Doctoral Student

Sujin Jang

Sujin Jang is a Ph.D. Candidate in the joint Organizational Behavior and Social Psychology Program at Harvard. Her research examines the dynamics of cross-cultural interactions, particularly in the context of multicultural teams. In her dissertation, she develops and tests theory on cultural brokerage, the act of facilitating cross-cultural interactions. 

Sujin has taught and facilitated courses on Leadership and Organizational Behavior in the Harvard Psychology Department and at Harvard Business School, and as an invited lecturer in the International Spark Program (Republic of Georgia) and at Dubrovnik International University (Croatia). 

Originally from Seoul, South Korea, Sujin graduated with highest honors from Yonsei University with a B.A. in Business Administration. She also studied at New York University’s Stern School of Business as a member of the International Business Exchange Program. She holds an M.A. in Social Psychology from Harvard University, and is expected to obtain her Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior in May, 2014.

Sujin Jang is a Ph.D. Candidate in the joint Organizational Behavior and Social Psychology Program at Harvard. Her research examines the dynamics of cross-cultural interactions, particularly in the context of multicultural teams. In her dissertation, she develops and tests theory on cultural brokerage, the act of facilitating cross-cultural interactions. 

Sujin has taught and facilitated courses on Leadership and Organizational Behavior in the Harvard Psychology Department and at Harvard Business School, and as an invited lecturer in the International Spark Program (Republic of Georgia) and at Dubrovnik International University (Croatia). 

Originally from Seoul, South Korea, Sujin graduated with highest honors from Yonsei University with a B.A. in Business Administration. She also studied at New York University’s Stern School of Business as a member of the International Business Exchange Program. She holds an M.A. in Social Psychology from Harvard University, and is expected to obtain her Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior in May, 2014.

Journal Articles

  1. Beyond Individual Creativity: The Superadditive Benefits of Multicultural Experience for Collective Creativity in Culturally Diverse Teams

    Although recent research has consistently demonstrated the benefits of multicultural experience for individual-level creativity, its potential advantages for collective creativity in culturally diverse teams have yet to be explored. We predicted that multicultural experience among members of a collective would enhance joint creativity in a superadditive fashion. Using a two-step methodology that included both individual and dyadic brainstorming sessions, we found that even after controlling for individual creativity, multicultural experience had a superadditive effect on dyadic creativity. Specifically, dyads performed best on a creative task in terms of fluency, flexibility, and novelty—three classic dimensions of creativity—when both dyad partners had high levels of multicultural experience. These results show that when it comes to multicultural experience, the creative whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Implications for diversity research are discussed.

    Keywords: Creativity; Groups and Teams;

    Citation:

    Tadmor, Carmit, Patricia Satterstrom, Sujin Jang, and Jeffrey Polzer. "Beyond Individual Creativity: The Superadditive Benefits of Multicultural Experience for Collective Creativity in Culturally Diverse Teams." Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology 43, no. 3 (April 2012): 384–392.

Book Chapters

  1. Building Intercultural Trust at the Negotiating Table

    This chapter examines the challenges of intercultural negotiation with a focus on the critical role of trust. Building trust is crucial for successful negotiations between cultures, yet intercultural negotiations are often characterized by a lack of trust. We discuss what trust is, why it matters, and why it is so difficult to establish in intercultural negotiations. We then offer guidelines for building trust in intercultural negotiations with an emphasis on cultural intelligence-the capacity to adapt effectively across cultures.

    Keywords: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Negotiation; Trust; Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin, and Roy Y.J. Chua. "Building Intercultural Trust at the Negotiating Table." In Negotiation Excellence: Successful Deal Making, edited by Michael Benoliel. World Scientific, 2011.

Working Papers

  1. Bringing Worlds Together: Cultural Brokerage in Global Teams: (Job Market Paper)

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin. "Bringing Worlds Together: Cultural Brokerage in Global Teams: (Job Market Paper)." Working Paper, August 2013.
  2. We're Halfway There? Transitions and Creativity in Work Teams

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin, Colin M. Fisher, and J. Richard Hackman. "We're Halfway There? Transitions and Creativity in Work Teams." Working Paper, April 2013.
  3. From Seeing Dots to Perceiving Social Cues: Mapping the Relationship between Visual Processing and Social Perceptiveness

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin, George Alvarez, and J. Richard Hackman. "From Seeing Dots to Perceiving Social Cues: Mapping the Relationship between Visual Processing and Social Perceptiveness." Working Paper, August 2012.

Presentations

  1. Cultural Brokerage in Cross-Cultural Collaborations

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin. "Cultural Brokerage in Cross-Cultural Collaborations." In Understanding the Dynamics of Cross-Cultural Interactions. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Lake Buena Vista, FL, August 2013.
  2. Bringing Worlds Together: Cultural Brokerage in Multicultural Teams

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin. "Bringing Worlds Together: Cultural Brokerage in Multicultural Teams." Paper presented at the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research Conference, Atlanta, GA, USA, July 2013.
  3. Why, When, and How Task Groups Transition

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin, Colin M. Fisher, and J. Richard Hackman. "Why, When, and How Task Groups Transition." Paper presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, August 2012.
  4. We're Halfway There? A Closer Look at Midpoint Transitions in Small Task Groups

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin, Colin M. Fisher, and J. Richard Hackman. "We're Halfway There? A Closer Look at Midpoint Transitions in Small Task Groups." Paper presented at the Interdisciplinary Network for Group Research Conference, Chicago, IL, USA, July 2012.
  5. From Seeing Dots to Perceiving Social Cues: Mapping the Relationship between Visual Processing and Social Perceptiveness

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin, George Alvarez, and J. Richard Hackman. "From Seeing Dots to Perceiving Social Cues: Mapping the Relationship between Visual Processing and Social Perceptiveness." Paper presented at the Transatlantic Doctoral Conference, London Business School, London, UK, May 2011.
  6. You Are Who You Befriend: Spillover Effects of Online Identities

    Citation:

    Jang, Sujin, Lakshmi Ramarajan, and Jeff Polzer. "You Are Who You Befriend: Spillover Effects of Online Identities." Paper presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Montreal, Canada, August 2010.
  7. The Influence of Multiculturalism and Self-verification on Creativity in Culturally Diverse Dyads

    Citation:

    Tadmor, Carmit, Patricia Hernandez, Sujin Jang, and Jeff Polzer. "The Influence of Multiculturalism and Self-verification on Creativity in Culturally Diverse Dyads." Paper presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Chicago, August 2009.