Lynn S. Paine

John G. McLean Professor of Business Administration
Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Development

Unit: General Management

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Lynn Sharp Paine is John G. McLean Professor and Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Development at Harvard Business School.  A member and former chair of the General Management unit, she co-founded the School's required course on Leadership and Corporate Accountability and currently co-chairs the Senior Executive Program for China.  Ms. Paine's research focuses on the leadership and governance of companies that meld high ethical standards with outstanding financial results.  Her publications, including more than 200 case studies, have appeared in a variety of books, periodicals, and scholarly journals.  She is most recently co-author of Capitalism at Risk: Rethinking the Role of Business with HBS colleagues Joe Bower and Dutch Leonard

Her other books include Value Shift: Why Companies Must Merge Social and Financial Imperatives to Achieve Superior Performance (McGraw‐Hill 2003) and Leadership, Ethics, and Organizational Integrity (McGraw-Hill 1998). Her most recent articles include “Sustainability in the Boardroom: Lessons from Nike's Playbook,” “A Global Leader’s Guide to Managing Business Conduct” (with Rohit Deshpandé and Joshua Margolis), “Global Capitalism at Risk:  What Are You Doing About It?” (with Joe Bower and Dutch Leonard), and  “The China Rules: A Practical Guide for CEOs Managing Multinational Corporations in the People’s Republic”—all published in the Harvard Business Review

A member of Phi Beta Kappa and a summa cum laude graduate of Smith College, Ms. Paine holds a doctorate in moral philosophy from Oxford University and a law degree from the Harvard Law School. She is a member of the Massachusetts bar and practiced law with the Boston firm of Hill & Barlow early in her career.  In addition to providing executive education and consulting services to numerous firms and industry groups, she has served on a variety of advisory boards and panels.   She was a member of the Conference Board’s Blue‐Ribbon Commission on Public Trust and Private Enterprise after Enron’s collapse and the Conference Board's Task Force on Executive Compensation after the financial crisis of 2008. Ms. Paine is currently a member of the academic council of the Hills Program on Governance at CSIS (Center for Strategic and International Studies) and one of three public members of the Governing Board of the Center for Audit Quality based in Washington, D.C. She was a director of RiskMetrics Group (NYSE) until June 2010, when it became part of MSCI Inc., and currently serves on the board of Atos SE (NYSE Euronext Paris).

Before joining the Harvard faculty in 1990, Ms. Paine taught at Georgetown University Business School and the University of Virginia's Darden School of Business as well as National Cheng Chi University in Taiwan, where she was a Luce Scholar in 1976-77.  Since 1987 she has been a permanent member of the Henry Luce Foundation's Luce Scholar Selection Panel.  She and her husband, Tom Paine, have three adult children and live in Wellesley, Massachusetts.

Featured Work

Publications

Books

  1. Capitalism at Risk: Rethinking the Role of Business

    Joseph L. Bower, Herman B. Leonard and Lynn S. Paine

    The spread of capitalism worldwide has made people wealthier than ever before. But capitalism's future is far from assured. The global financial meltdown of 2008 nearly triggered another Great Depression, economies in Europe are still teetering, and powerful forces-income inequality, resource depletion, and mass migrations from poor to rich countries, to name just a few-pose serious threats to continued prosperity. How can the future of capitalism be secured? And who should spearhead the effort? Many observers point to government. But in 'Capitalism at Risk,' the authors argue otherwise. While they agree that governments must play a role, they maintain that businesses should lead the way. Indeed, for enterprising companies, the current threats to market capitalism present vital opportunities. Drawing on discussions with business leaders around the world, the authors argue that companies must stop seeing themselves as bystanders and instead develop innovative business strategies that address the disruptors, produce profitable growth, and strengthen institutions at the community, national, and international levels.

    Keywords: business and society; Economic Growth; Economic Systems; Financial Crisis; Leading Change; Growth and Development Strategy; Business and Community Relations; Business and Stakeholder Relations; Business Strategy;

    Citation:

    Bower, Joseph L., Herman B. Leonard, and Lynn S. Paine. Capitalism at Risk: Rethinking the Role of Business. Harvard Business Review Press, 2011. (Published in Chinese as "Qi ye zai jing ji zhong de jue se," Beijing: China Machine Press, 2012.) View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Sustainability in the Boardroom: Lessons from Nike's Playbook

    Lynn S. Paine

    One surprising role of Nike's corporate responsibility committee is to provide support for innovation. More and more companies recognize the importance of corporate responsibility to their long-term success—and yet the matter gets short shrift in most boardrooms, consistently ranking at the bottom of some two dozen possible priorities. Many years ago labor conditions in Asian contract factories prompted Nike board member Jill Ker Conway to lobby for a board-level corporate responsibility committee, which the company created in 2001. In the years since, the committee has steadily broadened its purview, now advising on a broad range of issues including innovation and acquisitions in addition to labor practices and resource sustainability. A close examination of Nike's experience has led the author to conclude that a dedicated board-level committee of this sort could be a valuable addition to many if not most companies in at least five ways: as a source of knowledge and expertise, as a sounding board and constructive critic, as a driver of accountability, as a stimulus for innovation, and as a resource for the full board. In an accompanying interview with Paine, Conway discusses the committee's creation and provides an insider's perspective on what has made it so effective.

    Keywords: Governing and Advisory Boards; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Sports Industry; Asia;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Sustainability in the Boardroom: Lessons from Nike's Playbook." Harvard Business Review 92, nos. 7/8 (July–August 2014): 87–94. View Details
  2. Global Capitalism at Risk: What Are You Doing About It?

    Joseph L. Bower, Herman B. Leonard and Lynn S. Paine

    Market capitalism, a system that has proven to be a remarkable engine of wealth creation, is poised for a breakdown. That sounds dire, and it is. Increasing income inequality, migration, weaknesses in the global financial system, environmental degradation, and inadequate government and international institutions are just a few of the forces that threaten to disrupt global market capitalism in the decades ahead. In conversations with business leaders around the world, the authors found that virtually all of them shared a deep concern for the sustainability of the market system, but their beliefs about how to respond varied widely. Some said that changing their behavior would be unnecessary or even inappropriate. Others were unsure how to deal with issues seldom thought to be the responsibility of individual firms. The authors call for business to be both innovator and activist in protecting and strengthening market capitalism. Instead of seeing themselves as narrowly self-interested players in a system that is overseen by others, business leaders must spearhead entrepreneurial activity on a massive scale-devising strategies that provide employment for the billions now outside the system, inventing business models that make better use of scarce resources, and creating institutional arrangements for coordinating and governing neglected and dysfunctional aspects of market capitalism.

    Keywords: Disruption; Economic Systems; Globalization; Corporate Governance; Markets; Risk and Uncertainty;

    Citation:

    Bower, Joseph L., Herman B. Leonard, and Lynn S. Paine. "Global Capitalism at Risk: What Are You Doing About It?" Harvard Business Review 89, no. 9 (September 2011). View Details
  3. A Global Leader's Guide to Managing Business Conduct

    Lynn S. Paine, Rohit Deshpandé and Joshua D. Margolis

    An extensive global survey by three Harvard Business School professors finds that employees agree on core standards of corporate behavior. But meeting those standards will require new approaches to managing business conduct. The compliance and ethics programs of most companies today fall short of addressing multinationals' basic responsibilities, let alone such vexing issues as how to stay competitive in markets where rivals follow different rules. Companies must bring to the management of business conduct the same performance tools and concepts that they use to manage quality, innovation, and financial results.

    Keywords: Leadership; Management;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Rohit Deshpandé, and Joshua D. Margolis. "A Global Leader's Guide to Managing Business Conduct." Harvard Business Review 89, no. 9 (September 2011). (Online edition.) View Details
  4. The China Rules: A Practical Guide for CEOs Managing Multinational Corporations in the People's Republic

    Lynn S. Paine

    To achieve growth and profitability in the world's third-largest economy, multinationals need strong leadership--but China is tough on top executives. Pulsating with opportunity, China attracts foreigners, yet HR professionals continue to rank it as one of the most challenging destinations for expatriates. The problem, says the author, is that many executives sent to lead China operations are ill equipped to tackle the country's unique challenges. And it's hard to overcome that handicap, because leading in China calls for skills that go beyond and in some cases conflict with standard business teaching and practice. Foreign executives must be adept at reworking management orthodoxies in real time to do well there. The author's research--which includes interviews with the China business heads of around two dozen companies--confirms that success requires cultural understanding and adaptability, market knowledge, the ability to sense and respond to rapid change, and support from headquarters. Most important, effective leaders have the crucial ability to play roles that Westerners often view as contradictory: For instance, they are strategic yet hands-on; authoritative yet nurturing; and action driven yet circumspect. Above all, they have the intellectual dexterity to develop new frameworks and capabilities to meet China's particular circumstances. This article illustrates how CEOs have modified accepted wisdom to tackle their biggest challenges in China. Though some of the lessons may seem like common sense to experienced China hands, they're anything but to a freshman expat. Leaders must (1) understand the market, but work with the state; (2) adapt to local conditions, but implement global standards; (3) pay for performance, but build a people-centric workplace; (4) drive costs down, but maintain quality; and (5) recognize complexity, but define clear priorities.

    Keywords: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Multinational Firms and Management; Leadership; Management Skills; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Adaptation; China;

  5. Law, Ethics, and Managerial Judgment

    L. S. Paine

    Keywords: Law; Ethics; Management; Judgments;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S. "Law, Ethics, and Managerial Judgment." Journal of Legal Studies Education 12, no. 2 (summer/fall 1994): 153–169. (Reprinted in A Companion to Business Ethics, Blackwell Companions to Philosophy, edited by Robert E. Frederick, 194-206. Malden, Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishers Ltd., 1999.) View Details
  6. Managing for Organizational Integrity

    L. S. Paine

    Keywords: Management; Organizations;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S. "Managing for Organizational Integrity." Harvard Business Review 72, no. 2 (March–April 1994): 106–117. (Reprinted in The International Library of Management, Ethics in Business and Economics, vol. 1, edited by Thomas Donaldson and Thomas W. Dunfee. Aldershot, England: Dartmouth Publishing Company, Ltd., 1996. Also reprinted in Organizational Behavior: The Ethical Challenge, 2nd ed., edited by Yassin Sankar. Toronto, Canada: Canadian Scholars’ Press Inc., 2004, pp. 405-419.) View Details
  7. Trade Secrets and the Justification of Intellectual Property: A Comment on Hettinger

    L. S. Paine

    Keywords: Intellectual Property;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S. "Trade Secrets and the Justification of Intellectual Property: A Comment on Hettinger." Philosophy & Public Affairs 20, no. 3 (summer 1991): 247–263. (Reprinted in Business in Ethical Focus: An Anthology, edited by Fritz Allhoff and Anand J. Vaidya, 564-576. Peterborough, ON: Broadview Press, 2008; Reprinted in Ethics in the Workplace: Selected Readings in Business Ethics, edited by Robert A. Larmer, 268-278. St. Paul, Minn.: West Publishing, 1996; Reprinted in Ethics in the Workplace, edited by Edward J. Ottensmeyer and Gerald McCarthy, 508-519. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1996; Reprinted in Intellectual Property: Moral, Legal, and International Dilemmas, edited by Adam D. Moore, 39-56. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1997.) View Details
  8. Corporate Policy and the Ethics of Competitor Intelligence Gathering

    L. S. Paine

    Keywords: Policy; Ethics; Competition; Knowledge;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S. "Corporate Policy and the Ethics of Competitor Intelligence Gathering." Journal of Business Ethics 10, no. 6 (June 1991): 423–436. (Reprinted in Ethical Theory and Business, edited by Norman E. Bowie and Tom L. Beauchamp, 4th ed. 489-497. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1993; Reprinted in Ethics in Marketing, edited by J. Quelch and C. Smith. Burr Ridge, Ill.: Richard D. Irwin, 1993; Reprinted (and abridged) in Ethics Journal 2, no. 1, Ethics Resource Center (1992): 1-5.) View Details
  9. Management Buyouts and Managerial Efforts

    Robert F. Bruner and Lynn S. Paine

    Management buyouts, which have played an important role in the recent wave of corporate restructurings, have been criticized from several directions. This article addresses the problems created by management's conflict of interest. As members of the buyout team, managers have strong incentives to act in their own self-interest, yet they have a fiduciary duty to promote shareholders' interests. The conflict of interest inherent in management buyouts can be dealt with through a system of disclosure and review provided that management, board members, shareholders, and judges apply an appropriate standard of fair price. The authors propose a standard of fairness, the "synthetic MBO standard," based on the implications of management's fiduciary duties in the buyout context. They recommend that the disclosure requirements of the federal securities laws be modified to include disclosure of a company's value under this standard.

