Richard G. Hamermesh

MBA Class of 1961 Professor of Management Practice

Unit: Entrepreneurial Management

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(617) 495-4179

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Richard Hamermesh is the MBA Class of 1961 Professor of Management Practice at the Harvard Business School where he teaches in the MBA Program and is the Faculty Chair of the HBS Health Care Initiative. Richard created and teaches the second-year MBA elective, Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital in Healthcare. Previously, he was the Course Head for the required first year course entitled The Entrepreneurial Manager.  In addition Richard participates in several HBS Executive Education programs.

As founding faculty chair of the HBS Health Care Initiative, Richard has been instrumental in expanding the role of health care in MBA education and faculty research. Today, over 10% of students enrolled at Harvard Business School are pursuing careers in health care.

From 1987 to 2001, Richard was a co-founder and a Managing Partner of The Center for Executive Development, an executive education and development consulting firm. Prior to this, from 1976 to 1987, he was a member of the faculty of the Harvard Business School.

Richard is also an active investor and entrepreneur, having participated as a principal, director, and investor in the founding and early stages of over 20 organizations. These have included start-ups, leveraged buy-outs, industry roll-ups, and non-profit foundations. He was the founding president of the Newton (MA) Schools Foundation and served on the editorial board of the Harvard Business Review. Richard has served on numerous Boards of Directors, and has chaired the Audit Committees of two public companies. He is currently on the Boards of one public and one private corporation. From 1991 to 1996, he was the founding Chairman of Synthes Spine, Inc.

Richard is the author or co-author of five books, including New Business Ventures and the Entrepreneur. His best-known book, Fad-Free Management, was published in 1996. He has published numerous articles and more than 100 case studies. His most recent article, "Realizing the Potential of Personalized Medicine," appeared in the Harvard Business Review (October 2007).  Richard received his AB from the University of California, and his MBA and DBA from HBS. He is married, has two children, and four grandchildren. His hobbies include tennis, skiing, and yoga.


Publications

Books

  1. New Business Ventures and the Entrepreneur

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship;

    Citation:

    Roberts, Michael J., Howard H. Stevenson, William A. Sahlman, Paul Marshall and Richard G. Hamermesh, eds. New Business Ventures and the Entrepreneur. 6th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2006. View Details
  2. Fad-Free Management: The Six Principles That Drive Successful Companies and Their Leaders

    Keywords: Management Practices and Processes;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. Fad-Free Management: The Six Principles That Drive Successful Companies and Their Leaders. Santa Monica, CA: Knowledge Exchange, 1996. View Details
  3. Business Policy: Text and Cases

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Corporate Strategy; Policy;

    Citation:

    Andrews, K., J. Bower, C. R. Christensen, R. Hamermesh, and M. E. Porter. Business Policy: Text and Cases. 6 Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin, 1986. View Details
  4. Making Strategy Work: How Senior Managers Produce Results

    Keywords: Management Teams; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. Making Strategy Work: How Senior Managers Produce Results. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1986. View Details
  5. Strategic Management

    Keywords: Management Teams; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., ed. Strategic Management. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1983. View Details
  6. Business Policy: Text and Cases

    Keywords: Policy; Information; Cases;

    Citation:

    Christensen, C. Roland, Kenneth R. Andrews, Joseph L. Bower, Richard G. Hamermesh, and Michael E. Porter. Business Policy: Text and Cases. 5th ed. Homewood, IL: Richard D. Irwin, 1982. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Realizing the Promise of Personalized Medicine

    Keywords: Health;

    Citation:

    Aspinall, Mara G., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Realizing the Promise of Personalized Medicine." Harvard Business Review 85, no. 10 (October 2007). View Details
  2. Making Planning Strategic

    Keywords: Planning; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Making Planning Strategic." Harvard Business Review 64, no. 4 (July–August 1986): 115–120. View Details
  3. Manage Beyond Portfolio Analysis

    Keywords: Investment; Theory; Management;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Roderick E. White. "Manage Beyond Portfolio Analysis." Harvard Business Review 62, no. 1 (January–February 1984): 103–109. View Details
  4. Toward a Model of Business Unit Performance

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Performance;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Toward a Model of Business Unit Performance." Academy of Management Review (April 1981). View Details
  5. How to Compete in Stagnant Industries

    Keywords: Competition; Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "How to Compete in Stagnant Industries." Harvard Business Review 57, no. 5 (September–October 1979). View Details
  6. Strategies for Low Market Share Business

    Keywords: Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., M. Jack Anderson Jr., and J. Elizabeth Harris. "Strategies for Low Market Share Business." Harvard Business Review 56, no. 3 (May–June 1978). View Details
  7. Responding to Divisional Profit Crises

    Keywords: Profit;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Responding to Divisional Profit Crises." Harvard Business Review 55, no. 2 (March–April 1977). View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Kathy Giusti and the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

    What do you do when your rising professional career is cut short by an unexpected cancer diagnosis? Kathy Giusti shifted careers, built a new organization that transformed how cancer research is done, and now faces the challenge of sustaining the organization and its funding for its newest venture. Since she was first diagnosed with multiple myeloma (MM) in 1996, Giusti had led an effort to better understand and treat the disease. She had co-founded the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF), helped form the Multiple Myeloma Research Consortium (MMRC), and brought together a diverse body of academics, researchers, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, physicians, and patients to combine their efforts around the disease. The MMRF had helped facilitate clinical trials for promising drugs, sponsored research, and raised a substantial amount of money for these purposes. In 2014, the MMRF was in the midst of its CoMMpass program; a multi-year effort to collect tissue samples from 1,000 patients at key junctures in their disease, sequence these samples to better understand the genetic underpinnings of MM and its many sub-types, and thus enable researchers to study a comprehensive sampling of patients. CoMMpass also had a patient-facing element which allowed the patient community to communicate with one another and with professional moderators. By mid-2014, some 550 patients were enrolled and 85 hospitals were participating. As a non-profit, the MMRF had historically relied on donations to fund its research operations. Giusti wanted to find a way to ensure a reliable revenue stream for the organization and give it greater financial stability. The MMRF had historically given away its resources and knowledge for free in order to speed research; Giusti worried if charging for some of its functions would be at odds with its mission and historical practices. She worked with her executive team to examine potential sources of revenue, and to decide if this was the right thing to do.

    Keywords: leadership; philanthropy; philanthropy funding; entrepreneurship; health care; management styles; management skills; personalized medicine; health care outcomes; cancer; Cancer care in the U.S.; personal care; Leading Change; Social Entrepreneurship; Giving and Philanthropy; Health Care and Treatment; Leadership Style; Management Style; Growth and Development Strategy; Business Strategy; Health; Health Industry; United States; Canada; Spain;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Joshua D. Margolis, and Matthew G. Preble. "Kathy Giusti and the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation." Harvard Business School Case 814-026, June 2014. View Details
  2. Building Life Science Businesses Fall 2014: Course Outline and Syllabus

    This Course Outline and Syllabus gives an overview of the Fall 2013 class Building Life Science Businesses.

    Keywords: healthcare ventures; entrepreneurial management; entrepreneurship; entrepreneurs; Health Care and Treatment; Health Testing and Trials; Medical Specialties; Health Industry; Biotechnology Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Asia; North America; Europe;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Building Life Science Businesses Fall 2014: Course Outline and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 815-003, July 2014. View Details
  3. salaUno: Eliminating Needless Blindness in Mexico

    In May 2013 the co-founders and co-CEOs of salaUno, Javier Okhuysen and Carlos Orellana, were encouraged by the results of their fledgling start-up. salaUno was founded as a for-profit enterprise in order to have the capital needed for rapid growth and to fulfill its mission of Eliminating Needless Blindness in Mexico. salaUno had grown from doing 75 cataract surgeries in its first month of operation to a high of 388 surgeries 21 months later. This case explores the challenges in scaling up a healthcare venture within a developing country.

    Keywords: medical services; developing countries; developing markets; health care industry; health services; healthcare ventures; healthcare startups; Health Care and Treatment; Health; Medical Specialties; Developing Countries and Economies; Health Industry; Mexico; Mexico City;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard, Regina Garcia Cueller, and Valerie Moy. "salaUno: Eliminating Needless Blindness in Mexico." Harvard Business School Case 814-041, March 2014. (Revised June 2014.) View Details
  4. Fred Khosravi and AccessClosure (C)

    On September 11, 2013, the three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit denied St. Jude's request to rehear an appeal on the "double patenting" ruling for the '439 patent. Further, it removed the injunction threat that was hanging over the company. The future looked bright for AccessClosure as 2013 drew to a close. The company expected 2014 revenues of more than $100 million with a gross margin of greater than 70%. It was also anticipating FDA approval on a significant product improvement within the next several months.

    Keywords: medical devices; vascular closure device; patent litigation; Patenting; Biotechnology Industry; Biomedical Research; biotechnology; biotech; Technological Innovation; Patents; Health Care and Treatment; Biotechnology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard, and Lauren Barley. "Fred Khosravi and AccessClosure (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 814-074, January 2014. View Details
  5. MedImmune Ventures

    "MedImmune Ventures" highlights the problems faced by corporate venture capital firms, the challenges of investing in early-stage healthcare, and the difficulty of operating in distant markets.

    Keywords: MedImmune Ventures; NeuProtect; Corporate Venture Capital; venture capital; Ron Laufer; Australia; Starfish Ventures; AstraZeneca; MEVE; healthcare; Startup; Venture Capital; Business Startups; Health Industry; Australia; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard, and Andrew Otazo. "MedImmune Ventures." Harvard Business School Teaching Plan 814-039, January 2014. View Details
  6. GenapSys: Business Models for the Genome

    GenapSys, a California-based startup, was soon to release a new DNA sequencer that the company's founder, Hesaam Esfandyarpour, believed was truly revolutionary. The sequencer would be substantially less expensive—potentially costing just a few thousand dollars—and smaller than other sequencers, many of which were large devices costing tens of thousands or hundreds of thousands of dollars. GenapSys' device, named GENIUS, could also quickly generate large amounts of data, as it was capable of sequencing an entire human genome in less than eight hours. At this price, GenapSys' device would be attractive to customers that had been unable to afford sequencers, such as smaller laboratories or hospitals, and even expand the market to include industries such as agriculture and biofuels.

