Ray A. Goldberg

George M. Moffett Professor of Agriculture and Business, Emeritus

A native of North Dakota, Dr. Goldberg received his A.B. from Harvard University in 1948, his MBA from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration in 1950 and his Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Minnesota in 1952.

Together with John H. Davis he developed the Agribusiness Program at Harvard Business School in 1955. From 1970 to 1997 he was the Moffett Professor of Agriculture and Business and head of the Agribusiness Program. Since July 1, 1997, as emeritus professor, he has chaired the Agribusiness Senior Management Seminars at Harvard Business School and currently teaches a course on Food Policy and Agribusiness at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard and also teaches a junior tutorial seminar on Climate and Its Impact on the Global Food System at Harvard College. He is also an Honorary Professor and a member of the Royal Agricultural College at Cirencester, England. He is coordinator of the Joint Business, Scientific, Public Policy, Consumer Policy Technology Committee of the U.S. Food System (PAPSAC) which meets annually at Harvard University.He received the Distinguished Service Award from Harvard Business School in June 2001.

Dr. Goldberg is the author, co-author and or editor of 23 books and over 110 articles on positioning firms and institutions in the global value added food system. He also has authored and supervised the development of over 1000 case studies on various private, public, and farm cooperative firms and institutions in the global food system. His most recent publications involve developing strategies for private, public, and cooperative managers as they position their firms, institutions, and government agencies in a rapidly changing global food system. He is also conducting research on the major biological, logistical, packaging and informational revolutions that affect global agribusiness managers as they attempt to cope with the volatile restructuring of major commodity systems.

Dr. Goldberg has served on over 40 Boards of Directors of major agribusiness firms, farm cooperatives, and technology firms. He has advised financial institutions on their agribusiness investments such as Rabobank, John Hancock and Agriculture Technology Partners. He is one of the founders and first President of the International Agribusiness Management Association and  is a lifetime board advisor and consultant to numerous government agencies and private firms. He currently serves as a Director Emeritus of Smithfield Foods, Inc., and is on the Advisory Board to Teays River Investments LLC  and is an advisor to Synthetic Genomics, Inc. and is an Overseer Emeritus of the Beth Israel Medical Center. He also serves as a member of the Science Advisory Board of the IFT/FDA Research Contract, and is Chairman of the Advisory Panel for a World Bank Guide to developing Agricultural Markets and Agro-Enterprises. He was Chairman of the Subcommittee on Economic and Social Development in a Global Context of the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources of the National Research Council. He was Chairman of the Task Force to Utilize Tobacco Funds for Economic Development for the State of Kentucky. He was Co-Director of the European Food and Agribusiness Seminar that took place in Rome, Italy October 2011.

Dr. Goldberg was a member of the Presidential Mission to Poland in December of 1989. He was a member and speaker at the U.S. Department of Agriculture 2020 Vision: Beyond Reorganization Senior Policy Retreat in May of 1994. He is Chairman of the Russian Food Management Program Research Project and Seminar sponsored by the international Agribusiness Management Association. He most recent articles are entitled the 'Business of Agriceuticals' published in Nature Biotechnology, Volume 17 Supplement 1999; 'Transforming Life, Transforming Business: The Life-Science Revolution,' co-authored with Juan Enriquez and published in the Harvard Business Review, March-April 2000; and 'Food Wars: A Potential Peace' published in the Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics Supplement to Volume 28 No. 4 Selected Proceedings of 'Genes and Society: Impact of New Technologies on Law, Medicine, and Policy, May 10-12, 2000' pages 39-45 Winter 2000:and Biotechnology and the Agricultural Industry of the Future published in the Conference Proceedings of the Eight Annual Conference of the Emirates Center for Strategic Studies and Research(ECSSR) Abu Dhabi U.A.E. August 2003

He was made a Fellow of the International Agribusiness Management Association in 2004. In July of 2005 he became a Fellow of the American Agricultural Economic Association.  He is married to Thelma Englander and has three children and six grandchildren.

Books

Journal Articles

Book Chapters

  1. Transforming Life, Transforming Business: The Life Science Revolution

    Keywords: Science-Based Business; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Human Needs; Welfare or Wellbeing; Transformation;

    Citation:

    Enriquez, Juan, and Ray A. Goldberg. "Transforming Life, Transforming Business: The Life Science Revolution." In The Digital Enterprise: How To Reshape Your Business For A Connected World, edited by Nicholas G. Carr. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2001. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Beidahuang

    This teaching plan is designed to support the teaching of Beidahuang, HBS No. 914-412, rev. March 2014. Beidahuang is a major new Chinese player in global grain trading that in 2013 is seeking access to grain both to help assure China's food security and in pursuit of its own commercial goals. Focusing on potential trade in Brazilian soybeans, the case asks students to re-evaluate the role of agricultural cooperatives in the global trading system and to assess what sort of model Beidahuang can create to capitalize on current industry trends while remaining true to its character as a leading Chinese agricultural grower and distributor.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; sourcing; supply chain management; Beidahuang; s; China; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and David Lane. "Beidahuang." Harvard Business School Teaching Plan 914-415, April 2014. View Details
  2. Amul Dairy

    In 2013, Rahul Kumar, the managing director of Amul dairy, India's leading dairy firm, had to decide how to position his firm for the future in light of India's growing population and demand for dairy. How could he maintain the firm's cooperative structure, address the nutritional needs of all Indians, make use of emerging technology, and navigate the country's dairy policies in the coming years?

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Matthew Preble. "Amul Dairy." Harvard Business School Teaching Plan 914-411, March 2014. View Details
  3. Beidahuang

    Beidahuang is a major new Chinese player in global grain trading that in 2013 is seeking access to grain both to help assure China's food security and in pursuit of its own commercial goals. Focusing on potential trade in Brazilian soybeans, the case asks students to re-evaluate the role of agricultural cooperatives in the global trading system and to assess what sort of model Beidahuang can create to capitalize on current industry trends while remaining true to its character as a leading Chinese agricultural grower and distributor.

    Keywords: China; Brazil; International trade; grain; soybeans; Agribusiness; Plant-Based Agribusiness; Globalized Markets and Industries; Cooperation; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; China; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and David Lane. "Beidahuang." Harvard Business School Case 914-412, December 2013. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  4. Seeding Growth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    By 2013, the agricultural sector in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) had long suffered from war, political instability, and dilapidated infrastructure. A country with 75 million inhabitants and the second lowest GDP per capita in the world in 2011, the DRC's most pressing task was to grow its agriculture sector and cultivate its 80 million hectares of fertile land. This case explores how a developing country could create a comprehensive strategy to implement the necessary institutional, political, and social frameworks needed to support sustainable agricultural developments and rise out of long-term poverty.

    Keywords: National Agricultural Investment Plan (PNIA); developing agriculture; World Bank; poverty reduction; Special Economic Zones (SEZs); small-scale farmers; Agricultural Business Parks; infrastructure; economic growth; agriculture reform; Agribusiness; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Africa; Congo, Democratic Republic of the;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray, Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Djordjija Petkoski. "Seeding Growth in the Democratic Republic of the Congo." Harvard Business School Case 914-401, December 2013. (Revised April 2014.) View Details
  5. IdentiGEN

    Ciaran Meghen and Ronan Loftus, co-founders of IdentiGEN (an Irish company that had created a unique service called DNA TraceBack to help customers identify and trace meat products), were discussing the company's future. The recent crisis over beef products being contaminated with horsemeat in Europe had generated strong demand for IdentiGEN's services. But more than this, DNA TraceBack gave customers strong insight into their operations to ensure product was genuine, and helped facilitate a continuous feedback loop between all players of the supply chain to deliver a high quality product to consumers. In light of strong demand, how should IdentiGEN proceed in terms of which customers to work with, and which products should it support?

    Keywords: Agribusiness; supply chain management; Animal-Based Agribusiness; Agribusiness; Supply Chain Management; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Canada; United Kingdom; United States; Republic of Ireland;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Matthew Preble. "IdentiGEN." Harvard Business School Case 914-408, November 2013. View Details
  6. Amul Dairy

    In 2013, Rahul Kumar, the managing director of Amul dairy, India's leading dairy firm, had to decide how to position his firm for the future in light of India's growing population and demand for dairy. How could he maintain the firm's cooperative structure, address the nutritional needs of all Indians, make use of emerging technology, and navigate the country's dairy policies in the coming years?

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Dairy; Policy; Corporate Strategy; Nutrition; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray, and Ian McKown Cornell. "Amul Dairy." Harvard Business School Case 914-405, July 2013. View Details
  7. Nestlé: Agricultural Material Sourcing Within the Concept of Creating Shared Value (CSV) (TN)

    In December 2012, Hans Jöhr, Nestlé's head of corporate agriculture, was preparing to meet with the company's board of directors to discuss its vision for the future related to sustainable agriculture. Nestlé's continued success depended on its ability to access the raw agricultural ingredients essential for the operations of the world's largest agribusiness in a secure, sustainable, and ethical way. Doing so not only ensured the future wellbeing of Nestlé, but of its suppliers, partners, and customers as well. The world's changing climate, emerging health crises around hunger and obesity, and an increasingly urbanized population presented Nestlé with numerous challenges for the future. Other emerging issues such as the importance of food security, consumer demands for more nutritious food, increased collaboration between public and private entities, consolidation within the global agribusiness community, new sources of product origination, and the rise of new technologies, among many other trends, would all influence how Nestlé did business in the future. The company had focused on the strategic issues of nutrition, water, and rural development, and had started a number of programs to begin addressing these challenges. As he sat in his office, Jöhr considered how the company was going to ensure the sustainability of its supply, and how Nestlé planned to work with the entirety of the supply chain to ensure proper stewardship of the land and water resources the chain managed, while also introducing new technologies, engaging with consumers on the role food played in their overall health, working with both small- and large-scale farmers in managing their operations in a sustainable way, and verifying that its programs were all working towards these diverse goals.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; sustainability; Sustainability Management; Agribusiness; Environmental Sustainability; Food; Nutrition; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Matthew Preble. "Nestlé: Agricultural Material Sourcing Within the Concept of Creating Shared Value (CSV) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 913-412, March 2013. View Details
  8. Domaines Barons de Rothschild (Lafite): Plus ça change…

    For centuries Lafite has been the most admired wine Estate in the world. How does Baron Eric de Rothschild protect this crown jewel in a conservative manner while DBR develops other Chateaux blending wine programs, reaches out to new areas such as China and begins to take a more active interest in the world's number one market—the United States.

