Doctoral Student

Matthew Scott Lee

For a detailed profile and information on my research, please visit my job market website at http://www.matthewscottlee.com

Matthew Lee is a Doctoral Candidate in Management at Harvard Business School. His current research focuses on social entrepreneurship as a setting for institutional hybridization, the process by which multiple existing organizational templates recombine into innovative organizational practices. Other, ongoing research examines corporate social responsibility (CSR) and how the presence of corporations shapes the social structure of the communities in which they are embedded. His work has been published in Strategic Management Journal and the Stanford Social Innovation Review, and he is a finalist for the 2013 INFORMS/Organization Science dissertation proposal competition.


For a detailed profile and information on my research, please visit my job market website at http://www.matthewscottlee.com

Matthew Lee is a Doctoral Candidate in Management at Harvard Business School. His current research focuses on social entrepreneurship as a setting for institutional hybridization, the process by which multiple existing organizational templates recombine into innovative organizational practices. Other, ongoing research examines corporate social responsibility (CSR) and how the presence of corporations shapes the social structure of the communities in which they are embedded. His work has been published in Strategic Management Journal and the Stanford Social Innovation Review, and he is a finalist for the 2013 INFORMS/Organization Science dissertation proposal competition.


Journal Articles

  1. Who Is Governing Whom? Executives, Governance, and the Structure of Generosity in Large U.S. Firms

    We examine how organizational structure influences strategies over which corporate leaders have significant discretion. Corporate philanthropy is our setting to study how a differentiated structural element—the corporate foundation—constrains the influence of individual senior managers and directors on corporate strategy. Our analysis of Fortune 500 firms from 1996 to 2006 shows that leader characteristics at both the senior management and director levels affect corporate philanthropic contributions. We also find that organizational structure constrains the philanthropic influence of board members but not of senior managers, a result that is contrary to what existing theory would predict. We discuss how these findings advance understanding of how organizational structure and corporate leadership interact and of how organizations can more effectively realize the strategic value of corporate social responsibility activities.

    Keywords: Organizational Structure; Corporate Strategy; Giving and Philanthropy; Leadership; Governing and Advisory Boards; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; United States;

    Citation:

    Marquis, Christopher, and Matthew Lee. "Who Is Governing Whom? Executives, Governance, and the Structure of Generosity in Large U.S. Firms." Strategic Management Journal 34, no. 4 (April 2013): 483–497. (Earlier version distributed as Harvard Business School Working Paper No. 11-121.)
  2. In Search of the Hybrid Ideal

    In the first large-scale, quantitative study of nascent social entrepreneurs, researchers from Harvard Business School and Echoing Green examine the rise of hybrid organizations that combine aspects of nonprofits and for-profits and the challenges hybrids face as they attempt to integrate traditionally separate organizational models.

    Keywords: Social Entrepreneurship;

    Citation:

    Battilana, Julie, Matthew Lee, John Walker, and Cheryl Dorsey. "In Search of the Hybrid Ideal." Stanford Social Innovation Review (Summer 2012).

Managerial Articles

  1. It Takes a Village to Raise an Entrepreneur

    Citation:

    Battilana, Julie, and Matthew Lee. "It Takes a Village to Raise an Entrepreneur." Harvard Business Review Blogs (May 24, 2012). http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/05/social_entrepreneurship_has_ev.html.

Working Papers

  1. How the Zebra Got Its Stripes: Imprinting of Individuals and Hybrid Social Ventures

    Hybrid organizations that combine multiple, existing organizational forms are frequently proposed as a source of organizational innovation, yet little is known about the origins of such organizations. We propose that individual founders of hybrid organizations acquire imprints from past exposure to work environments, thus predisposing them to incorporate the associated logics in their subsequent ventures, even when doing so requires deviation from established organizational templates. We test our theory on a novel dataset of over 700 founders of social ventures, all guided by a social welfare logic. Some of them also incorporate a commercial logic along with the social welfare logic, thereby creating a hybrid social venture. We find evidence of three sources of commercial imprints: the founder's own, direct work experience, as well as the indirect influence of parental work experiences and professional education. Our findings further suggest that the effects of direct imprinting are strongest from the early tenure of for-profit experience, but diminish with longer tenure. In supplementary analyses, we parse out differences between the sources of imprints and discuss implications for how imprinting functions as an antecedent to the creation of new, hybrid forms.

    Keywords: hybrid organizations; imprinting; institutional theory; social entrepreneurship; Social Entrepreneurship; Organizations;

    Citation:

    Lee, Matthew, and Julie Battilana. "How the Zebra Got Its Stripes: Imprinting of Individuals and Hybrid Social Ventures." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 14-005, July 2013.
  2. Who Is Governing Whom? Executives, Governance and the Structure of Generosity in Large U.S. Firms

    We examine how organizational structure influences strategies over which corporate leaders have significant discretion. Corporate philanthropy is our setting to study how a differentiated structural element—the corporate foundation—constrains the influence of individual senior managers and directors on corporate strategy. Our analysis of Fortune 500 firms from 1996 to 2006 shows that leader characteristics at both the senior management and director levels affect corporate philanthropic contributions. We also find that organizational structure constrains the philanthropic influence of board members, but not of senior managers, a result that is contrary to what existing theory would predict. We discuss how these findings advance understanding of how organizational structure and corporate leadership interact and of how organizations can more effectively realize the strategic value of corporate social responsibility activities.

    Keywords: Giving and Philanthropy; Corporate Governance; Governing and Advisory Boards; Leadership; Managerial Roles; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Organizational Structure; Corporate Strategy; United States;

    Citation:

    Marquis, Christopher, and Matthew Lee. "Who Is Governing Whom? Executives, Governance and the Structure of Generosity in Large U.S. Firms." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 11-121, May 2011.

Presentations

  1. Who is Governing Whom? Executives, Governance and the Structure of Generosity in Large U.S. Firms

    Citation:

    Marquis, Christopher, and Matthew Scott Lee. "Who is Governing Whom? Executives, Governance and the Structure of Generosity in Large U.S. Firms." Paper presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Montreal, Canada.