John A. Quelch

Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration

Unit: Marketing

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John A. Quelch

John A. Quelch is the Charles Edward Wilson Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He also holds a joint appointment at Harvard School of Public Health as Professor in Health Policy and Management.  In addition, he is also a fellow of the Harvard China Fund, a Member of the Harvard China Advisory Board and Associate in Research at the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies.

Between 2011 and 2013, Professor Quelch was Dean, Vice President and Distinguished Professor of International Management at CEIBS, China's leading business school. Between 2001 and 2011, he was the Lincoln Filene Professor of Business Administration and Senior Associate Dean at Harvard Business School, teaching Marketing in the Advanced Management Program. He served as Dean of London Business School from 1998 to 2001. Prior to 1998, he was the Sebastian S. Kresge Professor of Marketing and Co-Chair of the Marketing Unit at Harvard Business School.

Professor Quelch is known for his teaching materials and innovations in pedagogy.  Over the past twenty-five years, his case studies have sold over 4 million copies, third highest in HBS history.  In 1995, he developed the first HBS interactive CD-ROM exercise (on Intel's advertising budgeting process). In 1999, he developed and presented a series of twelve one hour programs on Marketing Management for the Public Broadcasting System. Professor Quelch is currently developing a new course titled "Consumers, Corporations and Public Health" for both MBA and MPH students.

Professor Quelch is the author, co-author or editor of twenty-five books, including All Business Is Local (2011), Greater Good:  How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy (2008), Business Solutions for the Global Poor: Creating Social and Economic Value (2007), The New Global Brands (2006), Global Marketing Management (5th edition, 2006), The Global Market (2005), Cases in Advertising and Promotion Management (4th Edition, 1996) and The Marketing Challenge of Europe 1992 (2nd edition, 1991). He has published eighteen articles on marketing strategy issues in the Harvard Business Review, most recently “How To Market In A Downturn” (April 2009), and many more in other leading management journals such as  McKinsey Quarterly and Sloan Management Review.

Professor Quelch has served as an independent director of twelve publicly listed companies in the USA and UK. He recently stepped down as a  non-executive director of WPP after twenty-five years of service.  He is currently a non-executive director of Alere, a health diagnostics company and Datalogix, a big data marketing services company. Professor Quelch has also served as a consultant, seminar leader and speaker for firms, industry associations and government agencies in more than fifty countries.  

In the area of public service, Professor Quelch served pro bono for eight years as Chairman of the Port Authority of Massachusetts. He is the Honorary Consul General of Morocco in New England and served previously as Chairman of the British-American Business Council of New England.  He is a member of the Trilateral Commission and the Council On Foreign Relations. He received the CBE for services to British business in 2011 and holds an honorary doctorate from Vietnam National University.

Professor Quelch was born in London, England, was educated at Exeter College, Oxford University (BA and MA), the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania (MBA), the Harvard School of Public Health (MS) and Harvard Business School (DBA). In addition to the UK and USA, he has lived in Australia, Canada and China.

Featured Work

Publications

Books

  1. Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy

    Marketing has a greater purpose, and marketers, a higher calling, than simply selling more widgets, according to John Quelch and Katherine Jocz. In "Greater Good", the authors contend that marketing performs an essential societal function—and does so democratically. They maintain that people would benefit if the realms of politics and marketing were informed by one another's best principles and practices. Quelch and Jocz lay out the six fundamental characteristics that marketing and democracy share: (1) exchange of value, such as goods, services, and promises, (2) consumption of goods and services, (3) choice in all decisions, (4) free flow of information, (5) active engagement of a majority of individuals, and (6) inclusion of as many people as possible. Without these six traits, both marketing and democracy would fail, and with them, society. Drawing on current and historical examples from economies around the world, this landmark work illuminates marketing's critical role in the development, growth, and governance of societies. It reveals how good marketing practices improve the political process and—in turn—the practice of democracy itself.

    Keywords: Economic Systems; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Government and Politics; Marketing; Practice; Welfare or Wellbeing;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine E. Jocz. Greater Good: How Good Marketing Makes for Better Democracy. Boston: Harvard Business Press, 2008. View Details

Journal Articles

Book Chapters

  1. The Marketing Factor for Nonconventional-Protein Products

    Keywords: Food; Product Marketing; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Austin, James E., J. A. Quelch, Joe R. D'Cruz, and Edward T. Popper. "The Marketing Factor for Nonconventional-Protein Products." Chap. 9 in Protein Resources and Technology, edited by Max Milner, Nevin S. Scrimshaw, and Daniel I.C. Wang, 111–135. Westport, CT: AVI Publishing Company, 1978. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Johnson & Johnson: The Pursuit of Wellness

    The chief medical officer of Johnson & Johnson (J & J) is reflecting on forty years of sustained efforts by the company to improve employee wellness. The case reviews J & J's multiple wellness initiatives and efforts to measure their effectiveness. It also invites discussion of what more still remains to be done.

    Keywords: empoylee wellness programs; human resource management; corporate management strategy; employee engagement; Human Resources; Management; Organizations; Performance; Personal Development and Career; Programs; Strategy; Health Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; North and Central America; Europe; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Johnson & Johnson: The Pursuit of Wellness." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 515-021, July 2014. View Details
  2. Johnson & Johnson: The Pursuit of Wellness

    To create the world's healthiest workforce, diversified health care giant Johnson & Johnson (J&J) mandated participation in its "Culture of Health" program globally, customized by location, culture, and specific health needs to offer prevention-focused education, rewards for healthy behavior, and workplace environments that encouraged healthy employee behavior. By 2015, 90% of J&J's 128,000 employees would participate in Culture of Health programs; 80% would know their key health indicators (e.g., blood pressure, body-mass index, blood sugar, cholesterol); and 80% would have a "low risk" health profile. To hit these goals, J&J managers in 2014 sought to: 1) reduce national variation in program adoption and popularity, 2) do more to help employees ensure their overall—physical, mental, and spiritual—health, and 3) accurately measure the investments in and return on the program.

    Keywords: healthcare; human resources; employee motivation; Transformation; Ethics; Health; Human Resources; Leadership; Management; Personal Development and Career; Problems and Challenges; Strategy; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; North and Central America; Middle East; Latin America; Europe; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Johnson & Johnson: The Pursuit of Wellness." Harvard Business School Case 514-112, June 2014. View Details
  3. Access Health CT: Marketing Affordable Care

    At the close of open-enrollment in March of 2014, Kevin Counihan, CEO of Access Health CT, Connecticut's state health insurance exchange, stops to consider the success it has experienced so far and think about how to ensure its long-term sustainability.

    Keywords: health care; health care industry; health care policy; public health insurance exchange; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; Connecticut;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Michael Norris. "Access Health CT: Marketing Affordable Care." Harvard Business School Case 514-119, June 2014. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  4. Vaxess Technologies, Inc.

    In February 2014, Michael Schrader, chief executive of Vaxess Technologies, Inc., was assessing the startup health care company's 2014 marketing plan. On December 31st, 2013, Vaxess had obtained an exclusive license to a series of patents for a silk protein technology that, when added to vaccines, reduced or removed the need for refrigeration between manufacturing and delivery to the end patient. Schrader and his colleagues had to decide on which vaccines to focus and whether and how to target the drug companies that manufactured the vaccines or the quasi-government organizations (such as UNICEF and PAHO) and nongovernment organizations (such as GAVI) that purchased large quantities of vaccines for the developing world.

    Keywords: vaccine; cold chain; antigen; temperature controlled; developing markets; immunization; Health Care and Treatment; Health Pandemics; Global Strategy; Supply Chain; Health; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Vaxess Technologies, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 514-107, May 2014. View Details
  5. Note on Mobile Health Care

    Delivering health care to the global population was a challenge. Health care costs accounted for ten percent of world GDP by 2013. In the U.S., health care costs were expected to top $3.1 trillion in 2014. New technologies, shortages of trained personnel and lengthening life expectancies were accelerating the growth of health care costs. Physicians often failed to engage patients in preventative care, which many believed would help combat the rising costs of treating chronic conditions. Diabetes and hypertension, in particular, afflicted many developed nations and were a growing threat in the developing world. Mobile health (mHealth) used networked devices to distribute or collect medical information from patients and/or medical personnel. Given its low cost and broad reach, many wondered if and how mHealth could help solve the global health care crisis.

    Keywords: health care; mobile; mobile app; public health; Startups; hardware; software; telemedicine; global; medical devices; medical services; medical solutions; entrepreneurs; government and business; technological change; Health Care and Treatment; Entrepreneurship; Government and Politics; Technological Innovation; Health Industry; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Note on Mobile Health Care." Harvard Business School Background Note 514-122, April 2014. (Revised August 2014.) View Details
  6. Demarketing Soda in New York City

    In 2013, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg tried and failed to institute a ban on serving sizes of large sugary beverages. Obesity posed a large public health risk to the city. Mayor Bloomberg's proposed ban was one of many attempts to combat the rising threat of obesity. The case discusses the efficacy of the proposed ban on large soda serving sizes in the context of the other anti-obesity initiatives crafted by Bloomberg's administration.

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Demarketing Soda in New York City." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-052, March 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  7. E-Cigarettes: Marketing Versus Public Health

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were heralded by some as a healthcare game changer, enabling smokers to switch to a new product which carried lower risk of cancer. However, there were concerns about the public health risk of e-cigarettes, particularly the chance that teens would easily develop nicotine addictions from smoking the fruit-flavored products. Manufacturers argued that current smokers, not teens were the target market, but laws regulating e-cigarettes were far less stringent than those governing tobacco products.

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "E-Cigarettes: Marketing Versus Public Health." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-108, March 2014. View Details
  8. Vision 2020: Takeda and the Vaccine Industry

    In 2014, Yasuchika Hasegawa was orchestrating the transformation of Takeda from a Japanese pharmaceutical company with a global footprint into a global company with a Japanese heritage. A 33-year veteran of Takeda, Hasegawa-san was appointed president of Takeda in 2003 and chief executive in 2009. By 2013, Takeda was in the midst of implementing its new Vision 2020 plan, a strategic plan for the evolving global corporation, which included developing a global vaccine business.

    Keywords: health care; global; NGO; public health; pharmaceutical industry; Japan; GSK; vaccine; supply chain; Market entry; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Trade; Market Entry and Exit; Global Strategy; Health Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Vision 2020: Takeda and the Vaccine Industry." Harvard Business School Case 514-084, March 2014. View Details
  9. The Slingshot: Improving Water Access

    Entrepreneur Dean Kamen has inked a multimillion dollar partnership with Coca-Cola (CC) to mass produce and distribute the Slingshot, a low energy device that can convert raw sewage into potable water for poor people and communities in developing economies.

    Keywords: Innovation Strategy; DEKA; Dean Kamen; Coca-Cola; Technological Innovation; Innovation Strategy; Commercialization; Marketing; Marketing Strategy; Food and Beverage Industry; Health Industry; North Africa; South Africa; Asia; South America;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "The Slingshot: Improving Water Access." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-109, February 2014. View Details
  10. CleanSpritz

    Sales of CleanSpritz all-purpose cleaning spray have been steadily declining for the past five years, and management believes the decline correlates to a growing environmental concern among U.S. consumers. CleanSpritz's management is considering several options to address the environmental concerns in hopes of reversing the decline in revenue: re-launching the current product; adding a new product that includes stronger concentrate in a recyclable pouch; adding a new stronger concentrate in a dissolvable packet; or keeping the business status-quo. Students must present their recommendations for the most effective strategy, keeping in mind the potential risks of each alternative. Students learn to demonstrate the importance of packaging in the marketing mix, analyze the costs and benefits of being a first mover, and learn about the decision-making process for a product extension that represents a creative attempt to rejuvenate a mature brand. This case can be used in courses on marketing management, product management or new product development, or marketing and social responsibility.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Competition; Marketing Strategy; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Performance Improvement; Environmental Sustainability; Product Launch; Product Development; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Alisa Zalosh. "CleanSpritz." Harvard Business School Brief Case 914-537, January 2014. View Details
  11. Cancer Screening in Japan: Market Research and Segmentation

    Keywords: Market research; Market segmentation; health care industry; Health Care and Treatment; Innovation and Invention; Marketing Strategy; Health Industry; Public Administration Industry; Communications Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Cancer Screening in Japan: Market Research and Segmentation." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-100, January 2014. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  12. Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.: Safety, Environment and Health

    In January 2014, Gary Bald, senior vice president of Safety, Environment and Health at Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines (RCL), prepared for a review meeting with the company's chief executive, Adam Goldstein, and chairman, Richard Fain. Prior to joining RCL in 2006, Bald had spent 28 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. After seven years of upgrading security for the cruise line, Bald stated, "We've come a long way, but what keeps me up at night is what I don't know." As he prepared for his meeting with Fain and Goldstein, Bald considered whether his department's current initiatives would be sufficient to maintain RCL's position at the cutting edge of cruise industry best practice, and whether RCL could and should differentiate itself in marketing from its competitors in the areas of safety, environment and health.

