies that are positioned to capture the value engendered by them.

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Product; Mobile Technology; Wireless Technology; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "Welcome to a Wireless World." Harvard Business School Background Note 709-445, November 2008. View Details
  15. Strategy: Building and Sustaining Competitive Advantage

    It's great to have a blockbuster quarter or a revolutionary product or service, but true business excellence demands sustainability. Maintaining your competitive advantage requires a strategy that makes your business unique and carries you forward as the world around you changes. What makes a winning, sustainable strategy? Strategy: Building and Sustaining Competitive Advantage is a multimedia resource developed by ten faculty members in the Strategy Department at Harvard Business School. Included in this resource are faculty presentation, animated frameworks, print- and video-based case studies, and workbooks to help business leaders formulate action plans specific to their own companies.

    Keywords: Competitive Advantage;

    Citation:

    Anand, Bharat N., Stephen P. Bradley, Pankaj Ghemawat, Tarun Khanna, Cynthia A. Montgomery, Michael E. Porter, Jan W. Rivkin, Michael G. Rukstad, John R. Wells, and David B. Yoffie. "Strategy: Building and Sustaining Competitive Advantage." Harvard Business School Class Lecture 705-509, June 2005. (Revised September 2008.) View Details
  16. Broadband and Video Games: Playing and Winning Together

    This note examines the relationship between video gaming devices (console, handhelds, mobile and PC) and gaming software development. The impact of broadband, wireless technologies and other innovations are also presented.

    Keywords: Games, Gaming, and Gambling; Innovation and Invention; Relationships; Hardware; Software; Wireless Technology; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "Broadband and Video Games: Playing and Winning Together." Harvard Business School Background Note 708-440, April 2008. View Details
  17. The Music Recording Industry: Digital Rocks

    Digital and mobile technologies profoundly and forever changed the long-held value proposition for the recorded music industry--the 12-song physical CD selling at $15. By 2007, it was apparent that the music recording business had become a digital business, and consumers had redefined consumption and usage of music. This revolution required a relatively habitual industry to create new paradigms for artist development, distribution, and format.

    Keywords: Arts; Disruption; Music Entertainment; Distribution; Practice; Technology Adoption; Value; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "The Music Recording Industry: Digital Rocks." Harvard Business School Background Note 708-463, December 2007. View Details
  18. How Media Choices are Changing Online Advertising

    What is the response by advertisers as media consumption moves to the digital medium? Provides an overview of online advertising in mid-2006 and discusses the impact of an increasingly fractured media landscape and its accompanying expanding advertising options.

    Keywords: Online Advertising; News; Media; Emerging Markets; Internet; Perspective; Disruption; Journalism and News Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "How Media Choices are Changing Online Advertising." Harvard Business School Background Note 707-458, October 2006. (Revised February 2007.) View Details
  19. Where to Get Your News and Information: The Digital Disruption

    What is the response by traditional news and information deliverers (newspapers and television networks) to declining audiences as media consumption moves to the digital medium? Provides a view of the news industry in mid-2006 and discusses the impact of an increasingly fractured media landscape and various media format's ability to capture advertising dollars. Both offline and online entities are discussed.

    Keywords: News; Media; Emerging Markets; Internet; Disruption; Perspective; Advertising; Journalism and News Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "Where to Get Your News and Information: The Digital Disruption." Harvard Business School Background Note 707-442, September 2006. (Revised January 2007.) View Details
  20. Broadcast Television in the Broadband World

    What strategies have the top four (NBC, CBS, ABC, and FOX) broadcast television networks tested in response to changing media consumption behavior in the broadband world? Discusses the new distribution platforms, including downloads and video streaming. Also, provides a brief background of the evolution of the U.S. TV broadcast networks from the 1970s through the end of the 20th century.

