Daniel Malter

Assistant Professor of Business Administration

Daniel Malter is an Assistant Professor of Business Administration in the Strategy Unit at the Harvard Business School where he teaches Strategy in the MBA required curriculum. Professor Malter studies social market structure, specifically, the status hierarchies and identities of organizations within markets. His work has implications for market selection, how firms should maneuver the incentive structure in their markets, and for how individuals and firms should structure their networks to best appeal to their audiences. He received his Ph.D. in strategic management from the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland after earning his diploma at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin.

Daniel Malter is an Assistant Professor of Business Administration in the Strategy Unit at the Harvard Business School where he teaches Strategy in the MBA required curriculum. Professor Malter studies social market structure, specifically, the status hierarchies and identities of organizations within markets. His work has implications for market selection, how firms should maneuver the incentive structure in their markets, and for how individuals and firms should structure their networks to best appeal to their audiences. He received his Ph.D. in strategic management from the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland after earning his diploma at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin.

Working Papers

  1. On the Causality and Cause of Returns to Organizational Status: Evidence from the grands crus classés of the Médoc

    This paper addresses the recent debate about the causality of status effects and identifies the symbolic effect of status on the prices organizations charge for their products. I exploit the grand cru classification of the chateaux of the Médoc, created in 1855, as a fixed hierarchical symbol of class status. The classification cannot be reversely affected by the quality chateaux produce or the prices they charge, which greatly facilitates the estimation of the causal effect. To discern whether status serves as a signal of quality under uncertainty or satisfies the motive of conspicuous consumption, I study a period of time during which the uncertainty about quality has arguably declined. An instrumental variable and a matching estimator identify a symbolic effect of status on prices. The effect increases in a time of decreasing uncertainty, which supports the motive of conspicuous consumption as a driver of the effect. However, the results caution that we might commonly overestimate the symbolic value of status if we underestimate the disproportional value markets place on the pinnacle of quality, the enduring nature of reputation, and the effect of endogenous quality choices on status effect estimates.

    Keywords: Status and Position; Price;

    Citation:

    Malter, Daniel. "On the Causality and Cause of Returns to Organizational Status: Evidence from the grands crus classés of the Médoc." Working Paper, December 2013. (Administrative Science Quarterly, forthcoming.) View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Social Strategy at Cisco Systems

    In April 2013, Jeanne Beliveau-Dunn, vice president and general manager for Learning@Cisco Systems, was planning the future of the Cisco Learning Network, an online platform hosted at Cisco.com. Since its launch in 2008, the Cisco Learning Network provided content to prepare networking professionals for certification exams, as well as social functionalities to let users interact with each other. To help realize the company's vision for "The Internet of Everything (IOE)," a world where nearly all physical objects, places, people, and processes were connected through the Internet, Cisco estimated that 75 to 90% of all IT workers needed to be re-skilled. The Cisco Learning Network played an important role in that process, helping to train networking professionals to design, build, and manage more complex networks. Aware of just how much was riding on the success of the learning platform, Beliveau-Dunn needed to decide whether to invest heavily in content—and have Cisco employees post videos, tutorials, and study guides to the site—or invest in more social networking tools to enable the community to produce content and help one another master the material in preparation for new certifications.

    Keywords: Networks; Technology Platform; Internet; Competency and Skills; Learning; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Piskorski, Mikolaj Jan, Daniel Malter, and Aaron Smith. "Social Strategy at Cisco Systems." Harvard Business School Case 714-475, January 2014. View Details

Other Publications and Materials

  1. Basking in the Eclipse of Reflected Glory: When High-status Affiliations Impede Organizational Growth

    Citation:

    Malter, Daniel. "Basking in the Eclipse of Reflected Glory: When High-status Affiliations Impede Organizational Growth." 2012. View Details
  2. On the Causality, Cause, and Consequence of Returns to Organizational Status: Evidence from the Grands Crus Classes of the Medoc

    Citation:

    Malter, Daniel. "On the Causality, Cause, and Consequence of Returns to Organizational Status: Evidence from the Grands Crus Classes of the Medoc." 2012. View Details