    As GenapSys came closer to releasing its product, Esfandyarpour and his Senior Director of Operations and Strategy, Leila Rastegar (HBS '11), sat down to decide which of three business models they would choose to bring this device to market. In the first model, the company would sell sequencers at a higher price to those entities which already purchased sequencers, primarily major research labs and pharmaceutical firms, but position its machine as a faster alternative to existing technologies. In the second model, GenapSys would sell its sequencer at a lower price but charge more for the cartridges necessary to run a sample, and earn its primary revenue from these cartridges. The third model would see GenapSys sell its device at or around cost, but use the data customers generated to create a proprietary database of genetic information. Customers could pay to access the database for research, to create genetic tests, or for many other purposes. GenapSys would also build an online store with the genetic tests customers created.

    Esfandyarpour's and Rastegar's decision would determine GenapSys' customer base and financial position for the coming years, and also impact development and capital needs of the firm. Which was the right model to bring the device to market and have a meaningful impact?

    Keywords: DNA Sequencing; life sciences; business model; innovation & entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Genetics; Business Strategy; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry; Technology Industry; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Joseph B. Fuller, and Matthew Preble. "GenapSys: Business Models for the Genome." Harvard Business School Case 814-050, January 2014. (Revised January 2014.) View Details
  7. FasterCures: Removing Barriers to Treatments

    In mid-2013, as FasterCures celebrated its 10th anniversary as a center of the Milken Institute, Executive Director Margaret Anderson thought about what the organization should do to ensure it had even more impact in its next 10 years. FasterCures was a non-profit "action tank" whose mission was to speed up the process of moving new therapies from discovery to patients in need. Although their annual conference ("Partnering for Cures") to improve how government research was organized was a huge success, Anderson considered refocusing their resources on greater challenges.

    For example, current trends in the US showed that investors were increasingly supporting late stage research with higher probabilities of success while funding for riskier early stage research was drying up. Should FasterCures raise money and direct it toward early stage breakthrough therapies? Another issue was the US clinical trial process system. It's complicated, takes a long time, and is very expensive. Should FasterCures reorganize to better understand this issue and make a high-level push to improve it? Or perhaps FasterCures should look at drug reimbursement decisions. Anderson needed to determine where FasterCures should get fully involved, what it should do, and whether it could make a difference.

    Keywords: health; health care; health care industry; health care policy; health services; healthcare; healthcare reform; healthcare ventures; nonprofit; non-profit managment; not-for-profit; incubator; accelerator; venture philanthropy; medical services; medical solutions; medical research; medical treatment; clinical trials; drug reimbursement; early stage; early stage research funding; early stage funding; Milken Institute; Michael Milken; David Baltimore; Partnering for Cures; National Institutes of Health; Cancer care in the U.S.; Cancer care services; policy-making; Health Care and Treatment; Health; Health Testing and Trials; Entrepreneurship; Social Entrepreneurship; Nonprofit Organizations; Policy; Health Industry; United States; District of Columbia;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and James Weber. "FasterCures: Removing Barriers to Treatments." Harvard Business School Case 814-003, October 2013. View Details
  8. Fred Khosravi and AccessClosure (B)

    It was January 2013, and Fred Khosravi, chairman of the board of AccessClosure Inc., wondered what the new year had in store for him and AccessClosure, the company he founded in late 2002. Khosravi was cautiously optimistic—the Mountain View, California-based medical device company had been cash flow positive for seven consecutive quarters with annual revenues over $70 million. Since 2007, it had shipped well over 1.5 million of its vascular closure device (VCD), the Mynx, which was stocked in more than 1,200 catheter labs worldwide. However, a 2008 patent infringement lawsuit filed by St. Jude Medical, the VCD market leader, loomed large. The case was on appeal, and a three-judge panel would hear arguments in March 2013. If AccessClosure lost its appeal, it faced a $27.1 million judgment for patent infringement and a permanent injunction from selling its Mynx family of VCDs, its sole source of revenue.

    Keywords: medical devices; vascular closure device; patent litigation; Patenting; Biotechnology Industry; Biomedical Research; biotechnology; biotech; Technological Innovation; Patents; Health Care and Treatment; Biotechnology Industry; United States; California;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Lauren Barley. "Fred Khosravi and AccessClosure (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 814-038, October 2013. (Revised January 2014.) View Details
  9. MedImmune Ventures

    Ron Laufer is the new Senior Managing Director of MedImmune Ventures, the corporate venture capital arm of AstraZeneca, a leading pharmaceuticals firm. Laufer has to decide whether to pursue a high-potential, but very risky, early-stage investment. The decision Laufer will make will reflect his vision for MedImmune Ventures and more broadly the incentives he faces as a corporate venture capitalist.

    Keywords: MedImmune; MedImmune Ventures; AstraZeneca; NeuProtect; corporate venturing; venture capital; biotechnology; venture investing; Venture Capital; Health Care and Treatment; Pharmaceutical Industry; Financial Services Industry; Biotechnology Industry; United States; Australia; Europe; London;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and David Lane. "MedImmune Ventures." Harvard Business School Case 814-023, August 2013. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  10. Building Life Science Businesses Fall 2013: Course Outline and Syllabus

    This Course Outline and Syllabus gives an overview of the Fall 2013 class Building Life Science Businesses.

    Keywords: healthcare ventures; entrepreneurial management; entrepreneurship; entrepreneurs; Health Care and Treatment; Health Testing and Trials; Medical Specialties; Health Industry; Biotechnology Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Asia; North America; Europe;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Building Life Science Businesses Fall 2013: Course Outline and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 814-019, August 2013. View Details
  11. The Entrepreneurial Manager: Course Overview, 2013 Winter Term

    Course overview of The Entrepreneurial Manager.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Management; Business Education;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Thomas Eisenmann. "The Entrepreneurial Manager: Course Overview, 2013 Winter Term". Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 813-155, January 2013. (Revised January 2013.) View Details
  12. Westlake Lanes: How Can This Business Be Saved? Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Alisa Zalosh. "Westlake Lanes: How Can This Business Be Saved? Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 124-434, May 2012. View Details
  13. Westlake Lanes: How Can This Business Be Saved? Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Alisa Zalosh. "Westlake Lanes: How Can This Business Be Saved? Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 124-433, May 2012. View Details
  14. Westlake Lanes: How Can This Business Be Saved? (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Alisa Zalosh. "Westlake Lanes: How Can This Business Be Saved? (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 124-432, May 2012. View Details
  15. Sugar Bowl, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case) (CW)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Alisa Zalosh. "Sugar Bowl, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case) (CW)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 913-540, November 2012. View Details
  16. Sugar Bowl, Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case) (CW)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Alisa Zalosh. "Sugar Bowl, Spreadsheet for Students (Brief Case) (CW)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 913-539, November 2012. View Details
  17. Sugar Bowl (Brief Case) (TN)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Alisa Zalosh. "Sugar Bowl (Brief Case) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 913-538, November 2012. View Details
  18. Sugar Bowl

    Shelby Givens, a recent business school graduate, returned home to Raleigh, North Carolina, to help rescue her family's ailing and outdated bowling alley, Westlake Lanes. Although she cut costs and addressed inefficiencies, moving the business from near-bankruptcy to profitability in nine months, market conditions threatened the long-term viability of the business. Givens then sold her family on a new, more youth-oriented concept, an urban lounge called Sugar Bowl that could generate sizable revenues from the food and beverage businesses already embedded in Westlake Lanes. The case follows Givens as she builds Sugar Bowl into a turnaround story through shrewd decision making in finance, operations, and marketing, while contending constantly with challenging surprises and disappointments. The case also captures Givens's reflections on how the entrepreneurial drive has motivated her. Sugar Bowl may be taught alone or after "Westlake Lanes" (4431), which follows Givens through the initial turnaround process.

    Keywords: Family Business; Entrepreneurship; Operations; Performance; Business Strategy; Corporate Finance; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Raleigh;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Alisa Zalosh. "Sugar Bowl." Harvard Business School Brief Case 913-537, November 2012. View Details
  19. Gene Patents (A) (TN)

    This is the teaching note for case Gene Patents (A). In March 2010, U.S. District Court Judge Robert Sweet overturned 30 years of legal precedent and ruled that unaltered human genes could not be patented. This case reviews patent law and how it relates to our increasing knowledge of the Human Genome. The case issues deal with potential implications of Judge Sweet's decision for biotechnology entrepreneurs and investors.

    Keywords: patents; genetics; biotech; Human Genome; Patents; Genetics; Biotechnology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Matthew Preble. "Gene Patents (A) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 813-099, December 2012. View Details
  20. Companion Diagnostics: Uncertainties for Approval and Reimbursement

    The FDA approvals of novel therapeutics were seen as signs in the personalized medicine community of real progress in the growth of personalized medicine. The FDA's approval of such drugs, along with companion diagnostics, suggested a shift in thinking and regulatory practices at the agency. Beyond the regulatory questions, many considered the reimbursement system archaic, dispersed, unpredictable, and unnecessarily time consuming. Many questioned whether the traditional models of reimbursement were relevant in the era of personalized medicine, and who should be covering the cost of tests needed to identify the sometimes small number of patients who could benefit from expensive targeted drugs. This case focuses on the array of possibilities and the ambiguity surrounding these regulatory and reimbursement issues.

    Keywords: models of reimbursement; personalized medicine; regulation; healthcare reform; Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Norman C. Selby, and Phillip Andrews. "Companion Diagnostics: Uncertainties for Approval and Reimbursement." Harvard Business School Case 813-037, November 2012. (Revised January 2013.) View Details
  21. Amylin Pharmaceuticals (B)

    Amylin Pharmaceuticals brought two first-in-class diabetes drugs to market, Byetta and Symlin, in 2005, which were sold in over 80 countries with $650.7 million in sales by 2011. However, the company remained unprofitable as sales plateaued. The small pharmaceutical company was hurt by long delays in bringing Bydureon, a once-a-week version of Byetta, to market, which allowed a competitor time to establish itself in the once-a-week market. Amylin also failed to develop a marketable anti-obesity drug after the purchase of the promising leptin molecule from Amgen, Inc. In 2012, Amylin was acquired by Bristol-Myers Squibb for $5.3 billion.

    Keywords: Pharmaceuticals; Bristol-Myers Squibb; Health Care and Treatment; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Amylin Pharmaceuticals (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 813-091, November 2012. View Details
  22. Westlake Lanes: How Can This Business Be Saved?

    Shelby Givens, a new MBA, is the general manager of Westlake Lanes, a near-bankrupt bowling alley that her grandfather founded decades earlier. Givens has been given one year to turn a profit; if the goal is not met Westlake will close. During the first few days on the job, Givens learns that the business is in worse shape financially than she—or the board—thought. She also finds that Westlake's employees exhibit minimal productivity. Givens tackles these two issues, creatively uncovering ways to reduce costs while building morale. After nine months, the business has its first profitable month in over two years. Yet Givens is worried it is too little, too late and begins to sketch a bolder long-term strategy based on pursuing one of two alternative new markets. Students are invited to consider whether the board should accept her potentially transformative proposal, maintain existing operations, or liquidate to pay off pressing loan responsibilities. The case includes a quantitative assignment for students.