    Keywords: management; buyout; ethical decision making; Management; Leveraged Buyouts; Ethics; Decision Making;

    Citation:

    Bruner, Robert F., and Lynn S. Paine. "Management Buyouts and Managerial Efforts." California Management Review 30, no. 2 (winter 1988): 89–106. View Details
  10. The Board's Role in Influencing the Corporation's Ethical Climate

    L. S. Paine

    Keywords: Governance; Business Ventures; Ethics;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S. "The Board's Role in Influencing the Corporation's Ethical Climate." Director's Monthly (September 1987): 1–5. (Reprinted in Ethics and the Boardroom, compiled by the National Association of Corporate Directors, 11-16. Washington, D.C.: National Association of Corporate Directors, 1996.) View Details
  11. Children as Consumers: An Ethical Evaluation of Children's Television Advertising

    L. S. Paine

    Keywords: Customers; Ethics; Media; Advertising;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S. "Children as Consumers: An Ethical Evaluation of Children's Television Advertising." Business & Professional Ethics Journal 3, nos. 3/4 (spring/summer 1984): 119–145. (Reprinted in Business Ethics, edited by Thomas White. New York: MacMillan Publishing Company, 1993; Revised as "Children as Consumers: The Ethics of Children's Television Advertising." In Ethics in Marketing, edited by J. Quelch and C. Smith, 672-686. Burr Ridge, Ill: Richard D. Irwin, 1993.) View Details

Book Chapters

  1. The Value Shift

    Lynn Paine

    Keywords: Values and Beliefs;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn. "The Value Shift." In Humanism in Business: Perspectives on the Development of a Responsible Business Society, edited by Michael Pirson. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2008. View Details
  2. Leadership, Ethics, and Organizational Integrity: Time for a New Credo

    L. S. Paine

    Keywords: Leadership; Ethics; Trust; Organizations;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S. "Leadership, Ethics, and Organizational Integrity: Time for a New Credo." In Ethics in Business Leadership: Facing the Challenges of the 21st Century, edited by Domenec Mele. Ediciones Universidad de Navarra, S.A. (EUNSA), 2000, Spanish ed. View Details
  3. Ethics, Organizations and Business Schools

    L. S. Paine and Thomas R. Piper

    Keywords: Ethics; Organizations; Business Education; Non-Governmental Organizations;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S., and Thomas R. Piper. "Ethics, Organizations and Business Schools." In The Intellectual Venture Capitalist: John H. McArthur and the Work of the Harvard Business School, 1980-1995, edited by T. K. McCraw and J. L. Cruikshank. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1999. View Details
  4. Regulating the International Trade in Hazardous Pesticides: Closing the Accountability Gap

    L. S. Paine

    Keywords: Trade; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Corporate Accountability; Chemical Industry; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S. "Regulating the International Trade in Hazardous Pesticides: Closing the Accountability Gap." In Ethical Theory and Business. 4th ed. Edited by Norman E. Bowie and Tom L. Beauchamp, 547–556. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1993. (Reprinted in The International Library of Management, Ethics in Business and Economics, vol. 2, edited by Thomas Donaldson and Thomas W. Dunfee. Aldershot, England: Dartmouth Publishing Company, Ltd., 1996.) View Details
  5. Stakeholder Welfare, Managerial Ethics, and Management Buyouts

    L. S. Paine and Robert F. Bruner

    Keywords: Executive Compensation; Ethics; Conflict of Interests; Business and Stakeholder Relations;

    Citation:

    Paine, L. S., and Robert F. Bruner. "Stakeholder Welfare, Managerial Ethics, and Management Buyouts." In The Ethics of Organizational Transformation, edited by Robert Frederick, Michael W. Hoffman, and Edward S. Petry Jr.. New York: Quorum Books, 1989. View Details

Brief Articles, Reports, Book Reviews

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. China Vanke (A-1)

    Lynn S. Paine, John Macomber and Keith Chi-ho Wong

    As China's largest homebuilder, China Vanke Co. Ltd. (Vanke) was facing an industry downturn sparked by strong government intervention. Faced with falling prices, Vanke's president must decide whether to keep the company's pricing and product positioning intact, and how aggressively to pursue its greener building strategy. Follow-up cases present additional decisions, including how, and how aggressively, to improve safety and quality (A-2), and whether to expand into other asset classes, such as commercial real estate.

    Keywords: real estate; China; green building; sustainable development; leadership; business government relations; Leadership; Business and Government Relations; Urban Development; Growth and Development Strategy; Safety; Real Estate Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., John Macomber, and Keith Chi-ho Wong. "China Vanke (A-1)." Harvard Business School Case 314-104, March 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  2. China Vanke (A-2)

    Lynn S. Paine, John Macomber and Keith Chi-ho Wong

    China Vanke's president and his team must decide on a plan of action after reviewing the quality issues the company faced in early 2012 after a series of highly publicized incidents concerning the quality of the homes they built.

    Keywords: real estate; China; green building; sustainable development; safety; asset management; Leadership; Urban Development; Growth and Development Strategy; Assets; Safety; Real Estate Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., John Macomber, and Keith Chi-ho Wong. "China Vanke (A-2)." Harvard Business School Supplement 314-105, March 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  3. China Vanke (A-3)

    Lynn S. Paine, John Macomber and Keith Chi-ho Wong

    China Vanke's president is considering whether and how the company might make further inroads into the commercial real estate sector, while continuing to lead in the residential sector. He is also considering whether to branch into overseas residential markets such as Hong Kong, Singapore, and the United States.

    Keywords: real estate; China; sustainable development; green building; safety; asset management; Urban Development; Growth and Development Strategy; Safety; Assets; Real Estate Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., John Macomber, and Keith Chi-ho Wong. "China Vanke (A-3)." Harvard Business School Supplement 314-106, March 2014. View Details
  4. China Vanke (B)

    Lynn S. Paine, John Macomber and Keith Chi-ho Wong

    The case describes Vanke's response to the decisions posed in the A1, A2, and A3 cases and asks whether Vanke should expand its strategic scope by defining itself as an "urban facilities provider" rather than a "residential housing developer." The management team is also reviewing the company's forays in places such as Hong Kong, Singapore, the U.S., and Europe.

    Keywords: real estate; China; green building; sustainable development; safety; asset management; Growth and Development Strategy; Urban Development; Safety; Assets; Real Estate Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., John Macomber, and Keith Chi-ho Wong. "China Vanke (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 314-107, March 2014. (Revised April 2014.) View Details
  5. Governance and Sustainability at Nike (A)

    Lynn S. Paine, Nien-he Hsieh and Lara Adamsons

    Two members of Nike's executive team must decide what sustainability targets to propose to Nike's CEO and to the corporate responsibility committee of Nike's board of directors. Set in 2012, the case traces the evolution of Nike's approach to environmental and social concerns from its origins in student protests against labor conditions in the supply chain in the 1990s through the development of a board-level corporate responsibility (CR) committee in 2001 to the creation of the Sustainable Business & Innovation (SB&I) strategy in 2009. In this context, Hannah Jones, Nike's VP of SB&I, and Eric Sprunk, VP of Merchandising & Product, are working to finalize the company's next round of sustainability targets for presentation to the CR committee. When Nike signs on to the Roadmap to Zero, a Greenpeace-inspired initiative to eliminate the discharge of toxic chemicals into the water supply by 2020, the company's target-setting process becomes more complex. Jones and Sprunk must decide whether to recommend that Nike dial back other sustainability goals to meet the zero toxics challenge, modify its commitment to zero toxics, or find another solution.

    Keywords: Nike; Hannah Jones; Mark Parker; Phil Knight; Philip Knight; Eric Sprunk; Jill Ker Conway; Phyllis Wise; Don Blair; sustainable business and innovation; SB&I; Flyknit; DyeCoo; Footwear; Athletic Footwear; Apparel; Athletic Apparel; sustainability; Greenpeace; Detox campaign; Dirty Laundry; Water; Water Use; Water Pollution; Water Resources; Corporate Responsibility Committee; Decision Choices and Conditions; Decisions; ethics; fairness; Globalized Firms and Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Globalized Markets and Industries; governance; corporate accountability; corporate governance; Innovation and Invention; Innovation and Management; Innovation Leadership; Innovation Strategy; Goals and Objectives; Management Practices and Processes; corporate social responsibility and impact; Performance; Alignment; supply chain; Organizational Change and Adaptation; judgment; board of directors; board committees; environmental and social sustainability; footwear industry; Decision Choices and Conditions; Decisions; Ethics; Fairness; Globalized Firms and Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Globalized Markets and Industries; Governance; Corporate Accountability; Corporate Governance; Innovation and Invention; Innovation and Management; Innovation Leadership; Innovation Strategy; Goals and Objectives; Management Practices and Processes; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Performance; Alignment; Supply Chain; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Judgments; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Asia; China; United States; Oregon; Portland;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Nien-he Hsieh, and Lara Adamsons. "Governance and Sustainability at Nike (A)." Harvard Business School Case 313-146, June 2013. View Details
  6. Governance and Sustainability at Nike (B)

    Lynn S. Paine, Nien-he Hsieh and Lara Adamsons

    Two members of Nike's executive team must decide what sustainability targets to propose to Nike's CEO and to the corporate responsibility committee of Nike's board of directors. Set in 2012, the case traces the evolution of Nike's approach to environmental and social concerns from its origins in student protests against labor conditions in the supply chain in the 1990s through the development of a board-level corporate responsibility (CR) committee in 2001 to the creation of the Sustainable Business & Innovation (SB&I) strategy in 2009. In this context, Hannah Jones, Nike's VP of SB&I, and Eric Sprunk, VP of Merchandising & Product, are working to finalize the company's next round of sustainability targets for presentation to the CR committee. When Nike signs on to the Roadmap to Zero, a Greenpeace-inspired initiative to eliminate the discharge of toxic chemicals into the water supply by 2020, the company's target-setting process becomes more complex. Jones and Sprunk must decide whether to recommend that Nike dial back other sustainability goals to meet the zero toxics challenge, modify its commitment to zero toxics, or find another solution.

    Keywords: Nike; Hannah Jones; Mark Parker; Phil Knight; Philip Knight; Eric Sprunk; Jill Ker Conway; Phyllis Wise; Don Blair; sustainable business and innovation; SB&I; Flyknit; DyeCoo; Footwear; Athletic Footwear; Apparel; Athletic Apparel; sustainability; Greenpeace; Detox campaign; Dirty Laundry; Water; Water Use; Water Pollution; Water Resources; Corporate Responsibility Committee; Decision Choices and Conditions; Decisions; ethics; fairness; Globalized Firms and Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Globalized Markets and Industries; governance; corporate accountability; corporate governance; Innovation and Invention; Innovation and Management; Innovation Leadership; Innovation Strategy; Goals and Objectives; Management Practices and Processes; corporate social responsibility and impact; Performance; Alignment; supply chain; Organizational Change and Adaptation; judgment; board of directors; board committees; environmental and social sustainability; footwear industry; Decision Choices and Conditions; Decisions; Ethics; Fairness; Globalized Firms and Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Globalized Markets and Industries; Governance; Corporate Accountability; Corporate Governance; Innovation and Invention; Innovation and Management; Innovation Leadership; Innovation Strategy; Goals and Objectives; Management Practices and Processes; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Performance; Alignment; Supply Chain; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Judgments; Apparel and Accessories Industry; Asia; China; United States; Oregon; Portland;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Nien-he Hsieh, and Lara Adamsons. "Governance and Sustainability at Nike (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 313-147, June 2013. View Details
  7. Solving a Problem or Sounding the Alarm? Guidelines on Blowing the Whistle

    Lynn S. Paine and Lara Adamsons

    Many of us will at some point in our professional lives encounter situations involving what we believe to be wrongful or injurious activities that may cause harm to innocent parties, our company, or the public. It may be necessary to bring the matter to the attention of someone who can do something about it—to engage in what is sometimes called "whistleblowing." This note outlines some factors that should be considered when that happens.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Ethics; Corporate Disclosure; Business Processes; Behavior;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Lara Adamsons. "Solving a Problem or Sounding the Alarm? Guidelines on Blowing the Whistle." Harvard Business School Background Note 308-005, June 2008. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  8. Business and Human Rights

    Lynn S. Paine and Lara Adamsons

    This note addresses some of the most frequently asked questions about the relation between human rights and business. Topics include the definition of human rights, the business leader's role regarding human rights, and legal liability of companies and executives for violating human rights.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Ethics; Human Capital; Legal Liability; Rights; Leadership; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Lara Adamsons. "Business and Human Rights." Harvard Business School Background Note 309-097, February 2009. (Revised September 2011.) View Details
  9. Stolt-Nielsen Transportation Group

    Lynn S. Paine and Lara Adamsons

    Richard Wingfield considers whether to continue a cooperative agreement with industry peers in the deep-sea parcel tanker shipping industry. What are the economic and strategic implications of ending the agreement? What are the legal implications of continuing? Where is the line between cooperation and conspiracy, and what should a company do if the legality of a long-standing business practice comes into question?