    Keywords: health care; public health; cruising; cruise lines; Royal Caribbean; safety; Security; biodefense; epidemic; norovirus; fire safety; crew; environmental protection; innovation; ship design; vacation; recreation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.: Safety, Environment and Health." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-101, March 2014. View Details
  13. Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (A), (B) & (C)

    Keywords: advertising; advertising media; digital marketing; viral advertising; Viral Marketing; public safety; Advertising; Marketing; Marketing Strategy; Web; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Public Administration Industry; Oceania; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John. "Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (A), (B) & (C)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-082, January 2014. View Details
  14. Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (C)

    The case series focuses on Melbourne Trains' viral advertising campaign to improve safe behaviors around trains among young people. This iconic, low budget campaign swept the Cannes Lions advertising awards in 2013 and became a social media sensation.

    Keywords: marketing; marketing communication; advertising; viral advertising; Advertising; Advertising Campaigns; Marketing Strategy; Advertising Industry; Public Administration Industry; Transportation Industry; Oceania; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John. "Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-081, January 2014. View Details
  15. Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (B)

    The case series focuses on Melbourne Trains' viral advertising campaign to improve safe behaviors around trains among young people. This iconic, low budget campaign swept the Cannes Lions advertising awards in 2013 and became a social media sensation.

    Keywords: Marketing channels; marketing communication; digital marketing; viral advertising; Advertising; Advertising Campaigns; Public Sector; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Advertising Industry; Public Administration Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Oceania; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John. "Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-080, January 2014. View Details
  16. Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (A)

    The case series focuses on Melbourne Trains' viral advertising campaign to improve safe behaviors around trains among young people. This iconic, low budget campaign swept the Cannes Lions advertising awards in 2013 and became a social media sensation.

    Keywords: advertising; digital marketing; Viral Marketing; Advertising; Marketing Communications; Social Marketing; Advertising Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Public Administration Industry; Oceania; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John. "Dumb Ways To Die: Advertising Train Safety (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-079, January 2014. View Details
  17. Cancer Screening in Japan: Market Research and Segmentation

    Since founding CancerScan in 2008, Jun Fukuyoshi and Yoshiki Ishikawa had helped to improve cancer screening rates in Japan. Between 2005 and 2007, awareness of breast cancer in Japan rose from 55% to 70%, but the incidence of breast cancer screenings remained constant. Jun and Yoshiki applied marketing research techniques to increase the screening rate for breast cancer, a disease which killed over 12,000 Japanese women in 2011. Cancer screening initiatives accounted for 60% of the company's 2013 sales of $2.5 million.

    Keywords: cancer; Public Health Projects; Japan; Japan;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Cancer Screening in Japan: Market Research and Segmentation." Harvard Business School Case 514-057, January 2014. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  18. 23andMe: Genetic Testing for Consumers (B)

    Following the FDA's letter in November 2013, which ordered 23andMe to cease sales of its DNA test kits, observers wondered how co-founder and CEO, Anne Wojcicki, would guide the company in the presence of uncertainty.

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Genetics; Crisis Management; Health Care and Treatment; Product Development; Business and Government Relations; Biotechnology Industry; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "23andMe: Genetic Testing for Consumers (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-095, January 2014. (Revised March 2014.) View Details
  19. 23andMe: Genetic Testing for Consumers (A)

    On November 22, 2013, the direct-to-consumer genetic testing provider, 23andMe, received a letter from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ordering the company to halt the sale and promotion of its genetic testing kit. The FDA stated that the product was marketed as a diagnostic and preventative tool and that it was subject to the agency's regulations for medical devices. Company co-founder Anne Wojcicki and chairman Andy Page carefully considered the potential impact of the FDA's letter on 23andMe's position in the industry and the sustainability of its operations.

    Keywords: marketing; public health; strategy; genome testing; health care; genetics; ancestry; 23andMe; Marketing; Product Launch; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Health Testing and Trials; Genetics; Strategy; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "23andMe: Genetic Testing for Consumers (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-086, January 2014. (Revised April 2014.) View Details
  20. Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.: Safety, Environment and Health

    In January 2014, Gary Bald, senior vice president of Safety, Environment and Health at Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines (RCL), prepared for a review meeting with the company's chief executive, Adam Goldstein, and chairman, Richard Fain. Prior to joining RCL in 2006, Bald had spent 28 years with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. After seven years of upgrading security for the cruise line, Bald stated, "We've come a long way, but what keeps me up at night is what I don't know." As he prepared for his meeting with Fain and Goldstein, Bald considered whether his department's current initiatives would be sufficient to maintain RCL's position at the cutting edge of cruise industry best practice, and whether RCL could and should differentiate itself in marketing from its competitors in the areas of safety, environment and health.

    Keywords: marketing; Market segmentation; operations; shipbuilding; travel industry; cruising; cruise lines; Royal Caribbean; Carnival; environmental and social sustainability; environment; safety; Security; health; public health; environmental protection; health care; International; Safety; Environmental Sustainability; Travel Industry; Health Industry; Europe; West Indies; Mexico; United States; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.: Safety, Environment and Health." Harvard Business School Case 514-069, February 2014. View Details
  21. GlaxoSmithKline in China (C)

    Keywords: ethics; pharmaceutical industry; China; healthcare; pharmaceutical sales; Ethics; Multinational Firms and Management; Pharmaceutical Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John, and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "GlaxoSmithKline in China (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-092, January 2014. (Revised January 2014.) (This case is a follow up to GlaxoSmithKline (A), 514049 and GlaxoSmithKline (B), 514050.) View Details
  22. Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety In Bangladesh (A) and (B)

    On April 24, 2013 the Rana Plaza factory building collapsed in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. Over 1,100 people were killed in the worst industrial accident since the Union Carbide plant gas leak in Bhopal, India. Most of the victims worked for garment factories, whose primary clients were European, US and Canadian firms. Export contracts to such firms had helped Bangladesh become the world's second largest clothing exporter. Rana Plaza was not the first tragedy to occur in Bangladesh's garment industry, and without intervention, more might follow. International brand owners, domestic and foreign governments, labor unions and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), stepped up to discuss their responsibilities for improving conditions for Bangladeshi garment workers.

    Keywords: Apparel and Accessories Industry; Bangladesh;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety In Bangladesh (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-062, January 2014. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  23. GlaxoSmithKline in China (B)

    In 2013, Chinese investigators detained four GSK employees for allegedly bribing health care staff to sell GSK pharmaceuticals. A month later, GSK's Asia Pacific regional president, Abbas Hussain, said the company would help identify corrupt practices. Two days later, GSK's CEO, Andrew Witty, called the allegations "shameful" and said the company would use the opportunity to "make changes."

    Keywords: marketing; public health; Pharmaceuticals; China; bribery; CSR; hong bao; health care; drug; GlaxoSmithKline; GSK; Witty; ethics; government; Marketing; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Corporate Strategy; Corporate Governance; Business and Government Relations; Ethics; Pharmaceutical Industry; China; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "GlaxoSmithKline in China (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-050, November 2013. View Details
  24. GlaxoSmithKline in China (A)

    Four GlaxoSmithKline employees were accused of bribing Chinese health care workers to prescribe the company's drugs. The accusations brought to light the questionable incentive structures of the Chinese health care system and the pressure on companies to adhere to local customs while still observing local laws.

    Keywords: marketing; public health; Pharmaceuticals; China; bribery; CSR; hong bao; health care; drug; GlaxoSmithKline; GSK; Witty; ethics; government; Marketing; Health; Health Care and Treatment; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Corporate Strategy; Corporate Governance; Business and Government Relations; Ethics; Pharmaceutical Industry; China; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "GlaxoSmithKline in China (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-049, November 2013. View Details
  25. E-Cigarettes: Marketing Versus Public Health

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) were heralded by some as a healthcare game changer, enabling smokers to switch to a new product which carried lower risk of cancer. However, there were concerns about the public health risk of e-cigarettes, particularly the chance that teens would easily develop nicotine addictions from smoking the fruit-flavored products. Manufacturers argued that current smokers, not teens were the target market, but laws regulating e-cigarettes were far less stringent than those governing tobacco products.

    Keywords: marketing; public health; tobacco; smoking; cigarettes; electronic cigarettes; cancer; lung; lorillard; Philip Morris; Safety; Technological Innovation; Conflict of Interests; Market Entry and Exit; Marketing; Health; Advertising; Consumer Products Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "E-Cigarettes: Marketing Versus Public Health." Harvard Business School Case 514-059, November 2013. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  26. Demarketing Soda in New York City

    In 2013, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg tried and failed to institute a ban on serving sizes of large sugary beverages. Obesity posed a large public health risk to the city. Mayor Bloomberg's proposed ban was one of many attempts to combat the rising threat of obesity. The case discusses the efficacy of the proposed ban on large soda serving sizes in the context of the other anti-obesity initiatives crafted by Bloomberg's administration.

    Keywords: marketing; soda; public health; business and public policy; obesity; Business and Government Relations; Public Sector; Strategy; Marketing Strategy; Marketing; Health; City; Food and Beverage Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Margaret L. Rodriguez, Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Christine Snively. "Demarketing Soda in New York City." Harvard Business School Case 514-003, October 2013. (Revised April 2014.) View Details
  27. The Slingshot: Improving Water Access

    In 2012, over 750 million people around the globe lacked access to safe drinking water. Dean Kamen, inventor of the Segway, sought to bring fresh water to poor and rural areas with the Slingshot, a water purification device. Kamen's challenge was to identify ways to distribute the Slingshot to areas where it was most needed. A partnership with the Coca-Cola Company helped Kamen to pilot distribution of the Slingshot in low-access regions.

    Keywords: Water; public health; health care; Slingshot; Dean Kamen; DEKA; Coca-Cola; developing markets; Freestyle; Safety; Natural Environment; Pollution and Pollutants; Health; Distribution Channels; Developing Countries and Economies; Innovation and Invention; Africa; Latin America; South America; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Margaret L. Rodriguez, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "The Slingshot: Improving Water Access." Harvard Business School Case 514-007, October 2013. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  28. Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety in Bangladesh (B)

    In the aftermath of the Rana Plaza building collapse, a group of international retailers and labor unions partnered to create a proposal for more stringent inspections and enforcement of safety standards in Bangladesh garment factories. The proposal was met by opposition from several U.S. firms, which claimed the proposal carried too a high a risk of litigation for them to sign. Neither proposal relied on legislation, but options for government involvement are also discussed in the case.

    Keywords: retail trade; corporate social responsibility; Apparel; Bangladesh; worker safety; government and business; international business; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Bangladesh;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety in Bangladesh (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 514-035, September 2013. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  29. Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety In Bangladesh (A)

    On April 24, 2013 the Rana Plaza factory building collapsed in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. Over 1,100 people were killed in the worst industrial accident since the Union Carbide plant gas leak in Bhopal, India. Most of the victims worked for garment factories, whose primary clients were European, US and Canadian firms. Export contracts to such firms had helped Bangladesh become the world's second largest clothing exporter. Rana Plaza was not the first tragedy to occur in Bangladesh's garment industry, and without intervention, more might follow. International brand owners, domestic and foreign governments, labor unions and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), stepped up to discuss their responsibilities for improving conditions for Bangladeshi garment workers.

    Keywords: marketing; public health; safety; workplace; human rights; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Bangladesh;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Margaret L. Rodriguez. "Rana Plaza: Workplace Safety In Bangladesh (A)." Harvard Business School Case 514-034, September 2013. (Revised February 2014.) View Details
  30. Montreaux Chocolate USA: Are Americans Ready for Healthy Dark Chocolate?

    Andrea Torres, director of new product development at a high-end chocolate confectionery company, leads her team through a carefully sequenced program of market research to support the development and launch of a new product, healthy dark chocolate with fruit. This is the first time Montreaux USA, an offshoot of a Swiss confectioner, has created a product specifically for U.S. chocolate consumers. The case explains the steps Torres and her NPD team have completed and describes the decisions that lie ahead, a few months in advance of the anticipated launch. A challenging situation is intensified by a competitor also having tested a dark-chocolate-with-fruit product that was likely to be introduced into the U.S. marketplace in the near future. Students must perform a quantitative analysis as part of their work.