    Keywords: United States; operations management; small and medium-sized enterprises; turnarounds; marketing strategy; entrepreneurship; strategy; Leading Change; Marketing Strategy; Entrepreneurship; Operations; Transformation; Growth and Development Strategy; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Alisa Zalosh. "Westlake Lanes: How Can This Business Be Saved?" Harvard Business School Brief Case 124-431, May 2012. View Details
  23. Building Life Science Businesses Fall 2012: Course Outline and Syllabus

    This Course Outline and Syllabus gives an overview of the Fall 2012 class Building Life Science Businesses

    Keywords: healthcare ventures; entrepreneurial management; entrepreneurship; entrepreneurs; Health Care and Treatment; Health Testing and Trials; Medical Specialties; Health Industry; Biotechnology Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Asia; North America; Europe;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Building Life Science Businesses Fall 2012: Course Outline and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 812-167, September 2012. (Revised from original June 2012 version.) View Details
  24. Meli Marine, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Asia; Singapore; industry structure; operations management; capacity analysis; supply chain management; competitive strategy; Logistics; packaging cartons &containers;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Sunru Yong. "Meli Marine, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 124-429, April 2012. View Details
  25. Meli Marine, Instructor Supplement (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Asia; Singapore; industry structure; operations management; capacity analysis; supply chain management; competitive strategy; Logistics; packaging cartons &containers;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Sunru Yong. "Meli Marine, Instructor Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 124-430, April 2012. View Details
  26. Meli Marine (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Sunru Yong. "Meli Marine (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 124-427, April 2012. View Details
  27. Meli Marine

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Sunru Yong. "Meli Marine." Harvard Business School Brief Case 124-426, April 2012. View Details
  28. Gene Patents (B)

    The case updates events since the Court's ruling against Myriad Genetics on March 29, 2010 and should be used in conjunction with Gene Patents (A). On July 29, 2011, a US Appeals Court reversed the prior ruling against Myriad. On September 16, 2011, the first major overhaul of US Patent law in nearly 60 years was signed into law. Among other provisions, the law moved the US to a first-to-file priority when granting patents, as was the practice in most of the rest of the world. Many felt this change would help to reduce the amount of patent litigation. The case ends with the Supreme Court's 9 to 0 vote on March 29, 2012 ruling against another company in a case similar to Myriad's. Within five days of that decision, the Supreme Court remanded the Myriad case back down to the Court of Appeals for reconsideration.

    Keywords: Courts and Trials; Patents; Genetics; Judgments; Investment; Biotechnology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard, and Phillip Andrews. "Gene Patents (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 812-130, March 2012. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  29. Gene Patents (A)

    In March 2010, U.S. District Court Judge Robert Sweet overturned 30 years of legal precedent and ruled that unaltered human genes could not be patented. This case reviews patent law and how it relates to our increasing knowledge of the Human Genome. The case issues deal with the potential implications of Judge Sweet's decision for biotechnology entrepreneurs and investors.

    Keywords: Courts and Trials; Patents; Genetics; Judgments; Science-Based Business; Biotechnology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard, David Kiron, and Phillip Andrews. "Gene Patents (A)." Harvard Business School Case 811-089, June 2011. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  30. Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital in Healthcare Fall Term 2011: Course Outline and Syllabus

    Provides an overview of the second-year MBA elective course Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital in Healthcare.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Venture Capital; Health Care and Treatment;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Robert F. Higgins. "Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital in Healthcare Fall Term 2011: Course Outline and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Background Note 806-048, November 2005. (Revised November 2011.) View Details
  31. eHealthpoint: Healthcare for Rural India

    Healthpoint Services sought to address rural India's shortage of quality and affordable healthcare with a multi-service platform that comprised telemedical health clinics called eHealthpoints, clean drinking water, a diagnostic lab, and a pharmacy. Could they convince rural Indians to leapfrog from local healers to telemedicine? And could they convince Investors that their capital Intensive, bundled offering was a high-growth, self-sustaining venture? Healthpoint Services grappled with multiple challenges: changing mind-sets of patients and investors, generating traffic at their eHealthpoints, expanding their product portfolio, and growing within and outside India.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Mona Sinha, and Elizabeth Vrolyk. "eHealthpoint: Healthcare for Rural India." Harvard Business School Case 812-020, October 2011. (Revised December 2012.) View Details
  32. Gene Sequencing: Staking a Position in an Expanding Industry

    Towards the end of 2010, companies in the gene sequencing industry were pushing aggressive R&D programs to develop technologies and products in the race to sequence the entire human genome at a cost of $1,000. It remained to be seen when the "$1,000 genome" would arrive, and despite all of the buzz surrounding the industry, it was still unclear to investors who the industry winners would be. This case focuses on the emergence of third-generation sequencing and the four segments in the industry: hardware, consumables, services, and interpretation. The case presents the history of the industry, the evolution of sequencing technology, and the business models of players in each segment.

    Keywords: Genetics; Business Growth and Maturation; Business Plan; Competition; Venture Capital; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Mara Aspinall, and Phillip Andrews. "Gene Sequencing: Staking a Position in an Expanding Industry." Harvard Business School Case 812-004, October 2011. View Details
  33. U.S. Universities and Technology Transfer

    Technology transfer from U.S. universities to industry has increased dramatically in the last 25 years. Reviews the history of technology transfer with particular emphasis on the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980. It then examines how universities responded to Bayh-Dole, the growth of technology transfer offices, and compares how three different universities (MIT, Stanford, and Harvard) approach technology transfer. Provides an overview of the technology transfer process and issues around current practices.

    Keywords: Higher Education; Technology; Laws and Statutes; Education Industry; Technology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Josh Lerner, and Phillip Andrews. "U.S. Universities and Technology Transfer." Harvard Business School Background Note 812-016, August 2011. (Revised September 2011.) View Details
  34. Primedic—Providing Primary Care in Mexico

    Primedic is a Mexican start-up that aims to deliver affordable primary and preventative healthcare to those at the base of the economic pyramid. The company is about to exhaust its first round of venture capital funding and the business model has yet to gain traction. How should the business model be changed and should the venture capitalists continue to fund the company?

    Keywords: Business Model; Business Startups; Developing Countries and Economies; Social Entrepreneurship; Venture Capital; Health Care and Treatment; Social Enterprise; Health Industry; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Regina Garcia-Cuellar, and Lauren Sarah Margulies. "Primedic—Providing Primary Care in Mexico." Harvard Business School Case 811-040, October 2010. (Revised July 2011.) View Details
  35. Whose Money Is It Anyway? (TN) (A), (B), and (C)

    Teaching Note for 810-008, 810-013, and 810-031.

    Keywords: Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., V.G. Narayanan, and Rachel Gordon. "Whose Money Is It Anyway? (TN) (A), (B), and (C)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 111-128, June 2011. View Details
  36. Novasys Medical (TN)

    Teaching Note for 810027.

    Keywords: Product Development; Health Care and Treatment; Policy; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Novasys Medical (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 811-084, June 2011. View Details
  37. Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey - Managing in the Shadow of Health Care Reform

    Per the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), which President Obama signed in 2010, states would be required to create state-wide health insurance marketplaces - the Health Benefit Exchanges (HBEs) - in which individuals and small employers could choose from a set of easy-to-compare, tightly regulated health plans. This case explores how Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey would have to decide whether and how to compete in New Jersey's HBEs.

    Keywords: Insurance; Health Care and Treatment; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Emerging Markets; Risk and Uncertainty; Health Industry; Insurance Industry; New Jersey;

    Citation:

    Oberholzer-Gee, Felix, Raffaella Sadun, and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey - Managing in the Shadow of Health Care Reform." Harvard Business School Case 711-403, March 2011. (Revised March 2011.) View Details
  38. Primedic—Providing Primary Care in Mexico (TN)

    Teaching Note for 811040.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Health Care and Treatment; Venture Capital; Financing and Loans; Business Model; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Primedic—Providing Primary Care in Mexico (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 811-074, March 2011. View Details
  39. Computerized Provider Order Entry at Emory Healthcare

    The Computerized Provider Order Entry at Emory Healthcare case presents one hospital system's efforts to implement computerized provider order entry (CPOE) across all of its hospitals and the challenges they faced in doing so. Issues such as standardization of care, how to handle medication reconciliation, and unexpected challenges (e.g., changes to the post-op ordering process, lack of a human gatekeeper to monitor order flow, increase in lab orders). Dr. Bill Bornstein, Chief Quality and Medical Officer of Emory Healthcare in Atlanta is responsible for the smooth implementation of CPOE at Emory Healthcare, which is a vital part of their $50 million electronic medical record initiative. By June 2009, CPOE had gone "live" at Emory University Orthopaedics and Spine Hospital, Emory University Hospital, and Wesley Woods Hospital in a staged rollout. While Dr. Bornstein felt good about how the implementation had gone thus far, as he looked ahead next month to July 13, 2009, the fast approaching go-live date for Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUHM), he was concerned about the challenges and possible perils that lay ahead. He considered what additional actions he should take to prepare for go-live at Midtown, and if Midtown was ready for CPOE at all. One thing was certain; this hospital was different. The Computerized Provider Order Entry at Emory Healthcare case presents one hospital system's efforts to grapple with the challenges of implementing CPOE and the reactions that result. Issues such as how to deal with a workforce that has mixed views about the value of implementing such systems, the pros and cons associated with standardization of care, as well as how to deal with unexpected changes to work processes are brought out in the case. The case also allows for discussion of how to plan a phased implementation with adequate time for organizational learning to occur between the time that various sites "go live."