    Keywords: Plant-Based Agribusiness; Expansion; Market Entry and Exit; Global Strategy; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; France; China;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Arthur I. Segel, Elie Ofek, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Domaines Barons de Rothschild (Lafite): Plus ça change… ." Harvard Business School Case 913-402, December 2012. (Revised May 2013.) View Details
  9. Nestlé: Agricultural Material Sourcing Within the Concept of Creating Shared Value (CSV)

    Corporate Head of Agriculture Hans Jöhr's mind raced in anticipation of the executive board meeting that afternoon. Jöhr recognized the meeting as a key opportunity to strategize far into the future, reexamining how his team's efforts in sustainable agricultural sourcing supported Nestlé's position as the world's leading nutrition, health and wellness company. The company had undertaken to impact three of the world's most urgent challenges—nutrition, water and rural development—and Jöhr's team was fundamental to each of these pillars. Yet the forces changing the global food system were formidable: unprecedented levels of hunger, obesity and chronic disease; land degradation, frequent natural disasters, and critical threats to water supply; population growth by the billions in the coming decades, along with increased urbanization; and a volatile and tentative world economy. In the face of such threats and complexity, how could Hans Jöhr ensure that Nestlé's agricultural raw materials were safe, high quality, of consistent supply, and sustainably and ethically and economically produced? How can the procurement process enable the small scale producer to become a viable partner in the milk production models that Nestlé has developed in the developing world? Further, how could his team excel beyond the company's day-to-day business and enable Nestlé's visions for the future?

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Value Creation; Quality; Supply Chain Management; Social Issues; Environmental Sustainability; Problems and Challenges; Growth and Development Strategy; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Lorin A. Fries. "Nestlé: Agricultural Material Sourcing Within the Concept of Creating Shared Value (CSV)." Harvard Business School Case 913-406, December 2012. (Revised August 2013.) View Details
  10. Monsanto

    Monsanto CEO Hugh Grant must guide his global agribusiness technology company into an uncertain future where food security, food safety, sustainability, and climate change will all impact the global food system.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; technology; Risk and Uncertainty; Technology; Food; Social and Collaborative Networks; Global Strategy; Agribusiness; Globalized Markets and Industries; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A. "Monsanto." Harvard Business School Case 913-404, October 2012. View Details
  11. Jain Irrigation Systems Limited: Inclusive Growth for India's Farmers

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Social Enterprise; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Matthew Preble. "Jain Irrigation Systems Limited: Inclusive Growth for India's Farmers." Harvard Business School Case 912-403, November 2011. (Revised February 2012.) View Details
  12. CHS Inc.: Cooperative Leadership in a Global Food Economy

    CHS- the largest farm cooperative in the US- was planning its 2020 vision statement and the role the cooperative should play in the food system.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Global Strategy; Goals and Objectives; Cooperative Ownership; Strategic Planning; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Matthew Preble. "CHS Inc.: Cooperative Leadership in a Global Food Economy." Harvard Business School Case 911-409, November 2010. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  13. The Full Yield

    New firm created to provide understanding of the role of food in health and nutrition.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Business Startups; Entrepreneurship; Food; Health Care and Treatment; Nutrition; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Noemie Myriam Delfassy. "The Full Yield." Harvard Business School Case 911-402, December 2010. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  14. CHS Inc.: Cooperative Leadership in a Global Food Economy (TN)

    Teaching Note for 911409.

    Keywords: Food; Cooperative Ownership; System; Planning; Food and Beverage Industry; Energy Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Matthew Preble. "CHS Inc.: Cooperative Leadership in a Global Food Economy (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 911-418, February 2011. View Details
  15. Farmland Investing: A Technical Note

    This note seeks to provide an overview of farmland investing, the investment thesis behind investing in agriculture, how and why investors would choose farmland, and the general risks and return characteristics of this asset class. In recent years, a growing number of individual and institutional investors have allocated a portion of their capital into agricultural farmland. Private investors, public companies, and sovereign wealth funds are now all currently purchasing and selling large amounts of farmland for profit.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Investment; Investment Return; Risk Management; Property; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Financial Services Industry; Real Estate Industry; Asia; United States; South America;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray, Arthur I Segel, Gustavo Herrero, and Andrew Terris. "Farmland Investing: A Technical Note." Harvard Business School Background Note 211-022, November 2010. (Revised October 2012.) View Details
  16. Agricultural Cooperatives: Origins, Structure, Financing and Partnerships

    This technical note explains how agricultural cooperatives are structured and financed, as well as how they form partnerships with one another and other elements of the food system.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Capital; Food; Organizational Structure; Partners and Partnerships; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Matthew Preble. "Agricultural Cooperatives: Origins, Structure, Financing and Partnerships." Harvard Business School Background Note 911-410, November 2010. View Details
  17. Cresud S.A., Farmer or Real Estate Developer?

    Alejandro Elsztain, CEO of Cresud S.A., is faced with the difficult choice of whether to sell, develop, or continue to hold the 151,000 hectares of remaining undeveloped farmland at the company's Los Pozos farm in Argentina. Developing the land will further expose Cresud to a variety of risks related to owning and operating farmland, but the potential financial rewards are potentially significant. As competition has increased and farmland values have skyrocketed in the last eight years, Cresud's overall corporate strategy has been to increasingly focus on development opportunities outside of the country—in areas such as Brazil, Paraguay, and Bolivia. Alejandro's looming decision on Los Pozos is, in many ways, reflective of choices facing his company in general.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Investment; Investment Portfolio; Risk Management; Ownership Stake; Property; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Real Estate Industry; Argentina;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray, Arthur I Segel, Gustavo Herrero, and Andrew Terris. "Cresud S.A., Farmer or Real Estate Developer?" Harvard Business School Case 211-011, November 2010. (Revised February 2013.) View Details
  18. Rabobank: The Global Food and Agriculture Bank

    Rabobank decides to focus primarily on food and agriculture firms and farms on a global basis.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Banks and Banking; Food; Globalization; System; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Bell, David E., Ray A. Goldberg, Mary Louise Shelman, and Aldo Sesia. "Rabobank: The Global Food and Agriculture Bank." Harvard Business School Case 510-024, December 2009. (Revised April 2010.) View Details
  19. DaChan Food (Asia) in China

    DaChan Food in China is providing leadership in the quality, health, and environmental needs of the Chinese consumer as poultry consumption increases there. Continuing to provide that leadership as global and national competition increase becomes more and more difficult because a price differential is essential to pay for the added safeguards the company provides through its vertically integrated structure and traceability system. How should DaChan position itself for this future?

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Food; Leadership Development; Demand and Consumers; Brands and Branding; Competitive Strategy; Vertical Integration; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and David Lane. "DaChan Food (Asia) in China." Harvard Business School Case 910-401, November 2009. (Revised December 2009.) View Details
  20. GTC Biotherapeutics: Developing Medicines in the Milk of Goats

    GTC is the first company in the animal world to receive FDA approval of a transgenic pharmaceutical. What are the implications for other firms in plants and animals and their opportunities to produce new medicines in an economical and safe fashion?

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Animal-Based Agribusiness; Plant-Based Agribusiness; Science-Based Business; Medical Specialties; Product; Technological Innovation; Health Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Sarah Morton. "GTC Biotherapeutics: Developing Medicines in the Milk of Goats." Harvard Business School Case 910-403, November 2009. (Revised December 2009.) View Details
  21. Fighting Malnutrition and Hunger in the Developing World

    The millennium objectives of reducing poverty and malnutrition are not being met. How do the private, public, and NGO sectors of society work together to achieve better results and include the recipients in the process?

    Keywords: Food; Nutrition; Poverty; Partners and Partnerships; Non-Governmental Organizations; Strategy; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Djordjija Petkoski, and Kerry Herman. "Fighting Malnutrition and Hunger in the Developing World." Harvard Business School Background Note 909-406, April 2009. (Revised April 2009.) View Details
  22. Transformation of COFCO in a Changing Environment

    China's COFCO, the country's leading edible oil and food importer and exporter and its largest food manufacturer, had in its 50-plus years of operation undergone four stages of transformation and was about to embark on a fifth. The global agriculture system was undergoing major changes and the standard of living in China was increasing, changing the food consumption and dietary habits of the nation's 1.3 billion people. COFCO's management needed to decide how the company should transform to seize the opportunities in the industry and in China.