    Keywords: Competition; Food; Consumer Behavior; Nutrition; Product Launch; Product Development; Food and Beverage Industry; Switzerland; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Diane Badame. "Montreaux Chocolate USA: Are Americans Ready for Healthy Dark Chocolate?" Harvard Business School Brief Case 914-501, July 2013. View Details
  31. Brannigan Foods: Strategic Marketing Planning

    The soup division at Brannigan Foods contributes over 40% of the firm's revenue. The general manager is concerned that the soup industry is declining and that the soup division shows declining profits and market share, especially among the important baby boomer segment. Hoping to reverse these trends, he asks four key managers to review a consultant's analysis of the soup industry and recommend a turnaround strategy. Each manager presents a different plan, from investing in core market segments and products to acquiring new product lines and customers. Students must perform a quantitative analysis of each proposal while considering the feasibility and risks associated with each option before making a final recommendation.

    Keywords: United States; Consumer marketing; Acquisitions; Forecasting; Quantitative analysis; strategic planning; risk management; decision making; product development; Budgeting; Supermarkets; food; Strategic Planning; Demand and Consumers; Marketing Strategy; Food; Resource Allocation; Acquisition; Product Development; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and James T. Kindley. "Brannigan Foods: Strategic Marketing Planning." Harvard Business School Brief Case 913-545, January 2013. View Details
  32. Cottle-Taylor: Expanding the Oral Care Group in India, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Forecasting; Budgeting; emerging markets; international marketing; Product planning & policy; consumer behavior; Sales promotions; Marketing plans; Products;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Alisa Zalosh. "Cottle-Taylor: Expanding the Oral Care Group in India, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 114-352, October 2011. (Revised March 2012.) View Details
  33. Cottle-Taylor: Expanding the Oral Care Group in India, Student Spreadsheet (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Forecasting; Budgeting; emerging markets; international marketing; Product planning & policy; consumer behavior; Sales promotions; Marketing plans; Products;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Alisa Zalosh. "Cottle-Taylor: Expanding the Oral Care Group in India, Student Spreadsheet (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 114-356, October 2011. (Revised March 2012.) View Details
  34. Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors

    Reed Supermarkets is a high-end supermarket chain with operations in several Midwestern states. Meredith Collins, vice president of marketing, visits stores located in Columbus, Ohio, an important region with the largest market and the greatest impact on revenue growth. She is concerned about increased competition from dollar stores and limited-assortment stores offering very low, appealing price points. Reed's market research shows that as a result of the economic downturn, customer loyalty is dwindling and consumers are willing to go to multiple stores to get the best deals. Collins must decide whether to change the current marketing and positioning plan in an effort to increase market share to meet challenging corporate targets. Her options include retreating from price competition and focusing on quality or embracing more private-label brands and competing more aggressively on price. She can also maintain the current positioning and appeal to customers looking for a quality shopping experience. The case contains an implicit quantitative assignment that instructors can emphasize to the degree they choose.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Marketing Strategy; Business Growth and Maturation; Competitive Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Brands and Branding; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carole Carlson. "Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors." Harvard Business School Brief Case 114-296, June 2011. View Details
  35. Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors (Brief Case)

    Teaching note for brief case 4296.

    Keywords: competitive strategy; Consumer marketing; marketing strategy; market positioning; Market segmentation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carole Carlson. "Reed Supermarkets: A New Wave of Competitors (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 114-297, June 2011. View Details
  36. The American Express Card

    Senior executives at American Express are reviewing the company's marketing strategy for charge and credit cards in the United States. A variety of growth options exists for students to consider, including further penetration of existing markets and the opening of new markets. Historical background information in the case enables instructors to analyze the phases of American Express's card strategy over the past 50 years.

    Keywords: Credit; Credit Cards; Growth and Development Strategy; Marketing Strategy; Financial Services Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Jacquie Labatt. "The American Express Card." Harvard Business School Case 509-027, September 2008. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  37. Google in China (B)

    In a January 2010 public statement, Google threatened to stop censoring its search results on its Google.cn website, as required by Chinese authorities. Should Google exit China? Or attempt a compromise with the Chinese government?

    Keywords: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Crisis Management; Market Entry and Exit; Business and Government Relations; Internet; Search Technology; Information Technology Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Google in China (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 510-110, April 2010. (Revised March 2011.) View Details
  38. Interview with John Smith, CEO, BBC Worldwide

    In an interview conducted by Professor John Quelch, Harvard Business School, October, 2007, BBC Worldwide CEO, John Smith, discusses formation of BBC Worldwide's Global Strategy Plans.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Global Strategy; Media and Broadcasting Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Interview with John Smith, CEO, BBC Worldwide." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 511-704, January 2011. View Details
  39. John Smith, CEO BBC Worldwide, Remarks to AMP, October 2007

    BBC Worldwide CEO, John Smith addresses AMP participants in October 2007.

    Keywords: Global Strategy; Globalized Markets and Industries; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Media and Broadcasting Industry; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "John Smith, CEO BBC Worldwide, Remarks to AMP, October 2007." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 511-705, January 2011. View Details
  40. Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning

    After three years of development, Paramount Health and Beauty Company is preparing to launch a new technologically advanced vibrating razor called Clean Edge. The innovative new design of Clean Edge provides superior performance by stimulating the hair follicles to lift the hair from the skin, allowing for a closer shave. The company has already decided to introduce Clean Edge into the men's market where it has a strong presence. Jackson Randall, the product manager for Clean Edge, struggles with how best to position the product for the launch. One strategy is to release Clean Edge as a "niche" product, targeting the high-end market of fastidious groomers looking for superior skin care products. Another strategy is to release the product into the highly competitive mainstream razor market where the product can be positioned as the most effective razor available. Randall meets internal resistance to the mainstream strategy from the product manager for the company's current, but aging, mainstream razor products and he must consider the effects of cannibalization in his plan. Randall must recommend an optimal strategy and provide supporting economic analysis of his decision--not just for Clean Edge, but for its effect on the entire company.

    Keywords: leadership; project management; conflict management; Interdepartmental relations; product development; Organizational change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Leadership; Conflict Management; Product Positioning; Marketing Strategy; Relationships; Product Development; Consumer Products Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning." Harvard Business School Brief Case 114-249, January 2011. View Details
  41. Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning (Brief Case)

    Teaching Note for 4249

    Keywords: leadership; project management; conflict management; Interdepartmental relations; product development; Organizational change;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Clean Edge Razor: Splitting Hairs in Product Positioning (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 114-250, January 2011. View Details
  42. Toyota Recalls (A): Hitting the Skids

    In the fall of 2009, Toyota Motor Corporation, once revered for its commitment to quality and reliability, faced a highly publicized series of recalls in the United States representing approximately a year's worth of sales in one of its most important markets. While the first Toyota recall was met with widespread disbelief but continuing support for the brand, subsequent revelations and recalls tested the brand's resilience in the U.S. The firm's initial public response to the problems - a mixture of silence from top executives and vague, misleading public statements - frustrated U.S. government officials and the public. Not until weeks after the news first broke did Toyota organize a clear message around its commitment to return to quality. In late February 2010 Toyota President Akio Toyoda reluctantly accepts an invitation to testify to the U.S. Congress, 148 days after the first recall announcement. He has to decide what to say.

    Keywords: Communication Strategy; Crisis Management; Brands and Branding; Quality; Public Opinion; Auto Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Ryan Johnson. "Toyota Recalls (A): Hitting the Skids." Harvard Business School Case 511-016, October 2010. (Revised January 2011.) View Details
  43. Hikma Pharmaceuticals (B)

    By 2009, Hikma Pharmaceuticals operated 13 manufacturing plants in 8 countries of which 5 were approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Hikma tracked its sales revenues over the period to show where the largest contributors were from.

    Keywords: Strategy; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Sales; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Hikma Pharmaceuticals (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 511-075, November 2010. View Details
  44. Hikma Pharmaceuticals (A)

    The president of a Jordanian pharmaceutical company is contemplating how to further penetrate the U.S. market, either through its own manufacturing and sales efforts, or as a supplier to a third party.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Globalized Markets and Industries; Emerging Markets; Expansion; Pharmaceutical Industry; Jordan; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Robin Root. "Hikma Pharmaceuticals (A)." Harvard Business School Case 598-019, November 1997. (Revised November 2010.) View Details
  45. Tesco PLC: Fresh & Easy in the United States

    Tesco, the world's third largest retailer, is facing problems with its launch of a new retail chain in the U.S.

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Marketing; Market Entry and Exit; Retail Industry; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Tesco PLC: Fresh & Easy in the United States." Harvard Business School Case 511-009, August 2010. (Revised November 2010.) View Details
  46. Toyota Recalls (B): Mr. Toyoda Goes to Washington

    Case describes the testimony to the U.S. Congress of the Toyota CEO and the head of its U.S. motor sales.

    Keywords: Safety; Business and Government Relations; Auto Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Ryan Johnson. "Toyota Recalls (B): Mr. Toyoda Goes to Washington." Harvard Business School Supplement 511-041, October 2010. View Details
  47. Toyota Recalls (C): Bumpy Road Ahead

    Between February and July 2010, Toyota sales recover thanks to the use of extensive PR and sales incentives. Yet recalls continue. Can Toyota stem the tide and correct its organizational flaws to address the underlying issues?

    Keywords: Safety; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Sales; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Ryan Johnson. "Toyota Recalls (C): Bumpy Road Ahead." Harvard Business School Supplement 511-042, October 2010. View Details
  48. Metabical: Positioning and Communications Strategy for a New Weight Loss Drug

    Cambridge Sciences Pharmaceuticals (CSP) expects final approval for its revolutionary weight loss drug, Metabical. Metabical will be the only weight loss drug with FDA approval that is also clinically proven to be effective for moderately overweight people. Barbara Printup, Senior Marketing Director for CSP, must develop the positioning strategy and marketing communications plan in preparation for the launch of the new drug. Printup must consider the consumer decision-making process and the interaction between the consumer who purchases the drug and the health care provider who prescribes the medication. Despite promising medical studies and consumer research, poor positioning of the drug in the highly competitive market for weight-loss solutions could spell disaster. Students analyze market research data and consider the optimal positioning strategy and marketing communications program.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Marketing Communications; Product Launch; Consumer Behavior; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Positioning and Communications Strategy for a New Weight Loss Drug." Harvard Business School Brief Case 104-240, July 2010. View Details
  49. CEIBS: A Global Business School Made in China

    In 2009, just 15 years after it was founded, the China Europe International Business School (CEIBS) has achieved the remarkable 8th position in the Financial Times Global MBA rankings. The case describes the short history of the school and the reasons for its success. It also describes the difficult challenges the school faces to maintain its position of leadership in Asia: stiff competition from schools in Greater China, South East Asia and South Asia; recruitment of high-quality faculty members; generating new knowledge that contributes to management practice not just in China but globally; and maintaining a robust economic model to ensure long term financial sustainability.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Quality; Business History; Competitive Advantage; Business Education; Global Strategy; Growth and Development Strategy; Education Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., S. Ramakrishna Velamuri, and Shengjun Liu. "CEIBS: A Global Business School Made in China." Harvard Business School Case 510-088, May 2010. View Details
  50. Flare Fragrances Company, Inc: Analyzing Growth Opportunities

    Flare Fragrances, a manufacturer of perfumes for women, faces a growth challenge in a difficult economic environment. CEO Joely Patterson outlines two growth opportunities for her marketing staff to evaluate. One involves launching a new scent -- and possibly separating it from the trusty "umbrella brand" that comprises Flare's other scents; the other involves deepening Flare's penetration into the drugstore channel. In Patterson's view, the firm can pursue the first opportunity, the second, or both -- but it must do something. In helping Patterson to assess the opportunities, the marketing team must consider a wide range of factors, including brand management, consumer demographics, and positioning and pricing issues. The case requires students to complete a quantitative assignment as part of case analysis. Key topics include product line management, product positioning, and new product launch.