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Information Management; Management Systems; Standards; Service Delivery; Business Processes; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Projects; Information Technology; Software; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., F. Warren McFarlan, Mark Keil, Andrew Katz, Michael Morgan, and David LaBorde. "Computerized Provider Order Entry at Emory Healthcare." Harvard Business School Case 311-061, November 2010. (Revised January 2011.) View Details
  40. The Entrepreneurial Manager 2011 Winter Term: Course Overview

    Course overview of The Entrepreneurial Manager.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Management; Business Education;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "The Entrepreneurial Manager 2011 Winter Term: Course Overview." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-325, January 2001. (Revised January 2011.) View Details
  41. Plavix: Drugs in the Age of Personalized Medicine

    PIavix, one of the world's best selling drugs in 2010, appears to have a limited future. Its patent was due to expire soon, and recently new data had been discovered that indicated that a small subset of the population would be at risk for stroke, heart attack, or even death if they took PIavix. As a result, the FDA had added a black box warning—the agency's most severe—to Plavix's label in 2010. In addition, it had been discovered that the common combination of Plavix and Prilosec, an over-the-counter drug, could adversely affect patients. Finally, Plavix faced new competition from two new drugs with different mechanisms of action. This case reviews the recent history of Plavix in greater detail to encourage a discussion of the following questions: How might the current manufacturers of Plavix handle these emerging threats to their leading blockbuster? How might Plavix's potential competitors utilize Plavix's mixed history to their advantage? How should genotyping be integrated into the clinical care of patients in the light of emerging knowledge?

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Product Positioning; Business and Government Relations; Genetics; Competitive Strategy; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Mara G. Aspinall, and Rachel Gordon. "Plavix: Drugs in the Age of Personalized Medicine." Harvard Business School Background Note 811-001, October 2010. (Revised November 2010.) View Details
  42. DermaCare: Zapping Zits Directly

    DermaCare has developed an innovative new product for the treatment of acne that they hope to sell to consumers via direct-response television. The unconventional nature of the product and its distribution has led the company to seek angel financing. The Silicon Valley Band of Angels has agreed to finance the company and has submitted a proposed term sheet. Recently, however, a venture capital (VC) group has submitted a competing term sheet. The company must decide whether to accept financing from the Angels or the VC group.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Venture Capital; Investment; Innovation and Invention; Product; California;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Lauren Barley. "DermaCare: Zapping Zits Directly." Harvard Business School Case 808-064, September 2007. (Revised October 2010.) View Details
  43. MINTing Innovation at NewYork-Presbyterian (TN)

    Teaching Note for 810004.

    Keywords: Commercialization; Technological Innovation; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and David Kiron. "MINTing Innovation at NewYork-Presbyterian (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 811-010, October 2010. View Details
  44. The Jenner Situation

    Dr. Bill Lemont is the new chief medical officer of a large academic medical center. During his first week on the job he has become aware of the abusive behavior and temper outbursts of a prominent orthopedic surgeon. How Dr. Lemont handles the situation will be scrutinized inside and perhaps outside the hospital.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Employee Relationship Management; Managerial Roles; Behavior; Conflict Management; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Andy Whittemore, and Eliot Sherman. "The Jenner Situation." Harvard Business School Case 809-070, May 2009. (Revised August 2010.) View Details
  45. Whose Money Is It Anyway? (A)

    The Brigham and Women's Physician's Organization (BWPO) and its corporate parent disagree over who has jurisdiction over significant legacy funds. Are they controlled by the BWPO or do they belong to BWPO's corporate parent? The BWPO and its corporate parent must negotiate who has control of the funds which impacts how the funds may be used.

    Keywords: Accounting; Investment Funds; Governance Controls; Agreements and Arrangements; Boundaries; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Rachel Gordon. "Whose Money Is It Anyway? (A)." Harvard Business School Case 810-008, March 2010. (Revised June 2010.) View Details
  46. Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe and Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe (Abridged) (TN)

    Keywords: Europe;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Indra Reinbergs. "Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe and Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe (Abridged) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 805-080, November 2004. (Revised May 2010.) View Details
  47. Proteus Biomedical: Making Pigs Fly

    Proteus is a healthcare start-up that has developed technology to embed electronics for computing and sensing in existing medical devices and drugs. The technology could potentially change the basis of competition in the pharmaceutical industry. The company is currently considering a number of licensing and business development deals and must choose which one(s) to pursue.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Entrepreneurship; Technological Innovation; Rights; Negotiation Deal; Business Strategy; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Lauren Barley, and Ginger Graham. "Proteus Biomedical: Making Pigs Fly." Harvard Business School Case 809-051, December 2008. (Revised April 2010.) View Details
  48. Managing Drugs on the Forefront of Personalized Medicine: The Erbitux and Vectibix Story

    In May 2007, Amgen Inc. (Amgen) received disappointing news from the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) that its drug Vectibix, developed to fight metastatic colorectal cancer, had been rejected. This was especially surprising news given that a similar rival drug had received approval several years prior. Moreover, Vectibix had also received Food and Drug Administration approval in 2006. During additional trials, Amgen has learned that the Vectibix is only effective with the 60% of the population that has a specific gene marker. Given this development, what should Amgen's strategy around Vectibix be both in Europe and the United States?

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Health Testing and Trials; Marketing Strategy; Product Positioning; Genetics; Biotechnology Industry; Europe; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Raju Kucherlapati, and Rachel Gordon. "Managing Drugs on the Forefront of Personalized Medicine: The Erbitux and Vectibix Story." Harvard Business School Case 810-066, November 2009. (Revised March 2010.) View Details
  49. Whose Money Is It Anyway? (B)

    The case describes the various reactions of doctors and administrators to the solutions they developed.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Organizations; Behavior; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Rachel Gordon. "Whose Money Is It Anyway? (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 810-013, March 2010. View Details
  50. Whose Money Is It Anyway? (C)

    The case describes how the Brigham and Women's Physicians Organization and its corporate parent resolved the issue of how the disputed funds would be distributed and used.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Business Subsidiaries; Organizational Design; Conflict and Resolution; Resource Allocation; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Narayanan, V.G., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Rachel Gordon. "Whose Money Is It Anyway? (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 810-031, March 2010. View Details
  51. Amylin Pharmaceuticals: Diabetes and Beyond (A)

    Ginger Graham, CEO of Amylin Pharmaceuticals, joined the company with the expectation of taking the company's signature drug, Symlin, to market. However, unforeseen regulatory challenges have put the approval process in jeopardy. At the same time, the company has a second drug, Byetta, in its pipeline. Graham must decide how to manage the company's limited resources while also finalizing another deal that has huge future potential. Graham knows that Amylin's immediate success depends on its ability to commercialize its products, but its long-term success depends on replenishing its pipeline. Can the company do it all successfully?

    Keywords: regulations; drug regulations; Symlin; negotiation; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Resource Allocation; Negotiation Deal; Product Development; Research and Development; Commercialization; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Rachel Gordon. "Amylin Pharmaceuticals: Diabetes and Beyond (A)." Harvard Business School Case 809-011, December 2008. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  52. Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe (Abridged)

    Shurgard, a U.S.-based firm that rents storage facilities to consumers and small businesses, is considering financing options for rapid expansion of its European operations. Five years after entering Europe, Shurgard Europe has opened 17 facilities in Belgium, France, and Sweden. Along the way, Shurgard has encountered skepticism from both European consumers and investors about the unfamiliar self-storage concept and internal debates on how much to adapt the U.S. business model to European lifestyles. Wall Street analysts also do not value the impact that the European expansion could have on Shurgard's U.S. performance as a publicly traded Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT). As an alternative, to finance this expansion, Shurgard received a proposed deal from a consortium of banks and other investors where they would provide private equity financing spaced over the next few years plus a line of credit. In return, the investors would receive a large share of Shurgard's equity and control of its board, which could force a public offering in less than two years. The decision focuses on whether Shurgard Europe should accept the conditions and valuation of the proposed deal or seek another deal at a later point in time. Students must assess whether the self-storage business model can deliver the growth rate in Europe that the company has promised his potential investors. Involves calculating some basic estimates of the company's value from financial exhibits (enterprise value using an EBITDA multiple). Main focus is to assess this as an entrepreneurial venture. Students do not need to be familiar with REITs.

    Keywords: Business Model; Business Growth and Maturation; Multinational Firms and Management; Logistics; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Trade; Equity; Corporate Finance; United States; Europe;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 810-102, February 2010. View Details
  53. State of Emergency at Mercy Hospital and The Jenner Situation (TN)

    Teaching Note for [809070] and [409048].

    Keywords: Health; Non-Governmental Organizations; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "State of Emergency at Mercy Hospital and The Jenner Situation (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 810-068, January 2010. View Details
  54. MINTing Innovation at NewYork-Presbyterian

    Several top surgeons at NewYork-Presbyterian hospital (NYP) are receiving financial and administrative support to advance their surgical device inventions through the earliest stages of commercialization.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Financing and Loans; Investment; Health Care and Treatment; Innovation and Invention; Intellectual Property; Commercialization; Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; New York (state, US);

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and David Kiron. "MINTing Innovation at NewYork-Presbyterian." Harvard Business School Case 810-004, August 2009. (Revised July 2012.) View Details
  55. Calloway Laboratory: Pee for Profit (TN)

    Teaching Note for [807-040].

    Keywords: Profit;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Calloway Laboratory: Pee for Profit (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 808-119, February 2008. (Revised January 2010.) View Details
  56. The Explosion of Genetic Testing: Opportunities and Challenges

    This case study invites the reader to consider genetic testing in several different lights. First, can the business of genetic testing be considered a disruptive innovation to the current drug therapy model as defined by Harvard Business School Professor Clay Christensen? Secondly, which business models are likely to be the most successful? Finally, we encourage readers to explore possible future business implications and applications in the area of genetic testing while using a framework of disruptive innovation.

    Keywords: Genetics; Health Care and Treatment; Health Testing and Trials; Disruptive Innovation; Business Model; Biotechnology Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Mara G. Aspinall, and Rachel Gordon. "The Explosion of Genetic Testing: Opportunities and Challenges." Harvard Business School Case 810-067, November 2009. View Details
  57. Novasys Medical

    Novasys has developed a new medical device and procedure for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence that is cheaper and can be performed in doctors' offices. In spite of FDA approval, the American Medical Association has been unwilling to approve the product for reimbursement. The case deals with the company's struggle to obtain a reimbursement code.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Policy; Health Care and Treatment; Health Disorders; Product Development; Business and Government Relations; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Lauren Barley. "Novasys Medical." Harvard Business School Case 810-027, September 2009. (Revised August 2012.) View Details
  58. Syndexa and Technology Transfer at Harvard University

    Gokhan Hotamisligil is a star researcher at Harvard School of Public Health who has made groundbreaking discoveries linking fat cells, inflammation, and diabetes. He now wants to form a company to commercialize these discoveries. At the same time, Isaac Kohlberg, the head of Harvard's Office of Technology Development (OTD), is eager to improve Harvard's record in commercializing science. Describes the negotiations between Hotamisligil, OTD, the new company, and the School of Public Health to establish appropriate licensing and sponsored research agreements.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Higher Education; Entrepreneurship; Innovation and Invention; Intellectual Property; Rights; Agreements and Arrangements; Science-Based Business; Commercialization; Biotechnology Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and David Kiron. "Syndexa and Technology Transfer at Harvard University." Harvard Business School Case 808-073, September 2007. (Revised May 2009.) View Details
  59. Amylin Pharmaceuticals: Diabetes and Beyond (TN)

    Teaching Note for [809011].