    Keywords: Entertainment; Technology; Media and Broadcasting Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Nancy Bartlett. "Broadcast Television in the Broadband World." Harvard Business School Background Note 707-486, November 2006. (Revised January 2007.) View Details
  21. Out of Frame: The Coming Digital Disruption of Hollywood

    The record opening of the Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, starring Johnny Depp, had finally provided the industry with incontrovertible proof that it was still possible to draw massive audiences to movie theaters. Grossing $136 million during its opening weekend, the special effects swashbuckler had trounced the $115 million opening weekend record set by Spider-Man in 2002--something few thought would ever be possible in the era of MySpace.com, X-Box 360, video iPods, and digital privacy. Dead Man's Chest, which followed the adventures of Depp's roguish but charming Captain Jack Sparrow, also did what few movies had been able to do in recent memory: prove that producing Hollywood blockbusters could still be a lucrative and relevant endeavor. Dead Man's Chest had cost more than $200 million to make but the film had grossed a record breaking $258 million in its first 10 days, and the best was yet to come. Not only was the film in line to gross $400 million in the United States alone, but The Walt Disney Co. had decided to produce the second and third Pirates films simultaneously, so another Pirates sequel was already completed and ready for release in the summer of 2007. Disney's good fortune seemed like good news for everyone, as it signaled a rebound from 2005, when the industry's domestic theoretical revenue had dropped by 6.2% to $8.99 billion and when that year's all-important summer revenue had dropped 8.5% to $3.62 billion.

    Keywords: Disruption; Decisions; Film Entertainment; Revenue; Success; Technology Adoption; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Brian DeLacey, and Reed Martin. "Out of Frame: The Coming Digital Disruption of Hollywood." Harvard Business School Background Note 707-418, July 2006. View Details
  22. NTT DoCoMo, Inc.: Mobile FeliCa

    Managers of DoCoMo, Japan's largest mobile phone company, are formulating a strategy for mobile FeliCa: contactless integrated circuits that will be built into DoCoMo phones, allowing them to be used for quick and convenient retail or commuter fare payments, building entry, airline boarding passes, and other applications. DoCoMo's managers must determine how best to profit from mobile FeliCa. The options, which are not mutually exclusive, include: increasing mobile phone subscriber acquisition and retention rates by offering "sticky" differentiated new services; extracting monopoly rents from a joint venture (with Sony, FeliCa's inventor) that will license FeliCa technology to other mobile phone companies and application providers; and profiting from eMoney (retail payments) either through partnerships with incumbent financial services firms or by offering payment services directly.

    Keywords: Cost vs Benefits; Expansion; Alliances; Wireless Technology; Information Technology Industry; Communications Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Thomas R. Eisenmann, Masako Egawa, and Akiko Kanno. "NTT DoCoMo, Inc.: Mobile FeliCa." Harvard Business School Case 805-124, April 2005. (Revised June 2006.) View Details
  23. AOL Time Warner, Inc.

    AOL Time Warner, which has been billed as the "first fully integrated media and communications company of the Internet Century," raises the fundamental question of how value will be created and captured by the merger of AOL and Time Warner. This case describes just how different AOL was from Time Warner in strategy, culture, and execution, and permits a thorough analysis of how value is proposed to be created through capturing synergies within the new company. The discussion of synergies is divided into three levels: tactical, strategic, and transformational. The key question to address is whether a merger of this sort is the most effective way to create value or whether contracting and other mechanisms is equally good or perhaps superior. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Internet; Value Creation; Organizational Culture; Consolidation; Change Management; Telecommunications Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Erin Sullivan. "AOL Time Warner, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 702-421, March 2002. (Revised June 2005.) View Details
  24. Bombardier TEG (A)

    Bombardier, a Canadian manufacturer of passenger railcars and market leader in the United States, faces aggressive competition from a new entrant, U.S.-owned Morrison Knudsen, that has come into the industry with closely related capabilities in engineering and transportation construction. Bombardier must decide is how to respond to the loss of market share and the strategic threat posed by the new competitor.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Goals and Objectives; Strategy; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Rail Transportation; Manufacturing Industry; Rail Industry; Canada; United States;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Bombardier TEG (A)." Harvard Business School Case 796-002, May 1996. (Revised March 2005.) View Details
  25. China's Telecommunications Sector

    In mid-2003, China was the fastest-growing telecom market. Telecom subscribers are estimated at 472 million. With the size and growth of telecom, China is a hot spot for new telecom and IT technologies. Furthermore, China's sheer market power provides a strong position for establishing telecom policies and standards that have important global and economic implications. This case provides the underlying background to discuss the key issues and decisions facing China's policymakers.