    Keywords: Food; Leadership; Change Management; Transformation; Globalization; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Food and Beverage Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Kefei Yang. "Transformation of COFCO in a Changing Environment." Harvard Business School Case 909-403, November 2008. (Revised December 2008.) View Details
  23. Syngenta International AG: Tropical Sugar Beet

    Syngenta has developed a new sugar beet crop especially useful to tropical climates that enable double cropping to take place and provide both food and energy from the soil. Thus both the governments of Colombia and India are enthused about the new technological breakthrough.

    Keywords: Food; Government and Politics; Technological Innovation; Performance Improvement; Performance Productivity; Research and Development; Environmental Sustainability; Technology Adoption; India; Colombia;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Alwin R. Kopse. "Syngenta International AG: Tropical Sugar Beet." Harvard Business School Case 909-404, November 2008. View Details
  24. Food Security and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

    The Mormon Church focuses on self-reliance and being prepared for emergencies. Part of their program encourages each member of the Church to have a reserve food supply on hand at all times. Given U.S. and global food stock levels, is the Church program a good model for the country?

    Keywords: Food; Globalized Markets and Industries; Crisis Management; Logistics; Programs; Religion; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Eliot Sherman. "Food Security and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints." Harvard Business School Case 508-002, September 2007. (Revised June 2008.) View Details
  25. Alleviating Poverty and Malnutrition: Successful Models

    Provides successful models of private-public sector cooperatives in alleviating poverty and malnutrition.

    Keywords: Business Model; Nutrition; Cooperative Ownership; Business and Government Relations; Non-Governmental Organizations; Poverty; Welfare or Wellbeing;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Laura Winig, and Kerry Herman. "Alleviating Poverty and Malnutrition: Successful Models." Harvard Business School Background Note 907-412, March 2007. (Revised December 2007.) View Details
  26. Alleviating Poverty and Malnutrition

    Deals with approaches to alleviating poverty and how firms, governments, and NGOs are able to work together to accomplish these goals.

    Keywords: Developing Countries and Economies; Nutrition; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Business and Government Relations; Non-Governmental Organizations; Poverty; Welfare or Wellbeing;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Kerry Herman. "Alleviating Poverty and Malnutrition." Harvard Business School Case 907-409, March 2007. (Revised October 2007.) View Details
  27. ConAgra Foods: The Next Chapter

    In 2005, CEO Bruce Rohde has almost completed the integration of ConAgra Foods' collection of 90 independent operating companies into a focused, value-added firm and was beginning to think about his successor. ConAgra had become the second largest food company and No. 1 food service supplier in the United States. Rohde believed that the company, with its solid portfolio of brands and history of leadership in important trends such as healthy foods, was ready to begin its next chapter as one of the great marketing companies, in league with Kraft Food or Coca-Cola. The job of the next CEO would be to unlock the enterprise value of the company in the face of continuing customer consolidation and increasingly diverse consumer requirements.

    Keywords: Change Management; Corporate Strategy; Leading Change; Management Succession; Strategic Planning; Brands and Branding; Food; Agribusiness; Product Marketing; Management Teams; Transformation; Customer Focus and Relationships; Food and Beverage Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Mary L. Shelman. "ConAgra Foods: The Next Chapter." Harvard Business School Case 906-409, November 2005. (Revised August 2007.) View Details
  28. Friona Industries: Delivering Better Beef

    CEO James Herring of Friona Industries, a leading U.S. cattle feedlot operator, has a history of leadership in the highly fragmented and often contentious U.S. beef industry. Friona has established relationships up and down the beef production chain to provide high-quality, consistently tender beef that consumer's value. In 2005, Friona is partnering with Cargill, the leading U.S. meatpacker, to produce private-label beef products for grocery retailers such as Harris Teeter and Safeway. Will the introduction of high-quality, reasonably priced beef lead to higher sales for the retailer and ultimately stronger margins for Friona?

    Keywords: Production; Quality; Leadership; Price; Partners and Partnerships; Sales; Food and Beverage Industry; Texas; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Mary L. Shelman. "Friona Industries: Delivering Better Beef." Harvard Business School Case 906-405, October 2005. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  29. McDonald's Corporation: Managing a Sustainable Supply Chain

    McDonald's seeks to learn from a successful response to Greenpeace's Amazon deforestation campaign in order to make its supply chain more socially and environmentally responsible.

    Keywords: Food; Supply Chain Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Environmental Sustainability; Management Systems; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Jessica Droste Yagan. "McDonald's Corporation: Managing a Sustainable Supply Chain." Harvard Business School Case 907-414, March 2007. (Revised April 2007.) View Details
  30. Cargill (A)

    Cargill is one of the world's leading marketers, processors, and distributors of agricultural, food, industrial, and financial products. In 1998, the company decided to develop a strategic intent to restructure and refocus the company. It did so in response to the consolidation of the industry, globalization, and the impact of the genetic revolution. It had to change its focus from the producer to the consumer and market solutions.

    Keywords: Business Strategy; Agribusiness; Restructuring; Industry Structures; Global Strategy; Genetics; Demand and Consumers; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Jose M. M. Porraz. "Cargill (A)." Harvard Business School Case 903-420, December 2002. (Revised April 2007.) View Details
  31. Ripe 'n Ready

    Stoned fruit has quality variations, reducing consumption. Five independent growers formed a cooperative to provide quality control and a brand name--Ripe 'N Ready--that enabled retailers to differentiate their stores and producers to differentiate the products they supplied. Consumer acceptance has been high. The issue is how to expand the concept without adversely affecting the original users of the product. Also, what new kinds of competition are they creating?

    Keywords: Quality; Brands and Branding; Competitive Strategy; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Laura Winig. "Ripe 'n Ready." Harvard Business School Case 906-404, October 2005. (Revised February 2007.) View Details
  32. Brazil Sugar and the WTO: Agricultural Reform in the European Union

    Brazil's secretary of trade and production for the Ministry of Agriculture, Pedro de Camargo Neto, has won a WTO sugar decision for Brazil against the EU sugar policies. Analyzes what this decision will mean to world food policies, especially those of the EU and the United States. The ruling strengthens the WTO as a decision maker with respect to fair trade policy. The issue is what actions will the various private and public decision makers now take to make this ruling work and not put too big a burden on any one segment of the economy.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Trade; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Governing and Advisory Boards; Policy; Government and Politics; Food and Beverage Industry; Europe; United States; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Kerry Herman, and Irina Tarsis. "Brazil Sugar and the WTO: Agricultural Reform in the European Union." Harvard Business School Case 906-408, November 2005. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  33. Nestle's Milk District Model: Economic Development for a Value-Added Food Chain and Improved Nutrition

    Nestle is the largest milk firm in the world. For over a century, it has developed a milk model procurement program that improved the well-being of the small-scale farmer and the ultimate consumer. Can it partner with other firms and institutions to make even greater use of this model and can it do so in a manner that is consistent with host country goals and equally useful to the long-term viability of Nestle?

    Keywords: Development Economics; Value Creation; Programs; Partners and Partnerships; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Kerry Herman. "Nestle's Milk District Model: Economic Development for a Value-Added Food Chain and Improved Nutrition." Harvard Business School Case 906-406, November 2005. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  34. Global Conservation Trust, The: A Foundation for Food Security

    Biodiversity is being lost due to the delegation of the ability to store and maintain various types of plants to governments and foundations with no or little financial base. How does one develop the resources to maintain plant diversity for the future benefit of society?

    Keywords: Food; Safety; Plant-Based Agribusiness; Nonprofit Organizations; Welfare or Wellbeing; Finance; Environmental Sustainability; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Global Conservation Trust, The: A Foundation for Food Security." Harvard Business School Case 903-418, November 2002. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  35. Environmental Power Corporation: Changing Manure Into Gold?

    In 2002, Environmental Power Corp. (EPC), a small company developing renewable energy projects, was attempting to commercialize its "digester," a facility that extracted methane from manure, reduced manure's environmental impact, and generated electricity. The company addressed two promising convergent markets: the farm waste management market and the renewable energy market. One of the main challenges was to put together a financial scheme that satisfied the conflicting interests of four groups of stakeholders: the farmers who lacked cash, the investors who distrusted the electricity trading business after the Enron scandal, the utilities who resisted long-term commitments to buy electricity, and the government who was reconsidering its agricultural and energy policies. The primary challenge is to provide a process that reduces animal waste pollution and at the same time provides a positive renewable energy source.

    Keywords: Commercialization; Energy Generation; Renewable Energy; Environmental Sustainability; Investment; Projects; Wastes and Waste Processing; Corporate Finance; Business and Government Relations; Energy Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Laure Mougeot Stroock. "Environmental Power Corporation: Changing Manure Into Gold?" Harvard Business School Case 903-403, September 2002. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  36. Codex Alimentarius and Food Labeling

    Codex Alimentarius is a set of international food standards devised by the Codex Commission, a body within the United Nations jointly sponsored by the FAO and WHO. The purpose of the standards is to harmonize global trade in food products and agricultural commodities, protect the health of consumers, and promote fair trade practices in foods. A subset of the commission's work involved establishing international food labeling standards. The most disputed issue in food labeling dealt with the topic of genetically modified ingredients and how to treat them.

    Keywords: Standards; Trade; Agreements and Arrangements; Food; Agribusiness; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Globalization; Health; Food and Beverage Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "Codex Alimentarius and Food Labeling." Harvard Business School Case 903-417, October 2002. (Revised February 2006.) View Details
  37. Nestle's Milk District Model: Economic Development for a Value-Added Food Chain and Improved Nutrition (TN)

    Keywords: Nutrition; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Kerry Herman. "Nestle's Milk District Model: Economic Development for a Value-Added Food Chain and Improved Nutrition (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 906-413, February 2006. View Details
  38. Nestle's Milk Districts: Case Supplement

    Nestle as the largest milk company in the world, has a history of economic development, nutrition, health, and food safety in all the major countries of the world. Each milk model is tailor-made to the needs of each country's political, social, and economic priorities.