    Keywords: Negotiation Deal; Product Development; Success; Commercialization; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Resource Allocation; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Rachel Gordon. "Amylin Pharmaceuticals: Diabetes and Beyond (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 809-127, April 2009. View Details
  60. Proteus Biomedical: Making Pigs Fly (TN)

    Teaching Note for [809051].

    Keywords: Business Startups; Technology; Competition; Negotiation Deal; Health Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Proteus Biomedical: Making Pigs Fly (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 809-128, March 2009. View Details
  61. Technology Transfer at U.S. Universities (TN)

    Teaching Note for [807124].

    Keywords: United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Technology Transfer at U.S. Universities (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 809-106, February 2009. View Details
  62. Syndexa and Technology Transfer at Harvard University (TN)

    Teaching Note for [808073].

    Keywords: Agreements and Arrangements; Commercialization; Science-Based Business; Research; Rights; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Syndexa and Technology Transfer at Harvard University (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 809-107, February 2009. View Details
  63. Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (TN)

    Teaching Note to (805-067).

    Keywords: Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Erin Seefeld. "Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-140, March 2006. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  64. Cynthia Fisher and the Rearing of ViaCell (TN)

    Teaching Note for [806002].

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Erin Seefeld. "Cynthia Fisher and the Rearing of ViaCell (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 808-115, January 2008. (Revised January 2009.) View Details
  65. Healthcare and Harvard Business School Alumni in 2008

    This case chronicles the role that Harvard Business School alumni play in the healthcare industry. Overall data on alumni is given, and the industry is broken into seven areas in which the careers of twenty-five alumni are highlighted.

    Keywords: Business Education; Executive Education; Personal Development and Career; Practice; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Cara Sterling. "Healthcare and Harvard Business School Alumni in 2008." Harvard Business School Case 808-044, March 2008. (Revised June 2008.) View Details
  66. ProfitLogic (CW)

    This interactive spreadsheet accompanies the ProfitLogic case (#802-110) to enable analysis of the cash flow implications of three business models that the company is considering. Students are able to change key assumptions and see the impact on cash flow.

    Keywords: Cash Flow; Business Model;

    Citation:

    Applegate, Lynda M., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Michael J. Roberts. "ProfitLogic (CW)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 808-704, April 2008. View Details
  67. DermaCare: Zapping Zits Directly (TN)

    Teaching Note for [808064].

    Keywords: Product Development; Innovation and Invention; Health Care and Treatment; Financing and Loans; Venture Capital; Advertising; Distribution; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "DermaCare: Zapping Zits Directly (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 808-122, February 2008. View Details
  68. Fred Khosravi and AccessClosure (A)

    Fred Khosravi is a serial medical device entrepreneur. In his latest venture, he must decide whether to sell now or continue to develop his current product and whether to market it, sell the company, or IPO.

    Keywords: negotiation; medical devices; venture capital; life sciences; health care industry; Healthcare Technology; healthcare ventures; Business Startups; Decision Choices and Conditions; Entrepreneurship; Growth and Development Strategy; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard, and Liz Kind. "Fred Khosravi and AccessClosure (A)." Harvard Business School Case 806-044, December 2005. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  69. Calloway Laboratory: Pee for Profit

    Describes the formation and rapid growth of a drug-testing company. The company needs to decide whether to enter the painkiller testing market, in addition to growing its drug treatment center business.

    Keywords: For-Profit Firms; Health Care and Treatment; Health Testing and Trials; Growth and Development Strategy; Market Entry and Exit; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and David Kiron. "Calloway Laboratory: Pee for Profit." Harvard Business School Case 807-040, October 2006. (Revised August 2007.) View Details
  70. Corporate Venture Capital at Eli Lilly

    Reviews the role of corporate venture capital and its history at Eli Lilly. Also presents a challenging venture investment opportunity.

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Investment; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Ron Laufer, and David Lane. "Corporate Venture Capital at Eli Lilly." Harvard Business School Case 806-092, February 2006. (Revised July 2007.) View Details
  71. Technology Transfer at U.S. Universities

    Technology transfer from U.S. universities to industry has increased dramatically in the last 25 years. Reviews the history of technology transfer with particular emphasis on the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980. It then examines how universities responded to Bayh-Dole, the growth of technology transfer offices, and compares how three different universities (MIT, Stanford, and Harvard) approach technology transfer. Provides an overview of the technology transfer process and issues around current practices.

    Keywords: Higher Education; Technology; Laws and Statutes; Education Industry; Technology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Josh Lerner, and David Kiron. "Technology Transfer at U.S. Universities." Harvard Business School Background Note 807-124, January 2007. (Revised June 2007.) View Details
  72. Endo Pharmaceuticals Series (TN)

    Keywords: Information;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Brian DeLacey, and Erin Seefeld. "Endo Pharmaceuticals Series (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 807-166, June 2007. View Details
  73. DentalCorp (TN)

    Keywords: Health; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Erin Seefeld. "DentalCorp (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 807-163, May 2007. View Details
  74. Endo Pharmaceuticals (A): From LBO to...?

    Endo Pharmaceuticals was formed in 1997 as a leveraged buyout spin-off from DuPont Merck. In 1999, it must decide whether to do an IPO or merge with a smaller company.

    Keywords: Private Equity; Initial Public Offering; Leveraged Buyouts; Mergers and Acquisitions; Health Care and Treatment; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Brian DeLacey. "Endo Pharmaceuticals (A): From LBO to...?" Harvard Business School Case 806-064, January 2006. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  75. Endo Pharmaceuticals (B): Merger Decision

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Brian DeLacey. "Endo Pharmaceuticals (B): Merger Decision." Harvard Business School Supplement 806-065, January 2006. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  76. Endo Pharmaceuticals (C): An "At Risk" Launch?

    Keywords: Product Launch; Risk and Uncertainty; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Brian DeLacey. Endo Pharmaceuticals (C): An "At Risk" Launch? Harvard Business School Supplement 806-066, January 2006. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  77. Endo Pharmaceuticals (D): Hatch-Waxman Change

    Keywords: Change; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Brian DeLacey. "Endo Pharmaceuticals (D): Hatch-Waxman Change." Harvard Business School Supplement 806-067, January 2006. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  78. Endo Pharmaceuticals (E): Judge Stein Rules

    Keywords: Lawsuits and Litigation; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Brian DeLacey. "Endo Pharmaceuticals (E): Judge Stein Rules." Harvard Business School Supplement 806-081, January 2006. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  79. Endo Pharmaceuticals (F): Appeals Court Ruling

    Keywords: Lawsuits and Litigation; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Brian DeLacey. "Endo Pharmaceuticals (F): Appeals Court Ruling." Harvard Business School Supplement 806-082, January 2006. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  80. Corporate Venture Capital at Eli Lilly

    Keywords: Management; Business Ventures; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Corporate Venture Capital at Eli Lilly." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 807-705, November 2006. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  81. Cynthia Fisher and the Rearing of ViaCell

    Describes the start up of Viacord, a Boston-based medical services firm founded by Cynthia Fisher (HBS MBA) in 1993. Told from Fisher's perspective, the entrepreneur details the conceptualization and launch of the business and the many obstacles and expenses faced in the company's first seven years. Fisher describes the venture capital negotiations and a merger with a biotech company that led to the creation of ViaCell in 2000. Fisher explains how her role changed from founder and CEO of Viacord to president and then board member of ViaCell, and carries the firm's story to the successful 2005 IPO.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Business Growth and Maturation; Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Service Industry; Health Industry; Boston;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Ingrid Vargas. "Cynthia Fisher and the Rearing of ViaCell." Harvard Business School Case 806-002, December 2005. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  82. Cutlass Capital, L.P.

    David Hetz and Jon Osgood are forming a new venture capital fund in 2001 to invest in health care start-ups. Describes their fundraising activities at a time when venture capital investing has reached an all-time high. Although their background skills and experiences fall outside venture capital, they have identified a large investor and a number of smaller investors to back their small fund. They believe their fund's strategy uniquely addresses the strategic needs of large, corporate acquirers. At the same time, their approach addresses venture capital's reliance on public markets for liquidity events--which all but evaporated with the dot-com collapse of March 2000. Hetz and Osgood face challenging negotiations to close the fund. Raises the question of whether there is a need for a fund like this at the time of the case. Supports discussion of specialized versus generalized venture capital funds.

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Negotiation Process; Entrepreneurship; Investment Funds; Health Care and Treatment; Business Startups; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Brian DeLacey. "Cutlass Capital, L.P." Harvard Business School Case 805-075, December 2004. (Revised March 2007.) View Details
  83. Note on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

    Describes the U.S. FDA with particular emphasis on its role in the development of new drugs, biologic products, and medical devices today. Provides context for the drug approval process by describing the FDA's history and organizational structure.

    Keywords: Health; Governance Compliance; Policy; Product Development; Government and Politics; Pharmaceutical Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Biotechnology Industry; Public Administration Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Virginia Fuller. "Note on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration." Harvard Business School Background Note 807-050, January 2007. (Revised January 2007.) View Details
  84. Note on Biotech Business Development

    Describes the business development process in biotechnology companies. Topics covered include: participants in the licensing process and their interests, the major steps in the licensing process, the terms that are part of most agreements, and the most contentious issues that arise in the implementation of licensing agreements.

    Keywords: Agreements and Arrangements; Entrepreneurship; Intellectual Property; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Robert F. Higgins. "Note on Biotech Business Development." Harvard Business School Background Note 807-032, January 2007. View Details
  85. Dental Corp--video

    Keywords: Media; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Dental Corp--video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 807-703, December 2006. View Details
  86. Corporate Venture Capital at Eli Lilly (TN)

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Erin Seefeld. "Corporate Venture Capital at Eli Lilly (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 807-059, September 2006. View Details
  87. DentalCorp

    DentalCorp is the fifth largest provider of dental insurance in Brazil and has tripled its sales in the past two years. Whether to expand to Chile or to continue expansion in Brazil is the major strategic choice facing the company at the end of 2004.