    Keywords: Quantitative analysis; Distribution; Product positioning; Market segmentation; Product introduction; New product marketing; Product lines; Product Positioning; Distribution; Product Launch; Segmentation; Growth and Development Strategy; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Lisa D. Donovan. "Flare Fragrances Company, Inc: Analyzing Growth Opportunities." Harvard Business School Brief Case 104-550, May 2010. View Details
  51. Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities (Brief Case)

    Teaching note to case #4550

    Keywords: Quantitative analysis; Distribution; Product positioning; Market segmentation; Product introduction; New product marketing; Product lines;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Lisa D. Donovan. "Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 104-551, May 2010. View Details
  52. Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities, Instructor Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Quantitative analysis; Distribution; Product positioning; Market segmentation; Product introduction; New product marketing; Product lines;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Lisa D. Donovan. "Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities, Instructor Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 104-553, May 2010. View Details
  53. Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Quantitative analysis; Distribution; Product positioning; Market segmentation; Product introduction; New product marketing; Product lines;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Lisa D. Donovan. "Flare Fragrances Company, Inc.: Analyzing Growth Opportunities, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 104-554, May 2010. View Details
  54. Google in China (A)

    In January 2010, Google threatened in a public statement to stop censoring its search results on its google.cn website, as required by Chinese authorities. Should Google exit China? Or attempt a compromise with the Chinese government?

    Keywords: Crisis Management; Market Entry and Exit; Business and Government Relations; Internet; Search Technology; Information Technology Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Katherine Jocz. "Google in China (A)." Harvard Business School Case 510-071, January 2010. (Revised April 2010.) View Details
  55. Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug

    Metabical is a new weight loss drug from Cambridge Sciences Pharmaceuticals intended for moderately overweight individuals. In anticipation of final FDA approval, the senior director of marketing, Barbara Printup, prepares for the product launch and must make several critical decisions. First, she must select the optimal packaging size for the drug which typically requires a 12-week course of treatment. Next, she must determine the appropriate pricing. Since most insurance companies do not cover weight-loss medications, price has a direct impact on the sales forecast. To establish the initial demand forecast, Printup considers three approaches based on different assumptions. Her final recommendations must consider long term profitability and meet the company's desired return on investment.The case includes a quantitative assignment for students.

    Keywords: Return on investment; Forecasting; Pricing policies; demand planning; Marketing Strategy; Price; Consumer Behavior; Investment Return; Forecasting and Prediction; Product Launch; Planning; Brands and Branding; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug." Harvard Business School Brief Case 104-183, April 2010. View Details
  56. Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug (Brief Case)

    Teaching Note to 4183

    Keywords: Return on investment; Forecasting; Pricing policies; demand planning;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 104-184, April 2010. View Details
  57. Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Return on investment; Forecasting; Pricing policies; demand planning;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 104-186, April 2010. View Details
  58. Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Return on investment; Forecasting; Pricing policies; demand planning;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Metabical: Pricing, Packaging, and Demand Forecasting Recommendations for a New Weight Loss Drug, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 104-187, April 2010. View Details
  59. The Passion of the Christ (A)

    Bob Berney, president of Newmarket Films, must decide on a distribution and marketing strategy for Mel Gibson's controversial new movie, The Passion of the Christ. Fueled by Gibson's star power as well as an extensive prescreening campaign among Christian leaders and others representing likely target audiences in the summer of 2003, the religious movie had started to generate publicity in mainstream media. Five months prior to the film's scheduled opening on February 25, 2004, Berney has to choose whether to continue with the prescreening campaign to stimulate further word-of-mouth among core audiences or switch to a mainstream media advertising campaign more commonly used to promote new movies. He also has to determine the appropriate distribution strategy, in particular whether to opt for a wide or limited release and whether to change the timing of the release.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Film Entertainment; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Product Positioning; Distribution Channels; Religion; Motion Pictures and Video Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Anita Elberse, and Anna Harrington. "The Passion of the Christ (A)." Harvard Business School Case 505-025, September 2004. (Revised February 2010.) View Details
  60. Culinarian Cookware: Pondering Price Promotion

    In November of 2006, senior executives at Culinarian Cookware were debating the merits of price promotions for the company's premium cookware products. The VP of Marketing, Donald Janus, and Senior Sales Manager, Victoria Brown, had different views. Janus felt price promotions were unnecessary, potentially damaging to the brand image, and possibly encouraged retailer hoarding; Brown believed the promotions strengthened trade support, improved brand awareness, and stimulated sales from both new and existing customers. The issue was complicated by a consultant's study of the firm's 2004 price promotions which concluded that these promotions had a negative impact on profits. Janus trusted the results, but Brown, believing the study assumptions were flawed and required further analysis, suspected the promotions had actually produced positive results. The pressing decision is whether to run a price promotion in 2007 and, if so, to determine what merchandise to promote and on what terms. The broader issue is what strategy Culinarian should pursue to achieve sales growth goals, and what role, if any, price promotion should play.

    Keywords: Profitability analysis; Consumer marketing; Brand equity; Pricing policies; Sales promotions; Small & medium-sized enterprises; Decisions; Goals and Objectives; Price; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Management Teams; Sales; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Culinarian Cookware: Pondering Price Promotion." Harvard Business School Brief Case 094-057, September 2009. View Details
  61. Manchester Products: A Brand Transition Challenge

    In January of 2005, Manchester Products Inc., a longtime leader in office furniture that only recently entered into the home furniture market, acquired Paul Logan's Furniture Division (PLFD). The acquisition of PLFD made Manchester an instant market leader in household furniture. A key factor in the value of PLFD has been the name of the company founder -- arguably the premiere name in high-end fashion and accessories, and a true lifestyle brand. However, Manchester has acquired rights to use the Paul Logan brand name for only three years. Jason Adams, VP of Marketing for Manchester, is responsible for designing a plan to transition the brand from the Paul Logan name to Manchester. He must develop the optimal timing and sequencing of the brand transition, assess the implications, and establish the appropriate mix of advertising and promotion programs to support the transition.

    Keywords: Acquisitions; Marketing communications; Consumer marketing; marketing strategy; Brand equity; branding; Brands and Branding; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Mergers and Acquisitions; Retail Industry; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Heather Beckham. "Manchester Products: A Brand Transition Challenge." Harvard Business School Brief Case 094-043, June 2009. View Details
  62. Mary Kay Cosmetics: Asian Market Entry (A)

    In February 1993, Curran Dandurand, senior vice president of Mary Kay Cosmetics Inc.'s global marketing group, was reflecting on the company's international operations. Mary Kay Cosmetics Inc. products had been sold outside the United States for over 15 years, but by 1992, international sales represented only 11% of the $1 billion total. In contrast, one of Mary Kay Cosmetics' U.S. competitors, Avon Products Inc., derived over 55% of its $3.6 billion sales (at wholesale prices) from international markets in 1992.

    Keywords: Globalized Firms and Management; Market Entry and Exit; Operations; Sales; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; Asia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Mary Kay Cosmetics: Asian Market Entry (A)." Harvard Business School Case 594-023, September 1993. (Revised June 2009.) View Details
  63. Mary Kay Inc.: Asian Market Entry (B)

    By 2008, over half of Mary Kay Cosmetics' $2.8 billion sales were from outside the U.S. Sales from China exceeded $500 million in 2008 through over 450,000 beauty consultants. China was Mary Kay Cosmetics' second most important national market with revenues growing at over 20 percent each year. In contrast, Mary Kay Cosmetics had decided to exit the Japanese market in 2001.

    Keywords: Global Strategy; Growth and Development Strategy; Brands and Branding; Emerging Markets; Market Entry and Exit; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; Asia; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Mary Kay Inc.: Asian Market Entry (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 509-067, June 2009. View Details
  64. F. William McNabb, Chairman, Vanguard Group, Interviewed by Professor John Quelch, April 2008

    Professor John Quelch interviewed F. William McNabb, Chairman, Vanguard Group in April 2008 to review updates since the original case was published in 2004.

    Keywords: Growth and Development Strategy; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Financial Services Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "F. William McNabb, Chairman, Vanguard Group, Interviewed by Professor John Quelch, April 2008." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 509-730, June 2009. View Details
  65. Real Madrid Club de Futbol (Multimedia)

    In June 2004, Florentino Perez, a well-known Spanish businessman, was elected president of Real Madrid, one of the world's top soccer clubs. In his campaign, Perez had promised to turn around the club's finances, bring in world-class talent, and extend the club's brand around the world through multiple channels. As re-election looms four years later, his management team reflects on initiatives to date and challenges ahead. The case describes the soccer industry and the trends transforming it. The video includes five video vignettes that illuminate key elements of the case. The five vignettes--The Brand, The President, The Fans, The Players, and The Marketing--include segments of interviews with Real Madrid executives, player David Beckham, and fans of the club. The videos help to explain the power of the Real Madrid brand and the marketing strategies designed to capture maximum brand value.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Sports; Expansion; Sports Industry; Spain;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Real Madrid Club de Futbol (Multimedia)." Harvard Business School Video Case 505-081, July 2005. (Revised April 2009.) View Details
  66. Launching the New MINI

    Focuses on how strategy is transformed into creative branding materials. Reports on the development of a wide variety of brand communication materials produced to support the MINI launch in the United States. MINI USA executives worked with their ad agency Crispin Porter & Bogusky to develop these materials to address a variety of challenging strategic issues. Asks students to reverse-engineer the brand strategy from these documents.

    Keywords: Advertising; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Creativity; Auto Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Holt, Douglas B., and John A. Quelch. "Launching the New MINI." Harvard Business School Video Case 505-020, November 2004. (Revised April 2009.) View Details
  67. Real Madrid Club de Fútbol in 2007: Beyond the Galácticos

    On June 17, 2007, Real Madrid sealed its first Spanish league championship under new president Ramon Calderon, ending an unprecedented title drought. Real Madrid had seen a significant growth in revenues and now was the world's biggest soccer club and among the largest and most profitable sports franchises globally. Although Calderon signed several new stars in his first year, he also rejuvenated the team by acquiring the promising youngsters, thereby moving away from what had been dubbed the "Galacticos Strategy" introduced by former president Florentino Perez. Would the move away form this strategy bring continued successes on the field? And how would it impact real Madrid's business performance?

    Keywords: Talent and Talent Management; Risk Management; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Sports; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Elberse, Anita, and John A. Quelch. "Real Madrid Club de Fútbol in 2007: Beyond the Galácticos." Harvard Business School Case 508-060, December 2007. (Revised October 2008.) View Details
  68. Marketing as Competitive Advantage: Fundamentals

    Marketing as Competitive Advantage: Fundamentals will help today's business executives and tomorrow's business leaders understand the key elements of a successful marketing strategy. The multimedia resource includes video lectures by Harvard Business School faculty, who teach core principles of marketing, as well as animated frameworks, articles, and notes. Instructional workbook exercises will help you evaluate your own marketing efforts and create a marketing plan for your organization.

    Keywords: Customers; Framework; Marketing Strategy; Product Positioning; Planning; Competitive Advantage; Segmentation;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, David E. Bell, Anita Elberse, John T. Gourville, David B. Godes, John A. Quelch, Gail J. McGovern, Luc R. Wathieu, and Marta Wosinska. "Marketing as Competitive Advantage: Fundamentals." Harvard Business School Class Lecture 509-719, October 2008. View Details
  69. Marketing the "$100 Laptop" (A)

    In 2002, Professor Nicholas Negroponte, a successful venture capitalist, author, and co-founder and chairman emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Media Lab, announced his intention to build a PC so cheap as to make it possible to provide Internet- and multimedia-capable machines to millions of children in developing countries. The concept--subsequently often referred to as the "$100 PC"--was launched at the Media Lab in 2003 before being spun into a separate nonprofit association, One Laptop Per Child (OLPC), founded by Negroponte in January 2005. At the time skeptics, including technology industry leaders, argued that it simply could not be done. Through innovative design and technology, Negroponte and his team proved them wrong but struggled to sell the concept and the machines to the world's education ministries, who would be purchasing the laptops for their school age children. Furthermore, by 2007, many other low-cost PC options had emerged and OLPC had not started shipping yet, leading some observers to wonder if the non-profit should reconsider its strategy and options

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Internet; Information Technology; Product Development; Technological Innovation; Nonprofit Organizations; Marketing Strategy; Hardware; Developing Countries and Economies; Manufacturing Industry; Information Technology Industry; Computer Industry; Cambridge;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. Marketing the "$100 Laptop" (A). Harvard Business School Case 508-024, August 2007. (Revised September 2008.) View Details
  70. Marketing the "$100 Laptop" (C)

    In October 2007, the OLPC reported production delays and missed its shipment date. In early November, the $100 PC finally went into production, with initial shipments planned for Uruguay and Mongolia, and mid-month launched the "Give One, Get One" program. It enabled consumers in the U.S. and Canada, who had the option of purchasing an OLPC for $400, more than double the estimated production cost of $188 for each laptop. Roughly half of the $400 amount went towards purchasing an OLPC for the consumer, while the other half went towards financing a laptop for a child in a different country. The program was popular and extended. But just as things were looking up for the non-profit, Intel resigned from OLPC's board in early January 2008 and announced that it would no longer be partnering with the nonprofit corporation. According to Intel, the move was a result of pressure it received from OLPC to stop marketing its own low-cost Windows-based laptop, the Classmate.