    Keywords: Lawfulness; Lawsuits and Litigation; Agreements and Arrangements; Alliances; Cooperation; Ship Transportation; Shipping Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Lara Adamsons. "Stolt-Nielsen Transportation Group." Harvard Business School Case 310-043, October 2009. (Revised May 2011.) View Details
  10. Memo From Counsel: Antitrust Law and Customer Allocation

    Lynn S. Paine and Lara Adamsons

    When do antitrust laws come into play in a bidding situation? What should a company do if an antitrust violation is uncovered? This memo discusses "hard-core" antitrust violations, focusing on bid rigging and market allocation, under the laws of the U.S. and other leading antitrust regimes.

    Keywords: Laws and Statutes; Bids and Bidding; Monopoly; Shipping Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Lara Adamsons. "Memo From Counsel: Antitrust Law and Customer Allocation." Harvard Business School Background Note 310-048, October 2009. (Revised May 2011.) View Details
  11. Leading Citigroup (A)

    Lynn S. Paine, Aldo Sesia and Carin-Isabel Knoop

    The (A) case describes a series of controversial events and alleged misdeeds that placed Citigroup in the public spotlight and launched investigations into the company's business practices by regulators in Japan and Europe in the fall of 2004. CEO Chuck Prince must decide what to do to right the company and restore its reputation.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Leadership; Organizational Culture; Business and Government Relations; Reputation; Japan; Europe;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Aldo Sesia, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Leading Citigroup (A)." Harvard Business School Case 308-001, April 2008. (Revised May 2011.) View Details
  12. Wiwa v. Royal Dutch/Shell

    Lynn S. Paine and Lara Adamsons

    On the eve of trial, and after nearly 14 years of pre-trial litigation, the parties in Wiwa v. Royal Dutch/Shell jointly announced that the four U.S. lawsuits stemming from the execution of the Ogoni Nine in 1995 had been settled.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Multinational Firms and Management; Corporate Accountability; Lawsuits and Litigation; Nigeria; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Lara Adamsons. "Wiwa v. Royal Dutch/Shell." Harvard Business School Case 310-038, October 2009. (Revised February 2010.) View Details
  13. Employment At Will: A Legal Perspective

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Provides a brief overview of the employment-at-will doctrine, an important concept unique to the U.S. legal system and business landscape. Briefly surveys the history and development of this doctrine and certain limitations and exceptions to it, as well as some of the distinguishing features of the employment termination process in the United States relative to other countries.

    Keywords: Business History; Resignation and Termination; Employment; Common Law; Laws and Statutes; Business and Government Relations; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Employment At Will: A Legal Perspective." Harvard Business School Background Note 306-036, August 2005. (Revised February 2010.) View Details
  14. Manville Corporation Fiber Glass Group (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Sarah Gant

    Manville Corp.'s senior managers must decide how to respond to a new scientific study suggesting that fiberglass, the source of 75% of the company's profits, may be another asbestos and must act under conditions of great uncertainty. In particular, when should a manager inform employees and customers about potential product risks, and how should hazard communications be handled to inform without inflaming?

    Keywords: Communication Strategy; Decision Choices and Conditions; Ethics; Health Disorders; Risk Management; Marketing Communications; Product; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Safety; Consumer Products Industry; Industrial Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Sarah Gant. "Manville Corporation Fiber Glass Group (A)." Harvard Business School Case 394-117, December 1993. (Revised November 2009.) View Details
  15. China's Evolving Labor Laws (A)

    Lynn Sharp Paine and Aldo Sesia Jr.

    The (A) case describes key provisions of the new labor contract law proposed by China's National People's Congress in 2006. The case invites students to consider how domestic and multinational companies should respond to the Chinese government's invitation to comment on the proposal. The case also describes the impetus for the new legislation and initial reaction to the draft by key business groups, legal scholars, and others.

    Keywords: Multinational Firms and Management; Government Legislation; Labor; Contracts; Laws and Statutes; Business and Government Relations; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn Sharp, and Aldo Sesia Jr. "China's Evolving Labor Laws (A)." Harvard Business School Case 308-092, January 2008. (Revised November 2009.) View Details
  16. China's Evolving Labor Laws (B)

    Lynn Sharp Paine and Aldo Sesia Jr.

    The (B) case describes how the various business groups responded to the Chinese government's invitation to submit comments on its draft labor contract law and details the ensuing global controversy. The (B) case also describes changes made to the working draft and provides an overview of the law as finally enacted in June 2007.

    Keywords: Government Legislation; Labor; Contracts; Laws and Statutes; Business and Government Relations; Labor and Management Relations; Conflict and Resolution; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn Sharp, and Aldo Sesia Jr. "China's Evolving Labor Laws (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 308-093, January 2008. (Revised November 2009.) View Details
  17. AES Honeycomb (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Sarah C. Mavrinac

    Senior managers of the AES Corp., an independent power producer, must decide whether to drop the company's emphasis on corporate values and revamp organizational controls as advised by investment analysts and outside counsel. The company is recovering from an incident of environmental fraud at one of its plants where an innovative decentralized "honeycomb" structure has been put in place. Some believe the structure is too decentralized and that lack of controls contributed to the incident.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Energy Generation; Values and Beliefs; Corporate Governance; Governance Controls; Crisis Management; Organizational Structure; Environmental Sustainability; Energy Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Sarah C. Mavrinac. "AES Honeycomb (A)." Harvard Business School Case 395-132, December 1994. (Revised October 2009.) View Details
  18. Royal Dutch/Shell in Nigeria (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Mihnea C. Moldoveanu

    Working with Shell's country manager for Nigeria, the company's Committee of Managing Directors must decide how to respond to the Nigerian government's decision to impose the death sentence on Ken Saro-Wiwa and eight other leaders of a movement for the rights of the Ogoni (one of Nigeria's 240 ethnic groups). As the case opens, Saro-Wiwa and his codefendants have just been found guilty of inciting murder in a trial that international observers have criticized as deeply flawed. Saro-Wiwa, an environmentalist, writer, businessman, television producer, and human rights activist, has been a vocal critic of not only the Nigerian government but also Shell. Provides background on Shell, on its business in Nigeria, and on environmental and human rights issues in the Niger Delta.

    Keywords: Ethics; Multinational Firms and Management; Courts and Trials; Rights; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Business and Government Relations; Environmental Sustainability; Social Issues; Nigeria;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Mihnea C. Moldoveanu. "Royal Dutch/Shell in Nigeria (A)." Harvard Business School Case 399-126, February 1999. (Revised October 2009.) View Details
  19. The Fiduciary Relationship: A Legal Perspective

    Lynn S. Paine

    Discusses the concept of a fiduciary, as developed in the Anglo-American common law tradition, and outlines the principal differences between the legal standard applied to fiduciaries compared to ordinary arms'-length contractors.

    Keywords: Ethics; Assets; Financial Management; Common Law; Standards;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "The Fiduciary Relationship: A Legal Perspective." Harvard Business School Background Note 304-064, December 2003. (Revised April 2009.) View Details
  20. Baosteel Group: Governance with Chinese Characteristics

    Lynn S. Paine and G.A. Donovan

    The new outsider-dominated board of directors of China's state-owned Baosteel Group must decide whether to modify the Group's structure. With the completion of a pending acquisition, the Group will control four publicly listed steel-producing subsidiaries, and board members are concerned about competition among the subsidiaries and about the subsidiaries' public shareholders. Selected by the Chinese government as the first company to take part in a pilot project on corporate governance in state-owned enterprises, Baosteel and its board are under intense scrutiny by Chinese and overseas investors in the listed subsidiaries as well as by China's political leadership and the media. The case provides background on Baosteel, China's SOE reform, the Chinese government's pilot project on corporate governance, and the functioning of Baosteel's newly constituted board of directors.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Corporate Governance; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Governing and Advisory Boards; State Ownership; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and G.A. Donovan. "Baosteel Group: Governance with Chinese Characteristics." Harvard Business School Case 309-098, March 2009. View Details
  21. Salomon Brothers (A)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Describes Salomon Brothers' recovery from the August 1991 Treasury auction scandal. Details the impact of the firm's disclosure of bidding improprieties and describes how the new management team, led by Warren Buffett and Deryck Maughan, guided the company through the ensuing crisis. The impact of the crisis is followed through the end of 1992. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Ethics; Leadership; Crisis Management; Reputation; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Salomon Brothers (A)." Harvard Business School Case 305-019, November 2004. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  22. HDFC (A)

    Lynn S. Paine, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Suma Raju

    The top management team at India's leading home finance company must decide how to deal with the emergence of intense competition at the end of the 1990s. Having founded the industry and dominated it for nearly 20 years, the well-respected company faces a bevy of new entrants from the banking, mortgage finance, and insurance sectors. In particular, management must decide how to respond to an aggressive new competitor who has copied HDFC's processes, lured away some of its key staff, and whose misleading, but lawful, advertising of interest rates is drawing customers away from HDFC.

    Keywords: Values and Beliefs; Management Style; Management Teams; Competition; Financial Services Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Suma Raju. "HDFC (A)." Harvard Business School Case 301-093, March 2001. (Revised February 2009.) View Details
  23. Leading Citigroup (B)

    Lynn S. Paine, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Aldo Sesia

    The (B) case describes the actions taken by Citigroup CEO Chuck Prince and his management team to right the company in the wake of the controversies and alleged misdeeds described in the (A) case.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Ethics; Corporate Governance; Governance Controls; Leadership; Management Teams; Organizational Culture;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Aldo Sesia. "Leading Citigroup (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 308-002, April 2008. (Revised August 2008.) View Details
  24. Attorney-Client Privilege

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Provides a brief summary of the requirements of the attorney-client privilege--an important mechanism for protecting client confidences under U.S. law. Discusses the application of the privilege in a corporate context.

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Interpersonal Communication; Crime and Corruption; Law; Attorney and Client Relationships;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Attorney-Client Privilege." Harvard Business School Background Note 306-013, July 2005. (Revised August 2008.) View Details
  25. Note on the Law of Sexual Harassment

    Lynn Sharp Paine and Lara Adamsons

    This note provides an introduction to the law of sexual harassment. It has three parts. Part One describes the laws on harassment in the United States. Part Two explores controversial and emerging aspects of the American legal framework. Part Three gives a brief overview of sexual harassment laws and policies in several regions of the world, including Europe, Asia, and Latin America.

    Keywords: Social Issues; Laws and Statutes; Policy; Gender Characteristics; Asia; Latin America; United States; Europe;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn Sharp, and Lara Adamsons. "Note on the Law of Sexual Harassment." Harvard Business School Background Note 308-096, February 2008. (Revised August 2008.) View Details
  26. Haier Hefei Electronics Co. (A)

    Lynn Sharp Paine

    The Haier Group, the first mainland Chinese company to make the Financial Times list of Asia's "most admired companies," attributes its success in large measure to the new value system it has sought to instill throughout the organization. However, when Haier takes over the Yellow Mountain television factory in the distant Hefei province at the behest of Hefei's government, workers strike against the Haier culture and what it stands for. The immediate catalyst is the labor contract Haier has asked them to sign. Haier's management must decide what's fair and how to respond to the workers' demands in the face of local government pressure to compromise.

    Keywords: Public Ownership; Business and Government Relations; Organizational Culture; Transformation; Ethics; Labor and Management Relations; Business or Company Management; Contracts; Electronics Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn Sharp. "Haier Hefei Electronics Co. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 308-075, November 2007. (Revised May 2008.) View Details
  27. ChoicePoint (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Zack Phillips

    The CEO of ChoicePoint, a leading company in the rapidly growing U.S. personal data industry, must reexamine the company's business model after a serious breach of data security affecting some 145,000 U.S. citizens. He must decide on steps to strengthen data protection in the company and clarify his stance on regulating a largely unregulated industry.

    Keywords: Business Model; Ethics; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Safety; Information Technology; Information Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Zack Phillips. "ChoicePoint (A)." Harvard Business School Case 306-001, February 2006. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  28. Charles Veillon, S.A. (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Aldo Sesia

    The top management team at Charles Veillon, a Swiss mail-order company, is considering whether to work with a human rights organization to monitor the labor practices of its suppliers. A particular concern is avoiding child labor and other forms of workplace coercion. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Ethics; Governance Controls; Labor; Rights; Nonprofit Organizations; Switzerland;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Aldo Sesia. "Charles Veillon, S.A. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 307-002, July 2006. (Revised August 2007.) View Details
  29. Governing Sumida Corporation

    Lynn S. Paine, Masako Egawa, Chisato Toyama and Kim Bettcher

    Describes the corporate governance changes adopted by Japan's Sumida Corp. between 1999 and 2005, setting them in the context of changes in Japan's commercial code during this period. Sumida was the first Japanese company to adopt a new U.S.-inspired "committee system" of governance as permitted under legal changes that took effect in 2003. Board members must assess the company's governance system and decide whether further changes are needed.

    Keywords: Governing and Advisory Boards; Corporate Governance; Change Management; Business or Company Management; Management Teams; Law; Japan;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Masako Egawa, Chisato Toyama, and Kim Bettcher. "Governing Sumida Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 306-022, November 2005. (Revised February 2007.) View Details
  30. Instructor's Guide to Leadership and Corporate Accountability (LCA)

    Lynn S. Paine

    To provide instructors with a roadmap to the Harvard Business School's required first-year MBA Course Leadership and Corporate Accountability. Describes the objectives of the course, as well as its structure, content, and guiding framework. A day-by-day synopsis, sample syllabus, and order information for cases and materials are also provided.