    Keywords: International Finance; Expansion; Entrepreneurship; Health Care and Treatment; Global Strategy; Insurance Industry; Health Industry; Brazil; Chile;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Ricardo Reisen de Pinho. "DentalCorp." Harvard Business School Case 806-023, October 2005. (Revised September 2006.) View Details
  88. Wu Xi Pharmatech

    Keywords: Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Wu Xi Pharmatech." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 807-701, September 2006. View Details
  89. Cutlass Capital, L.P.: Discussion with David Hetz and Jon Osgood

    Keywords: Capital; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Cutlass Capital, L.P.: Discussion with David Hetz and Jon Osgood." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 806-719, June 2006. View Details
  90. WuXi PharmaTech

    WuXi Pharmatech has gone from zero to $21 million in sales in three years. The company must decide its growth strategy and how best to finance and organize for rapid growth.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Capital Markets; Problems and Challenges; Pharmaceutical Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Simin Zhou. "WuXi PharmaTech." Harvard Business School Case 806-003, September 2005. (Revised June 2006.) View Details
  91. WuXi PharmaTech (TN)

    Keywords: Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Erin Seefeld. "WuXi PharmaTech (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-180, May 2006. View Details
  92. Achieving Profitable Growth and Market Value

    Provides an overview of how a new venture needs to change as it passes from the initial start-up to the growth phase. Explores how a venture's leadership, strategy, and execution need to evolve to deal with rapid growth.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Business Growth and Maturation; Business Startups; Change Management;

    Citation:

    Heskett, James L., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Achieving Profitable Growth and Market Value." Harvard Business School Background Note 804-157, April 2004. (Revised May 2006.) View Details
  93. Cutlass Capital, L.P. (TN)

    Teaching Note to 805075.

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Erin Seefeld. "Cutlass Capital, L.P. (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-155, March 2006. View Details
  94. Stan Lapidus: Profile of a Medical Entrepreneur (TN)

    Teaching Note to (805-087).

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Erin Seefeld. "Stan Lapidus: Profile of a Medical Entrepreneur (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-149, March 2006. View Details
  95. Conor Medsystems (TN)

    Teaching Note to (804-180).

    Keywords: Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Higgins, Robert F., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Erin Seefeld. "Conor Medsystems (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-150, March 2006. View Details
  96. Fred Khosravi and AccessClosure (TN)

    Teaching Note to (806-044).

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Decision Choices and Conditions; Mergers and Acquisitions; Business Exit or Shutdown; Initial Public Offering; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Erin Seefeld. "Fred Khosravi and AccessClosure (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-141, March 2006. View Details
  97. Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

    Molecular Insight has developed a novel biopharmaceutical to detect heart attacks. The company's unique approach to intellectual property protection uses the Hatch Waxman Act and the Orphan Drug Act. The company is struggling to raise $7 million in Series B financing. Should it continue its current strategy or change its approach? Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Intellectual Property; Health Care and Treatment; Pharmaceutical Industry; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Edwin W. Parkinson III. "Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 805-067, January 2005. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  98. John Moran and the Orthopedics Industry (TN)

    Teaching Note to 805026.

    Keywords: Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "John Moran and the Orthopedics Industry (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-125, February 2006. View Details
  99. Threshold Sports

    Describes the sales, marketing, and operating issues facing Threshold Sports, a small cycling event management company that produces the Pro Cycling Tour. Examines the issues facing the company as it approaches breakeven and attempts to grow the business substantially. The company must balance its growth objectives with a series of internal and external challenges. These include expanding the event to more cities, selling more sponsorships, expanding the TV coverage, and developing new revenue streams.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Bicycle Transportation; Service Delivery; Sports; Bicycle Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Todd H Thedinga. "Threshold Sports." Harvard Business School Case 803-134, March 2003. (Revised January 2006.) View Details
  100. Shurgard Self-Storage (video)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Shurgard Self-Storage (video)." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 806-711, October 2005. View Details
  101. ProfitLogic: Scott Friend, CEO (DVD)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michael J. Roberts. "ProfitLogic: Scott Friend, CEO (DVD)." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 806-702, October 2005. View Details
  102. Vialog Corporation (DVD)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Vialog Corporation (DVD)." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 806-701, October 2005. View Details
  103. MAC Development Corporation (DVD)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "MAC Development Corporation (DVD)." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 806-703, October 2005. View Details
  104. ProfitLogic (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-802-110), (9-806-702), and (9-806-705).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michael J. Roberts. "ProfitLogic (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 806-057, September 2005. View Details
  105. A Note on Managing the Growing Venture

    Focuses on the strategic and organizational challenges that confront growing enterprises and the entrepreneurs who lead them. Provides an overview of how a new venture needs to change as it passes from the initial start-up to the growth phase. Explores how a venture's leadership, strategy, and execution need to evolve to deal with rapid growth. A rewritten version of an earlier note.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Leading Change;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., James L. Heskett, and Michael J. Roberts. "A Note on Managing the Growing Venture." Harvard Business School Background Note 805-092, January 2005. (Revised August 2005.) View Details
  106. Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe

    Shurgard, a U.S.-based firm that rents storage facilities to consumers and small businesses, is considering financing options for rapid expansion of its European operations. Five years after entering Europe, Shurgard Europe has opened 17 facilities in Belgium, France, and Sweden. Along the way, Shurgard has encountered skepticism from both European consumers and investors about the unfamiliar self-storage concept and internal debates on how much to adapt the U.S. business model to European lifestyles. Wall Street analysts also do not value the impact that the European expansion could have on Shurgard's U.S. performance as a publicly traded Real Estate Investment Trust (REIT). As an alternative, to finance this expansion, Shurgard received a proposed deal from a consortium of banks and other investors where they would provide private equity financing spaced over the next few years plus a line of credit. In return, the investors would receive a large share of Shurgard's equity and control of its board, which could force a public offering in less than two years. The decision focuses on whether Shurgard Europe should accept the conditions and valuation of the proposed deal or seek another deal at a later point in time. Students must assess whether the self-storage business model can deliver the growth rate in Europe that the company has promised his potential investors. Involves calculating some basic estimates of the company's value from financial exhibits (enterprise value using a pEBITDA multiple). Main focus is to assess this as an entrepreneurial venture. Students do not need to be familiar with REITs.

    Keywords: Private Equity; Valuation; Business Model; Governing and Advisory Boards; Entrepreneurship; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Service Industry; Belgium; France; Sweden; United States; Europe;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Indra Reinbergs. "Shurgard Self-Storage: Expansion to Europe." Harvard Business School Case 804-112, March 2004. (Revised May 2005.) View Details
  107. John Moran and the Orthopedics Industry

    Reviews John Moran's 25-year career in the orthopedic industry and his current decision whether to start a hand and foot surgery company.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Decision Choices and Conditions; Personal Development and Career; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "John Moran and the Orthopedics Industry." Harvard Business School Case 805-026, October 2004. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  108. Kingsley Management

    Includes a brief overview of key challenges facing recent HBS graduates seeking funding for a business, followed by a 22-page excerpt from the Kingsley Management business plan. Describes Matthew Lieb and Chris Jones, two of the partners who developed the business plan for Kingsley Management, as they prepare to meet with potential investors. Lieb and Jones are particularly concerned about the investors' financial returns and the structure of the new business entity (i.e., C-corp. vs. LLC). Outlines several questions facing Lieb and his co-founders, which students are asked to resolve.

    Keywords: Business Organization; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Business Plan; Opportunities; Investment Return; Organizational Structure;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Kingsley Management." Harvard Business School Case 801-474, June 2001. (Revised November 2004.) View Details
  109. Managing Segway's Early Development

    Describes the early development of the Segway Human Transporter and focuses on the organizational issues that arise between the parent company and the new company that is being spun out to produce and market the Segway. Key issues are the distribution of bonuses and stock options.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Business Startups; Employee Stock Ownership Plan; Resource Allocation; Organizational Design; Technology Adoption;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and David Kiron. "Managing Segway's Early Development." Harvard Business School Case 804-065, December 2003. (Revised September 2004.) View Details
  110. Managing Segway's Early Development (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-804-065).

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Managing Segway's Early Development (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 805-016, September 2004. View Details
  111. Pre-Money / Post-Money Tutorial (Instructor Guide)

    Teaching Note to (9-803-703).

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Valuation; Finance; Online Technology;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michael J. Roberts. "Pre-Money / Post-Money Tutorial (Instructor Guide)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 804-195, June 2004. View Details
  112. Explo Leisure Products

    Tim Trowac and Dave Rahall, two former investment bankers, skillfully execute the leveraged buyout of a golf ball recycling company after working intensely on their due diligence, writing a business and financial plan, and developing the investment memorandum. Six months later, they question the competency of their management team, which they had assembled from former Explo employees rather than conduct extensive searches. Now financial results are poor. Trowac and Rahall need to explain the poor performance and come up with an action plan for their investors.

    Keywords: Selection and Staffing; Leveraged Buyouts; Business Plan; Performance; Management Teams; Business Strategy; Financial Strategy; Business and Shareholder Relations; Green Technology Industry; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Explo Leisure Products." Harvard Business School Case 399-053, November 1998. (Revised July 2012.) View Details
  113. Resourcery, Ltd. (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-803-148).

    Keywords: Nigeria;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Resourcery, Ltd. (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 804-008, January 2004. View Details
  114. Resourcery, Ltd.

    Recounts the story of how a successful Nigerian entrepreneur has expanded his systems integration/networking business. He now faces the problem of raising growth capital in a developing country.

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Growth Management; Expansion; Race Characteristics; Entrepreneurship; Developing Countries and Economies;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Feyi A. Boroffice. "Resourcery, Ltd." Harvard Business School Case 803-148, March 2003. (Revised November 2003.) View Details
  115. Threshold Sports (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-803-134).

    Keywords: Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Todd H Thedinga. "Threshold Sports (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 803-135, March 2003. (Revised June 2003.) View Details
  116. MAC Development Corporation

    Deals with MAC Development's efforts to develop a 41-acre site near Chicago. Reviews two years of efforts and highlights the remaining issues of: 1) gaining town approval for development and tax reductions, 2) meeting the bank's debt covenants, including finding a buyer for the first lot, and 3) agreeing on a final purchase price with the seller. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Taxation; Financial Instruments; Borrowing and Debt; Asset Pricing; Construction Industry; Chicago;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Colleen McCaffrey. "MAC Development Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 802-140, March 2002. (Revised June 2003.) View Details
  117. ProfitLogic

    Describes an "application software" company that has been through several evolutions--from consulting firm to applications service provider (ASP). The firm has received significant venture funding to pursue the ASP model but this has not worked, at least at the time the case ends. The company faces a choice: continuing with its current ASP business model, increasing its burn rate to convert to a licensed software model, or decreasing its burn rate to offer a more custom version of the ASP product.