    Keywords: Development Economics; Nutrition; Health; Food; Government and Politics; Social Psychology; Economics; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Kerry Herman. "Nestle's Milk Districts: Case Supplement." Harvard Business School Supplement 906-411, November 2005. View Details
  39. Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 2005

    CEO Mayo Schmidt had just guided his firm through five difficult years. Survival had come with the difficult decision to change the 80-year-old agricultural cooperative into a Canadian business corporation. The Saskatchewan Wheat Pool (SWP) now faced the future with a new financial structure, world-class assets, a proven management team, a sound balance sheet, and access to capital for stability and expansion. In the face of increasing global grain demand and new technology-based product possibilities, Schmidt was convinced that, as a producer, Canada would have a long-term advantage because of its history of high-quality grain production. Further, he believed that SWP, with its deep farmer relationships and state-of-the-art infrastructure, was ideally positioned to lead the development of identity-preserved value chains. How should Schmidt build on the SWP's unique strengths to create a company that would flourish and prosper for the next 80 years?

    Keywords: Change Management; Customer Value and Value Chain; Capital; Technological Innovation; Leading Change; Demand and Consumers; Partners and Partnerships; Expansion; Technology Adoption; Food and Beverage Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Mary L. Shelman. "Saskatchewan Wheat Pool 2005." Harvard Business School Case 906-402, October 2005. View Details
  40. Exporting Spanish Olive Oil to the U.S. Market

    Spain is the largest olive oil producer, yet it sells much of its product to Italy, where it is repackaged as Italian olive oil. The decision maker in the case wants to develop Spain as the olive oil leader not just in production but in quality and value added. He wants to use the American market to develop both private label and branded products, using Spain as the country of origin.

    Keywords: Plant-Based Agribusiness; Trade; Goods and Commodities; Demand and Consumers; Supply and Industry; Brands and Branding; Decisions; Customization and Personalization; Product Design; Product Development; Marketing Strategy; Product Marketing; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Spain; United States; Italy;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Hal Hogan, and Miguel Angel Llano Irusta. "Exporting Spanish Olive Oil to the U.S. Market." Harvard Business School Case 905-408, December 2004. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  41. Brazil's WTO Cotton Case: Negotiation Through Litigation

    Brazil has just won a cotton case action against the U.S. cotton agriculture program at the World Trade Organization. What does this mean for future agricultural programs in the United States? For future trade policies of the United States, Brazil, and others in the global agribusiness system? The future role of the WTO? Negotiation through litigation? Developed versus developing country trade policies?

    Keywords: Developing Countries and Economies; Trade; Globalized Markets and Industries; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Policy; Lawsuits and Litigation; Negotiation Process; Negotiation Types; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States; Brazil;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Robert Lawrence, and J. Katherine Milligan. "Brazil's WTO Cotton Case: Negotiation Through Litigation." Harvard Business School Case 905-405, September 2004. (Revised January 2005.) View Details
  42. AWB Limited

    Discusses how to evaluate the performance of the Australia Wheat Board in meeting the needs of its Australian wheat farmers and global consumers. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Customer Value and Value Chain; Globalized Markets and Industries; Performance Effectiveness; Performance Evaluation; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Australia;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "AWB Limited." Harvard Business School Case 905-401, October 2004. (Revised November 2004.) View Details
  43. Electronic Product Code, The: Future Impact on the Global Food System

    The Electronic Product Code (EPC) is a successor to the Uniform Product Code and will improve the efficiency and traceability of the global food system. Focuses on how best to implement this new system and respect the privacy of the ultimate consumer. Teaching Purpose: To analyze the impact of EPC on the global food system.

    Keywords: Transition; Innovation and Invention; Management Systems; Consumer Behavior; Performance Efficiency; Performance Improvement; Technology Adoption; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and James Weber. "Electronic Product Code, The: Future Impact on the Global Food System." Harvard Business School Case 905-409, November 2004. View Details
  44. Deere & Company

    John Deere & Co. wants to improve shareholder value and provide incentives to do so. The task is difficult in a volatile agriculture and construction industry. It also wants to be more global and provide machinery that traces commodities from the field to the consumer.

    Keywords: Factories, Labs, and Plants; Volatility; Machinery and Machining; Multinational Firms and Management; Goods and Commodities; Goals and Objectives; Strategic Planning; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Construction Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "Deere & Company." Harvard Business School Case 905-406, November 2004. View Details
  45. DNA Traceability at Maple Leaf Foods

    Maple Leaf Foods is concerned about the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease) issue in Canada and the reputation of Canadian meat products in the domestic and global markets. DNA can now trace products from sow and piglets to consumer pork products. Focuses on how to implement the new technology to improve food safety and trace nutrition and health benefits in an efficient manner.

    Keywords: Food; Globalization; Nutrition; Performance Efficiency; Performance Improvement; Safety; Technology Adoption; Food and Beverage Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Joan McRobbie, and Matthew L. Reisman. "DNA Traceability at Maple Leaf Foods." Harvard Business School Case 905-407, October 2004. View Details
  46. Restricting Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value in Texas Public Schools

    The Commission of Agriculture in Texas wants to improve the nutritional quality of the school lunch program to help fight obesity in students. It needs the cooperation of the soft drink industry to change their products and the manner in which they provide financial support to the school system.

    Keywords: Government and Politics; Business and Government Relations; Nutrition; Food; Quality; Education; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "Restricting Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value in Texas Public Schools." Harvard Business School Case 904-420, March 2004. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  47. Can Florida Orange Growers Survive Globalization?

    Florida Citrus Department has to deal with increasing competition from Brazil. What position should the industry take on its existing tariff? Who benefits? Who loses?

    Keywords: Cost vs Benefits; Trade; Price; Globalized Markets and Industries; Goods and Commodities; Competition; Competitive Strategy;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "Can Florida Orange Growers Survive Globalization?" Harvard Business School Case 904-415, November 2003. (Revised March 2004.) View Details
  48. Launching the European Food Safety Authority

    The first food safety commission is established for the European Union. How does it handle food safety, scientific evaluations, and people's attitudes toward scientific changes in food growing and processing--for example, genetically modified organisms?

    Keywords: Food; Safety; Nutrition; Policy; Food and Beverage Industry; European Union;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "Launching the European Food Safety Authority." Harvard Business School Case 904-414, October 2003. (Revised February 2004.) View Details
  49. Global Farmer and the Future of Soybean Production, The

    Three farmers from three different countries are looking at the global soybean system and how to position themselves in the future.

    Keywords: Animal-Based Agribusiness; Trade; Globalized Markets and Industries; Food; Strategic Planning; Forecasting and Prediction; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Kevin M. Allison. "Global Farmer and the Future of Soybean Production, The." Harvard Business School Case 904-402, October 2003. (Revised January 2004.) View Details
  50. XS, Inc.

    XS, Inc. created a seller and buyer Internet for the $200 billion farm supply industry. How can this start-up remain the nonpartisan hub of this network, and how will it aid in the traceability of the U.S. food system?

    Keywords: Internet; Food; System; Business Startups; Agribusiness; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Joan McRobbie. "XS, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 904-417, November 2003. (Revised January 2004.) View Details
  51. BSE in Canada

    A cow was determined to have Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Canada, which closed its beef exports to the United States and 39 other countries. What future action should be taken, and how will country of origin specification and traceability take place in the future?

    Keywords: Animal-Based Agribusiness; Trade; Food; Globalized Markets and Industries; Health; Food and Beverage Industry; Health Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Kevin Allison. "BSE in Canada." Harvard Business School Case 904-413, October 2003. (Revised January 2004.) View Details
  52. Rabobank Group: Leadership Role in Global Agribusiness

    The largest global agribusiness bank has lost its triple A rating and is rethinking its global strategy as the leading global food and agribusiness bank. How does it position itself in the vertical value-added global food system?

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Globalization; Finance; Risk Management; Global Strategy; Value Creation; Banking Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "Rabobank Group: Leadership Role in Global Agribusiness." Harvard Business School Case 903-421, December 2002. (Revised June 2003.) View Details
  53. Monsanto: Leadership in a New Environment

    Monsanto is the biotechnology leader in agriculture. How does it use its leadership in Round Up to fund long-term research and development in biotechnology that is acceptable to the priority system of consumers in different parts of the world? Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Research and Development; Science-Based Business; Food; Business or Company Management; Agribusiness; Industry Growth; Customer Focus and Relationships; Globalization; Leadership; Biotechnology Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., James Weber, and James M Beagle. "Monsanto: Leadership in a New Environment." Harvard Business School Case 903-419, November 2002. (Revised June 2003.) View Details
  54. DaChan Great Wall Group

    Describes the challenges facing a leading Taiwanese agribusiness concern as it competes in an increasingly complex business environment in China.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Brands and Branding; Competition; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Taiwan; China;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Cate Reavis. "DaChan Great Wall Group." Harvard Business School Case 903-416, November 2002. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  55. Fonterra: Taking on the Dairy World

    Fonterra was a cooperatively owned dairy company--New Zealand's largest company and the world's largest exporter of dairy products. To maintain its leadership, Fonterra had to respond to increased competition, new consumer tastes, consolidation of its customers, and increasing subsidies on milk by developing countries. This futuristic case identifies trends that the cooperative has to take into account for its future success. It can be examined as a model for other cooperatives in other commodity systems.