    Keywords: Leadership; Corporate Accountability;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Instructor's Guide to Leadership and Corporate Accountability (LCA)." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 307-032, October 2006. (Revised November 2006.) View Details
  31. Merck Sharp & Dohme Argentina, Inc. (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Hal Hogan

    Describes the efforts of the new managing director of Merck's subsidiary for Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay to transform the organization and its culture. Focuses on a critical decision: whether to offer the son of a high-ranking official in the government's national health-care program a place in the company's highly selective intern program for young professionals.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Ethics; Decision Making; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Leadership; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Conflict of Interests; Argentina; Uruguay; Paraguay;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Hal Hogan. "Merck Sharp & Dohme Argentina, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 398-033, December 1997. (Revised October 2006.) View Details
  32. Recall 2000: Bridgestone Corp. (A) (Abridged)

    Lynn S. Paine

    In September 2000, the president of Bridgestone-Firestone, the U.S. subsidiary of Japan's Bridgestone Corp., was invited to appear before a U.S. congressional subcommittee investigating the August 2000 recall of more than 6.5 million tires made by the subsidiary. The tires had been implicated in several hundred auto accidents and dozens of fatalities in the United States and elsewhere around the globe. Depicts the tire controversy and the decisions it posed for Bridgestone's management. Tracing Bridgestone's evolution from a regional multinational to a global player by way of acquiring Firestone, a U.S. tire maker founded in 1900, the case shows how organizational factors, compounded by cultural differences between the two business systems, contributed to tire safety problems and the ensuing controversy.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Crisis Management; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Product; Trade; Organizational Culture; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Auto Industry; United States; Japan;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Recall 2000: Bridgestone Corp. (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 306-020, July 2005. (Revised October 2006.) View Details
  33. Grutter v. Bollinger: A Synopsis

    Lynn S. Paine

    In June 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court announced its decision in Grutter v. Bollinger, upholding the principle of affirmative action in university admissions, which had been challenged as a violation of the U.S. Constitution's Fourteenth Amendment. This case includes excerpts from the amicus curiae briefs filed by General Motors and by the United States.

    Keywords: Lawsuits and Litigation;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Grutter v. Bollinger: A Synopsis." Harvard Business School Background Note 304-065, December 2003. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  34. Bribery in Business: A Legal Perspective

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Provides a brief overview of the concept of bribery and the principal rationales prompting restrictions on such conduct. Also, reviews some of the most important U.S. and international laws prohibiting various forms of bribery.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Lawfulness;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Bribery in Business: A Legal Perspective." Harvard Business School Background Note 306-012, July 2005. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  35. Deception in Business: A Legal Perspective

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Discusses several of the most important prohibitions on deception found in U.S. law, starting with the basic elements of liability for fraud and moving to important antifraud provisions in federal statutes, restrictions on "misrepresentation" in consumer and contract law, deceptive nondisclosure, and forms of sales "puffery" that are not legally actionable.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Lawfulness;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Deception in Business: A Legal Perspective." Harvard Business School Background Note 306-019, July 2005. (Revised August 2006.) View Details
  36. Citigroup: Euro Zone Bond Trading (A)

    Lynn S. Paine, Christopher Bruner and Aldo Sesia

    Describes the development and execution of a bond trading strategy by a London-based team of Citigroup eurozone bond traders. The trades, which involved two of Europe's leading electronic trading platforms, gave rise to a European-wide controversy over the traders' conduct and Citigroup's role in the eurozone bond market. Describes the idea behind the strategy.

    Keywords: Debt Securities; Financial Markets; Bonds; Ethics; Values and Beliefs; Decision Making; Lawfulness; Business Strategy; Banking Industry; Financial Services Industry; Europe;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Christopher Bruner, and Aldo Sesia. "Citigroup: Euro Zone Bond Trading (A)." Harvard Business School Case 307-004, July 2006. View Details
  37. Cherkizovsky Group, The (A) (Abridged)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Describes the transformation of a formerly state-owned meat processing plant in Russia into a privately owned and operated food processing conglomerate under Russia's economic reforms of the 1990s. Among the challenges the CEO, Igor Babaev, and his top management team must address is what to do when sales plummet as a result of false rumors that the company's meat products are being produced with tainted and potentially deadly meat.

    Keywords: History; Business Conglomerates; Privatization; Transformation; Management Teams; Sales; Brands and Branding; Business or Company Management; Marketing Strategy; Crisis Management; Food and Beverage Industry; Russia;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Cherkizovsky Group, The (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 306-021, August 2005. (Revised May 2006.) View Details
  38. Corporate Reform in the United States

    Lynn S. Paine and Kim Bettcher

    The spate of corporate misdeeds revealed to the American public in 2001 to 2002 prompted corrective action in many quarters of the U.S. economy. The note summarizes some of the steps taken by lawmakers, regulators, law-enforcement officials, companies, investors, professional associations, and educators to restore public trust in U.S. capital markets and the U.S. system of corporate governance.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Capital Markets; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Trust; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Kim Bettcher. "Corporate Reform in the United States." Harvard Business School Background Note 304-091, March 2004. (Revised May 2006.) View Details
  39. Marriott Corporation (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Charles A. Nichols

    Marriott Corp.'s chairman and CEO must decide whether to recommend a restructuring of the company to the board of directors. The proposal he is considering would split the Marriott Corp., a premier hotel developer, owner, and manager, into two separate companies by a stock dividend to shareholders. One of the new companies would contain most of Marriott Corp.'s profitable management operations, while the other would retain ownership of its hotel properties as well as most of its long-term debt.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Restructuring; Governing and Advisory Boards; Decision Making; Ethics; Management Teams; Business and Shareholder Relations; Accommodations Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Charles A. Nichols. "Marriott Corporation (A)." Harvard Business School Case 394-085, December 1993. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  40. Sealed Air Taiwan (A) (Abridged)

    Lynn S. Paine

    The general manager for U.S.-based Sealed Air Corp.'s Taiwan subsidiary must decide how to improve productivity and achieve profitability. In addition to considering a new approach to compensation, he is wondering how to bridge the gap between Sealed Air's corporate culture and local business practices in Taiwan. A particular problematic practice is the local use of "tea money."

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Relationships; Service Operations; Motivation and Incentives; Management Skills; Compensation and Benefits; Taiwan; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Sealed Air Taiwan (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 305-094, March 2005. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  41. Sealed Air Corporation: Globalization and Corporate Culture (A) (Abridged)

    Lynn S. Paine and Karen Wruck

    Sealed Air Corp.'s CEO and COO are considering what approach they should take to building a seamless corporate culture worldwide. Anticipating continuing growth and expansion, especially outside the United States, they are concerned with preserving and promoting the culture that has been one of the company's key assets. However, their experience in integrating acquired companies, especially outside the United States, has heightened their awareness of differences among the regional cultures of the world and the challenges they face in maintaining a unified corporate culture.

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Business or Company Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Expansion; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Policy; Leadership; United States; Europe; Asia;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Karen Wruck. "Sealed Air Corporation: Globalization and Corporate Culture (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 305-095, March 2005. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  42. PCAOB, The (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Kim Bettcher

    Members of the Public Co. Accounting Oversight Board--a private-sector, nonprofit body created by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002--must determine the form and content of a new auditing standard on internal control that will fulfill the requirements of Section 404 of the act. After receiving comments from issuers, investors, and accounting firms, board members contemplate the necessary scope of an audit engagement to evaluate the effectiveness of internal controls and restore investors' confidence in financial reporting. Gives students an opportunity to consider the role of external regulation and self-regulation and such issues as the difficulties of cost-benefit analysis for proposed regulations, the relation between rules and discretion, the differences between investor and executive perspectives, and the apportionment of responsibilities among management, internal auditors, and external auditors.

    Keywords: Law; Financial Reporting; Corporate Governance; Standards; Government Administration; Accounting Audits;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Kim Bettcher. "PCAOB, The (A)." Harvard Business School Case 305-025, February 2005. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  43. Oracle vs. PeopleSoft (A)

    Lynn S. Paine, Guhan Subramanian and David Millstone

    Focuses on the hotly contested takeover battle between software rivals Oracle and PeopleSoft in 2003 and 2004. Raises novel issues of takeover law under Delaware corporate law as well as issues of fair competition under California law. A central issue is whether the PeopleSoft board's adoption of a "Customer Assurance Program" is a permissible move to protect customers or an impermissible takeover defense.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Software; Ethics; Law; Governing and Advisory Boards; Information Technology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Guhan Subramanian, and David Millstone. "Oracle vs. PeopleSoft (A)." Harvard Business School Case 306-058, November 2005. (Revised February 2006.) View Details
  44. Note on Insider Trading Liability

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Provides a general description and overview of U.S. law on insider trading, including the basic theories of liability, the responsibilities of securities firm managers to prevent and detect insider trading, and the potential penalties for insider trading. A rewritten version of an earlier note.

    Keywords: Legal Liability; Ethics; Crime and Corruption; Finance;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Note on Insider Trading Liability." Harvard Business School Background Note 305-029, November 2004. (Revised February 2006.) View Details
  45. Ron Perez (A)

    Lynn S. Paine

    The division human resources officer must decide whether to discipline a long-time employee for misusing company time and for improperly filling out time cards for his work on government contracts. Intended to focus on the various factors relevant to disciplining employees for violating company policy as expressed in the code of ethics.

    Keywords: Ethics; Moral Sensibility; Employees; Business or Company Management; Management Practices and Processes; Organizations; Crime and Corruption;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Ron Perez (A)." Harvard Business School Case 306-084, January 2006. View Details
  46. Martha Stewart (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Explores Martha Stewart's December 2001 sale of ImClone Systems common stock, the ensuing federal investigations into possible insider trading, and Stewart's criminal prosecution and sentencing. Discusses the impact of publicity on Stewart's company, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, and on her personal image, and raises issues of prosecutorial discretion. Challenges students to consider the validity of the insider trading charge against Stewart as well as the securities fraud charge included in the indictment, the appropriate sentence, and whether federal authorities unfairly singled out Stewart for investigation.

    Keywords: Capital Markets; Corporate Governance; Financial Markets; Management Teams; Law; Government and Politics;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Martha Stewart (A)." Harvard Business School Case 305-034, November 2004. (Revised January 2006.) View Details
  47. Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation (B)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Officials of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) must decide whether to refer the Beech-Nut apple juice case to the Justice Department for criminal prosecution, and if so, whether to recommend prosecution of individual executives or of the company only.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Decisions; Cases; Law; Management; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 394-103, November 1993. (Revised January 2006.) View Details
  48. Trend Micro (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Kim Bettcher

    The founder and CEO of Trend Micro is seeking to develop an effective decision-making process for the company's multicultural executive team as part of his effort to develop a more cohesive and focused global organization. This case describes the company's growth and development, including the efforts made to develop an approach to decision making that melds the best of Eastern and Western cultures.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Management Teams; Diversity Characteristics; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Kim Bettcher. "Trend Micro (A)." Harvard Business School Case 303-065, March 2003. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  49. Trend Micro (B)

    Lynn S. Paine and Kim Bettcher

    The Trend Micro team's discussion of consumer strategy at its quarterly meeting in Germany provides an opportunity to assess the effectiveness of the team's decision process.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Management Teams; Business Strategy; Diversity Characteristics; Information Technology Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Kim Bettcher. "Trend Micro (B)." Harvard Business School Case 303-085, April 2003. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  50. Dual Class Share Companies

    Samuel L. Hayes III, Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Provides a brief historical overview of dual class share companies in the United States, focusing on the New York Stock Exchange's evolving position on dual class structures since the 1920s, the impact of hostile takeovers on their use since the 1980s, and recent perspectives on their utility and appropriateness. Concludes with a brief discussion of the role of dual class structures in recent debates over Europe's takeover laws.

    Keywords: Acquisition; Debates; Capital Structure; Equity; Business History; Law; Organizational Structure; Business and Shareholder Relations; Perspective; Europe; United States;

    Citation:

    Hayes, Samuel L., III, Lynn S. Paine, and Christopher Bruner. "Dual Class Share Companies." Harvard Business School Background Note 306-032, August 2005. View Details
  51. Competitive Information Policy at Pratt & Whitney

    Lynn S. Paine

    Officials at United Technologies Corp. (UTC) must decide on an ethics policy to govern competitive intelligence gathering. The flow of competitor information into the Pratt & Whitney division has declined sharply since adoption of UTC's code of ethics. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Policy; Corporate Governance; Ethics; Competition; Information Management; Business or Company Management; Law;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Competitive Information Policy at Pratt & Whitney." Harvard Business School Case 394-154, February 1994. (Revised July 2005.) View Details
  52. Guth v. Loft: Synopsis

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Provides a brief overview of the Supreme Court of Delaware's opinion in the 1939 case of Guth v. Loft, a widely cited application of the "corporate opportunity doctrine." Explores the corporate law principles regulating when a corporate manager can or cannot take advantage of a business opportunity relating to the corporation's business, in light of the manager's fiduciary duties.