    Keywords: History; Business Model; Venture Capital; Cash Flow; Decision Choices and Conditions; Balanced Scorecard; Information Technology Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Michael J. Roberts, and Taslim Pirmohamed. "ProfitLogic." Harvard Business School Case 802-110, January 2002. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  118. Jim Sharpe: Extrusion Technology, Inc.

    Jim Sharpe discusses his early career at General Electric to his decision to purchase and run a small company. The discussion includes a detailed acquisition financing proposal, which resulted in Sharpe being able to raise virtually all of the financing from some combination of the seller and the bank.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Mergers and Acquisitions; Financing and Loans;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Paul W. Marshall. "Jim Sharpe: Extrusion Technology, Inc." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 803-803, May 2003. View Details
  119. Kingsley Management TN

    Teaching Note for (801-474).

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michelle Lutz. "Kingsley Management TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-484, June 2001. (Revised April 2003.) View Details
  120. Pre-Money / Post-Money Tutorial

    An online, interactive tutorial that addresses issues surrounding entrepreneurial valuations. Topics include: the difference between an implied and a "bottom-up" valuation; the difference between pre-money and post-money valuations; the calculation of pre-money and post-money valuations; and the creation and interpretation of a capitalization table.

    Keywords: Money;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Nitin Nohria, Michael J. Roberts, Arleen Ahearn-Cavanaugh, and Sal Darji. Pre-Money / Post-Money Tutorial. Harvard Business School Tutorial 803-703, February 2003. View Details
  121. MAC Development Corporation (TN)

    Teaching Note for (2-802-140), (9-806-703), and (9-806-706).

    Keywords: Construction Industry; Chicago;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "MAC Development Corporation (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 803-024, July 2002. View Details
  122. Vialog Corporation

    Traces the origin of Vialog Corp.--from its founding in 1996 through a roll-up of several independent teleconferencing companies in 1997 and its initial public offering (1999) and eventually to a potential merger or acquisition in June 2000. The company has grown rapidly and has the option of merging with an Internet company or another strategic partner, or selling to a European strategic partner.

    Keywords: History; Business Exit or Shutdown; Internet; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Partners and Partnerships; Initial Public Offering; Business Growth and Maturation; Mergers and Acquisitions; Business Processes; Information Technology Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Vialog Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 802-008, January 2002. (Revised July 2002.) View Details
  123. Vialog Corporation (TN)

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Vialog Corporation (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 802-053, January 2002. (Revised July 2002.) View Details
  124. Note on Business Model Analysis for the Entrepreneur

    Describes the primary elements and defining characteristics of a company's business model from the perspective of an entrepreneur. Introduces several analytic techniques and provides illustrative examples of business models to support the analytic framework presented.

    Keywords: Business Model; Entrepreneurship; Framework; Mathematical Methods; Opportunities; Perspective;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., Paul W. Marshall, and Taslim Pirmohamed. "Note on Business Model Analysis for the Entrepreneur." Harvard Business School Background Note 802-048, January 2002. View Details
  125. Return Logic, Inc. (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-801-167) and (9-801-168).

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Return Logic, Inc. (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-366, January 2001. (Revised May 2001.) View Details
  126. Balance, Inc. (A)

    Focuses on an entrepreneur who founded a successful health-food store and seeks to expand his retail concept. Illustrates the challenges he faces as he recruits his top management team.

    Keywords: Distribution Channels; Executive Compensation; Agreements and Arrangements; Outcome or Result; Recruitment; Management Teams; Selection and Staffing; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Balance, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 801-169, February 2001. (Revised May 2001.) View Details
  127. Balance, Inc. (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-801-169) and (9-801-170).

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Balance, Inc. (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-372, February 2001. (Revised May 2001.) View Details
  128. Return Logic, Inc. (A)

    Follows three graduating HBS students as they build a business-to-business Internet venture and highlights the challenges they confront in structuring financing terms with venture capitalists. Requires students to carefully read a six-page term sheet to identify which provisions should and should not be accepted.

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Investment Funds; Private Equity; Internet; Negotiation Deal; Entrepreneurship;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Return Logic, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 801-167, January 2001. (Revised May 2001.) View Details
  129. Return Logic, Inc. (B)

    Highlights how multiple rounds of financing work in practice and illustrates how terms agreed to in early-stage financing deals have an impact in later financing rounds. Also illustrates ethical issues that entrepreneurs confront as they build "dot-com" ventures.

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Investment Funds; Private Equity; Internet; Negotiation Deal; Entrepreneurship; Ethics;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Return Logic, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 801-168, January 2001. (Revised May 2001.) View Details
  130. Lawyers & Leases

    Profiles Rajath Chaundry, an aspiring entrepreneur, as he attempts to secure office space for his growing team, select a lawyer, and continue to build his fledgling enterprise, eLearning.com. Designed to be used in an entrepreneurial management or small business course to illustrate the importance of early negotiations in the life of a business venture.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business or Company Management; Business Ventures; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Intellectual Property; Management Succession; Leasing; Negotiation; Education Industry; Legal Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Lawyers & Leases." Harvard Business School Case 801-166, January 2001. (Revised April 2001.) View Details
  131. Balance, Inc. (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Balance, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 801-170, February 2001. (Revised April 2001.) View Details
  132. Lawyers & Leases TN

    Teaching Note for (9-801-166).

    Keywords: Contracts; Negotiation; Entrepreneurship; Internet; Education; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Michele Lutz. "Lawyers & Leases TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-353, January 2001. (Revised April 2001.) View Details
  133. STT Aerospace: Interview with Charles Damon, Chairman and CEO, February 8, 1999

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Jeremy Dann. "STT Aerospace: Interview with Charles Damon, Chairman and CEO, February 8, 1999." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 300-502, November 1999. View Details
  134. STT Aerospace, Supplement

    Supplements the case.

    Keywords: Aerospace Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Jeremy Dann. "STT Aerospace, Supplement." Harvard Business School Supplement 399-078, January 1999. (Revised October 1999.) View Details
  135. Bloomberg L.P.

    Michael Bloomberg founded his company to provide customers quick access to financial market data and analytical tools for understanding that data. As Bloomberg L.P. grew quickly,entered the ranks of "large, established companies," it grappled with a whole new range of human resources, organizational, and corporate culture issues.

    Keywords: Human Resources; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Organizational Culture; Organizational Structure; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Christensen, Clayton M., Richard G. Hamermesh, and Jeremy Dann. "Bloomberg L.P." Harvard Business School Case 399-081, February 1999. (Revised June 1999.) View Details
  136. STT Aerospace and Supplement TN

    Teaching Note for (9-399-056) and (9-399-078).

    Keywords: Aerospace Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "STT Aerospace and Supplement TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 399-169, June 1999. View Details
  137. STT Aerospace

    Experienced entrepreneur Charles Damon conducted a "roll-up" from 1987-1994 within the commercial airliner interior products industry. Damon's company, STT Aerospace, took advantage of an industry-wide recession in the early 1990s by buying when asset prices were low. The strategy's success was borne out by the company's growth and success in the marketplace. However, the company faced its own set of problems as the industry downturn continued. Critical decisions to be made at the end of the case include: 1) Whether or not STT should continue its acquisition strategy in the face of declining profits; 2) If the company should reset the strike price of options packages, a big part of employee compensation; and 3) If they should invest in a breakthrough high-tech product.

    Keywords: Retention; Business Strategy; Selection and Staffing; Entrepreneurship; Financial Crisis; Growth and Development Strategy; Compensation and Benefits; Employee Stock Ownership Plan; Acquisition; Product Development; Aerospace Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Jeremy Dann. "STT Aerospace." Harvard Business School Case 399-056, December 1998. (Revised June 1999.) View Details
  138. Orthoteks USA (B3)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Badaracco, Joseph L., Jr., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Orthoteks USA (B3)." Harvard Business School Supplement 384-060, September 1983. (Revised May 1999.) View Details
  139. Explo Leisure Products TN

    Teaching Note for (9-399-053).

    Keywords: Search Funds;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Explo Leisure Products TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 399-168, May 1999. View Details
  140. Specialty Medical Chemicals

    A new general manager is supposed to rekindle growth. Seven months later, he questions the abilities of his direct reports. An organizational psychologist is brought in to assess his people. The general manager now has to decide who to keep and how to structure his direct report team.

    Keywords: Decisions; Employees; Leadership Development; Management Teams; Organizational Structure; Cognition and Thinking;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Lucinda Doran. "Specialty Medical Chemicals." Harvard Business School Case 399-094, December 1998. (Revised May 1999.) View Details
  141. Mitek Corporation TN

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Mitek Corporation TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 398-181, June 1998. View Details
  142. PC&D, Inc. TN

    Teaching Note for (9-380-072).

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "PC&D, Inc. TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 398-183, June 1998. View Details
  143. Orthoteks USA Series TN

    Teaching Note for (9-384-057), (9-384-058), (9-384-059), (9-384-060), (9-384-061), and (9-384-062).

    Keywords: Health Industry; United States; Switzerland;

    Citation:

    Badaracco, Joseph L., Jr., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Orthoteks USA Series TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 398-126, June 1998. View Details
  144. Cleveland Twist Drill (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-384-083) and (9-384-163).

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Joseph L. Bower. "Cleveland Twist Drill (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 395-236, June 1995. View Details
  145. General Electric: Strategic Position--1981

    Describes the introduction and evolution of General Electric's strategic planning system from the 1960s to Jack Welch's tenure. Allows discussion of the interplay of problems and circumstances to the evolution of the strategic planning system, and how Welch might use or alter the system to meet the challenge of growth.

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Growth Management;

    Citation:

    Aguilar, Francis, and Richard G. Hamermesh. "General Electric: Strategic Position--1981." Harvard Business School Case 381-174, April 1981. (Revised March 1993.) View Details
  146. General Electric Co.--1984

    Describes the first four years of Jack Welch's tenure as CEO of the General Electric Co. Deals with the ways Welch has tried to change GE's strategy and planning activities and his attempts to make the company more entrepreneurial.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Management Style; Change Management; Strategic Planning; Corporate Strategy; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Aguilar, Francis, and Richard G. Hamermesh. "General Electric Co.--1984." Harvard Business School Case 385-315, May 1985. (Revised March 1993.) View Details
  147. Orthoteks USA (A)

    A series on implementing strategy as the head of the U.S. subsidiary of a successful Swiss medical products firm. Traces the actions of the CEO over a four year period and highlights his negotiations with the Swiss parent and the way functional components of the strategy were developed and integrated. Describes Hans Wyss' first eight months as CEO of Orthoteks USA.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Trade; Health Care and Treatment; Leadership Style; Agreements and Arrangements; Strategy; Health Industry; Switzerland; United States;

    Citation:

    Badaracco, Joseph L., Jr., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Orthoteks USA (A)." Harvard Business School Case 384-057, September 1983. (Revised July 1991.) View Details
  148. Cleveland Twist Drill (B)

    Describes events at Cleveland Twist Drill between April 1982 and February 1983. Jim Bartlett's approach to the union and the implementation of the "move strategy" are described. Students are asked to evaluate these actions and to develop plans for dealing with current problems and with recent overtures from the union president.