    Keywords: Cooperative Ownership; Animal-Based Agribusiness; Trade; Global Strategy; Food; Business Model; Developing Countries and Economies; Competitive Strategy; Demand and Consumers; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; New Zealand;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Jose M. M. Porraz. "Fonterra: Taking on the Dairy World." Harvard Business School Case 903-413, December 2002. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  56. ConAgra Foods

    In 2002, ConAgra Foods CEO Bruce Rohde was deliberating the next steps in the process of transforming the company from an agribusiness giant to a value-added food processor. ConAgra had become the second largest food company and number one food service supplier in the United States following decades of growth through acquisitions, primarily in grain milling and meat processing businesses. During the 1990s, ConAgra made significant inroads into processed foods, with 86% of FY2002 operating profits coming from its value-added businesses. Despite its expanding portfolio of branded products, ConAgra's image as a commodity-oriented agribusiness company persisted. Given the rapidly changing food industry and the divestiture of ConAgra's fresh meat business, Rohde must establish a new identity and direction for the company.

    Keywords: Corporate Strategy; Leading Change; Change Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Food; Agribusiness; Product; Business Processes; Management Teams; Expansion; Brands and Branding; Food and Beverage Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Ingrid Vargas. "ConAgra Foods." Harvard Business School Case 903-412, November 2002. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  57. Charoen Pokphand Group: A Renewed Focus

    As one of Asia's biggest agriindustrial conglomerates, Charoen Pokphand, although solidly positioned in Thailand, was facing an increasingly competitive and complex business environment in China, where it made 30% of revenues. A change in management of the family-owned conglomerate (which included 11 publicly traded companies) was on the horizon.

    Keywords: Change Management; Agribusiness; Business Conglomerates; Family Business; Competition; Restructuring; Partners and Partnerships; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Thailand; China;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Cate Reavis. "Charoen Pokphand Group: A Renewed Focus." Harvard Business School Case 903-415, November 2002. (Revised April 2003.) View Details
  58. Water Policy Priorities Along the U.S.-Mexico Border

    The United States and Mexico face the challenges of managing shared water resources. The supply is limited and demand is growing on both sides of the border as a result of increased irrigated acreage and population growth.

    Keywords: Policy; Environmental Sustainability; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Negotiation; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Jose M. M. Porraz. "Water Policy Priorities Along the U.S.-Mexico Border." Harvard Business School Case 903-414, November 2002. (Revised March 2003.) View Details
  59. Calgene, Inc.

    In 1993, Calgene is on the verge of introducing the world's first genetically engineered plant product--a tomato will taste better and stay fresh longer. At the same time, it is using biotechnology to produce improved plant products for the cottonseed and the industrial and edible oil markets. As it develops and brings these products to market, however, it faces a series of marketing and public relations hurdles, including regulatory requirements consumer education activist resistance to production, and distribution logistics. How Calgene reacts to these challenges may determine whether it succeeds or fails in its quest to revolutionize the business of agriculture. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Technology; Marketing Strategy; Market Entry and Exit; Product Launch; Innovation Strategy; Social Issues; Production; Problems and Challenges; Biotechnology Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and John T. Gourville. "Calgene, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 502-041, October 2001. (Revised April 2002.) View Details
  60. 2002 Global Coffee Summit: Searching for Solutions

    Global coffee leaders gathered in 2002 to develop alternative market-based approaches that would ensure a sustainable supply of coffee and address the social and ecological issues confronted by a global depression in coffee prices.

    Keywords: Business Strategy; Social Issues; Natural Environment; Price; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and James M Beagle. "2002 Global Coffee Summit: Searching for Solutions." Harvard Business School Case 902-422, March 2002. View Details
  61. National Cooperative Council for Agriculture and Horticulture of the Netherlands, The

    As the No. 1 cooperative country in the world and the second leading trading country in the world, how do the cooperatives of the Netherlands organize to provide leadership in the global food system?

    Keywords: Cooperative Ownership; Food; Agribusiness; Globalization; Leadership; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Cate Reavis. "National Cooperative Council for Agriculture and Horticulture of the Netherlands, The." Harvard Business School Case 902-417, December 2001. (Revised January 2002.) View Details
  62. Nestle S.A.

    Peter Brabeck wants to focus Nestle as a wellness company in the global food system and do so in a way that provides both growth in sales and margins in both developed and developing countries.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Product Development; Supply Chain Management; Food; Multinational Firms and Management; Business Growth and Maturation; Sales; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Switzerland;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "Nestle S.A." Harvard Business School Case 902-419, December 2001. (Revised January 2002.) View Details
  63. OSI Group

    Discusses the challenges facing a global food service supplier and the company's ability to partner with major customers, such as McDonald's.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Food; Globalization; Service Delivery; Partners and Partnerships; Service Operations; Customers;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Hal Hogan. "OSI Group." Harvard Business School Case 902-408, November 2001. (Revised January 2002.) View Details
  64. Natural Pork Production

    An entrepreneurial hog farmer's creative use of contracts and capital structure drives very successful growth and returns in a depressed commodity industry.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Capital Structure; Futures and Commodity Futures; Credit Derivatives and Swaps; Goods and Commodities; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Contracts; Success; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and James M Beagle. "Natural Pork Production." Harvard Business School Case 902-413, December 2001. View Details
  65. Reporting on Agribusiness in the 21st Century

    Agriculture is not what it used to be. Neither is coverage of the industry by news organizations. A century ago, about 40% of the U.S. population lived on the farm, and one in three U.S. jobs was tied to agriculture. It made sense for daily newspapers to cover farming and to write for farmers. But now, less than 2% of the U.S. population lives on the farm, and a similarly small percentage of U.S. employment stems from agriculture. News organizations face a quandary: Covering agriculture for farmers no longer makes sense, and reporters must cover the industry differently. The question is how? In addition, the genetic revolution has created an agriceutical system, and the functions performed and the people performing have all changed. Unfortunately, news editors are not knowledgeable enough to understand the significance of this change and inform their readers about it. This case addresses how to change this perception.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Newspapers; Media; Perception; Change; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Anne M Fitzgerald. "Reporting on Agribusiness in the 21st Century." Harvard Business School Background Note 902-421, December 2001. View Details
  66. Royal Ahold NV: A Global Food Provider

    Ahold decides how strategy and partnerships will enable it to lead the global food industry for the future.

    Keywords: Business Strategy; Globalized Firms and Management; Partners and Partnerships; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and James M Beagle. "Royal Ahold NV: A Global Food Provider." Harvard Business School Case 902-416, November 2001. (Revised November 2001.) View Details
  67. Gold Kist Inc.

    An oversupply of poultry causes a major decrease in margins for the company and the industry. How does the only cooperative in the industry respond to short-term and long-term economic pressures?

    Keywords: Decision Making; Economics; Profit; Consumer Behavior; Supply and Industry; Strategic Planning; Business Strategy;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Stephanie Oestreich. "Gold Kist Inc." Harvard Business School Case 902-420, November 2001. View Details
  68. Aventis CropScience and StarLink Corn

    Aventis CropScience responds to the discovery of an unapproved corn variety in food supplies and draws lessons for the company, industry, and governments.

    Keywords: Policy; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Food; Science-Based Business; Outcome or Result; Governance Compliance; Problems and Challenges; Nutrition; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and James M Beagle. "Aventis CropScience and StarLink Corn." Harvard Business School Case 902-411, November 2001. View Details
  69. Tobacco and the Future of Rural Kentucky

    Governor Patton decides how to use settlement funds to develop a long-term plan for Kentucky's tobacco producers and rural communities.

    Keywords: Financial Instruments; Social Issues; Laws and Statutes; Rural Scope; Policy; Business and Community Relations; Government and Politics; Kentucky;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and James M Beagle. "Tobacco and the Future of Rural Kentucky." Harvard Business School Case 902-412, November 2001. View Details
  70. TIGR and ILRI: Solving Problems with Genomics

    Discusses nonprofit institutional leadership applying advances in genetic science to solve health and animal problems in industrial countries and the developing world.

    Keywords: Developing Countries and Economies; Health; Technological Innovation; Leading Change; Emerging Markets; Genetics; Non-Governmental Organizations; Technology Adoption; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and James M Beagle. "TIGR and ILRI: Solving Problems with Genomics." Harvard Business School Case 902-409, October 2001. View Details
  71. Identifying and Realizing Investments in Eastern Europe (B)

    Supplements the (A) case. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Robert E. Kennedy, and Laure Mougeot Strook. "Identifying and Realizing Investments in Eastern Europe (B)." Harvard Business School Case 701-087, March 2001. (Revised June 2001.) View Details
  72. Identifying and Realizing Investments in Eastern Europe (A)

    A Greek milling firm wants to invest in Eastern Europe. The case explores the firm's search strategy and its due diligence process after a potential investment, and considers how the company should structure its bid. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Foreign Direct Investment; Venture Capital; Emerging Markets; Business and Government Relations; Financial Strategy; Growth and Development Strategy; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Robert E. Kennedy, and Laure Mougeot Strook. "Identifying and Realizing Investments in Eastern Europe (A)." Harvard Business School Case 701-086, March 2001. (Revised June 2001.) View Details
  73. Grupo Beta San Miguel (A)

    The World Trade Organization and NAFTA are reviewing the sweetener system and governmental sugar programs and their impact on world trade. What position should Jose Pinto take, and how will this affect his company, Mexico, and the global sugar players?