    Keywords: Courts and Trials; Lawfulness; Management; Opportunities;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Guth v. Loft: Synopsis." Harvard Business School Background Note 306-015, July 2005. View Details
  53. Insider Trading Quiz

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Designed to test understanding of basic theories of insider trading under U.S. law. Presents six scenarios based on actual situations in which insider trading was alleged to have violated U.S. law, as well as a seventh scenario that took place in Italy, permitting comparison of U.S. and European approaches to insider trading regulation.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Stock Shares; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Law; Theory; Europe; Italy; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Insider Trading Quiz." Harvard Business School Exercise 306-016, July 2005. View Details
  54. Mall of America (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Christopher Bruner

    Explores fiduciary duty issues that arose in litigation among partners in the partnership that owned and controlled the Mall of America. Describes the complex real estate transaction in which one partner attempted to purchase an additional interest in the mall from a nonpartner financing entity and the litigation that ensued.

    Keywords: Ethics; Business Organization; Lawsuits and Litigation; Partners and Partnerships; Property; Investment; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Christopher Bruner. "Mall of America (A)." Harvard Business School Case 305-068, November 2004. (Revised June 2005.) View Details
  55. Note on Individual and Corporate Liability

    Lynn S. Paine

    Answers some of the most common questions managers ask about potential corporate and individual liability for corporate misconduct under U.S. law. Describes a few general principles of liability that managers should be aware of. A rewritten version of an earlier note.

    Keywords: Corporate Accountability; Legal Liability;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Note on Individual and Corporate Liability." Harvard Business School Background Note 305-049, September 2004. (Revised April 2005.) View Details
  56. Competitive Information Policy at Pratt & Whitney TN

    Lynn S. Paine and Charles A Nichols, III

    Teaching Note for (9-394-154).

    Keywords: Information; Policy; Competitive Strategy; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Charles A Nichols, III. "Competitive Information Policy at Pratt & Whitney TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 395-203, May 1995. (Revised April 2005.) View Details
  57. Martin Marietta: Managing Corporate Ethics (A)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Senior managers at Martin Marietta are considering two questions: how to assess the company's seven-year-old ethics program; and how to deal with employees' fear of retribution--real or imagined--for alerting the corporate ethics office to potential problems. The case describes the company's ethics program, the process of integrating it into the organization, and the reactions and views of key managers. Intended to provide in-depth knowledge of one company's approach to managing corporate ethics and to permit students to evaluate the impact of the program. Exposes students to a range of issues involved in managing programs like the one in place at Martin Marietta.

    Keywords: Ethics; Resignation and Termination; Employees; Law; Business or Company Management; Programs;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Martin Marietta: Managing Corporate Ethics (A)." Harvard Business School Case 393-016, September 1992. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  58. Martin Marietta: Managing Corporate Ethics (C-1)

    Lynn S. Paine

    The division human resources officer must decide whether an older employee should be disciplined for misusing company time and for improperly filling out time cards for his work on government contracts. Intended to focus on the various factors relevant to disciplining employees for violating company policy as expressed in the Code of Ethics.

    Keywords: Ethics; Human Resources; Contracts; Management; Situation or Environment;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Martin Marietta: Managing Corporate Ethics (C-1)." Harvard Business School Supplement 393-017, September 1992. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  59. Martin Marietta: Managing Corporate Ethics (B)

    Lynn S. Paine

    The president of one of Martin Marietta's four main operating companies has learned of procurement irregularities in the company he manages. The problems involve U.S. government contracts the company is working on. After getting legal advice from the company's general counsel, the president must decide whether to disclose the irregularities to the U.S. government. Permits students to consider how managers should react if they learn about potential wrong-doing in their companies. Asks students to consider whether a policy of openness and disclosure should be generally favored and how such a policy should be applied.

    Keywords: Fluctuation; Crime and Corruption; Ethics; Governing and Advisory Boards; Policy; Contracts; Leadership; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Martin Marietta: Managing Corporate Ethics (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 393-023, September 1992. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  60. Martin Marietta: Managing Corporate Ethics (C2)

    Lynn S. Paine

    A jury must decide whether an employee, discharged for misusing company time and filling out false time cards for work on U.S. government contracts, has been wrongfully terminated. Designed to show how the human resource manager's perspective on employee discipline compares with the perspective of U.S. legal doctrine and a group of disinterested jurors. Also permits students to consider the legal status of a company's policy documents, including the Code of Conduct.

    Keywords: Ethics; Governance Compliance; Policy; Resignation and Termination; Perspective;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Martin Marietta: Managing Corporate Ethics (C2)." Harvard Business School Supplement 393-022, September 1992. (Revised August 2004.) View Details
  61. Sarbanes-Oxley Act, The

    Lynn S. Paine and James Weber

    Describes the evolution and passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 from the perspective of the senior counsel on capital markets for the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services.

    Keywords: Government Legislation; Corporate Accountability; Governance Controls; Capital Markets; Financial Reporting; Laws and Statutes; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and James Weber. "Sarbanes-Oxley Act, The." Harvard Business School Case 304-079, March 2004. (Revised July 2004.) View Details
  62. Becton Dickinson: Ethics and Business Practices (A)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Becton Dickinson's Global One-Company Operations Group must decide on the company's global policy on gifts, gratuities, and business entertainment. A central issue is whether the policy should be established centrally and made uniform worldwide or whether it should be decided locally, depending on local circumstances and practices. The case contains numerous examples of troubling situations drawn from different regions of the world, as well as background information on growing anticorruption efforts worldwide.

    Keywords: Policy; Ethics; Law; Organizational Culture; Business Strategy; Giving and Philanthropy; Global Strategy; Trade; Business or Company Management;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Becton Dickinson: Ethics and Business Practices (A)." Harvard Business School Case 399-055, September 1998. (Revised May 2004.) View Details
  63. Sears Auto Centers (A) (Abridged)

    Lynn S. Paine

    In the early 1990s Sears faced and allegations by the California Department of Consumer Affairs that the company's auto repair centers had been overbilling customers and making unnecessary repairs. Top management must evaluate the problem and come up with a plan to improve performance. An abridged version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Corporate Accountability; Ethics; Organizational Culture; Compensation and Benefits; Management Teams; Employees; Behavior; Motivation and Incentives; Performance Improvement; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Sears Auto Centers (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 304-063, December 2003. (Revised May 2004.) View Details
  64. Governance Reform at MCI

    Lynn S. Paine and Bridget Gurtler

    Richard Breeden proposed corporate governance reforms for MCI. Breeden is a former chairman of the SEC who was a court-appointed "corporate monitor" for the troubled company (formerly WorldCom). The company must adhere to the proposals unless excused by a court order.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Restructuring; Insolvency and Bankruptcy; Business or Company Management; Management Teams;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Bridget Gurtler. "Governance Reform at MCI." Harvard Business School Case 304-066, March 2004. (Revised May 2004.) View Details
  65. Forging the New Salomon

    Lynn S. Paine and Michael Santoro

    Describes Salomon Brothers' recovery from the August 1991 Treasury auction scandal. Details the impact of the firm's disclosure of bidding improprieties and describes how the new management team, led by Warren Buffett and Deryck Maughan, guided the company through the ensuing crisis. The impact of the crisis is followed through the end of 1992.

    Keywords: Crisis Management; Ethics; Organizational Culture; Law; Business or Company Management;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Michael Santoro. "Forging the New Salomon." Harvard Business School Case 395-046, September 1994. (Revised January 2004.) View Details
  66. Manville Corp. Fiber Glass Group (B)

    Lynn S. Paine and Sarah Gant

    Describes how Manville's managers responded when their main product, fiberglass, was classified by an international research agency as a possible human carcinogen.

    Keywords: Product Marketing; Business or Company Management; Ethics; Product;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Sarah Gant. "Manville Corp. Fiber Glass Group (B)." Harvard Business School Case 394-118, December 1993. (Revised December 2003.) View Details
  67. Manville Corporation Fiber Glass Group (C) (Abridged)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Manville Corp.'s senior managers are surprised when Japanese government officials advise them not to go forward with their plan to add a cancer warning label to diatomaceous earth (DE) products sold in Japan. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled that a component of DE is probably carcinogenic, and Manville has prepared to modify its labels and material safety data sheets and to mount a communications effort inform customers of the cancer warning. Now, Manville's senior managers are being told that it is "culturally inappropriate" to proceed with this plan in Japan. An abridged version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Risk and Uncertainty; Moral Sensibility; Safety; Government Administration; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Decision Choices and Conditions; Ethics; Announcements; Industrial Products Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Manville Corporation Fiber Glass Group (C) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 304-078, December 2003. View Details
  68. Sears Auto Centers (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Michael Santoro

    The CEO of Sears must decide how to respond to allegations that the company's auto repair division has been misleading consumers and charging them for unnecessary repairs.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Corporate Accountability; Ethics; Organizational Culture; Compensation and Benefits; Management Teams; Employees; Behavior; Motivation and Incentives; Performance Improvement; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Michael Santoro. "Sears Auto Centers (A)." Harvard Business School Case 394-009, July 1993. (Revised December 2003.) View Details
  69. Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation (A-1)

    Lynn S. Paine

    The CEO of Beech-Nut Nutrition Corp. must decide what to do when he receives information that the company's supply of apple juice concentrate may be adulterated. The concentrate is used in many of the company's juice products. It appears that others in the company may have had reason to doubt the authenticity of the concentrate for several years. The case illustrates the importance of accurate information and open channels of communication to ensure sound decision making by top management. Also illustrates how emphasis on financial objectives and designated goals may obscure important ethical and legal considerations. May be used to discuss organizational barriers to information flow, approaches to decision making, and the role of the FDA and other U.S. regulatory officials in ensuring food purity.

    Keywords: Quality; Law; Ethics; Nutrition; Management Teams; Decisions; Business or Company Management; Communication; Governance Compliance; Information Management; Corporate Finance; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation (A-1)." Harvard Business School Case 392-084, February 1992. (Revised September 2003.) View Details
  70. Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation (A-2)

    Lynn S. Paine, Bronwyn Halliday and Michael Santoro

    Beech-Nut's CEO must decide what to do. Asks students to consider how much evidence of impurity should be enough to trigger management's acknowledgment of a problem. What are the cognitive and attitudinal factors and pressures that lead people to persist in beliefs long after they appear untenable to more objective observers?

    Keywords: Safety; Risk Management; Attitudes; Nutrition; Cognition and Thinking; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Bronwyn Halliday, and Michael Santoro. "Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation (A-2)." Harvard Business School Supplement 392-085, February 1992. (Revised September 2003.) View Details
  71. Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation (D)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Prosecutors in the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Consumer Litigation reflect on their case against the Beech-Nut Nutrition Corp.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Lawsuits and Litigation; Management; Family Ownership; Cognition and Thinking; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation (D)." Harvard Business School Supplement 394-105, December 1993. (Revised September 2003.) View Details
  72. Recall 2000: Bridgestone Corp. (A)

    Lynn S. Paine

    In September 2000, the president of Bridgestone-Firestone, the U.S. subsidiary of Japan's Bridgestone Corp., was invited to appear before a U.S. congressional subcommittee investigating the August 2000 recall of more than 6.5 million tires made by the subsidiary. The tires had been implicated in several hundred auto accidents and dozens of fatalities in the United States and elsewhere around the globe. This case depicts the tire controversy and the decisions it posed for Bridgestone's management. Tracing Bridgestone's evolution from a regional multinational to a global player by way of acquiring Firestone, a U.S. tire maker founded in 1900, the case shows how cultural differences between the two business systems played a part in creating the situation and in shaping Bridgestone/Firestone's responses to it. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: History; Crisis Management; Business Processes; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Manufacturing Industry; Auto Industry; Rubber Industry; Japan; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Recall 2000: Bridgestone Corp. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 302-013, July 2001. (Revised February 2003.) View Details
  73. Funai Consulting Company, Ltd. (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Tomoya Nakamura

    In the summer of 1997, a consultant at Japan's Funai Consulting Co. Ltd., must decide how to respond to a client's proposal to offer "open pricing" (based on willingness to pay) to customers unable to pay the standard price for the client's product. The client, Akita Komachi Farmer's Association, markets rice and rice products to consumers and is facing increasing international competition with the opening of Japan's rice market. The case presents Funai Consulting's unusual business philosophy, which was developed by its founder and 1997 Chairman Yukio Funai. Mixing "new science" with both Japanese and Western concepts, Funai's approach is based on the goal of mutual prosperity rather than dominance in competition. Teaching purpose: To develop decision-making skills; and to develop understanding of a management and business philosophy rooted in Japanese culture.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Price; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Decisions; Agribusiness; Management Practices and Processes; Business Ventures; Consulting Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Tomoya Nakamura. "Funai Consulting Company, Ltd. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 398-017, January 1998. (Revised February 2002.) View Details
  74. Resinas Sinteticas, S.A. (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Greg Rogers

    A recent MBA graduate heads international marketing for his family's Mexico-based rosin supply business, he must decide how to respond to the aggressive tactics of his much larger American competitor. Among other things, the U.S. competitor is spreading false rumors among the Mexican company's European customers. This case provides background on Mexican culture and society as seen by the case protagonist.