    Keywords: History; Management Style; Leadership Style; Standards; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Cleveland Twist Drill (B)." Harvard Business School Case 384-163, May 1984. (Revised May 1989.) View Details
  149. Cleveland Twist Drill (A)

    Deals with the problems of implementing strategy in a declining industry and the negotiation of strategy with external constituencies, particularly labor unions. Traces Jim Bartlett's first nine months as president and asks for a plan of action.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Management Style; Negotiation Tactics; Labor and Management Relations; Corporate Strategy;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Cleveland Twist Drill (A)." Harvard Business School Case 384-083, September 1983. (Revised December 1988.) View Details
  150. Note on Implementing Strategy

    Presents a framework for thinking about problems of implementing strategy. Defines the tasks of implementation and the range of implementation situations, then develops four approaches to implementation and reviews a range of implementation skills. Intended for use in Business Policy II in conjunction with case studies.

    Keywords: Strategy;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Note on Implementing Strategy." Harvard Business School Background Note 383-015, September 1982. (Revised October 1988.) View Details
  151. Crown Cork & Seal Co., Inc. (Condensed)

    A condensed version of Crown Cork & Seal Co., Inc. The principal changes are the elimination of details about the early history of the company and condensation of the final section, Outlook for the Future.

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Industry Growth; Environmental Sustainability; Business Strategy; Trends; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Richard S. Rosenbloom. "Crown Cork & Seal Co., Inc. (Condensed)." Harvard Business School Case 388-096, February 1988. View Details
  152. Crown Cork & Seal Co., Inc.

    Describes the technical, economic, and competitive trends in the metal container industry. The strategy of Crown Cork and Seal is then described in relation to these trends. Focuses on two immediate threats to Crown's strategy: the future of aerosol cans, given the ozone problem; and the impact of the banning of nonreturnable containers.

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Business History; Industry Growth; Environmental Sustainability; Business Strategy; Trends; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Crown Cork & Seal Co., Inc." Harvard Business School Case 378-024, August 1977. (Revised April 1987.) View Details
  153. Orthoteks USA (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Badaracco, Joseph L., Jr., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Orthoteks USA (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 384-061, September 1983. (Revised July 1986.) View Details
  154. International Harvester (B1)

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "International Harvester (B1)." Harvard Business School Case 381-053, October 1980. (Revised June 1986.) View Details
  155. International Harvester (A), (B1), (B2), (B3), (B4), (C), and (D), Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "International Harvester (A), (B1), (B2), (B3), (B4), (C), and (D), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 386-125, June 1986. View Details
  156. Lyric Dinner Theatre: Deborah Denenberg, General Manager, Video

    Presents Deborah Denenberg, general manager, answering questions about her successful turnaround of an ailing dinner theatre.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Restructuring; Business Ventures; Arts; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Lyric Dinner Theatre: Deborah Denenberg, General Manager, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 886-523, April 1986. View Details
  157. PC&D, Inc.

    Covers history of PC&D from 1960 to 1975 as it grows from a single business firm to a diversified firm. Emphasizes the use of subsidiaries for product development and fast growth. Other issues include problems of a new CEO in keeping control of fast growing divisions.

    Keywords: Leadership; Business Subsidiaries; Diversification; Growth Management; Product Development;

    Citation:

    Christiansen, Evelyn T., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "PC&D, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 380-072, October 1979. (Revised March 1986.) View Details
  158. General Electric--1984: John F. Welch, Jr., Video

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Francis Aguilar. "General Electric--1984: John F. Welch, Jr., Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 886-529, January 1986. View Details
  159. Dexter Corp., Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Dexter Corp., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 379-172, April 1979. (Revised December 1985.) View Details
  160. Fuqua Industries (A), (B), and (C), Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Salter, Malcolm S., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Fuqua Industries (A), (B), and (C), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 375-280, February 1975. (Revised October 1985.) View Details
  161. Crown Cork & Seal Co., Inc., Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-378-024).

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Crown Cork & Seal Co., Inc., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 378-108, October 1977. (Revised October 1985.) View Details
  162. Federated Department Stores, Teaching Note

    Keywords: Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Bower, Joseph L., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Federated Department Stores, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 375-304, March 1975. (Revised October 1985.) View Details
  163. Orthoteks USA (B1)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Badaracco, Joseph L., Jr., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Orthoteks USA (B1)." Harvard Business School Supplement 384-058, September 1983. (Revised September 1985.) View Details
  164. Orthoteks USA (B2)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Health Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Badaracco, Joseph L., Jr., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Orthoteks USA (B2)." Harvard Business School Supplement 384-059, September 1983. (Revised September 1985.) View Details
  165. Federated Department Stores

    Keywords: Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Bower, Joseph L., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Federated Department Stores." Harvard Business School Case 375-147, November 1974. (Revised June 1985.) View Details
  166. General Electric: Business Development

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Diversification;

    Citation:

    Aguilar, Francis, and Richard G. Hamermesh. "General Electric: Business Development." Harvard Business School Case 382-092, November 1981. (Revised May 1985.) View Details
  167. Cleveland Twist Drill: Jim Bartlett, Video

    Presents a question and answer session with Jim Bartlett, president of Cleveland Twist Drill. Edited into three parts. Bartlett provides additional insights into the case situation and also describes subsequent events at the company.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Corporate Strategy; Policy; Construction Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Daniel F. Muzyka. "Cleveland Twist Drill: Jim Bartlett, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 885-513, April 1985. View Details
  168. International Harvester (A)

    Keywords: Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "International Harvester (A)." Harvard Business School Case 381-052, October 1980. (Revised January 1985.) View Details
  169. International Harvester (D)

    Keywords: Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "International Harvester (D)." Harvard Business School Case 383-035, November 1982. (Revised January 1985.) View Details
  170. Dexter Corp.

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Dexter Corp." Harvard Business School Case 379-112, February 1979. (Revised September 1983.) View Details
  171. Orthoteks USA (D)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Health Industry; United States; Switzerland;

    Citation:

    Badaracco, Joseph L., Jr., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Orthoteks USA (D)." Harvard Business School Supplement 384-062, September 1983. View Details
  172. General Electric: John F. Welch, Jr., Chairman of the Board, Video Transcript

    Transcript for Video (9-882-524).

    Keywords: Industrial Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Aguilar, Francis, and Richard G. Hamermesh. "General Electric: John F. Welch, Jr., Chairman of the Board, Video Transcript." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 383-002, June 1983. View Details
  173. Fuqua Industries (A)

    Citation:

    Salter, Malcolm S., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Fuqua Industries (A)." Harvard Business School Case 375-189, December 1974. (Revised May 1983.) View Details
  174. BiC Pen Corp. (A), Supplement

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "BiC Pen Corp. (A), Supplement." Harvard Business School Supplement 378-086, September 1977. (Revised May 1983.) View Details
  175. International Harvester: Comments on Tenure as CEO, Video

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "International Harvester: Comments on Tenure as CEO, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 883-517, April 1983. View Details
  176. General Electric: Strategic Planning, Corporate Goals, and the Job of the Chief Executive, Video

    Introduces Reginald Jones, former CEO of General Electric. Presents a question and answer session with Jones and Advanced Management Program participants.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Corporate Strategy; Strategic Planning; Goals and Objectives;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Francis Aguilar. "General Electric: Strategic Planning, Corporate Goals, and the Job of the Chief Executive, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 883-504, July 1982. View Details
  177. General Electric: John F. Welch, Jr., Chairman of the Board, Video

    Welch discusses a variety of topics.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Governing and Advisory Boards; Spoken Communication; Industrial Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Aguilar, Francis, and Richard G. Hamermesh. "General Electric: John F. Welch, Jr., Chairman of the Board, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 882-524, April 1982. View Details
  178. International Harvester: The First Two Years, Video

    Keywords: Agribusiness; United States;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "International Harvester: The First Two Years, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 881-504, June 1981. View Details
  179. International Harvester: Future Prospects and the Strike, Video

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "International Harvester: Future Prospects and the Strike, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 881-505, June 1981. View Details
  180. International Harvester (B2)

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "International Harvester (B2)." Harvard Business School Case 381-054, November 1980. (Revised April 1981.) View Details
  181. International Harvester (B4)

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "International Harvester (B4)." Harvard Business School Case 381-056, November 1980. (Revised March 1981.) View Details
  182. International Harvester (C)

    Keywords: Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "International Harvester (C)." Harvard Business School Case 381-057, November 1980. (Revised March 1981.) View Details
  183. International Harvester (B3)

    Keywords: Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "International Harvester (B3)." Harvard Business School Case 381-055, November 1980. View Details
  184. Mitek Corp.

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "Mitek Corp." Harvard Business School Case 379-110, February 1979. (Revised October 1980.) View Details
  185. Management Succession and Board Membership

    Keywords: Management Succession; Governing and Advisory Boards;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Management Succession and Board Membership." Harvard Business School Case 380-132, March 1980. (Revised May 1980.) View Details
  186. Management Succession and Board Membership, Teaching Note

    Keywords: Management Succession; Governing and Advisory Boards;

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Management Succession and Board Membership, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 380-187, April 1980. View Details
  187. Mitek Corp., Supplement

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G., and Evelyn T. Christiansen. "Mitek Corp., Supplement." Harvard Business School Supplement 379-111, February 1979. View Details
  188. Bishopric, Inc., Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Bishopric, Inc., Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 378-279, June 1978. View Details
  189. Bishopric, Inc.

    Citation:

    Hamermesh, Richard G. "Bishopric, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 378-025, October 1977. View Details
  190. Fuqua Industries (C)

    Citation:

    Salter, Malcolm S., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Fuqua Industries (C)." Harvard Business School Case 375-191, December 1974. (Revised April 1975.) View Details
  191. Fuqua Industries (B)

    Citation:

    Salter, Malcolm S., and Richard G. Hamermesh. "Fuqua Industries (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 375-190, December 1974. View Details