    Keywords: Globalized Markets and Industries; Technological Innovation; Policy; Decision Choices and Conditions; Competition; Telecommunications Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Stephen P. Bradley. "China's Telecommunications Sector." Harvard Business School Background Note 904-416, November 2003. (Revised June 2004.) View Details
  26. Pharmaceutical Industry, The: Challenges in the New Century

    Provides a broad overview of the numerous internal and external forces that were driving change in the global pharmaceutical industry in 2003. These forces--including downward price pressures, political and social pressures, increased development costs, new technologies, new and different competitors, consolidation, and threats to its basic business models--were changing the way drugs were discovered, developed, manufactured, tested, regulated, marketed, sold, and purchased. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Business Model; Change; Cost; Price; Globalization; Government and Politics; Brands and Branding; Industry Growth; Society; Competition; Consolidation; Technology; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and James Weber. "Pharmaceutical Industry, The: Challenges in the New Century." Harvard Business School Case 703-489, February 2003. (Revised April 2004.) View Details
  27. Wal-Mart Stores in 2003

    Examines Wal-Mart's development over three decades and provides financial and descriptive detail of its domestic operations. In 2003, Wal-Mart's Supercenter business has surpassed its domestic business as the largest generator of revenues. Its international operation seems poised to become the next growth driver for the company as it marches toward the trillion dollar sales mark. But problems are starting to surface even as the company is winning recognition as the number one company in the Fortune 500--unions keep pressuring its minimum-wage employees and allegations of gender discrimination are alleged. Teaching purpose: To introduce students to creating a competitive advantage.

    Keywords: Wages; Fairness; Corporate Strategy; Operations; Labor Unions; Problems and Challenges; Gender Characteristics; Globalized Firms and Management; Competitive Advantage; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Ghemawat, Pankaj, Stephen P. Bradley, and Ken Mark. "Wal-Mart Stores in 2003." Harvard Business School Case 704-430, September 2003. (Revised January 2004.) View Details
  28. Capturing the Value: Competitive Strategies That Work

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Capturing the Value: Competitive Strategies That Work." Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing Class Lecture, 2004. Electronic. (Faculty Lecture: HBSP Product Number 7529C.) View Details
  29. Edmunds.com, Inc. (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Auto Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Erin Sullivan. "Edmunds.com, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 704-016, September 2003. View Details
  30. NTT DoCoMo (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry; Telecommunications Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Erin Sullivan. "NTT DoCoMo (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 703-401, April 2003. View Details
  31. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.

    Focuses on the evolution of Wal-Mart's remarkably successful discount operations and describes the company's more recent attempts to diversify into other businesses. The company has entered the warehouse club industry with its Sam's Clubs and the grocery business with its Supercenters, a combination supermarket and discount store. Wal-Mart experienced a drop in the value of its stock price in early 1993, which it still has not made up. Wal-Mart has advantages over its competitors in areas such as distribution, information technology, and merchandising, to name a few.

    Keywords: Stocks; Price; Marketing Channels; Competitive Strategy; Diversification; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Pankaj Ghemawat. "Wal-Mart Stores, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 794-024, January 1994. (Revised November 2002.) View Details
  32. NTT DoCoMo (A): The Future of the Wireless Internet?

    NTT DoCoMo was established in 1992 and became publicly held in 1998. This case tracks how DoCoMo became the number one mobile phone company in Japan and how its i.mode service revolutionized the cellular phone market.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Goals and Objectives; Growth and Development Strategy; Growth Management; Competitive Strategy; Expansion; Internet; Mobile Technology; Information Technology Industry; Telecommunications Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Matthew Sandoval. "NTT DoCoMo (A): The Future of the Wireless Internet?" Harvard Business School Case 701-013, October 2000. (Revised September 2002.) View Details
  33. Edmunds.com (A)

    Edmund's began in 1966 as a publisher of new and used vehicle guides and grew into one of the leading third-party automotive web sites of today. This case explores how Edmunds.com gained a competitive edge using strategic partnerships and alliances, as well as careful product positioning and strategy implementation.