    Keywords: Plant-Based Agribusiness; Government and Politics; System; Competitive Advantage; Management Teams; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Hal Hogan. "Grupo Beta San Miguel (A)." Harvard Business School Case 901-017, November 2000. (Revised April 2001.) View Details
  74. Promise of Functional Foods, The

    This case presents a definition of functional foods or nutraceuticals (food or food ingredients that could provide a health benefit beyond the traditional nutrients they contain), a description of some of the major obstacles to their commercialization and popularization, and recent attempts by food and pharmaceutical companies to capitalize on their promise.

    Keywords: Food; Private Sector; Public Sector; Health; Product Development; Production; Commercialization; Food and Beverage Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Laure Mougeot Stroock. "Promise of Functional Foods, The." Harvard Business School Background Note 901-013, December 2000. (Revised January 2001.) View Details
  75. Loblaw Companies Ltd.: The Road Ahead

    After 24 years at the helm of Loblaw Companies, Canada's largest food retailer, Richard Currie is trying to decide on a strategy for the company's future. The firm's current emphasis on one-stop shopping for everyday household needs has been phenomenally successful. Its portfolio of stores to match local demographics, along with strong private label programs, has made the company one of the top mass retailers worldwide, but what can Currie do for an encore?

    Keywords: Business Strategy; Distribution; Food; Food and Beverage Industry; Retail Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., David E. Bell, and Ann Leamon. "Loblaw Companies Ltd.: The Road Ahead." Harvard Business School Case 901-015, December 2000. (Revised December 2000.) View Details
  76. Corn Products International, Inc.

    A firm that started in corn processing and moved up the value-added food chain decides to spin-off the original commodity part of the business. How does the new spin-off survive and how does it develop a strategy? Firms in the food system are separating out their commodity parts of the business from branded food products. How does the new commodity firm develop a strategy for the future?

    Keywords: Transformation; Growth and Development Strategy; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Product Development; Service Delivery; Vertical Integration; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "Corn Products International, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 598-051, November 1997. (Revised December 2000.) View Details
  77. CellFor, Inc.

    A new private company has developed a process to clone and multiply seeds for the forestry industry.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Transition; Technological Innovation; Private Ownership; Research and Development; Science-Based Business; Technology Adoption; Forestry Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, Frantz Edward Alphonse, and Laure Mougeot Stroock. "CellFor, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 901-020, December 2000. View Details
  78. Friona Industries, L.P.

    As the food industry becomes more sophisticated, and as genomics and other factors provide for quality control from the producers to the consumers in the food chain, the beef industry has been one of the last commodity systems to organize the vertical systems to satisfy consumers' needs for high-quality, consistently tender beef. The desire to also provide traceability has led Friona Industries to develop partnerships in the vertical chain to achieve these results with case-ready meat for supermarkets and consistent supplies for institutions such as McDonalds.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Customer Value and Value Chain; Food; Management Systems; Supply and Industry; Performance Consistency; Quality; Partners and Partnerships; Food and Beverage Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. "Friona Industries, L.P." Harvard Business School Case 901-009, December 2000. View Details
  79. Dean Foods

    After 50 years of successful growth, mostly by acquisition, Dean Foods, the nation's second-largest dairy processor, has established a division to develop and market branded products nationally. Can a $4 billion company rely on a $300 million growth vehicle? Is this the best way to respond to the prevailing trends in the food retailing industry? Can Dean, known as a private label producer of fluid milk, make the transition from commodity to branded, value-added products?

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Business Divisions; Transition; Food; Goods and Commodities; Brands and Branding; Product Launch; Product Positioning; Product Development; Value Creation; Food and Beverage Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., David E. Bell, Ann Leamon, and Kim Slack. "Dean Foods." Harvard Business School Case 901-007, November 2000. View Details
  80. WARDA: Leading a Rice Revolution in West Africa

    The West Africa Rice Development Association, along with various national and international partners, was developing and transferring new rice technologies to farmers throughout West and Central Africa. While production in West Africa was growing faster than any other part of the world, the region did not produce enough rice to meet local demand. As director general of the Association, Kanayo Nwanze believed that West African governments in general did not give enough attention to agricultural research because its impact was too difficult to measure. Nwanze had to figure out how to change the mindset of national policy makers and put agricultural research on the front burner.

    Keywords: Private Sector; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Policy; Government and Politics; Technological Innovation; Leadership; Performance Effectiveness; Problems and Challenges; Research and Development; Nonprofit Organizations; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Africa;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. "WARDA: Leading a Rice Revolution in West Africa." Harvard Business School Case 901-001, November 2000. View Details
  81. Smithfield Foods, Inc.

    Smithfield has become the number-one pork producer and processor in the world--given all the changes in the global agribusiness industry. How does the company develop its future strategy? A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Economy; Globalized Economies and Regions; Agribusiness; Globalization; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Strategic Planning; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and David Lane. "Smithfield Foods, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 900-015, December 1999. (Revised June 2000.) View Details
  82. Cresud S.A.

    Cresud, a listed Argentine agricultural company, generates value by operating farms and through land appreciation. This case describes Cresud's business model, industry, and country context. Can a corporate farmer in agriculture use public funds to compete in both the agricultural world and the land appreciation world?

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Business Model; Value; Corporate Accountability; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Jonathan West, and David Benedict Pearcy. "Cresud S.A." Harvard Business School Case 900-010, November 1999. (Revised April 2000.) View Details
  83. Ajinomoto Co., Inc.

    In the fall of 1999, Kumio Egashira, president of Ajinomoto, a 90-year old, Japan-based processed foods and specialty chemicals company, and his team of senior executives were deciding how to globally maximize the synergies that existed between their food and amino acid businesses. The issue before them was how to more effectively use amino-acid know-how to create diversified, innovative, yet focused businesses and doing so in an environmentally and socially conscious way. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Food; Chemicals; Globalization; Food and Beverage Industry; Chemical Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. "Ajinomoto Co., Inc." Harvard Business School Case 900-016, December 1999. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  84. Sam Huttenbauer: Entrepreneurship in Food Preservation and Nutraceuticals

    Sam Huttenbauer is trying to get two companies, in high-pressure food preservation and in nutraceuticals, off the ground. This case covers strategic, marketing, and financing challenges. It also looks at innovative technologies in the food industry and the role of the entrepreneur in commercializing them.

    Keywords: Corporate Entrepreneurship; Food; Problems and Challenges; Corporate Strategy; Marketing; Finance; Technological Innovation; Commercialization;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, Stacey J. Bell, and David Benedict Pearcy. "Sam Huttenbauer: Entrepreneurship in Food Preservation and Nutraceuticals." Harvard Business School Case 900-012, November 1999. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  85. Florida Department of Citrus

    The Florida Department of Citrus (FDOC) is a state agency responsible for the welfare of the Florida citrus industry. This case describes the FDOC's efforts to turn around grapefruit juice consumption. Using a health message, Dan Santangelo, the FDOC's new director, adopted a marketing-driven rather than supply-driven solution to oversupply and falling demand for grapefruit, .

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Management Teams; Product Marketing; Demand and Consumers; Food and Beverage Industry; Florida;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and David Benedict Pearcy. "Florida Department of Citrus." Harvard Business School Case 900-009, November 1999. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  86. Safe Food Act, The: A Consumer Group's Perspective

    The Center for Science in the Public Interest is taking a position on creating a new safety leadership vehicle in the U.S. government. How should it plead its cause? What are the position merits and faults?

    Keywords: Food; System; Consumer Behavior; Government and Politics; Safety; Leadership; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Hal Hogan. "Safe Food Act, The: A Consumer Group's Perspective." Harvard Business School Case 900-013, November 1999. (Revised December 1999.) View Details
  87. U.S. Government and Food Safety, The

    Keywords: Business and Government Relations; Food; Safety; Food and Beverage Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Hal Hogan. "U.S. Government and Food Safety, The." Harvard Business School Case 900-014, November 1999. (Revised December 1999.) View Details
  88. Gene Research, the Mapping of Life and the Global Economy

    A new firm is being created to speed up the process of mapping humans, animals, and plants by combining gene technology with rapid gene identification to improve the health and well being of the human population and the productivity of crops and animals. How does one manage this process?

    Keywords: Technology; Organizational Structure; Technological Innovation; Business Processes; Health Care and Treatment; Performance Productivity; Welfare or Wellbeing; Agribusiness; Genetics; Science-Based Business; Biotechnology Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Juan Enriquez-Cabot. "Gene Research, the Mapping of Life and the Global Economy." Harvard Business School Case 599-016, October 1998. (Revised December 1999.) View Details
  89. ConAgra, Inc.: Across the Food Chain

    Two years after taking over as CEO, Bruce Rohde must determine how best to deal with the changes affecting this major global agribusiness firm. He must reassess the direction of the company as well as determine in which industries it should participate.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Management Teams; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Globalization; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Carlos A. A Gonzalez. "ConAgra, Inc.: Across the Food Chain." Harvard Business School Case 999-010, April 1999. (Revised November 1999.) View Details
  90. Seminis Inc.

    Seminis became the world leader in vegetable seeds through a series of acquisitions. This case describes the Seminis strategy toward capturing value, biotechnology, and international operations.

    Keywords: Business Earnings; Acquisition; Profit; Global Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Valuation; Value Creation; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Jonathan West, Carin-Isabel Knoop, and David Benedict Pearcy. "Seminis Inc." Harvard Business School Case 600-030, November 1999. View Details
  91. British Sugar in China

    British Sugar, the first major diversification of Associated British Foods, is entering China as part of the global sweetener, starch, and ingredient strategy.