    Keywords: Family Business; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Competition; Marketing Strategy; Business Strategy; Crime and Corruption; Trade; Chemical Industry; Mexico; United States; Europe;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Greg Rogers. "Resinas Sinteticas, S.A. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 301-070, November 2000. (Revised February 2002.) View Details
  75. Avon Products (B)

    Lynn S. Paine and Greg Rogers

    Presents the results of the decision taken in the (A) case. Describes the subsequent challenges faced by Avon Products in promulgating its globalization worldwide.

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Gender Characteristics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Greg Rogers. "Avon Products (B)." Harvard Business School Case 301-060, October 2000. (Revised August 2001.) View Details
  76. Haier Group, The (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Robert J. Crawford

    Zhang Ruimin, founder and CEO of China's Haier Group, must decide whether to acquire Red Star Electric Appliance Co., an insolvent local manufacturer of washing machines. Although Haier, slated to become one of China's first global brand names, has successfully turned around other failing enterprises by infusing its distinctive culture and management style, it is not clear whether that approach will work at Red Star. Both Haier and Red Star are "collective enterprises."

    Keywords: Acquisition; Business or Company Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Success; Consumer Products Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Robert J. Crawford. "Haier Group, The (A)." Harvard Business School Case 398-101, March 1998. (Revised July 2001.) View Details
  77. Avon Products (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Greg Rogers

    The general manager of Avon Mexico, Fernando Lezama, must decide whether to promote a woman to the position of vice president of sales. If appointed, the candidate would be the first female in all of Latin America to hold an executive position and one of the first women in Mexico to attain this level of responsibility. Lezama's all-male executive team has doubts about the candidate's readiness, but Lezama is also cognizant of Avon's global vision which calls for the advancement of women at all levels of the organization. Earlier in the year, the Avon Mexico organization had completed an exercise called "appreciative inquiry" aimed at enhancing gender relations in the workforce.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Leading Change; Salesforce Management; Organizational Culture; Job Design and Levels; Gender Characteristics; Management Teams; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Greg Rogers. "Avon Products (A)." Harvard Business School Case 301-059, October 2000. (Revised July 2001.) View Details
  78. AES: Hungarian Project (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Ann Leamon

    The AES Corp., the world's largest independent power producer, has put out a request for bids to build a new power plant in Hungary. Just after the closing date for submitting bids, one of the contractors calls to request an opportunity to "improve" its bid. Although AES has not yet completed its analysis, this contractor appeared to be the low bidder. What should the coordinator do? This decision is one of several faced by AES as it attempts to do business in post-socialist Hungary. This case also explores AES's distinctive approach to downsizing the workforce at the power plants it purchased there. Teaching purpose: To explore how AES implements its values and ethical standards in a post-Communist context.

    Keywords: Bids and Bidding; Energy Generation; Technology Adoption; Business Startups; Ethics; Value; Energy Industry; Hungary;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Ann Leamon. "AES: Hungarian Project (A)." Harvard Business School Case 300-045, March 2000. (Revised June 2001.) View Details
  79. Wipro Technologies (A)

    Lynn S. Paine, Carin-Isabel Knoop and Suma Raju

    The new general manager of Wipro's software services division has been brought on board from General Electric to develop the division into a leading provider of software services to the world's largest corporations. A native of India who received management training in the United States, Vivek Paul faces a number of challenges in achieving this goal. Most immediate is attracting, developing, and retaining key talent. At the time of the case, Wipro is India's largest company in terms of market capitalization and its second largest exporter of software services.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Transformation; Change Management; Human Resources; Software; Information Technology Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Carin-Isabel Knoop, and Suma Raju. "Wipro Technologies (A)." Harvard Business School Case 301-043, February 2001. (Revised May 2001.) View Details
  80. Sealed Air Taiwan (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Robert J. Crawford

    The general manager for U.S.-based Sealed Air Corp.'s Taiwan subsidiary must decide whether he's hired the right person to bridge the gap between Sealed Air's corporate culture and Taiwan's business culture. This case details Bob Kayser's experiences in trying to infuse the Sealed Air culture into the Taiwan operation, including approaches to training, compensation, and motivation.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Relationships; Service Operations; Motivation and Incentives; Management Skills; Compensation and Benefits; Taiwan; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Robert J. Crawford. "Sealed Air Taiwan (A)." Harvard Business School Case 399-058, September 1998. (Revised April 2001.) View Details
  81. Avon Products China (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Jennifer Gui

    In April 1998, when the Chinese central government bans all forms of direct selling in China in April 1998, executives at Avon China must decide how to respond. The first direct sales company to enter China after its opening to outsiders, Avon sparked widespread interest in direct selling among the Chinese. Just as Avon is about to complete a new $40 million plant in Guangzhou, however, the government cracks down on local abuses of direct selling by banning all forms of the practice. Avon must decide whether to abandon its traditional business model in the face of these developments.

    Keywords: Crisis Management; Sales; Trade; Business and Government Relations; Government and Politics; Market Participation; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Jennifer Gui. "Avon Products China (A)." Harvard Business School Case 300-053, December 1999. (Revised April 2001.) View Details
  82. Sealed Air Corporation: Globalization and Corporate Culture (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Karen Wruck

    Sealed Air Corp.'s CEO and COO are considering what approach they should take to building a seamless corporate culture worldwide. Anticipating continuing growth and expansion, especially outside the United States, they are concerned with preserving and promoting the culture that has been one of the company's key assets. However, their experiences in integrating acquired companies, especially outside the United States, have heightened their awareness of differences among the regional cultures of the world and the challenges they face in maintaining a unified corporate culture.

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Business or Company Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Expansion; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Policy; Leadership; United States; Europe; Asia;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Karen Wruck. "Sealed Air Corporation: Globalization and Corporate Culture (A)." Harvard Business School Case 398-096, January 1998. (Revised January 2001.) View Details
  83. AES Global Values

    Lynn S. Paine

    Members of the development team for the AES Corp.'s power plant project in India must decide what plant technology to specify in their application for techno-economic clearance from the government of India's Central Electric Authority. Their choice is between more expensive technology that would enable the plant to meet more demanding U.S. environmental standards or less costly technology that would meet local environmental standards and free up funds for contributions to other needs of communities surrounding the projected plant. At the same time, executives at AES headquarters in Arlington, VA, are considering whether the company's traditional focus on meeting its social responsibility through CO2-offset programs is the best approach to social responsibility as the company expands worldwide.

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Environmental Sustainability; Energy Generation; Technology Adoption; Energy Industry; India; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "AES Global Values." Harvard Business School Case 399-136, May 1999. (Revised November 2000.) View Details
  84. MBA In Jeopardy (A)

    Lynn S. Paine, Gagan Gupta and Phani K. Nagarjuna

    The Community Standards Panel of Harvard Business School must determine whether two students have violated the school's community standards, and if so, what sanction would be appropriate. Concerns allegations of plagiarism. In a second-year elective course, two students submitted a joint paper, substantial portions of which were taken nearly verbatim from their sources. The material was not footnoted. However, the sources were listed in the bibliography provided at the end of the paper. The students, who are not from the United States, claim that they followed the citation practices customary in their home country.

    Keywords: Moral Sensibility; Business Education; Learning; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., Gagan Gupta, and Phani K. Nagarjuna. "MBA In Jeopardy (A)." Harvard Business School Case 301-033, September 2000. View Details
  85. Cimetrics Technology (B): Russian Perspectives

    Lynn S. Paine

    Presents the perspectives of two Russian software developers working for Cimetrics in Moscow. A central issue from the Russian perspective is whether a more structured and formal arrangement is needed for managing the Russian team.

    Keywords: Business Model; Software; Business or Company Management; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Human Resources; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Labor and Management Relations; Product Development; Performance Evaluation; Information Technology Industry; Russia; Canada; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Cimetrics Technology (B): Russian Perspectives." Harvard Business School Case 300-055, December 1999. (Revised July 2000.) View Details
  86. Cimetrics Technology (A-1)

    Lynn S. Paine and Jose Royo

    Jim Lee, president of Cimetrics (a young, fast growing, software start-up) is reevaluating his small company's geographically dispersed product development model. To take advantage of talented low-cost labor in Russia, the company has relied on two software engineering teams in Russia to develop its products. Bridging cultural differences between the Russian teams, their Toronto-based manager, and the company's Boston-based leadership has not been easy, however. After a Russian engineer (brought to Boston at Cimetrics' expense) asks to relocate back to Russia, Lee decides to reevaluate the situation.

    Keywords: Business Model; Software; Business or Company Management; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Human Resources; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Labor and Management Relations; Product Development; Performance Evaluation; Information Technology Industry; Russia; Canada; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Jose Royo. "Cimetrics Technology (A-1)." Harvard Business School Case 399-108, February 1999. (Revised June 2000.) View Details
  87. Royal Dutch/Shell in Transition (B)

    Lynn S. Paine

    This case describes the decisions made by Shell in response to the situation presented in the (A) case.

    Keywords: Governance; Corporate Accountability; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Social Issues; Public Opinion; Moral Sensibility; Values and Beliefs; Transformation; Energy Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Royal Dutch/Shell in Transition (B)." Harvard Business School Case 300-040, October 1999. View Details
  88. Cherkizovsky Group (A), The

    Lynn S. Paine and Hal Hogan

    Describes the transformation of a formerly state-owned meat processing plant in Russia into a privately-owned and operated food processing conglomerate under Russia's economic reforms of the 1990s. Among the challenges the CEO, Igor Babaev, and his top management team must address is what to do when sales plummet as a result of false rumors that the company's meat products are being produced with tainted and potentially deadly meat.

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Privatization; Transformation; Global Strategy; Culture; Food and Beverage Industry; Russia;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Hal Hogan. "Cherkizovsky Group (A), The." Harvard Business School Case 399-119, February 1999. (Revised October 1999.) View Details
  89. Royal Dutch/Shell in Transition (A)

    Lynn S. Paine

    After the Brent Spar episode and the 1995 events in Nigeria, Shell undertakes an intensive review of its values and business principles. At the same time, it conducts the largest multi-stakeholder consultation in its history in an effort to better understand society's evolving expectations for companies like Shell. Based on its findings, the company launches an effort to change its culture and embed in the organization a revised set of business principles. The company is considering whether as part of the transformation effort to begin public reporting on its environmental and social as well as its financial performance. The issue is sharpened when Shell receives a challenge from a small group of shareholders in the form of an unusual (for a British company) shareholder resolution.

    Keywords: Corporate Governance; Corporate Accountability; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Social Issues; Public Opinion; Moral Sensibility; Values and Beliefs; Transformation; Environmental Accounting; Energy Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Royal Dutch/Shell in Transition (A)." Harvard Business School Case 300-039, October 1999. View Details
  90. Manville Corp. Fiber Glass Group (C)

    Lynn S. Paine and Sarah Gant

    Manville Corp.'s senior managers are surprised when Japanese government officials advise them not to go forward with their plan to add a cancer warning label to diatomaceous earth (DE) products sold in Japan. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has ruled that a component of DE is probably carcinogenic, and Manville has prepared to modify its labels and material safety data sheets and to mount a communications effort to inform customers of the cancer warning. Now, Manville's senior managers are being told that it is "culturally inappropriate" to proceed with this plan in Japan.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Ethics; Conflict of Interests; Health; Safety; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Policy; Japan;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Sarah Gant. "Manville Corp. Fiber Glass Group (C)." Harvard Business School Case 394-116, February 1994. (Revised May 1999.) View Details
  91. Guaranty Trust Bank PLC Nigeria (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Hal Hogan

    Fola Adeola, the CEO of Nigeria's Guaranty Trust Bank and one of its founders in 1991, is considering what should be done to maintain the bank's original vision and vitality in the face of its rapid growth and success in the marketplace. Known for its high ethical standards, the bank is planning to expand inside and outside Nigeria. Among Adeola's concerns is what to do about employees' insistence on underpaying their personal income taxes--a practice he regards as inconsistent with the bank's mission of being a role model for society. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Banks and Banking; Organizational Culture; Ethics; Planning; Expansion; Business Processes; Law; Banking Industry; Nigeria;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Hal Hogan. "Guaranty Trust Bank PLC Nigeria (A)." Harvard Business School Case 399-110, February 1999. (Revised April 1999.) View Details
  92. Shepard Quraeshi Associates (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Harold F. Hogan Jr

    Samina Quraeshi, principal of Boston-based Shepard Quraeshi Associates, must decide whether to take legal action against her key employees after they leave her firm to start their own, taking with them key clients and data. Quraeshi sees the situation as reflecting cultural tension between Eastern and Western ways of doing business. This case details Quraeshi's cultural journey from her Muslim past in Pakistan to her life in the United States, including service as the director of the Design-Arts Program for the U.S. National Endowment for the Arts.