    Keywords: Growth and Development Strategy; Business Strategy; Success; Product Positioning; Partners and Partnerships; Competitive Advantage; Auto Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Christina Akers. "Edmunds.com (A)." Harvard Business School Case 701-025, August 2000. (Revised November 2001.) View Details
  34. eBay, Inc.

    eBay was the world's largest and most popular person-to-person trading community on the Internet. In early 1999, the company was doing very well and seemed to have solved many of its early problems. However, on March 30, 1999, Amazon.com announced that it was entering the online auction arena. This powerful firm could prove to be eBay's strongest competitor to date.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Growth and Development Strategy; Marketing Strategy; Planning; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Retail Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "eBay, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 700-007, September 1999. (Revised June 2001.) View Details
  35. Drug Wars, The: Pfizer's Hostile Bid for Warner-Lambert in 1999

    Describes Pfizer's hostile bid for Warner-Lambert in the fall of 1999. Allows for an evaluation of the possible synergies created and poses the question as to whether Pfizer will pay too much.

    Keywords: Acquisition; Bids and Bidding; Competitive Strategy; Valuation;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Matthew Sandoval. "Drug Wars, The: Pfizer's Hostile Bid for Warner-Lambert in 1999." Harvard Business School Case 701-009, December 2000. View Details
  36. Charles Schwab: A Category of One

    Examines Charles Schwab's on-line discount brokerage firm and questions whether or not Schwab has effectively balanced the old and new world of stock trading, and has remained a leader between giants like Merrill Lynch and Internet pure plays like E-Trade. Also looks at how Schwab has remained a competitive player with 363 brick and mortar branches while continuing to boost 81% of its trades over the Internet. While major bank mergers began to emerge as dominant online players, Schwab's unique status as a discount brokerage began to wane. In the wake of powerful full-service firms gaining online presence and discount brokerages offering $4.95 trades, how could Schwab sustain its competitive advantage?

    Keywords: Financial Institutions; Banks and Banking; Technological Innovation; Goals and Objectives; Growth and Development Strategy; Growth Management; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Banking Industry; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Thomas H. Esperson. "Charles Schwab: A Category of One." Harvard Business School Case 700-043, December 1999. (Revised December 2000.) View Details
  37. CDnow (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Distribution Channels; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Value Creation;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Christina Akers. "CDnow (B)." Harvard Business School Case 701-047, October 2000. View Details
  38. CDNow (A)

    With CDnow's acquisition of N2K's Music Boulevard web site, this case deals with capturing value in the music industry with online sales. CDnow has the advantage of being one of the exclusive music online retailers on AOL but faces fierce competition from Amazon.com. CDnow went through formal proceedings with Columbia House (Sony) and is now part of a border battle between standards for distributing music over the Internet.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Distribution Channels; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Value Creation;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Christina Akers, and Howard Reitz. "CDNow (A)." Harvard Business School Case 701-046, October 2000. View Details
  39. Quokka Sports

    Quokka Sports is an example of one of the new broadband services focused in total immersion sports. Quokka faces two issues: 1) the broadband infrastructure is emerging slowly so the type of services offered needs to be decided on. 2) Quokka faces an explosion of competition as various traditional cable sports channels enter the Internet web-casting field.

    Keywords: Online Advertising; Decisions; Information Publishing; Infrastructure; Competition; Advertising Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Thomas R. Eisenmann, Stephanie Mason Ogborne, and Julie C. Toscano. "Quokka Sports." Harvard Business School Case 701-011, September 2000. View Details
  40. Excite@Home: Betting on a Broadband Revolution