    Keywords: Nonprofit Organizations; For-Profit Firms; Partners and Partnerships; Hardware; Problems and Challenges; Giving and Philanthropy; Computer Industry; Canada; Mongolia; Uruguay; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and David Chen. Marketing the "$100 Laptop" (C). Harvard Business School Supplement 508-065, January 2008. (Revised September 2008.) View Details
  71. Mr. Nelson Peltz, Founding Partner, Trian Partners. Interviewed by Professor John Quelch

    Professor John Quelch interviewed Mr. Nelson Peitz, Founding Partner of Trian Partners on events and decisions leading up to the decision to acquire the Snapple brand and the results of that corporate decision.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Decision Choices and Conditions; Private Equity; Investment; Brands and Branding; Financial Services Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Mr. Nelson Peltz, Founding Partner, Trian Partners. Interviewed by Professor John Quelch." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 509-709, September 2008. View Details
  72. Charles Schwab & Co. "Talk to Chuck" Advertising Campaign Ad Clips

    A series of advertising clips that were prepared for television advertising to accompany the "Talk to Chuck" advertising campaign of Charles Schwab and Co.

    Keywords: Decisions; Business or Company Management; Advertising Campaigns; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. Charles Schwab & Co. "Talk to Chuck" Advertising Campaign Ad Clips. Harvard Business School Video Supplement 509-701, August 2008. View Details
  73. Becky Saeger, CMO, Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., Interviewed by Professor John Quelch

    Professor John Quelch interviewed Becky Saeger, Chief Marketing Officer of Charles Schwab and Co., Inc., with regard to the background and success of the "Talk to Chuck" advertising campaign.

    Keywords: Success; Advertising Campaigns; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Becky Saeger, CMO, Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., Interviewed by Professor John Quelch." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 509-703, August 2008. View Details
  74. Lenovo Chief Marketing Officer and Senior VP E-Commerce, Deepak Advani, Interviewed by Professor John Quelch

    Professor John Quelch interviewed Lenovo CMO, Deepak Advani, regarding Lenovo's buy-out of IBM's personal computer business, and Lenovo's marketing strategy leading up to the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China.

    Keywords: Advertising; Leveraged Buyouts; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Hardware; Computer Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Lenovo Chief Marketing Officer and Senior VP E-Commerce, Deepak Advani, Interviewed by Professor John Quelch." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 509-711, August 2008. View Details
  75. Lenovo: Building A Global Brand (Multimedia case)

    Announced in December 2004, the $1.75 billion acquisition of IBM's PC division by Lenovo, China's largest PC maker, made headlines around the world. A relative upstart in the business, Lenovo acquired the division of IBM that invented the PC in 1981. While Lenovo was arguably the best-known brand in China, it was virtually unknown in the rest of the world. In 2004, over 90% of Lenovo's revenues came from China, but with this major deal, Lenovo aimed to become a global technology giant. As a new multinational with 20,000 employees operating in 138 countries, Lenovo needed a global marketing and branding strategy to extent its global reach. This meant determining what Lenovo stood for and designing products that supported that claim. In January 2006, 13 months after the deal was announced and eight months after it closed, Lenovo is preparing for the intense limelight that would come with its sponsorship of the February 2006 Turin Winter Olympics. There, it plans to introduce a Lenovo-branded product line designed from the bottom up for the small to medium enterprise space--a move considered very bold and risky by many observers.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Hardware; Global Strategy; Acquisition; Brands and Branding; Manufacturing Industry; Computer Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Lenovo: Building A Global Brand (Multimedia case)." Harvard Business School Video Case 508-703, January 2008. View Details
  76. Samsung Electronics Company: Global Marketing Operations

    Samsung's global marketing director is assessing how to build the global brand reputation of the company further and upgrade the company's worldwide brand image. To show how to build a global brand.

    Keywords: Global Range; Globalized Firms and Management; Brands and Branding; Reputation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Anna Harrington. "Samsung Electronics Company: Global Marketing Operations." Harvard Business School Case 504-051, March 2004. (Revised January 2008.) View Details
  77. Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.: The "Talk to Chuck" Advertising Campaign

    Schwab management is evaluating the success of the recently launched "Talk to Chuck" advertising campaign. This campaign aims to differentiate Schwab in the cluttered financial services marketplace. Test market results facilitate discussion of advertising objectives, message strategy, media selection, and performance measures.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Communication Strategy; Brands and Branding; Media; Performance Evaluation; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Laura Winig. Charles Schwab & Co., Inc.: The "Talk to Chuck" Advertising Campaign. Harvard Business School Case 507-005, January 2007. (Revised January 2008.) View Details
  78. BBC Worldwide: Global Strategy

    In January 2007, John Smith, chief executive officer of BBC Worldwide (BBC WW), the commercial arm of the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), was preparing to meet with his senior managers to discuss BBC WW's global strategy options. BBC WW exploited and exported BBC-branded content around the globe through all formats, including magazines, television, books, DVDs, audio books, merchandise, mobile phones, downloads, and other emerging digital media (such as Internet Protocol TV). BBC WW delivered its profits back to the BBC. Since 2004, BBC WW profits had more than doubled.

    Keywords: Global Strategy; Brands and Branding; Marketing Channels; Expansion; Internet; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Great Britain;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "BBC Worldwide: Global Strategy." Harvard Business School Case 507-034, June 2007. (Revised January 2008.) View Details
  79. Colgate Max Fresh: Global Brand Roll-Out

    In February 2005, Nigel Burton, in his third year as president of global oral care at Colgate-Palmolive Company (CP), had every reason to feel optimistic. Worldwide market shares were strong and Colgate Max Fresh (CMF), a new toothpaste that had helped drive Colgate to a record value share in the important U.S. market, was in the global pipeline for 2005. Burton had on his desk the proposed marketing launch plans for CMF in China and Mexico. Each plan sought to maximize the business potential in the local market. Burton had to assess the plans from a global perspective.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Global Strategy; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; Health Industry; China; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Jacquie Labatt-Randle. "Colgate Max Fresh: Global Brand Roll-Out." Harvard Business School Case 508-009, October 2007. View Details
  80. Computron, Inc. (2006)

    In July 1996, Mr. Thomas Zimmermann, European Manager of Computron, must select a price for a new computer for his largest customer. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Price; Product; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Computron, Inc. (2006)." Harvard Business School Case 597-063, January 1997. (Revised August 2007.) View Details
  81. Real Madrid Club de Futbol

    In June 2004, Florentino Perez, a well-known Spanish businessman, was elected president of Real Madrid, one of the world's top soccer clubs. In his campaign, Perez had promised to turn around the club's finances, bring in world-class talent, and expand the club's brand around the world through multiple channels. As re-election looms four years later, his management team reflects on initiatives to date and challenges ahead as described in the case. Also describes the soccer industry and the trends transforming it.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Change Management; Expansion; Marketing Channels; Sports; Management Teams; Trends; Brands and Branding; Sports Industry; Spain;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Jose Luis Nueno, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Real Madrid Club de Futbol." Harvard Business School Case 504-063, April 2004. (Revised June 2007.) View Details
  82. Measuring Marketing Performance

    In many organizations, marketing exists far from the executive suite and the boardroom. This tutorial instructs students how to improve the link between high level corporate strategy and the marketing function. First, students are exposed to three companies in which marketing programs are tightly aligned with corporate strategy. Second, students learn how to create a marketing dashboard that can reveal the true performance of their companies' marketing activities. The resulting dashboard can be used to inform boards of directors and senior leaders as to how well their marketing efforts are supporting customers' needs. Lastly, the tutorial takes students into the Harvard Business School Executive Education classroom, where they can experience first-hand how other executives learned to master the marketing dashboard creation process. Authorized faculty can request an exam copy of a multimedia case by calling 800-545-7685 (outside the United States and Canada, 617-783-7600).

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Gail J. McGovern. Measuring Marketing Performance. Harvard Business School Tutorial 507-701, February 2007. View Details
  83. Lenovo: Building A Global Brand

    Announced in December 2004, the $1.75 billion acquisition of IBM's PC division by Lenovo, China's largest PC maker, made headlines around the world. A relative upstart in the business, Lenovo acquired the division of IBM that invented the PC in 1981. While Lenovo was arguably the best-known brand in China, it was virtually unknown in the rest of the world. In 2004, over 90% of Lenovo's revenues came from China, but with this major deal, Lenovo aimed to become a global technology giant. As a new multinational with 20,000 employees operating in 138 countries, Lenovo needed a global marketing and branding strategy to extend its global reach. This meant determining what Lenovo stood for and designing products that supported that claim. In January 2006, 13 months after the deal was announced and eight months after it closed, Lenovo is preparing for the intense limelight that would come with its sponsorship of the February 2006 Turin Winter Olympics. There, it plans to introduce a Lenovo-branded product line designed from the bottom up for the small to medium enterprise space--a move considered very bold and risky by many observers.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Hardware; Global Strategy; Acquisition; Brands and Branding; Manufacturing Industry; Computer Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Lenovo: Building A Global Brand." Harvard Business School Case 507-014, July 2006. (Revised October 2006.) View Details
  84. Starbucks: Delivering Customer Service

    Starbucks, the dominant specialty-coffee brand in North America, must respond to recent market research indicating that the company is not meeting customer expectations in terms of service. To increase customer satisfaction, the company is debating a plan that would increase the amount of labor in the stores and theoretically increase speed-of-service. However, the impact of the plan (which would cost $40 million annually) on the company's bottom line is unclear.

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Customer Satisfaction; Profit; Recruitment; Marketing Strategy; Service Operations; Performance Improvement; Planning; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Moon, Youngme E., and John A. Quelch. "Starbucks: Delivering Customer Service." Harvard Business School Case 504-016, July 2003. (Revised July 2006.) View Details
  85. Colgate-Palmolive Co.: The Precision Toothbrush

    Colgate-Palmolive Co. is considering how to position its new technological toothbrush, Precision. The case explores issues concerned with new product launches and requires students to do profitability analyses of different positioning alternatives.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Product Positioning; Product Launch; Consumer Products Industry; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Colgate-Palmolive Co.: The Precision Toothbrush." Harvard Business School Case 593-064, April 1993. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  86. ACCION International

    ACCION International is a major nonprofit player in microfinance. Reviews the organization's history and evolution, details current activities and relationships within its network, and assesses the organization's challenges moving forward.

    Keywords: Networks; Nonprofit Organizations; Microfinance;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "ACCION International." Harvard Business School Case 503-106, June 2003. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  87. Peace Winds Japan

    Kensuke Onishi, the young entrepreneurial founder of an international Japanese nongovernment organization specializing in humanitarian relief in emerging economies, is considering its future strategic direction. This case includes extensive commentary on Peace Winds' activities in Afghanistan and northern Iraq.

    Keywords: Emerging Markets; Entrepreneurship; Non-Governmental Organizations; Japan; Afghanistan; Iraq;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Peace Winds Japan." Harvard Business School Case 503-055, June 2003. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  88. Marketing at The Vanguard Group

    Senior executives at Vanguard are evaluating their marketing strategy. In particular, they are looking at their approach to market segmentation, the organization of the marketing function, and the weight placed on marketing metrics in the corporate dashboard in light of an economic and stock market downturn.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Segmentation;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Marketing at The Vanguard Group." Harvard Business School Case 504-001, August 2003. (Revised July 2004.) View Details
  89. WWF

    WWF is the best known environmental organization in the world. This case explores the issues WWF currently faces and reviews the organization's partnerships with the private sector. The protagonist, Paul Steele, WWF's COO, must decide which of three potential private corporation partnerships best serves WWF's interests.

    Keywords: Natural Environment; Nonprofit Organizations; Partners and Partnerships; Private Sector;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "WWF." Harvard Business School Case 503-113, June 2003. (Revised July 2004.) View Details
  90. IBM On Demand Community

    The vice-president of IBM Corporate Community Relations is developing the launch program for IBM On Demand Community, a suite of 140 technology tools designed to enable IBM employees to assist nonprofit community organizations and schools worldwide.