    Keywords: Ethnicity Characteristics; Nationality Characteristics; Ethics; Employees; Gender Characteristics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Immigration; Growth and Development Strategy; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Harold F. Hogan Jr. "Shepard Quraeshi Associates (A)." Harvard Business School Case 398-112, March 1998. (Revised March 1999.) View Details
  93. An Interview with Zhang Ruimin, CEO, Haier Group, Video

    Lynn S. Paine and Jennifer Benqing

    Zhang Ruimin, founder and CEO of China's Haier Group, must decide whether to acquire Red Star Electric Appliance Co., an insolvent local manufacturer of washing machines. Although Haier, slated to become one of China's first global brand names, has successfully turned around other failing enterprises by infusing its distinctive culture and management style, it is not clear whether that approach will work at Red Star. Both Haier and Red Star are "collective enterprises." Examines the management and culture of an enterprise that has adapted successfully to the new, more open, economy of China in the 1990s.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Acquisition; Business or Company Management; Consumer Products Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Jennifer Benqing. "An Interview with Zhang Ruimin, CEO, Haier Group, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 399-514, December 1998. View Details
  94. Shanghai Real Estate (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Harold F. Hogan Jr

    An independent consultant from the United States must decide what to do when faced with his client's apparent violation of an agreement with a third party. The consultant is American, the client is a Chinese real estate developer, and the third party is a French construction company. The case traces the development and tensions in a set of relationships fraught with cross-cultural confusion. The consultant must interpret the parties' agreement and decide whether loyalty to the client or a principle of transparency takes priority.

    Keywords: Ethics; Contracts; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Law; Agreements and Arrangements; Alliances; Corporate Accountability; Consulting Industry; Real Estate Industry; China; United States; France;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Harold F. Hogan Jr. "Shanghai Real Estate (A)." Harvard Business School Case 398-088, December 1997. (Revised August 1998.) View Details
  95. Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America: The Quest for a Model Workplace

    Lynn S. Paine and Dale Coxe

    This case details the sexual harassment case brought against Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America by nearly 300 female employees in April 1996. The recommendations developed for the company by former U.S. Labor Secretary Lynn Marten are presented. In response to the harassment controversy, Marten was asked to review the plant's policies and to formulate a plan for a "model workplace."

    Keywords: Ethics; Moral Sensibility; Groups and Teams; Organizational Culture; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Behavior; Attitudes; Problems and Challenges; Working Conditions; Crime and Corruption; Auto Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Dale Coxe. "Mitsubishi Motor Manufacturing of America: The Quest for a Model Workplace." Harvard Business School Case 398-028, September 1997. (Revised May 1998.) View Details
  96. Sealed Air Corporation: Globalization and Corporate Culture (B)

    Lynn S. Paine and Karen Wruck

    Sealed Air Corp.'s CEO and COO are considering what approach they should take to building a seamless corporate culture worldwide. Anticipating continuing growth and expansion, especially outside the United States, they are concerned with preserving and promoting the culture that has been one of the company's key assets. However, their experiences in integrating acquired companies, especially outside the United States, have heightened their awareness of differences among the regional cultures of the world and the challenges they face in maintaining a unified corporate culture.

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Business or Company Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Expansion; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Policy; Leadership; United States; Europe; Asia;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Karen Wruck. "Sealed Air Corporation: Globalization and Corporate Culture (B)." Harvard Business School Case 398-097, January 1998. (Revised April 1998.) View Details
  97. Sideco Americana S.A. (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Harold F. Hogan Jr

    This case focuses on a decision the Sideco management team faces when customers of its newly acquired and privatized water and sewer company neglect to pay its bills. Describes the effort to transform an old-style Argentine construction and engineering company into a customer-focused manager of public services and infrastructure projects. A key theme is transforming the culture and values of the organization and its workforce.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Organizational Structure; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Business and Government Relations; Transformation; Business or Company Management; Values and Beliefs; Argentina;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Harold F. Hogan Jr. "Sideco Americana S.A. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 398-081, January 1998. (Revised February 1998.) View Details
  98. Harassment at Work?

    Lynn S. Paine and Dale Coxe

    Presents three scenarios involving behavior that could arguably be called sexual harassment. The first scenario is set in a medical supply company in an unnamed emerging market region. The second is set in a New York-based securities firm. The third is set in a U.S. aerospace company. In the first two scenarios, a general manager must respond to complaints made by female employees about the behavior of their male managers. In the third scenario, a general manager must decide whether to approve a proposed plan to eliminate harassment.

    Keywords: Working Conditions; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Ethics; Moral Sensibility; Groups and Teams; Crime and Corruption; Attitudes; Behavior; Labor and Management Relations; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry; Financial Services Industry; New York (city, NY); United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Dale Coxe. "Harassment at Work?" Harvard Business School Case 398-001, August 1997. (Revised December 1997.) View Details
  99. Siam Cement Group,The: Corporate Philosophy (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Prompilai Khunaphante

    In the face of Thailand's 1990 cement shortage, managers at Siam Cement Co., Thailand's largest cement provider, must decide how to allocate available supply and whether to attempt to uphold government-controlled prices among the company's agents. At issue is the overall design of a rationing system as well as how to handle several special requests.

    Keywords: Business or Company Management; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Resource Allocation; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Policy; Construction Industry; Thailand;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Prompilai Khunaphante. "Siam Cement Group,The: Corporate Philosophy (A)." Harvard Business School Case 398-018, September 1997. (Revised November 1997.) View Details
  100. Siam Cement Group, The: Corporate Philosophy (B)

    Lynn S. Paine and Prompilai Khunaphante

    In 1996, senior executives of Thailand's Siam Cement Group must decide whether to apply its management philosophy and code of ethics when doing business outside of Thailand. The status of the code in joint ventures and contractual relationships is of particular concern.

    Keywords: Ethics; Decision Making; Joint Ventures; Corporate Strategy; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Policy; Construction Industry; Thailand;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Prompilai Khunaphante. "Siam Cement Group, The: Corporate Philosophy (B)." Harvard Business School Case 398-019, September 1997. View Details
  101. Siam Cement Group, The: Corporate Philosophy (C)

    Lynn S. Paine and Prompilai Khunaphante

    In November 1996, the board of directors of Thailand's Siam Cement Group approves a policy spelling out the extent to which code of ethics shall be applied in joint venture and contractor relationships.

    Keywords: Joint Ventures; Policy; Ethics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Governing and Advisory Boards; Construction Industry; Thailand;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Prompilai Khunaphante. "Siam Cement Group, The: Corporate Philosophy (C)." Harvard Business School Case 398-020, September 1997. View Details
  102. Levi Strauss & Co.: Global Sourcing (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Jane Palley Katz

    In 1993, senior managers at Levi Strauss & Co., the world's largest brand-name apparel manufacturer, were deciding whether the company should have a business presence in China, given the human rights and other problems there. The China Policy Group has been asked to use the company's "principled reasoning approach" to make a recommendation based on the company's ethical values and newly-adopted global sourcing guidelines.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Decisions; Management Skills; Trade; Brands and Branding; Rights; Ethics; Foreign Direct Investment; Apparel and Accessories Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Jane Palley Katz. "Levi Strauss & Co.: Global Sourcing (A)." Harvard Business School Case 395-127, November 1994. (Revised February 1997.) View Details
  103. Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation Series TN

    Lynn S. Paine and Charles A Nichols, III

    Teaching Note for (9-392-084), (9-392-085), (9-394-102), (9-394-103), (9-394-104), and (9-394-105).

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Charles A Nichols, III. "Beech-Nut Nutrition Corporation Series TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 395-184, April 1995. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  104. Avalon Information Services, Inc.

    Lynn S. Paine and Wilda White

    The Privacy Review Committee of Avalon Information Services must decide how to deal with concerns voiced by its retail supermarket customers about the privacy of consumer data collected through Avalon's point-of-sale data collection program. One customer is proposing that Avalon adopt a system requiring consumers to affirmatively consent to participate in the program in place of the "opt-out" system used to date.

    Keywords: Information; Data and Data Sets; Ethics; Mission and Purpose; Information Technology; Demand and Consumers; Safety; Information Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Wilda White. "Avalon Information Services, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 395-036, January 1995. (Revised November 1996.) View Details
  105. Corporate Purpose and Responsibility

    Lynn S. Paine

    Presents several conceptions of corporate purpose and responsibility as articulated by a variety of groups and individuals during the period 1970-95. Included are materials from the Business Roundtable, the American Law Institute, the Royal Society of Arts and Manufacturers (U.K.), the U.S. Catholic Bishops, and excerpts from the writings of economist Milton Friedman and lawyer Christopher Stone. A brief introduction provides historical background on the corporate responsibility debate.

    Keywords: Mission and Purpose; History; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Corporate Purpose and Responsibility." Harvard Business School Background Note 396-201, December 1995. (Revised November 1996.) View Details
  106. Problems at InSpeech

    Lynn S. Paine

    InSpeech, Inc., the largest U.S. provider of speech, occupational, and physical therapists to nursing homes and hospitals, is faltering badly. The company is having trouble retaining its frontline employees--the clinicians who deliver its services--and its customers. Senior managers must assess the problem and devise a turnaround strategy.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Business Strategy; Problems and Challenges; Health Care and Treatment; Crisis Management; Mission and Purpose; Values and Beliefs; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Problems at InSpeech." Harvard Business School Case 394-109, January 1994. (Revised June 1996.) View Details
  107. Lotus MarketPlace: Households

    Lynn S. Paine

    Managers at Lotus and Equifax must decide what to do about their new jointly developed database and software product Lotus MarketPlace which has been criticized as a threat to individual privacy. The Product, which would allow small businesses to buy targeting mail lists for direct mail marketing, has been under development for about two years and is scheduled for shipment in several months. The case includes information about relevant regulations and ethical standards developed by the direct marketing industry and by Equifax which wishes to be a leader in fair information practices, as well as details about the product and built-in privacy safeguards.

    Keywords: Ethics; Product Marketing; Business or Company Management; Decisions; Software; Rights; Marketing Communications; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Lotus MarketPlace: Households." Harvard Business School Case 392-026, October 1991. (Revised June 1996.) View Details
  108. Forging the New Salomon Series and Leadership Problems at Salomon Series TN

    Lynn S. Paine and Charles A Nichols, III

    Teaching Note for (9-395-046), (9-395-047), (9-395-044), and (9-395-045).

    Keywords: Leadership; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Charles A Nichols, III. "Forging the New Salomon Series and Leadership Problems at Salomon Series TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 395-171, May 1995. (Revised May 1996.) View Details
  109. NovaCare, Inc.: Living the Vision and Problems at InSpeech TN

    Lynn S. Paine and Charles A Nichols, III

    Teaching Note for (9-394-110) and (9-394-109).

    Keywords: Leadership; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Charles A Nichols, III. "NovaCare, Inc.: Living the Vision and Problems at InSpeech TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 395-197, May 1995. (Revised May 1996.) View Details
  110. Leading for Integrity: Corporate Purpose and Responsibility

    Lynn S. Paine

    Outlines several differing conceptions of corporate purpose and responsibility that emerged in the 1970s and 1980s.

    Keywords: Management; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Performance Evaluation; Corporate Strategy;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Leading for Integrity: Corporate Purpose and Responsibility." Harvard Business School Background Note 394-144, January 1994. (Revised May 1996.) View Details
  111. Wetherill Associates, Inc. Supplement

    Lynn S. Paine and Charles A Nichols III

    Describes the compensation system implemented for Wetherill Associates employees as of January 1995 and reports the company's financial results for 1994.

    Keywords: Business Earnings; Compensation and Benefits;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Charles A Nichols III. "Wetherill Associates, Inc. Supplement." Harvard Business School Supplement 395-182, April 1995. (Revised March 1996.) View Details
  112. Wetherill Associates, Inc.

    Lynn S. Paine

    Top managers of Wetherill Associates, Inc., a small, privately held distributor of electrical parts to the automotive aftermarket, are considering whether to modify the company's compensation system for its salesforce. The management wants a compensation system that reinforces the company's right-action policy and its team approach to customer service. The case describes the right-action ethic and its application throughout the business.

