Doctoral Student

Catarina Fernandes

Catarina is a fourth-year PhD student in the Organizational Behavior unit at the Harvard Business School. She studies how status, power and leadership emerge in teams and influence behaviors and decision-making processes. One of her current projects looks at the dynamic nature of status, in particular whether and how it varies for an individual across contexts, and the implications of status changes. In another project she is exploring how factors such as diversity and individuals' experience of their own identities can influence leadership. Catarina holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School and a BA in Economics from Nova School of Business & Economics in Lisbon. She also worked as a management consultant at A.T. Kearney.
Catarina is a fourth-year PhD student in the Organizational Behavior unit at the Harvard Business School. She studies how status, power and leadership emerge in teams and influence behaviors and decision-making processes. One of her current projects looks at the dynamic nature of status, in particular whether and how it varies for an individual across contexts, and the implications of status changes. In another project she is exploring how factors such as diversity and individuals' experience of their own identities can influence leadership. Catarina holds an MBA from the Harvard Business School and a BA in Economics from Nova School of Business & Economics in Lisbon. She also worked as a management consultant at A.T. Kearney.

Book Chapters

  1. Diversity in Groups

    Catarina Fernandes and Jeff Polzer

    Diversity has the potential to either disrupt group functioning or, conversely, be the source of collective creativity and insight. These two divergent perspectives pose a paradox that has held the attention of scholars for many years. In response, researchers have marshaled evidence to specify the conditions under which diversity leads to more positive outcomes and explain why it does so under these conditions. After describing these foundational perspectives and more recent work that addresses this paradox, we outline several promising directions for research in this domain. We encourage researchers to develop integrative theoretical explanations, use new technologies to gain insight into group processes, study diversity in the context of virtual interaction, and take advantage of opportunities for cross-disciplinary research.

    Citation:

    Fernandes, Catarina, and Jeff Polzer. "Diversity in Groups." In Emerging Trends in the Social and Behavioral Sciences: An Interdisciplinary, Searchable, and Linkable Resource, edited by Robert A. Scott and Stephen M. Kosslyn. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, 2015. Electronic. View Details

Presentations

  1. Women and Minorities' Leadership Identity Claims: The Role of Identity Granting and Status Beliefs

    Catarina R. Fernandes, Lakshmi Ramarajan and N. Andrew Cohen

    Citation:

    Fernandes, Catarina R., Lakshmi Ramarajan, and N. Andrew Cohen. "Women and Minorities' Leadership Identity Claims: The Role of Identity Granting and Status Beliefs." Paper presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, August 2014. View Details
  2. Status Spillover: How Status in One Group Influences the Perception of Status in Other Groups

    Catarina R. Fernandes and Jeffrey T. Polzer

    This research explores how moving between groups where individuals hold different status levels influences their subjective interpretation of their present status. We found evidence that individuals holding the same objective level of status experience it differently depending on whether they held higher or lower status in previous groups they belonged to. In particular, those who reached their current standing through status gain (coming from a group where they had lower status) experienced their current status as if it were subjectively higher compared to participants who reached the same objective status level through an equal-sized loss (coming from a group where they had higher status). Furthermore, we found that the spillover effect of individuals’ previous status depended on whether they experienced status gain or loss. Individuals who gained status revealed an overshooting effect, by which their self-perceived status overshot their current status level, leading them to overestimate how much status they actually held. Conversely, individuals who lost status exhibited an anchoring effect, by which they anchored their self-perception of their current status level on their previous higher standing, insufficiently adjusting their perception of their new status. We discuss the implications of this study for research on the dynamic nature of status.

    Keywords: Status and Position; Perception; Groups and Teams;

    Citation:

    Fernandes, Catarina R., and Jeffrey T. Polzer. "Status Spillover: How Status in One Group Influences the Perception of Status in Other Groups." Paper presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, August 2014. View Details