    Keywords: Nonprofit Organizations; Social Marketing; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "IBM On Demand Community." Harvard Business School Case 504-103, May 2004. (Revised July 2004.) View Details
  91. Bausch & Lomb: Regional Organization

    The CEO of Bausch & Lomb is contemplating replacing an international division with three regional divisions to sustain the company's growth, especially in international markets, and to add value to customers.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Marketing Strategy; Organizational Structure; Globalization; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "Bausch & Lomb: Regional Organization." Harvard Business School Case 594-056, October 1993. (Revised December 2003.) View Details
  92. Habitat for Humanity International: Brand Valuation

    Habitat for Humanity underwent a brand valuation study and found that its brand was worth $1.8 billion, equivalent to Starbucks. Senior management reviews the issues facing the organization; students are afforded insights into what drives brand value for a major nonprofit and what is critical for building and protecting brand value.

    Keywords: Nonprofit Organizations; Valuation; Brands and Branding;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "Habitat for Humanity International: Brand Valuation." Harvard Business School Case 503-101, June 2003. (Revised October 2003.) View Details
  93. BRAC

    BRAC is the world's largest NGO and has over the past 20 years experienced tremendous rates of growth. The case looks at diversity within the organization and the aspects of management that have made the organization so successful.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Diversity Characteristics; Non-Governmental Organizations;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "BRAC." Harvard Business School Case 504-012, August 2003. View Details
  94. BRAC and Aarong Commercial Brands, The

    BRAC is the world's largest NGO and has recently initiated a number of successful profit-making commercial enterprises, ranging from dairy processing to vegetable exports, as well as a university. Explores the tensions and benefits of a major nonprofit entering the commercial arena and the consequences for the organization.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Commercialization; For-Profit Firms; Non-Governmental Organizations;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "BRAC and Aarong Commercial Brands, The." Harvard Business School Case 504-013, August 2003. View Details
  95. CARE USA

    CARE USA is spearheading a rebranding process for the organization. Examines the process and components of the rebranding strategy and its impact on CARE USA's direct mail strategy. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Nonprofit Organizations; Marketing Communications; Brands and Branding; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "CARE USA." Harvard Business School Case 504-007, July 2003. View Details
  96. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    Didier Cherpitel, CEO of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), is implementing a new strategy that will fundamentally change the role of its International Secretariat. The organization is in the early stages of implementing a best practice tool called the National Society Self-Assessment and Cherpitel's challenge is to move forward with the implementation of this tool, while ensuring that the International Secretariat takes the necessary actions to strengthen IFRC's brand and image.

    Keywords: Globalized Firms and Management; Nonprofit Organizations; Brands and Branding;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies." Harvard Business School Case 503-059, May 2003. View Details
  97. UNICEF

    In September 2002, Marjorie Newman-Williams, director of communication for UNICEF, is poised to present the results of a two-year rebranding process at the annual meeting of the national committee heads. This case describes the organization and highlights the challenges UNICEF faces in 2002. Details of the rebranding process, including market research, the development of brand essence and brand models, and organizational challenges of consensus building, are at the core of the case.

    Keywords: Strategy; Nonprofit Organizations; Brands and Branding;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "UNICEF." Harvard Business School Case 503-032, February 2003. View Details
  98. Harlequin Romances-Poland (A)

    Harlequin Enterprises, the world's leading publisher of series romances, has been particularly successful in Poland. The case explores some of the challenges/opportunities of doing business in Eastern Europe and the marketing mix elements necessary for success.

    Keywords: Globalized Firms and Management; Brands and Branding; Publishing Industry; Poland;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "Harlequin Romances-Poland (A)." Harvard Business School Case 594-017, July 1993. (Revised June 2000.) View Details
  99. Jurassic Park

    Managers at MCA/Universal Merchandising are reviewing worldwide merchandising and licensing arrangements for the movie Jurassic Park.

    Keywords: Commercialization; Globalization; Film Entertainment; Brands and Branding; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Jurassic Park." Harvard Business School Case 596-014, November 1995. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  100. EMDICO (A)

    The general manager of Fuji Film's Saudi distributorship must decide on a relaunch strategy for Fuji film and cameras in Saudi Arabia.

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Emerging Markets; Product Launch; Brands and Branding; Manufacturing Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Saudi Arabia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Yoshinori Fujikawa. "EMDICO (A)." Harvard Business School Case 597-029, September 1996. (Revised March 1999.) View Details
  101. NIKE, Inc. in the 1990s (C)

    In 1998, Nike's earnings and sales growth slowed. Management faced new competition from Adidas. This case asks students to review the various strategies (including diversification into sports equipment) pursued by Nike to resuscitate corporate growth.

    Keywords: Diversification; Competition; Product Launch; Brands and Branding; Growth and Development Strategy; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "NIKE, Inc. in the 1990s (C)." Harvard Business School Case 598-119, March 1998. (Revised March 1999.) View Details
  102. Amway Japan Limited

    In April 1997, the president of Amway Japan (AJL, Tokyo, Japan), pondered how to reverse the first performance decline the company has experienced since entering the Japanese direct selling market in 1979. Established as the tenth overseas subsidiary of Amway Corp. of Ada, Michigan, AJL had grown to become the most successful company with 1996 sales of Y212 billion ($1.9 billion), accounting for 30% of Amway's worldwide sales. Having succeeded in doubling AJL's sales during the five years of his presidency, the AJL president now needed to develop a strategy not only for rebuilding growth in the second half of FY 1997 but also for achieving AJL's long-term goal of sales of Y300 billion by FY 2000. AJL faced the following issues in 1997: 1) fluctuating distributor motivation, 2) growing dissatisfaction with Amway products, 3) increasing difficulty in controlling the distributor network, and 4) a changing market environment. AJL could enhance its sales growth by boosting sponsoring, retention, and/or productivity of its distributor membership. Strategic options for AJL included: 1) penetration growth, 2) productivity growth, or 3) both. The AJL president needed to come up with a clear strategic design based on a thorough analysis of the pros and cons of each strategic choice.

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Motivation and Incentives; Business Subsidiaries; Distribution Channels; Customer Satisfaction; Consumer Products Industry; Michigan; Tokyo;

    Citation:

    Arnold, David J., John A. Quelch, Yoshinori Fujikawa, and Patrick Reinmoller. "Amway Japan Limited." Harvard Business School Case 598-029, February 1998. (Revised February 1999.) View Details
  103. Pepsi Blue

    Executives at Pepsico are considering a possible redesign of the Pepsi carbonated beverage packages worldwide to give the brand a modern, up-to-date image and "ownership" of the color blue against Coca-Cola's "ownership" of the color red.

    Keywords: Competition; Advertising; Brands and Branding; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Pepsi Blue." Harvard Business School Case 598-097, March 1998. (Revised August 1998.) View Details
  104. Gillette Indonesia

    The country manager of Gillette Indonesia is reviewing his 1996 marketing plan and considering whether the pace of market development and mix of product sales can be impacted by the level and type of Gillette expenditures in the market.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Emerging Markets; Forecasting and Prediction; Product Marketing; Manufacturing Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Indonesia;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Diane Long. "Gillette Indonesia." Harvard Business School Case 597-009, July 1996. (Revised June 1998.) View Details
  105. Daewoo's Globalization: Uz-Daewoo Auto Project

    The top management at Daewoo is reviewing its close relationship with the Uzbekistan government, focusing especially on the performance of Uz-Daewoo Auto, a strategic alliance to manufacture and market passenger cars.

    Keywords: Globalized Economies and Regions; Alliances; Developing Countries and Economies; Manufacturing Industry; Auto Industry; Uzbekistan; South Korea;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Chanhi Park. "Daewoo's Globalization: Uz-Daewoo Auto Project." Harvard Business School Case 598-065, October 1997. (Revised March 1998.) View Details
  106. Oscar Mayer: Strategic Marketing Planning

    The marketing director of Oscar Mayer faces a series of strategic marketing options regarding established and new products, including budget and capacity allocation decisions.

    Keywords: Decisions; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Product Development; Manufacturing Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Robert Drane, and Dan Kotchen. "Oscar Mayer: Strategic Marketing Planning." Harvard Business School Case 597-051, January 1997. (Revised March 1998.) View Details
  107. Aladdin Knowledge Systems

    The founder, president, and CEO of a leading software security company has just announced the $5.1 million cash acquisition of a key competitor. As a result, his company becomes the market share leader in Europe and number two in the United States. But now, he and the rest of the management team have to determine whether and how to integrate the worldwide marketing, sales, and distribution of the firm's two overlapping software security product lines.

    Keywords: Distribution; Marketing; Software; Globalization; Acquisition; Sales; Information Technology Industry; United States; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Robin Root. "Aladdin Knowledge Systems." Harvard Business School Case 598-018, July 1997. (Revised February 1998.) View Details
  108. Pechazur

    Explores the issues and opportunities facing a company from a developing country, exporting and marketing to developed-country markets. Brings to light the key success factors necessary to operate within a developing economy environment.

    Keywords: Market Entry and Exit; Developing Countries and Economies; Africa;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Pechazur." Harvard Business School Case 593-077, April 1993. (Revised February 1998.) View Details
  109. Sony Corporation: Car Navigation Systems

    In the summer of 1996, Masao Morita, president of Sony Personal Mobile Communication Co., contemplated how to formulate its multinational marketing strategy for the fast-changing car navigation systems market. Morita needed to resolve the conflicting views within his company regarding several key issues, including geographical market focus, product selection, and standard setting.

    Keywords: Geographic Location; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Standards; Mobile Technology; Conflict and Resolution; Auto Industry; Electronics Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Yoshinori Fujikawa. "Sony Corporation: Car Navigation Systems." Harvard Business School Case 597-032, October 1996. (Revised January 1998.) View Details
  110. Gallo Rice

    Describes a company marketing branded rice products to three different countries--Italy, Argentina, and Poland. Explores the differences and similarities between the countries in terms of consumers, competition, products, and margins.

    Keywords: Food; Brands and Branding; Food and Beverage Industry; Italy; Poland; Argentina;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Nathalie Laidler. "Gallo Rice." Harvard Business School Case 593-018, March 1993. (Revised January 1998.) View Details
  111. Heineken N.V.: Global Branding and Advertising

    Heineken managers are evaluating the results of the research projects designed to identify the values of the Heineken brand and to translate these into effective advertising messages.

    Keywords: Value; Advertising Campaigns; Globalization; Brands and Branding; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Heineken N.V.: Global Branding and Advertising." Harvard Business School Case 596-015, October 1995. (Revised January 1998.) View Details
  112. Vietnam: Market Entry Decisions

    The management of three U.S. multinationals have to decide whether to enter the Vietnam market and, if so, how.

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Market Entry and Exit; Emerging Markets; Viet Nam; United States;

    Citation:

    Arnold, David J., and John A. Quelch. "Vietnam: Market Entry Decisions." Harvard Business School Case 597-020, July 1996. (Revised January 1998.) View Details
  113. Loctite Corp.: International Distribution

    Loctite Corp., dissatisfied with the sales growth achieved by its independent distributor in Hong Kong, is considering whether to find a new distributor or acquire a controlling interest in a wholly owned subsidiary covering Hong Kong and possibly other markets. Loctite has a varied portfolio of international distribution arrangements and experience on which to base this decision.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Marketing; Distribution Channels; Globalization; Market Participation; Industrial Products Industry; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and David J. Arnold. "Loctite Corp.: International Distribution." Harvard Business School Case 594-021, September 1993. (Revised December 1997.) View Details
  114. DHL Worldwide Express

    The worldwide sales and marketing manager must determine the degree to which pricing strategy and tactics should be standardized or left to the discretion of the DHL subsidiary in each country.

    Keywords: Governance; Business Subsidiaries; Price; Marketing Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Sales; Shipping Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Greg Conley. "DHL Worldwide Express." Harvard Business School Case 593-011, September 1992. (Revised November 1997.) View Details
  115. Bayer AG (A)

    Bayer's senior executives convene in Germany to consider submitting a $1 billion bid that would recover the Bayer brand name and trademark cross in North America, both of which were confiscated by the U.S. government after World War I. The group also sets out to assess the communication challenge and brand management tasks the company would face should they decide to go forward with the purchase.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Brands and Branding; War; Communication; Trademarks; Acquisition; Government and Politics; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; Germany; North America; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Robin Root. "Bayer AG (A)." Harvard Business School Case 598-031, September 1997. (Revised October 1997.) View Details
  116. Bayer AG (B)

    Bayer's senior executives detail the communications challenge program that resulted from the company's reacquisition of its brand name and trademark cross, which gave Bayer one name worldwide for the first time since World War I.

