Andrei Hagiu

Associate Professor of Business Administration

Andrei is an Associate Professor in the Strategy group at Harvard Business School. Andrei's research focuses on multi-sided markets, which feature platforms/intermediaries serving two or more distinct groups of customers, who value each other's participation. He is studying the business strategies used by such platforms and the economic structure of the industries in which they operate: videogames (e.g. OnLive, PlayStation, Wii), e-commerce (e.g. Amazon, eBay, Gazelle, Rakuten), smartphones (e.g. Android, iPhone), personal computers (e.g. Windows, Mac OS), shopping malls (e.g. Roppongi Hills), intellectual property (e.g. Intellectual Ventures, Ocean Tomo, RPX), payment systems (e.g. Edy, PayPal, Suica, Visa), online TV services (e.g. Brightcove, PCCW, PP Live), etc.  Andrei is using the insights derived from this research to advise companies in some of these industries. He is also occasionally involved in competition and industrial policy research and advisory projects in Japan, China, and in the United States.  

Andrei graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole Nationale de la Statistique et Adminstration Economique in France with an MS in economics and statistics, before obtaining a PhD in economics from Princeton University.  Prior to joining HBS, he spent 18 months in Tokyo as a fellow at the Research Institute of Economy Trade and Industry, an economic policy think-tank affiliated with the Japanese Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry.

  1. Strategy and Technology

    by Andrei Hagiu

    Overview

    This course explores the unique aspects of creating effective management and investment strategies for technology-intensive businesses.  What are effective strategies for winning in markets with strong network effects?  How should firms go about commercializing highly uncertain, science-based technologies?  How can technology be leveraged to build (multi-sided) platforms?  How can firms create and capture the value from intellectual property assets?  How can they sustain value despite wide-spread imitation and convergence with substitute technologies?

    The course provides a series of useful concepts and frameworks which students can directly apply to strategic and investment problems they may encounter post-graduation.  Throughout the course, there will be a heavy emphasis on going from concepts and market analysis all the way to the formulation of concrete strategies.

    Industries covered include: consumer electronics (smartphones, videogame consoles, PCs, tablets), software (operating systems, virtualization, cloud services), Internet-based businesses (e-commerce, online video, social networking, browsers, app stores), semi-conductors, intellectual property, mobile communications, biotechnology, electronic ink, and mobile payment systems.

    Keywords: "strategy," technology;

  2. University of Hong Kong Teaching

    by Andrei Hagiu

    Follow the links below to see slides from a course taught by Professor Hagiu at the University of Hong Kong.

     Session 1: 
    Network Effects (with equations and graphs)
    Network Effects (concepts and mini-cases; no equations) 

    Session 2:
    Two-Sided Pricing Principles and Videogames Discussion

    Session 3:
    Bundling and Commitment Issues

    Session 4:
    MSP Dynamics (critical mass, divide-ad-conquer, staging TSPs) 

    Session 5:
    MSP Governance 
    Product Variety Restrictions (based on Luyi Zhao's senior thesis)

    Session 6:
    Strategic Information Manipulation by Intermediaries
    Is Google Making Us Stupid? (Atlantic article) 

    Session 7:
    Merchants vs. Two-Sided Platforms 

    Session 8:
    IP Intermediaries

    Session 9:
    Merchants vs. Two-Sided Platforms (II) (Gazelle and financial intermediaries)
    Financial Times article on Market Makers

    Session 10:
    What Makes Two-Sided Markets Special 
     
    Session 11:
    Playing with Multi-Sided Platforms

    Session 12:
    Course Wrap-Up 

    Keywords: "multi-sided platforms," two-sided markets, multi-sided markets, intellectual property intermediaries, network effects;