    In January 1999, @Home, a high-speed Internet access provider, announced the $6.7 billion purchase of Excite, the second largest of the major Internet "portals." This purchase marked a continuing consolidation of companies in the Internet "content" and "access" businesses and raised new issues about the form of future competitive success in the online arena. With the merger, @Home's largest minority shareholder, AT&T, inherited a contract with Excite that guaranteed the content provider exclusive access to its cable pipelines until 2002. In the months that followed, many analysts asked whether this contract would hurt AT&T in the long run, and rumors of an Excite@Home breakup pounded the stock. Excite@Home denied these reports, but many analysts suggested such a deal would be a positive move for both @Home and AT&T, which would no longer be bound to offer the content of single provider over their high-speed connections.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Joint Ventures; Technological Innovation; Growth and Development Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Internet; Web; Information Technology Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Matthew Sandoval. "Excite@Home: Betting on a Broadband Revolution." Harvard Business School Case 700-069, December 1999. (Revised September 2000.) View Details
  41. AMVESCAP in 1999

    Deals with the problems faced by a major mutual fund company as it attempts to respond to the threats and opportunities posed by the explosion of the Internet and the changing landscape of retail financial services.

    Keywords: Trends; Investment Funds; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Problems and Challenges; Alignment; Internet; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kathleen E. E Danoher. "AMVESCAP in 1999." Harvard Business School Case 701-016, August 2000. View Details
  42. Convergys Corporation

    Focuses on the important issue of capturing the synergies between the two sides of the business, Information Management Group (IMG) and Customer Management Group (CMG). In addition, the case also addresses strategic issues from each of the individual businesses. For IMG, the case touches on the competition in the billing and customer care side of the business. This involves competing with your customers to outsource the business as well as the potential threats from Lucent and Portal in selling software. For CMG, the case deals with the critical need to shift from call centers to contact centers.

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Customer Satisfaction; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Practices and Processes; Service Delivery; Service Operations; Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Information Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "Convergys Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 700-042, September 1999. (Revised September 1999.) View Details
  43. Edmund's-www.edmunds.com (Supplement)

    Supplements the case.

    Keywords: Auto Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Stephen P. Bradley, John J. Sviokla, and Kelley Porter. "Edmund's-www.edmunds.com (Supplement)." Harvard Business School Supplement 399-036, September 1998. (Revised September 1999.) View Details
  44. AOL in the Summer of 1999

    Keywords: Internet; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "AOL in the Summer of 1999." Harvard Business School Case 700-044, August 1999. View Details
  45. IBM's Lotus Development in 1999

    Describes Lotus' acquisition by IBM, its movement from proprietary standards to open standards, and its current market position. Microsoft is gaining ground with its Exchange Server, and Lotus has received unfavorable press.

    Keywords: Acquisition; Technological Innovation; Growth and Development Strategy; Growth Management; Product Marketing; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Information Technology Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "IBM's Lotus Development in 1999." Harvard Business School Case 799-014, September 1998. (Revised August 1999.) View Details
  46. Networks and Networking Software: Technology Note

    Used to educate students about client and enterprise software.

    Keywords: Software; Networks; Technology Networks;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "Networks and Networking Software: Technology Note." Harvard Business School Background Note 799-031, September 1998. (Revised August 1999.) View Details
  47. XcelleNet, Inc. (A)

    XcelleNet, a $35 million system software company based in Atlanta, was founded in 1986 to address the computing needs of a class of remote and mobile users and data that were rarely connected to a network. Though the clear first mover and leader in the remote enterprise computing segment in 1996, XcelleNet and its market had been stalled by successive waves of networking technology--remote LAN Access, Groupware, and the Internet/Intranet. The company's founder and CEO, Dennis Crumpler, must formulate a strategy for capitalizing on XcelleNet's first-mover advantage and responding to the opportunities created by these emerging technologies.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Opportunities; Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Technology Networks; Computer Industry; Atlanta;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Richard L. Nolan, and James Leonard. "XcelleNet, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 796-189, June 1996. (Revised January 1999.) View Details
  48. XcelleNet, Inc. (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Computer Industry; Atlanta;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "XcelleNet, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 799-028, September 1998. (Revised January 1999.) View Details
  49. State Street Corporation: Leading with Information Technology (B)

    With Multi-currency HORIZON, a real-time multi-currency accounting system that replaced the traditional batch-oriented single-currency accounting system, successfully launched, State Street Corp. (State Street) began to focus on growing the scope of its business through new information-based value-added services. At an analyst meeting in May 1997, Marshall N. Carter, chairman and chief executive office of State Street, had announced that State Street's goal was to offer its customers a fully integrated range of products and services, from news and market data to trade settlement.