    Keywords: Trade; Food; Globalization; Marketing Strategy; Market Entry and Exit; Diversification; Consumer Products Industry; China; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Srinivas Sunder. "British Sugar in China." Harvard Business School Case 599-059, November 1998. (Revised November 1999.) View Details
  92. Novartis: Betting on Life Sciences

    The merger of Ciba-Geigy and Sandoz produced genomic-based synergies for health care, agribusiness, and nutritional supplements. How to build on the strength of the individual divisions and provide synergies that would continue Novartis' leadership role is the question facing the company.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Business Divisions; Health Care and Treatment; Leadership; Product Positioning; Science-Based Business; Corporate Strategy; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Srinivas Sunder. "Novartis: Betting on Life Sciences." Harvard Business School Case 599-076, December 1998. (Revised September 1999.) View Details
  93. Medical Foods, Inc.

    Dr. Franklin Lowe is CEO of a new kind of company in a new kind of industry--medical foods. He must select a business model and partners that will help make this a viable business.

    Keywords: Business Model; Partners and Partnerships; Business or Company Management; Strategy; Business Startups; Health Care and Treatment; Food; Innovation and Management; Food and Beverage Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "Medical Foods, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 598-048, November 1997. (Revised May 1999.) View Details
  94. Guangdong Nowada Group, The

    In late 1998, 38-year-old He Boquan, CEO of the Guangdong Nowada Group, a health beverage producer, needs to decide how to fund his company's growth and ambition to become China's number one domestic health beverage producer by 2002. A consultants study revealed that foreign competition in China was likely to accelerate within the next three years, and that, without improved management skills and additional capital, Nowada risked going from being a leader to being marginalized. The consulting firm therefore identified potential investors (including the investment arm of a European family conglomerate, an international direct investment firm, and a food and beverage multinational). In late 1998, several rounds of negotiations gave He and his team three options: accept a majority investment by the multinational, accept a 25% capital injection with a risky repayment put option, or "go it alone."

    Keywords: Forecasting and Prediction; Capital; Foreign Direct Investment; Growth and Development; Leadership Style; Management Skills; Negotiation Offer; Competitive Strategy; Food and Beverage Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Anthony St. George. "Guangdong Nowada Group, The." Harvard Business School Case 599-064, December 1998. (Revised March 1999.) View Details
  95. MD Foods Amba

    In 1998, MD Foods, a Denmark-based dairy cooperative, was searching for growth opportunities that would enable it to become northern Europe's preferred retail dairy supplier. The options being considered included expanding in existing markets, entering into new markets, or growing via product alliances and innovation. The experience of the company's U.K. subsidiary demonstrated that as the food retail sector consolidated, being the supplier of choice was becoming increasingly difficult. Product and service innovation was the key to survival.

    Keywords: Cooperative Ownership; Growth and Development Strategy; Expansion; Market Entry and Exit; Alliances; Innovation and Management; Food and Beverage Industry; Europe; United Kingdom; Denmark;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. "MD Foods Amba." Harvard Business School Case 599-052, December 1998. View Details
  96. Amul and India's National Dairy Development Board

    Amul Dairy has been a successful change maker in India's dairy system. How does it move from this success to the new challenges facing the Indian food system--is it an appropriate model?

    Keywords: Business Model; Leading Change; Success; Cooperative Ownership; Problems and Challenges; Food and Beverage Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Srinivas Sunder. "Amul and India's National Dairy Development Board." Harvard Business School Case 599-060, November 1998. (Revised December 1998.) View Details
  97. Grupo Industrial Bimbo S.A. (1998)

    A leading Mexican agribusiness firm wants to expand in the United States and other locations. How to do so in a manner that utilizes the strengths of the company?

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Food; Global Strategy; Strength and Weakness; Expansion; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Srinivas Sunder. "Grupo Industrial Bimbo S.A. (1998)." Harvard Business School Case 599-066, December 1998. View Details
  98. Australian Wheat Board Limited.: Becoming a Grower-owned Corporation

    In July 1999, the Australian Wheat Board (AWB), a statutory national and international grain marketing organization, would become grower-owned. As a private corporation, the AWB would no longer receive government borrowing guarantees and would have to rely on its own capital base for investments. Along with a new structure, the AWB's wheat export monopoly was in jeopardy as domestic and international grain traders called for open competition. The case describes CEO Murray Roger's challenges in navigating the AWB into a new era.

    Keywords: Transformation; Capital Structure; Globalized Markets and Industries; Monopoly; Employee Ownership; Competition;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cate Reavis. "Australian Wheat Board Limited.: Becoming a Grower-owned Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 599-070, December 1998. View Details
  99. Wegmans Food Markets: Diabetes Counseling

    Danny Wegman, president of Wegmans Food Markets, is trying to decide how to evaluate the success of a nutrition-counseling program for diabetics, and whether and how to expand the program beyond the two stores currently involved. Wegmans, with 57 stores and $2.3 billion in revenues, implemented the program in conjunction with a local hospital and a disease-management company. Initially intended to stem the erosion of pharmacy margins due to managed care plans, the program filled a genuine social need--diabetes can be inexpensively controlled through diet if caught early. In addition to discussing how the program has been established, the case presents financials for the supermarket industry and Wegmans' competitors. The new role of supermarkets in addressing disease, health, and preventive medical needs is also presented.

    Keywords: Performance Evaluation; Expansion; Programs; Human Needs; Financial Management; Health Care and Treatment; Nutrition; Consumer Behavior; Pharmaceutical Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., David E. Bell, and Ann Leamon. "Wegmans Food Markets: Diabetes Counseling." Harvard Business School Case 599-057, November 1998. View Details
  100. Bluewater Aquaculture

    An entrepreneurial shrimp farm in Belize is evaluating its future growth strategy in every segment of the vertical value-added food chain.

    Keywords: Animal-Based Agribusiness; Entrepreneurship; Growth and Development; Performance Evaluation; Expansion; Vertical Integration; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "Bluewater Aquaculture." Harvard Business School Case 598-049, December 1997. View Details
  101. Colly Cotton Ltd.

    Colly Farm is an entrepreneurial cotton farm complex that has to compete on a world market. In going public it has to satisfy the market that it can remain profitable in volatile times.

    Keywords: Earnings Management; Entrepreneurship; Going Public; Balance and Stability;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "Colly Cotton Ltd." Harvard Business School Case 598-052, November 1997. View Details
  102. Borden Ranch: Balancing Private Property Rights and Social Interests in Ag

    Angelo Tsakopoulos wanted to convert grazing land to crop agriculture. He received different advice from different government agencies and became involved in legal battles.

    Keywords: Property; Social Entrepreneurship; Rights; Agribusiness; Social Issues; Interests; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Business and Government Relations; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Don Daniels, and Diane Richmond. "Borden Ranch: Balancing Private Property Rights and Social Interests in Ag." Harvard Business School Case 598-069, November 1997. View Details
  103. Royal Ahold NV: Shopkeeper to the Global Village

    Royal Ahold has become one of the top U.S. food retailers in the United States and Europe, with a family firm that began in the Netherlands and grew to a listing on the U.S. Stock Exchange. It wants to be a global player and is trying to develop a global strategy.

    Keywords: Family Business; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Global Strategy; Leadership Style; Public Ownership; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "Royal Ahold NV: Shopkeeper to the Global Village." Harvard Business School Case 598-055, November 1997. View Details
  104. Case Corporation

    A successful turnaround global farm machinery company is attempting to redefine its role in the global food system and develop a strategic plan for the company.

    Keywords: Change; Machinery and Machining; Global Strategy; Growth and Development; Strategic Planning; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "Case Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 598-046, November 1997. View Details
  105. Odwalla, Inc.

    Odwalla suffered one of the worst food safety crises in history and not only survived but continued to grow. Now they need to decide how the crisis affected their business and how to expand their business.

    Keywords: Growth and Development; Crisis Management; Safety; Expansion; System Shocks; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "Odwalla, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 598-047, November 1997. View Details
  106. National Pork Producers Council

    Al Tank, CEO of the National Pork Products Council, is facing an environmental and structural crisis in the U.S. pork industry. Can he resolve the environmental and image problems of his industry in time? Can he receive the support of both his growers and the international community?

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Situation or Environment; Crisis Management; Environmental Sustainability; Business and Community Relations; Animal-Based Agribusiness; Industry Structures; Reputation; Food and Beverage Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "National Pork Producers Council." Harvard Business School Case 598-053, November 1997. View Details
  107. Roslin Institute, The

    Dr. Ian Willmut and the Roslin Institute have developed a revolutionary new technology--cloning. Now they are faced with some tough choices concerning going forward. How should they balance commercialization opportunities with societal concerns?

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Independent Innovation and Invention; Social Issues; Commercialization; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Tom Clay. "Roslin Institute, The." Harvard Business School Case 598-045, October 1997. View Details
  108. Tri Valley Growers: A New Age Co-op

    Tri Valley Growers is a dominant co-operative in its industry and, yet, still suffers from poor returns. The board of directors worked with the new CEO to change the product, market, and financing focus of the co-op to assure a long and profitable future for its shareholders, employees, and growers.

    Keywords: Capital; Profit; Goods and Commodities; Product Marketing; Cooperative Ownership;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Mollie H. Carter. "Tri Valley Growers: A New Age Co-op." Harvard Business School Case 598-003, September 1997. View Details
  109. Technology Crisis and the Future of Agribusiness: Antibiotic Resistance in Humans and Animals

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Health Pandemics; Crisis Management; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Juan Enriquez-Cabot. "Technology Crisis and the Future of Agribusiness: Antibiotic Resistance in Humans and Animals." Harvard Business School Case 598-024, July 1997. View Details
  110. Delta & Pine Land: Measuring the Value of Transgenic Cotton

    Discusses the joint venture between two companies with different capabilities: 1) technology provider and 2) transportation agent. Discusses how to capture value from joint venture and biotechnology: 1) who are winners and who are losers; 2) how much value can/should be captured; 3) sustainability issues; 4) implications for agriculture/agchem industry/relationships between supply chain members. Delta & Pine and Monsanto are licensing a new technology cotton seed. They must decide how to do it and how to evaluate its success.