    Keywords: Globalized Firms and Management; War; Acquisition; Trademarks; Brands and Branding; Communication Strategy; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Robin Root. "Bayer AG (B)." Harvard Business School Case 598-032, September 1997. View Details
  117. Koc Holding: Arcelik White Goods

    Management is considering its options for future international expansion. Koc is the dominant supplier of white goods (kitchen appliances) in Turkey and has been increasing its export efforts. As lower import tariffs invite foreign competitors to enter Turkey, Koc must decide how to balance defense of its domestic market share against further foreign expansion.

    Keywords: Expansion; Multinational Firms and Management; Emerging Markets; Consumer Products Industry; Distribution Industry; Turkey;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Robin Root. "Koc Holding: Arcelik White Goods." Harvard Business School Case 598-033, September 1997. (Revised September 1997.) View Details
  118. Orbital Sciences Corporation: ORBCOMM

    In late 1993, Orbital Communications Corp. (OCC), a subsidiary of Orbital Sciences Corp., is developing a global two-way wireless data communications system, called "ORBCOMM," based on a 26-satellite constellation in low earth orbit. Service is scheduled to begin in the United States in late 1994, followed by a rollout to international markets in 1995. The case focuses on OCC's marketing strategy in the years prior to the product/service being available. Provides details on how the firm has defined its markets and estimated the demand for the United States and international markets. There is also a rich discussion of other parts of OCC's marketing strategy including product design and development, marketing to regulatory bodies, development of the sales organization to include channel partners to enter the domestic and international markets, pricing strategy, and the role of competition. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Business Model; Business Startups; Price; Global Strategy; Marketing Strategy; Demand and Consumers; Partners and Partnerships; Salesforce Management; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Das, and John A. Quelch. "Orbital Sciences Corporation: ORBCOMM." Harvard Business School Case 598-027, August 1997. View Details
  119. British Airways

    British Airways (BA) has recently introduced a global advertising campaign. The development of the campaign and its implementation are discussed. BA and advertising agency executives must renew the campaign and resolve issues pertaining to its future direction.

    Keywords: Air Transportation; Globalization; Advertising Campaigns; Air Transportation Industry; England;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "British Airways." Harvard Business School Case 585-014, July 1984. (Revised April 1997.) View Details
  120. Planet Reebok (A)

    Reebok International Ltd. is preparing to launch its first global advertising campaign for "Planet Reebok" in three European countries--France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. Planet Reebok was recently launched in the United States during the 1993 Superbowl. The company conducted market research on the Planet Reebok concept in the three countries.

    Keywords: Globalization; Advertising Campaigns; Brands and Branding; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Sports Industry; France; Germany; United Kingdom;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Planet Reebok (A)." Harvard Business School Case 594-074, April 1994. (Revised March 1997.) View Details
  121. Astra Sports, Inc. (B)

    Astra executives meet to discuss their options with a Venezuelan company that, for seven years, manufactured and marketed athletic shoes under the Astra name without authorization from Astra.

    Keywords: Strategy; Crime and Corruption; Brands and Branding; Manufacturing Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Sports Industry; Venezuela;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Astra Sports, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 595-008, August 1994. (Revised December 1996.) View Details
  122. MasterCard and World Championship Soccer

    The MasterCard vice president for global promotions and other MasterCard executives are appraising the results of MasterCard's worldwide sponsorship of the 1994 World Cup soccer championship. They must decide whether to commit to sponsor the 1998 championship to be held in France.

    Keywords: Credit Cards; Marketing Strategy; Multinational Firms and Management; Advertising Campaigns; Globalization; Sports; Financial Services Industry; Sports Industry; France; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "MasterCard and World Championship Soccer." Harvard Business School Case 595-040, February 1995. (Revised November 1996.) View Details
  123. Lexus and the USTR

    Lexus executives and dealers in the United States are debating how to respond to the U.S. Trade Representative's announcement of 100% tariffs on 13 models of Japanese luxury imported cars.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Taxation; Luxury; Trade; Auto Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Lexus and the USTR." Harvard Business School Case 595-127, June 1995. (Revised October 1996.) View Details
  124. Disney Consumer Products in Lebanon

    The managing director of Disney Consumer Products for Europe and the Middle East is reviewing recent market research in Lebanon regarding the sales potential of Disney licensed products and assessing the pros and cons of several distribution options.

    Keywords: Distribution; Multinational Firms and Management; Market Entry and Exit; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; Lebanon;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Disney Consumer Products in Lebanon." Harvard Business School Case 596-060, October 1995. (Revised October 1996.) View Details
  125. Procter & Gamble Co., The: Lenor Refill Package

    The assistant brand manager for Lenor, Procter & Gamble Germany's fabric softener brand, was preparing a presentation on the national launch of an environmentally friendly refill package.

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Environmental Sustainability; Product Launch; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; Germany; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., Minette E. Drumwright, and Julie Yao. "Procter & Gamble Co., The: Lenor Refill Package." Harvard Business School Case 592-016, September 1991. (Revised August 1996.) View Details
  126. Bajaj Auto Ltd.

    Bajaj Auto Ltd., the world's second-largest manufacturer of two- and three-wheeler vehicles, is facing increasing competition in its domestic Indian market. The case evaluates appropriate marketing responses both in the Indian market and export markets.

    Keywords: Competition; Marketplace Matching; Product Development; Product Marketing; Transportation Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Auto Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Bajaj Auto Ltd." Harvard Business School Case 593-097, June 1993. (Revised July 1996.) View Details
  127. AT&T USADirect In-Language Service: India

    AT&T managers are assessing demand for a soon-to-be launched new operator-assisted, in-language international telephone service from India.

    Keywords: Communication Technology; Demand and Consumers; Emerging Markets; Product Launch; Telecommunications Industry; United States; India;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "AT&T USADirect In-Language Service: India." Harvard Business School Case 596-013, December 1995. View Details
  128. General Mills, Inc.: Yoplait Custard-Style Yogurt (A)

    Yoplait's director of new product development is evaluating alternative line extensions including custard-style Yoplait. He must determine what additional research to recommend. Options include a mini-market test, a simulated test market and a fully-fledged test market.

    Keywords: Food; Product Development; Product Marketing; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "General Mills, Inc.: Yoplait Custard-Style Yogurt (A)." Harvard Business School Case 586-087, May 1986. (Revised July 1995.) View Details
  129. Air Miles

    The chairman and CEO of a U.K.-based frequent buyer travel award program is planning on launching in North America. Management must determine the marketing strategy to be used, specifically how the U.K. program should be altered, whether the U.S. and Canadian markets should use the same strategy, and whether grocery retailers or grocery manufacturers should be used as sponsors.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Service Delivery; Market Entry and Exit; Adaptation; Product Launch; Service Industry; Canada; United Kingdom; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Air Miles." Harvard Business School Case 593-102, May 1993. (Revised July 1995.) View Details
  130. OfficePro (A)

    The international procurement manager of an off-price office supply retail chain has to recommend which of several bids to accept for the right to supply computer diskettes to OfficePro's new French subsidiary.

    Keywords: Decisions; Globalized Firms and Management; Business Subsidiaries; Supply Chain Management; Retail Industry; France;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "OfficePro (A)." Harvard Business School Case 594-053, November 1993. (Revised July 1995.) View Details
  131. Astra Sports, Inc. (A)

    Astra executives meet to discuss how to counteract the appearance of Korean-made counterfeit athletic shoes in Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Strategy; Crime and Corruption; Manufacturing Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Sports Industry; North Korea; Latin America; South Korea; Asia; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Astra Sports, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 595-007, August 1994. (Revised July 1995.) View Details
  132. Milkpak Limited.: International Joint Venture

    Considers a Pakistani company's decision to conduct a joint venture with a foreign multinational. In 1987, Milkpak Ltd. had successfully developed a market for sterilized milk and wanted to produce other value-added food products. The company was evaluating the best means for increasing its success in the Pakistani market and conducted negotiations with alternative joint venture partners.

    Keywords: Negotiation; Multinational Firms and Management; Joint Ventures; Developing Countries and Economies; Food and Beverage Industry; Pakistan;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Milkpak Limited.: International Joint Venture." Harvard Business School Case 593-113, June 1993. (Revised December 1994.) View Details
  133. Nissan Motor Co. Ltd.: Marketing Strategy for the European Market

    Nissan executives are reviewing their European marketing strategy in light of the 1992 European Community (EC) market integration program and the likely end of bilateral import quotas on Japanese cars by some EC countries. Having recently established a manufacturing plant in the United Kingdom, Nissan has to decide how to allocate marketing and production resources among the different models in its line.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Resource Allocation; Market Entry and Exit; Trade; Auto Industry; Japan; United Kingdom; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Nissan Motor Co. Ltd.: Marketing Strategy for the European Market." Harvard Business School Case 590-018, August 1989. (Revised November 1994.) View Details
  134. Kao Corp.

    As the Japanese diaper market expands, Kao management must determine its response to new product introductions by its two major competitors. Options include launching a new premium priced brand or a new low priced brand, or increasing advertising and promotion expenditures for Kao's current diaper line.

    Keywords: Competition; Marketing Strategy; Industry Growth; Product Launch; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Kao Corp." Harvard Business School Case 591-012, September 1990. (Revised November 1994.) View Details
  135. Goodyear: The Aquatred Launch

    After many years of R&D, Goodyear has developed the Aquatred, an innovative new tire. However, the tire industry has matured and evolved, raising questions concerning the Aquatred's ability to gain support from Goodyear's independent tire dealers. Students must use information on channel evolution and consumer behavior to make two decisions: whether to launch the Aquatred and whether to expand Goodyear's distribution network. Also explores issues involved in managing a complex distribution structure during a time of rapid change.

    Keywords: Change Management; Consumer Behavior; Distribution Channels; Brands and Branding; Innovation and Invention; Auto Industry; Rubber Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Goodyear: The Aquatred Launch." Harvard Business School Case 594-106, July 1993. (Revised September 1994.) View Details
  136. Sorrell Ridge: Slotting Allowances

    Management is attempting to penetrate the California retail grocery market with the company's line of all-fruit preserves. Substantial up-front fees (slotting allowances) have been requested by the chains. Management must decide how to respond.

    Keywords: Food; Distribution; Marketing Strategy; Market Entry and Exit; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Sorrell Ridge: Slotting Allowances." Harvard Business School Case 591-011, June 1990. (Revised August 1994.) View Details
  137. Warner-Lambert Ireland: Niconil

    The marketing director of Warner-Lambert's Irish subsidiary is completing the marketing plan for the launch of Niconil, a transdermal skin patch to facilitate smoking cessation.

    Keywords: Product Launch; Pharmaceutical Industry; Republic of Ireland;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Susan Smith. "Warner-Lambert Ireland: Niconil." Harvard Business School Case 593-008, January 1993. (Revised November 1993.) View Details
  138. Nestle S.A.: International Marketing (A)

    A senior manager at Nestle's headquarters is reviewing the role of the central marketing staff with respect to Nestle's operating companies around the world. Two specific examples of the role of the central staff in guiding the advertising and packaging decisions of the operating companies are presented.

    Keywords: Globalized Firms and Management; Organizational Design; Organizational Structure; Marketing; Operations; Advertising; Management Teams; Food and Beverage Industry; Health Industry; Switzerland;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Edward J. Hoff. "Nestle S.A.: International Marketing (A)." Harvard Business School Case 585-013, September 1984. (Revised September 1993.) View Details
  139. Nestle S.A.: International Marketing (B)

    Describes organization changes announced by Nestle's chariman in 1991 and updates the description of Nestle's marketing organization.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Marketing Strategy; Organizational Structure; Globalization; Consumer Products Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Switzerland;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Nestle S.A.: International Marketing (B)." Harvard Business School Case 594-011, August 1993. View Details
  140. CIGNA Worldwide

    A CIGNA Worldwide (CWW) task group of European country directors and key functional managers is meeting in November 1988 to discuss how CWW should respond to the European Community's plan to remove existing internal barriers and restrictions to the free flow of goods and services in 1992. The case is designed to allow students to formulate strategies to deal with the opportunities and threats that will face CWW because of this change in its competitive and operating environment.