    Keywords: Accounting; Trends; Global Strategy; Growth and Development Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Information Technology; Value Creation; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "State Street Corporation: Leading with Information Technology (B)." Harvard Business School Case 799-034, January 1999. View Details
  50. Retail Financial Services in 1998

    Provides an overview of the current restructuring that is taking place in the retail financial services industry. Provides a brief overview of the structural changes in banking, brokerage, insurance, and mutual funds. Used as background for examining the strategies of several firms competing in this space.

    Keywords: Economic Sectors; Economy; Financial Institutions; Financial Markets; Industry Growth; Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Banking Industry; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Retail Financial Services in 1998." Harvard Business School Background Note 799-051, December 1998. View Details
  51. Retail Financial Services in 1998: Charles Schwab

    Provides an overview of Charles Schwab's current strategy for retail financial services. Retail Financial Services in 1998 should be given to all students as background material. The class should then be split into groups, with each group receiving one of the following cases: Retail Financial Services in 1998: Charles Schwab, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Fidelity Investments, Retail Financial Services in 1998: First Union, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Merrill Lynch, or Retail Financial Services in 1998: Travelers to prepare in order to understand how each player is attempting to capture value in the converging world of retail financial services.

    Keywords: Investment Funds; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Industry Structures; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Retail Financial Services in 1998: Charles Schwab." Harvard Business School Case 799-052, December 1998. View Details
  52. Retail Financial Services in 1998: Fidelity Investments

    Provides an overview of Fidelity Investment's current strategy for retail financial services. Retail Financial Services in 1998 should be given to all students as background material. The class should then be split into groups, with each group receiving one of the following cases: Retail Financial Services in 1998: Charles Schwab, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Fidelity Investments, Retail Financial Services in 1998: First Union, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Merrill Lynch, or Retail Financial Services in 1998: Travelers to prepare in order to understand how each player is attempting to capture value in the converging world of retail financial services.

    Keywords: Investment Funds; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Industry Structures; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Retail Financial Services in 1998: Fidelity Investments." Harvard Business School Case 799-053, December 1998. View Details
  53. Retail Financial Services in 1998: First Union

    Provides an overview of First Union's current strategy for retail financial services. Retail Financial Services in 1998 should be given to all students as background material. The class should then be split into groups, with each group receiving one of the following cases: Retail Financial Services in 1998: Charles Schwab, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Fidelity Investments, Retail Financial Services in 1998: First Union, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Merrill Lynch, or Retail Financial Services in 1998: Travelers to prepare in order to understand how each player is attempting to capture value in the converging world of retail financial services.

    Keywords: Investment Funds; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Industry Structures; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Retail Financial Services in 1998: First Union." Harvard Business School Case 799-054, December 1998. View Details
  54. Retail Financial Services in 1998: Merrill Lynch

    Provides an overview of Merrill Lynch's current strategy for retail financial services. Retail Financial Services in 1998 should be given to all students as background material. The class should then be split into groups, with each group receiving one of the following cases: Retail Financial Services in 1998: Charles Schwab, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Fidelity Investments, Retail Financial Services in 1998: First Union, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Merrill Lynch, or Retail Financial Services in 1998: Travelers to prepare in order to understand how each player is attempting to capture value in the converging world of retail financial services.

    Keywords: Investment Funds; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Industry Structures; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Retail Financial Services in 1998: Merrill Lynch." Harvard Business School Case 799-055, December 1998. View Details
  55. Retail Financial Services in 1998: Travelers

    Provides an overview of Travelers Group's current strategy for retail financial services. Retail Financial Services in 1998 should be given to all students as background material. The class should then be split into groups, with each group receiving one of the following cases: Retail Financial Services in 1998: Charles Schwab, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Fidelity Investments, Retail Financial Services in 1998: First Union, Retail Financial Services in 1998: Merrill Lynch, or Retail Financial Services in 1998: Travelers to prepare in order to understand how each player is attempting to capture value in the converging world of retail financial services.

