Doctoral Student

Frank Nagle

Frank is a doctoral candidate in the Technology & Operations Management unit at HBS where he studies the economics of IT and digitization. His main research interests are network effects in technology adoption, innovation and production for free, and generating strategic predictions from unstructured big data. His research utilizes large datasets derived from online social networks, financial market information, and surveys of enterprise IT usage.

Frank has worked at a number of small and large companies in the information security and technology consulting industries. In these roles, he has researched a variety of topics related to social network privacy and the economics of IT, spoke at numerous conferences, and developed and taught a 2 week course that all FBI cyber agents must pass before entering the field. Frank earned a BS and MS in Computer Science from Georgetown University and an MS in International Business Economics from City University, London.

Frank is a doctoral candidate in the Technology & Operations Management unit at HBS where he studies the economics of IT and digitization. His main research interests are network effects in technology adoption, innovation and production for free, and generating strategic predictions from unstructured big data. His research utilizes large datasets derived from online social networks, financial market information, and surveys of enterprise IT usage.

Frank has worked at a number of small and large companies in the information security and technology consulting industries. In these roles, he has researched a variety of topics related to social network privacy and the economics of IT, spoke at numerous conferences, and developed and taught a 2 week course that all FBI cyber agents must pass before entering the field. Frank earned a BS and MS in Computer Science from Georgetown University and an MS in International Business Economics from City University, London.

  1. Overview

    Frank's current research focuses on a number of areas within the field of the Economics of IT and Digitization. In the area of innovation and production for free, he is studying the value of open source software (with Shane Greenstein), the drivers of online word-of-mouth (with Christoph Riedl), and various aspects of digital economies (with Magnus Torfason and Mikolaj Piskorski). In the area of network effects in technology adoption, he is exploring supply-chain based network effects in enterprise IT adoption (with Kristina McElheran). In the area of generating strategic predictions from unstructured big data, he has researched the relationship between social media and stock market movements. His research utilizes large datasets derived from online social networks, financial market information, and surveys of enterprise IT usage. Frank's prior research focused on Influence, Trust, and Privacy in Social Networks.

    Keywords: Economic Growth; Economic Systems; Entrepreneurship; Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Independent Innovation and Invention; Technological Innovation; Technology; Information Technology; Internet; Mobile Technology; Online Technology; Technology Adoption; Technology Networks; Strategy;