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Insurance; Competitive Strategy; Emerging Markets; Trade; Insurance Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "CIGNA Worldwide." Harvard Business School Case 589-098, June 1989. (Revised July 1993.) View Details
  141. Sunkist Growers, Inc.

    A new media strategy for lemon advertising involving the concentration of the entire budget in a single-print vehicle, is under consideration.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Marketing Communications; Advertising;

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and John A. Quelch. "Sunkist Growers, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 577-051, October 1976. (Revised June 1993.) View Details
  142. Chevron Corp.: Corporate Image Advertising

    Describes a series of advertising research studies conducted by Chevron to monitor the effectiveness of its corporate advertising. Specific research approaches covered include the McCollum-Spielman and Communications Techniques. The Vals Typology developed by Stanford Research Institute is used in specifying target markets.

    Keywords: Surveys; Multinational Firms and Management; Research; Advertising; Brands and Branding; Energy Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Chevron Corp.: Corporate Image Advertising." Harvard Business School Case 591-005, March 1991. (Revised June 1993.) View Details
  143. Rossin Greenberg Seronick & Hill, Inc. (A)

    Rossin Greenberg Seronick & Hill (RGSH), a New England advertising agency, was keen to secure the account of Microsoft Corp. The case describes the bid for the account, which included the submission of a "flier" referring to knowledge of a competitor's plans, as a result of hiring two new creative people who had worked on the account of Lotus Development Corp. at another agency. Teaching objectives: 1) to examine how agencies bid for advertising accounts, 2) to consider how companies review agencies, and 3) to show how aggressive marketing may lead to allegations of misconduct.

    Keywords: Ethics; Marketing; Advertising; Advertising Industry; New England;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Rossin Greenberg Seronick & Hill, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 589-124, June 1989. (Revised May 1993.) View Details
  144. Rossin Greenberg Seronick & Hill, Inc. (B)

    Teaching objectives: 1) to show how aggressive marketing can lead to allegations of misconduct, 2) to consider responses under crisis management, and 3) to explore the importance of credibility within marketing communications.

    Keywords: Ethics; Marketing Communications; Advertising; Crisis Management; Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Rossin Greenberg Seronick & Hill, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 589-125, June 1989. (Revised May 1993.) View Details
  145. Rossin Greenberg Seronick & Hill, Inc. (C)

    Teaching objectives: 1) to consider legal and other obligations advertising agencies owe to their clients, 2) to show how aggressive marketing can lead to allegations of misconduct, 3) to explore conflicts of interest which may arise for professional service companies in marketing their expertise to more than one company within another industry, and 4) to consider the responsibilities of a corporation taking legal action against another.

    Keywords: Conflict of Interests; Ethics; Lawsuits and Litigation; Marketing; Advertising; Advertising Industry; New England;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Rossin Greenberg Seronick & Hill, Inc. (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 589-126, June 1989. (Revised May 1993.) View Details
  146. Maison Bouygues

    The vice president of marketing is reviewing the 1991 marketing plan and budget for Maison Bouygues, the leading builder of new single family homes in France. Due to recession, the company's sales are forecast to be flat and adjustments may need to be made in the marketing and selling mix.

    Keywords: Housing; Marketing Strategy; Forecasting and Prediction; Brands and Branding; Construction Industry; France;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Maison Bouygues." Harvard Business School Case 592-059, January 1992. (Revised March 1993.) View Details
  147. Nestle Italy

    Nestle Italy marketing executives are considering options for increasing the sales and market share of Nescafe instant coffee. Forty years after being introduced, Nescafe still has a market share of only one percent.

    Keywords: Product Marketing; Consumer Products Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Italy;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A., and Michele Costabile. "Nestle Italy." Harvard Business School Case 593-009, December 1992. View Details
  148. Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc.: Vaseline Petroleum Jelly

    The product manager for Vaseline Petroleum Jelly has to prepare the 1978 brand budget and determine expenditure levels for advertising, trade promotion, and consumer promotion.

    Keywords: Advertising; Budgets and Budgeting; Product Marketing; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc.: Vaseline Petroleum Jelly." Harvard Business School Case 581-047, May 1981. (Revised December 1992.) View Details
  149. Chipman-Union, Inc.: Odor-Eaters Socks

    The company is considering whether or not to introduce a branded line of men's athletic socks. Considers a preliminary marketing program, including supermarket and drug store distribution.

    Keywords: Distribution Channels; Product Marketing; Brands and Branding; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Chipman-Union, Inc.: Odor-Eaters Socks." Harvard Business School Case 581-073, July 1981. (Revised October 1992.) View Details
  150. Black & Decker Corp.: Household Products Group, Brand Transition

    This rewritten version differs from Black & Decker Corp.: Household Products Group (A1) in two ways: 1) It has an explicit decision focus. Homa must decide on a program to transfer the Black & Decker name to GE small appliances; and 2) The detailed information concerning advertising, promotion programs, purchase allowances, volume rebates, dating discounts, cooperative advertising, and consumer rebates has been condensed.

    Keywords: Decisions; Marketing Strategy; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Drumwright, Minette E., and John A. Quelch. "Black & Decker Corp.: Household Products Group, Brand Transition." Harvard Business School Case 588-015, October 1987. (Revised October 1992.) View Details
  151. Suzuki Samurai

    Suzuki and advertising agency executives are debating the product positioning and accompanying copy strategy alternatives for the Suzuki Samurai prior to its U.S. introduction.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Marketing Strategy; Market Entry and Exit; Advertising Campaigns; Advertising Industry; Auto Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Suzuki Samurai." Harvard Business School Case 589-028, September 1988. (Revised October 1992.) View Details
  152. Archdiocese of New York

    A print media campaign to improve attitudes toward the Catholic priesthood and to indirectly increase vocations is evaluated through a comparison of pretest and post-test data.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Measurement and Metrics; Media; Public Opinion; Valuation; Media and Broadcasting Industry; New York (state, US);

    Citation:

    Greyser, Stephen A., and John A. Quelch. "Archdiocese of New York." Harvard Business School Case 579-123, December 1978. (Revised March 1992.) View Details
  153. Loctite Corp.: Industrial Products Group

    A new product introduction strategy covering all elements of the marketing mix must be planned for equipment designed to dispense industrial adhesives. The equipment and adhesives are manufactured by the same company.

    Keywords: Product Marketing; Manufacturing Industry; Industrial Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Loctite Corp.: Industrial Products Group." Harvard Business School Case 581-066, December 1980. (Revised July 1991.) View Details
  154. Massachusetts Lottery

    Describes the role of state lotteries, lottery marketing, and the operation of the Massachusetts State Lottery, including reference to Massachusetts lottery advertising. Highlights the success of state lotteries while also noting growing criticism, particularly of their advertising. Teaching objectives: To consider 1) truth in advertising, 2) the ethics of marketing gambling, and 3) the marketing/public policy interface.

    Keywords: Ethics; Marketing; Advertising; Government and Politics; Public Administration Industry; Massachusetts;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Massachusetts Lottery." Harvard Business School Case 590-009, September 1989. (Revised January 1991.) View Details
  155. CIBA-GEIGY Pharmaceuticals: Pharma International

    Examines the decision by Pharma International on whether to launch an antimalarial product in Nigeria and, if so, how that should be implemented. Involves commercial, ethical, and policy considerations. Rich in situation assessment data, the case refers to criticism of pharmaceutical marketing practices in the Third World and CIBA-GEIGY's Servipharm initiative, one response to this problem.

    Keywords: Ethics; Decision Choices and Conditions; Product Launch; Policy; Developing Countries and Economies; Pharmaceutical Industry; Nigeria;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "CIBA-GEIGY Pharmaceuticals: Pharma International." Harvard Business School Case 589-108, July 1989. (Revised December 1990.) View Details
  156. Procter & Gamble Co. (A)

    An associate advertising manager at Procter & Gamble is considering several options to strengthen the company's position in the light duty liquid detergent market. One option is to introduce a fourth Procter & Gamble brand in the category. Provides substantial information on the Procter & Gamble brand management organization.

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Advertising; Product Launch; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Procter & Gamble Co. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 584-047, November 1983. (Revised May 1990.) View Details
  157. Procter & Gamble Co. (B)

    The brand assistant on H-80, a new light duty liquid detergent, has to develop a year-one national promotion plan for the new product. Illustrates one of the important tasks of a Procter & Gamble brand assistant and provides substantial information on different types of consumer promotions.

    Keywords: Advertising; Product Launch; Product Marketing; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Procter & Gamble Co. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 584-048, November 1983. (Revised May 1990.) View Details
  158. Reebok International Ltd.

    Reebok executives are reviewing the company's advertising and promotion programs for the second half of 1988. These include sponsorship of the 1988 Summer Olympics and a rock concert tour organized by Amnesty International. In addition, Reebok is launching a new advertising campaign with the slogan "Reeboks Let U.B.U."

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Music Entertainment; Advertising Campaigns; Sports; Advertising Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Reebok International Ltd." Harvard Business School Case 589-027, August 1988. (Revised November 1989.) View Details
  159. H.J. Heinz Co.: Plastic Bottle Ketchup (A)

    The Heinz Ketchup product manager must decide whether or not to launch a new plastic bottle and, if so, what marketing program and support to place behind it.

    Keywords: Decisions; Food; Product Launch; Innovation and Invention; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "H.J. Heinz Co.: Plastic Bottle Ketchup (A)." Harvard Business School Case 586-035, September 1985. (Revised September 1987.) View Details
  160. Hartmann Luggage Co.: Price Promotion Policy

    The president and the marketing vice president are reviewing past Hartmann price promotions in order to decide whether to run one or more promotions in 1981-82.

    Keywords: Price; Product Marketing; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Hartmann Luggage Co.: Price Promotion Policy." Harvard Business School Case 581-068, July 1981. (Revised June 1987.) View Details
  161. General Mills, Inc.: Yoplait Custard-Style Yogurt (B)

    Yoplait's director of new product development is finalizing plans for the national introduction of custard-style Yoplait. Based on the results of a mini-market test and a BASES laboratory test market.

    Keywords: Food; Product Launch; Product Development; Product Marketing; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "General Mills, Inc.: Yoplait Custard-Style Yogurt (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 586-088, May 1986. View Details
  162. H.J. Heinz Co.: Plastic Bottle Ketchup (B)

    The Heinz Ketchup product manager discovers she does not have sufficient finished inventory and production capacity to meet trade demand for a new plastic bottle ketchup. Alternatives include cancelling promotion events and putting the trade on allocation.

    Keywords: Distribution; Crisis Management; Innovation and Invention; Product Marketing; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "H.J. Heinz Co.: Plastic Bottle Ketchup (B)." Harvard Business School Case 586-036, September 1985. View Details
  163. Shopfair Supermarkets (A)

    The marketing vice president of the leading supermarket chain in a major metropolitan area has to plan his 1981 strategy in light of increasing warehouse store competition. Considers relationships with major manufacturers who are supplying warehouse stores with deal merchandise.

    Keywords: Competition; Marketing Strategy; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Shopfair Supermarkets (A)." Harvard Business School Case 581-158, June 1981. (Revised August 1985.) View Details
  164. Cable News Network

    The vice president of advertising and promotion is reviewing his advertising program for 1982. In particular, he is assessing an agency proposal for a new advertising campaign for cable news network.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Management Teams; Journalism and News Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Cable News Network." Harvard Business School Case 583-067, January 1983. (Revised July 1985.) View Details
  165. Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc.: Marketing Communications

    Marketing executives at the company are considering the merits of a variety of communications programs designed to increase the effectiveness of the company's sales force of beauty consultants.

    Keywords: Marketing Communications; Salesforce Management; Decision Making; Performance Effectiveness; Management Teams; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc.: Marketing Communications." Harvard Business School Case 583-068, January 1983. (Revised June 1985.) View Details
  166. MEM Co., Inc.

    The President of MEM Co., Inc. is assessing the proposed introduction of a new line of men's toiletries. He also must determine the best distribution channels and the size of the product's advertising budget.

    Keywords: Advertising; Distribution Channels; Budgets and Budgeting; Product Development; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Quelch, John A. "MEM Co., Inc." Harvard Business School Case 581-154, May 1981. (Revised May 1985.) View Details

    Research Summary

  1. Overview

    Professor Quelch is developing a series of case studies on the role and responsibilities of corporations in solving public health problems, both in the United States and worldwide.
  2. The Corporation and Public Health

    Professor Quelch is developing a series of case studies on the role and responsibilities of corporations in solving public health problems, both in the United States and worldwide.