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Joint Ventures; Marketing Strategy; Supply Chain Management; Performance Consistency; Technology; Transportation; Valuation; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Charlotte A. Tasker. "Delta & Pine Land: Measuring the Value of Transgenic Cotton." Harvard Business School Case 597-005, August 1996. (Revised May 1997.) View Details
  111. Archer Daniels Midland: Direction and Strategy

    Sets out the strategy and competitive competencies of one of the leading grain trade and processing companies in the world. An overview of the company's innovations in corn and oilseed by-products is provided. The strategy of the firm is to add by-products to corn, soybeans, and wheat processing so that they become part of a food, feed, fuel, and pharmaceutical industry complex.

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Strategic Planning; Business Strategy; Value Creation; Food and Beverage Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Thomas N. Urban Jr. "Archer Daniels Midland: Direction and Strategy." Harvard Business School Case 597-039, February 1997. View Details
  112. Farmington Fresh: Growers Changing Produce Distribution

    Opening up of Asian markets for U.S. produce provided an opportunity for large-scale producers to develop their own packing house and airline to ship their product to Asian markets. Teaching Purpose: How do farmers take a proactive strategy in reaching global produce markets in a direct fashion?

    Keywords: Distribution; Global Strategy; Air Transportation; Asia; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Don Daniels. "Farmington Fresh: Growers Changing Produce Distribution." Harvard Business School Case 597-047, November 1996. (Revised February 1997.) View Details
  113. Technology Crises and the Future of Agribusiness: BSE in Europe

    Keywords: Technology; Agribusiness; Crisis Management; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Juan Enriquez-Cabot. "Technology Crises and the Future of Agribusiness: BSE in Europe." Harvard Business School Case 597-036, September 1996. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  114. Boston Beer Company: Samuel Adams, Brewmaster Leading a Revolution

    Boston Beer Co. revolutionized the beer industry by identifying and responding to a new consumer segment. Using the excess capacity in the brewing industry to establish contract brewing arrangements and an extremely capable sales force, the company opened the industry's eyes to the need for high quality product and freshness. The emphasis on unique product development and freshness was a first for the industry.

    Keywords: Transformation; Leadership; Product Marketing; Product Development; Production; Quality; Salesforce Management; Segmentation; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Mollie H. Carter. "Boston Beer Company: Samuel Adams, Brewmaster Leading a Revolution." Harvard Business School Case 597-040, October 1996. (Revised November 1996.) View Details
  115. Diamond Walnut Growers

    Diamond Walnut Growers is the largest walnut marketer in the world. As a grower-owned cooperative, it is under pressure to operate as efficiently as independent handlers. Diamond is evaluating its high-margin consumer branded business, which has experienced little to no growth, and the low-margin but rapidly growing industrial business to determine its strategy regarding each.

    Keywords: Plant-Based Agribusiness; Change Management; Marketing Strategy; Operations; Cooperative Ownership; Corporate Strategy; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Mollie H. Carter. "Diamond Walnut Growers." Harvard Business School Case 597-048, November 1996. View Details
  116. Nestle and the Twenty-First Century

    A leading food company rethinks its future in the global food system by major geographical areas.

    Keywords: Change Management; Forecasting and Prediction; Geographic Location; Globalization; Strategy; System; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Elizabeth Ashcroft. "Nestle and the Twenty-First Century." Harvard Business School Case 596-074, December 1995. (Revised March 1996.) View Details
  117. Monsanto Company: The Coming of Age of Bio-Technology

    Monsanto has one product, Roundup, accounting for 30% of company net income and is going off patent. How should the company position itself and its products in the future?

    Keywords: Patents; Product Positioning; Strategic Planning; System Shocks; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Thomas N. Urban Jr. "Monsanto Company: The Coming of Age of Bio-Technology." Harvard Business School Case 596-034, November 1995. (Revised February 1996.) View Details
  118. Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.: Partnering in the '90s

    Keywords: Plant-Based Agribusiness; Partners and Partnerships; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Thomas N. Urban Jr. "Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.: Partnering in the '90s." Harvard Business School Case 596-029, September 1995. (Revised November 1995.) View Details
  119. Loblaw Companies Limited: Differentiation in the 90s and Beyond

    Loblaw wants to develop long-term relationships with its customers and is testing a variety of strategies to do this.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Decision Choices and Conditions; Business or Company Management; Marketing Strategy;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Thomas N. Urban Jr, and Jane L. Wertz. "Loblaw Companies Limited: Differentiation in the 90s and Beyond." Harvard Business School Case 596-030, September 1995. (Revised October 1995.) View Details
  120. Robert Mondavi Corporation

    As the Mondavi Corp. moves from a private to a public company and increases the number of types of wine it sells, how does it position itself in various segments of the market and what brand and distribution system is most important?

    Keywords: Globalized Markets and Industries; Brands and Branding; Distribution; Product Positioning; Going Public; Expansion; Change; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Thomas N. Urban Jr. "Robert Mondavi Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 596-031, October 1995. View Details
  121. Groupe Danone Prepares for the Next Century

    Danone is the largest food company in France and is in the top ten in the world, but most of its activity is in France, Spain, and Italy. How does it become a global company? Should it? How does it leverage its leadership in yogurt, biscuits, and mineral water?

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Global Strategy; Goods and Commodities; Marketing Strategy; Strategic Planning; Expansion; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Elizabeth Ashcroft. "Groupe Danone Prepares for the Next Century." Harvard Business School Case 596-054, October 1995. View Details
  122. Alcoma: The Strategic Use of Frozen Concentrated Orange Juice Futures

    Increases in orange tree production led to an orange juice surplus. How does one manage price risk in the orange juice industry under these conditions?

    Keywords: Plant-Based Agribusiness; Cost vs Benefits; Cost Management; Risk Management; Production; Problems and Challenges; Risk and Uncertainty; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., Phil Herndon, and Katherine L. Morris. "Alcoma: The Strategic Use of Frozen Concentrated Orange Juice Futures." Harvard Business School Case 595-029, October 1994. (Revised November 1994.) View Details
  123. American Rice, Inc. in Vietnam

    Describes the first major joint venture between a U.S. and Vietnam rice company with reqard to the world rice trade. What are the opportunities and what are the challenges?

    Keywords: Joint Ventures; Trade; Global Range; Problems and Challenges; Opportunities; Food and Beverage Industry; Viet Nam; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Quintus Travis. "American Rice, Inc. in Vietnam." Harvard Business School Case 595-020, November 1994. View Details
  124. Guinness PLC

    Changing demographics, new types of competition, and new attitudes toward alcoholic beverages force the company to rethink priorities.

    Keywords: Transformation; Demographics; Product Positioning; Competitive Strategy; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Grant Kelley. "Guinness PLC." Harvard Business School Case 595-021, September 1994. (Revised October 1994.) View Details
  125. Cott Corp.: Private Label in the 1990s

    Private label cola, Cott, gets 30% of the market in Canada. How does it move into the U.S. market? How do retailers evaluate its benefit costs? Does Cott use an existing structure or build new ones? Does Cott diversify from drink to snack foods?

    Keywords: Private Sector; Cost Management; Labels; Growth and Development Strategy; Market Entry and Exit; Industry Structures; Diversification; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A., and Robert S. Kaplan. "Cott Corp.: Private Label in the 1990s." Harvard Business School Case 594-031, September 1993. (Revised December 1993.) View Details
  126. Bay State Milling Co.

    Flour milling in recent years has had a great deal of consolidation. The fourth generation of a privately held firm is debating how to protect themselves in the industry as consumption, production, competition, logistics, technology, and patterns are all changing.

    Keywords: Change Management; Transition; Economics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Operations; Consolidation;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A. "Bay State Milling Co." Harvard Business School Case 594-080, December 1993. View Details
  127. The Private Label Movement

    Private labels, previously weak in the U.S. market, are making inroads in the United States and Canada. Reasons for this include a weak economy, better quality of private label goods, and a desire by retailers to increase profitability.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Retail Industry; United States; Canada;

    Citation:

    Kaplan, Robert S., and Ray A. Goldberg. "The Private Label Movement." Harvard Business School Background Note 594-039, September 1993. View Details
  128. Food Science Corp. (FSC)--Cholesterol Extraction and Other Technology Applied to Health Hazards in the Food Chain

    Keywords: Food; Health Care and Treatment; Science; Food and Beverage Industry; Health Industry;

  129. Federal Assistance to the Farm Credit System: The Road to Recovery?

    Keywords: Agribusiness; Welfare or Wellbeing; Government and Politics; Credit; Business and Government Relations; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A. "Federal Assistance to the Farm Credit System: The Road to Recovery?" Harvard Business School Case 589-040, September 1988. (Revised January 1990.) View Details
  130. Deregulation of the Australian Wheat Board: A Commodity System in Flux

    Keywords: Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Business and Government Relations; Goods and Commodities; Markets; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Australia;

    Citation:

    Goldberg, Ray A. "Deregulation of the Australian Wheat Board: A Commodity System in Flux." Harvard Business School Case 590-034, October 1989. (Revised December 1989.) View Details