    Keywords: Investment Funds; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Industry Structures; Competition; Competitive Strategy; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Retail Financial Services in 1998: Travelers." Harvard Business School Case 799-056, December 1998. View Details
  56. N2K, Inc.

    Keywords: Music Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Howard Reitz. "N2K, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 799-017, October 1998. View Details
  57. Excite, Inc.--1998

    Reviews recent trends and the evolution of the emerging portal industry, highlighting the competitive position of the industry's major participants. The business model of Excite, Inc., and its major competitors are presented. In addition, the case looks at the new entrants to the portal market such as online service providers and large media companies, and discusses how these players may affect the original portal players. Teaching Purpose: Written to demonstrate how one of the leading search engines, Excite, is making the transition into the portal market. Meant to be taught as part of a course that includes a module on how the Internet is leading to the creation of new industries.

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Business Model; Emerging Markets; Transformation; Market Entry and Exit; Industry Structures; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Kelley Porter. "Excite, Inc.--1998." Harvard Business School Case 799-044, October 1998. View Details
  58. Disposable Diaper Industry in 1994, The

    Updates the developments in the disposable diaper industry from 1984 to 1994. The key issue is Procter & Gamble's response to the continuing erosion of market share.

    Keywords: Markets; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Disposable Diaper Industry in 1994, The ." Harvard Business School Case 795-142, April 1995. (Revised March 1998.) View Details
  59. Crown Cork & Seal in 1989 TN

    Teaching Note for (9-793-035).

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Crown Cork & Seal in 1989 TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 395-224, June 1995. View Details
  60. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-794-024).

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 395-225, June 1995. View Details
  61. Promus Companies, The: Harrah's Casinos

    Provides an overview of the U.S. gambling industry and the rapid expansion of gambling beyond Nevada and New Jersey since 1988. Focuses on Harrah's, a traditional top-tier casino company, which was the first to aggressively expand into emerging gaming markets and that needs to consider how best to sustain its competitive position.

    Keywords: Emerging Markets; Competitive Advantage; Corporate Strategy; Expansion; Las Vegas; New Jersey;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Takia Mahmood. "Promus Companies, The: Harrah's Casinos." Harvard Business School Case 795-039, February 1995. View Details
  62. Disposable Diaper Industry in 1984

    Updates the Disposable Diaper Industry in 1974. Intended as an in-class handout.

    Keywords: Competition; Markets; Consumer Products Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Pankaj Ghemawat. "Disposable Diaper Industry in 1984." Harvard Business School Supplement 794-130, April 1994. View Details
  63. Madison Wire and Cable Corp. (B)

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and William S. Krasker. "Madison Wire and Cable Corp. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 183-118, November 1982. (Revised March 1994.) View Details
  64. Barbara J. Key vs. the Gillette Co. (B)

    Keywords: Courts and Trials;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Barbara J. Key vs. the Gillette Co. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 183-093, September 1982. (Revised June 1992.) View Details
  65. Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp.: Commercial Roofing Division (Condensed)

    Keywords: Construction Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp.: Commercial Roofing Division (Condensed)." Harvard Business School Case 892-001, August 1991. View Details
  66. Barbara J. Key vs. the Gillette Co. (A)

    Keywords: Courts and Trials;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Barbara J. Key vs. the Gillette Co. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 183-092, September 1982. (Revised October 1990.) View Details
  67. Disposable Diaper Industry in 1974, Guide to Caseware Worksheet

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Disposable Diaper Industry in 1974, Guide to Caseware Worksheet." Harvard Business School Background Note 390-123, March 1990. View Details
  68. World Copier Industry--1973-83

    Keywords: Business History;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "World Copier Industry--1973-83." Harvard Business School Background Note 189-102, November 1988. View Details
  69. Devereux Associates

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P. "Devereux Associates." Harvard Business School Case 183-087, September 1982. (Revised October 1984.) View Details
  70. Madison Wire and Cable Corp. (B), Supplement

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and William S. Krasker. "Madison Wire and Cable Corp. (B), Supplement." Harvard Business School Supplement 183-119, November 1982. View Details