    Keywords: Ethics; Business or Company Management; Organizational Structure; Compensation and Benefits; Salesforce Management;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Wetherill Associates, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 394-113, December 1993. (Revised November 1995.) View Details
  113. Hutton Branch Manager (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Jane Palley Katz

    The manager of an E.F. Hutton branch office must decide how best to approach a colleague whose aggressive and ethically problematic cash management practices have cost the branch a major institutional client. These practices had been encouraged by top management at Hutton. In 1982, when short-term interest rates were at historically high levels of 18%-20%, these practices were generating significant interest income, sometimes exceeding product revenues in certain offices. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Ethics; Business or Company Management; Decisions; Management Skills; Cash Flow; Financial Management; Investment; Management Teams; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Jane Palley Katz. "Hutton Branch Manager (A)." Harvard Business School Case 396-044, August 1995. (Revised September 1995.) View Details
  114. Hutton Branch Manager (C)

    Lynn S. Paine and Jane Palley Katz

    Centers on the company's plea of guilty to 2,000 counts of mail and wire fraud in response to the U.S. government's challenge to its cash management practices. Describes the Justice Department's investigations as well as the findings and recommendations of former Attorney General Griffin Bell, who was asked to determine responsibility for the questionable practices and to recommend organizational changes, if needed. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Financial Management; Governance Controls; Crime and Corruption; Governance Compliance; Law Enforcement; Financial Services Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Jane Palley Katz. "Hutton Branch Manager (C)." Harvard Business School Case 396-046, August 1995. (Revised September 1995.) View Details
  115. Hutton Branch Manager (D)

    Lynn S. Paine and Jane Palley Katz

    Describes the actions taken by E.F.Hutton management in response to the Bell Report, a study prepared by former Attorney General Griffin Bell and his law firm after Hutton pleaded guilty to 2,000 counts of mail and wire fraud in connection with its cash management practices. Developments leading up to the 1988 purchase of Hutton by Shearson Lehman also are described. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Legal Liability; Crime and Corruption; Moral Sensibility; Acquisition; Decisions; Business or Company Management; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Jane Palley Katz. "Hutton Branch Manager (D)." Harvard Business School Case 396-047, August 1995. View Details
  116. Note on the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations and Corporate Criminal Fines Exercise TN

    Lynn S. Paine and Michael Santoro

    Teaching Note for (9-393-060) and (9-394-101).

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Government and Politics; Corporate Governance;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Michael Santoro. "Note on the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations and Corporate Criminal Fines Exercise TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 395-195, May 1995. View Details
  117. Note on Industry Self-Regulation and U.S. Antitrust Laws

    Lynn S. Paine and Michael Santoro

    Describes the purpose and nature of industry self-regulation and outlines the factors self-regulatory groups must consider to avoid infringing U.S. antitrust laws. Several examples of industry self-regulation are discussed.

    Keywords: Ethics; Governance Compliance; Governing Rules, Regulations, and Reforms; Knowledge; Law;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Michael Santoro. "Note on Industry Self-Regulation and U.S. Antitrust Laws." Harvard Business School Background Note 395-214, May 1995. View Details
  118. Pfizer: Global Protection of Intellectual Property

    Lynn S. Paine and Michael Santoro

    Top officials at Pfizer are assessing their strategy for improving protection of Pfizer's patents around the world. The outcome of the Uruguay Round of the GATT negotiations is uncertain, and it is not clear whether an acceptable intellectual property protection agreement will emerge. The case describes how Pfizer helped transform intellectual property from a lawyer's specialty to an international trade issue of concern around the world through close cooperation with the U.S. government, leadership in forming a tripartite coalition among U.S., Japanese, and European industry, and mobilization of the Pfizer organization. Shows how far a company may go to protect its intellectual property in a world where the concept of intellectual property is not universally recognized or accepted. May also be used to discuss the effectiveness and legitimacy of Pfizer's strategy, the conflicts between industrialized country and developing country perspectives on international trade and national sovereignty, and the question of appropriate norms of intellectual property protection.

    Keywords: Patents; Trade; Policy; Government and Politics; Business Strategy; Agreements and Arrangements; Alliances; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Pharmaceutical Industry; United States; Japan; Europe;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Michael Santoro. "Pfizer: Global Protection of Intellectual Property." Harvard Business School Case 392-073, February 1992. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  119. NovaCare, Inc.: Living the Vision

    Lynn S. Paine

    NovaCare's CEO is considering how further to institutionalize the company's espoused values and beliefs. One challenge is integrating two newly acquired businesses; another is better aligning the values of the company's managers with those of its front-line employees--the health care providers who deliver rehabilitative services to patients in nursing homes and hospitals.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Health Care and Treatment; Labor and Management Relations; Management Teams; Values and Beliefs; Mergers and Acquisitions; Mission and Purpose; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "NovaCare, Inc.: Living the Vision." Harvard Business School Case 394-110, January 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  120. Note on the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations

    Lynn S. Paine

    Describes the federal guidelines used by judges for sentencing organizations convicted of criminal wrong-doing under U.S. law as of November 1, 1991. Describes the guidelines' approach to calculating criminal fines for organizations, determining an organization's culpability, and assessing the organization's legal compliance program. Outlines some of the common criticisms of the guidelines. Intended to permit discussion of the concept of "organizational culpability" and to inform students about the bases for assigning criminal punishment to corporations under current law.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Governance Compliance; Law Enforcement; Laws and Statutes; Organizations; Legal Services Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Note on the Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations." Harvard Business School Background Note 393-060, October 1992. (Revised February 1995.) View Details
  121. Sexual Harassment, Free Speech or ...?

    Lynn S. Paine

    Presents two brief vignettes about female employees who object to gender discrimination in their work environment. In one case, the manager of a convenience store removes "adult" magazines from the store's shelves because she sees them as damaging to women. In the other, a group of female employees of the Stroh Brewery Co. charge that the company's advertising creates an overall atmosphere of hostility to women. Designed to help students understand the scope of management's responsibility for dealing with sexual harassment in the workplace and the challenge of exercising that responsiblity in the face of moral and legal rights of free expression. May be used with Note on the Law of Sexual Harassment.

    Keywords: Moral Sensibility; Working Conditions; Law; Behavior; Managerial Roles; Crime and Corruption; Groups and Teams; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Sexual Harassment, Free Speech or ...?" Harvard Business School Case 393-033, August 1992. (Revised December 1994.) View Details
  122. Note on E-Mail and Privacy: U.S. Law and Company Policies

    Lynn S. Paine

    Describes the legal landscape of employee privacy as it applies to e-mail interception: the various legal theories on which a privacy claim might be based and proposed federal legislation relevant to the subject. Also describes the policies companies like UPS, Citibank, and Kodak have developed in the face of legal uncertainty. Gives students the background for understanding how judges and policy-makers think about ethical values like privacy in the new electronic communications environment.

    Keywords: Law; Risk and Uncertainty; Government Legislation; Theory; Policy; Ethics; Employees; Online Technology; Interpersonal Communication;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Note on E-Mail and Privacy: U.S. Law and Company Policies." Harvard Business School Background Note 392-074, January 1992. (Revised December 1994.) View Details
  123. Leadership Problems at Salomon (A)

    Lynn S. Paine and Michael Santoro

    Deryck Maughan, a vice chairman and co-head of investment banking at Salomon Brothers, learns that his superiors have been less than candid about their knowledge of bidding improprieties by the firm's government trading desk. He must decide what, if anything, he should do.

    Keywords: Leadership; Decision Choices and Conditions; Ethics; Moral Sensibility; Values and Beliefs; Crime and Corruption; Rank and Position; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S., and Michael Santoro. "Leadership Problems at Salomon (A)." Harvard Business School Case 395-044, September 1994. View Details
  124. Prodigy Services Company (A)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Top executives of Prodigy Services Co. must decide how to respond when publicly accused of allowing anti-Semitic messages to be posted on the electronic bulletin boards of the company's interactive computer service. Can they defend free expression while at the same time opposing expressions of hatred and bigotry?

    Keywords: Ethics; Values and Beliefs; Communication Intention and Meaning; Information Technology; Decision Making; Law; Management Teams; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Prodigy Services Company (A)." Harvard Business School Case 393-126, April 1993. (Revised May 1994.) View Details
  125. Managing for Integrity: Three Vignettes

    Lynn S. Paine

    Three situations are described. A branch manager for a retail brokerage firm must decide whether to change the branch's cash management techniques to increase interest earnings. An auto mechanic must decide whether to oversell parts and repairs to meet sales and service quotas set by management. A research director must decide what to do about suspicions of product adulteration. The vignettes illustrate the impact of organizational context on individual decision-making and the importance of management of management systems and behavior for organizational integrity.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Ethics; Decision Making; Organizational Culture; Financial Management; Sales; Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Managing for Integrity: Three Vignettes." Harvard Business School Case 393-154, May 1993. (Revised May 1994.) View Details
  126. Dow Corning Corporation: Business Conduct and Global Values (A), Supplement

    Lynn S. Paine

    Describes the 1988 amendments to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977.

    Keywords: Ethics; Law; Crime and Corruption; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Dow Corning Corporation: Business Conduct and Global Values (A), Supplement." Harvard Business School Supplement 394-068, November 1993. (Revised May 1994.) View Details
  127. Lexon Corp. (A)

    Lynn S. Paine

    A general manager at Lexon Computer Corp. must decide whether interception and surveillance of employees' e-mail is acceptable company practice, and whether to follow the advice of his computer operations manager who wants to fire the person who complained that the practice violates employees' privacy. The case introduces the topic of employee privacy in the electronic communications environment and potential conflicts between employees' privacy interest and employers' property interests. This case series permits students to compare and contrast the perspectives and modes of reasoning of managers, judges, and policy-makers as they approach the question of employee privacy in the electronic work environment.

    Keywords: Ethics; Interpersonal Communication; Managerial Roles; Employee Relationship Management; Resignation and Termination; Rights; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Lexon Corp. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 392-071, January 1992. (Revised August 1992.) View Details
  128. Lexon Corp. (B)

    Lynn S. Paine

    Lexon Corp. lawyers must decide how to respond to two lawsuits challenging the company's interception of electronic mail on privacy grounds. They must also formulate a company policy on e-mail. One suit was filed by an employee dismissed from her job after asking that her boss stop intercepting and reading electronic mail messages. The second is a class action suit for invasion of privacy by all those sending or receiving electronic mail messages from the California location. Introduces students to the emerging law of employee privacy in the electronic communications area and to the characteristic ways the law develops. Can be used to contrast a management perspective on employee privacy.

    Keywords: Ethics; Lawsuits and Litigation; Rights; Interpersonal Communication; Managerial Roles; Employee Relationship Management; Resignation and Termination; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Computer Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. "Lexon Corp. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 392-072, January 1992. (Revised August 1992.) View Details

Presentations

  1. Risk Management and Oversight." Panel Moderator. "Colloquium on the Governance of Financial Institutions

    Lynn S. Paine

    Keywords: Risk Management; Governance;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. Risk Management and Oversight." Panel Moderator. "Colloquium on the Governance of Financial Institutions. Lecture at the Colloquium on the Governance of Financial Institutions, Center for Strategic & International Studies, Hills Program on Governance, New York, NY, November 03–04, 2009. View Details
  2. Strengthening the Market Economy-the Crisis and Beyond." Panel Facilitator, "HBS-International Chamber of Commerce Conference on the Future of the Market System

    Lynn S. Paine

    Keywords: Economic Systems; Markets; Crisis Management;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. Strengthening the Market Economy-the Crisis and Beyond." Panel Facilitator, "HBS-International Chamber of Commerce Conference on the Future of the Market System. Lecture at the HBS-International Chamber of Commerce Conference on the Future of the Market System, Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, October 09–10, 2009. View Details
  3. Business Research in a Post-Crisis World: Opportunities for Integration and Collaboration?" Panelist. "HBS Faculty Research Symposium 2009.

    Lynn S. Paine

    Keywords: Research; Integration; Opportunities;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. Business Research in a Post-Crisis World: Opportunities for Integration and Collaboration?" Panelist. "HBS Faculty Research Symposium 2009. Lecture at the HBS Faculty Research Symposium, Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, May 21, 2009. View Details
  4. The Conference Board Task Force on Executive Compensation." Task Force Member, output: "The Conference Board Task Force on Executive Compensation Report.

    Lynn S. Paine

    Keywords: Executive Compensation;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. The Conference Board Task Force on Executive Compensation." Task Force Member, output: "The Conference Board Task Force on Executive Compensation Report. Conference Board Task Force on Executive Compensation, New York, March 1, 2009. View Details
  5. Sustainability in the Board Room." Presentation for the Conference Board: "Corporate Governance and Sustainability Working Group

    Lynn S. Paine

    Keywords: Corporate Governance;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn S. Sustainability in the Board Room." Presentation for the Conference Board: "Corporate Governance and Sustainability Working Group. Lecture at the Conference Board Corporate Governance and Sustainability Research Working Group, New York, NY, February 26, 2009. View Details
  6. The Case for Global Business Standards: Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Global Economy." Keynote speaker. "POLITEIA Annual Forum

    Lynn Paine

    Keywords: Standards; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Global Range;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn. The Case for Global Business Standards: Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility in a Global Economy." Keynote speaker. "POLITEIA Annual Forum. Politeia Annual Forum, Politeia, Milan, Italy, June 09, 2006. View Details
  7. Global Standards of Corporate Conduct: What are the Prospects?" Speaker. "Regulatory Policy Program: Business and Government Seminar Series

    Lynn Paine

    Keywords: Standards; Global Range;

    Citation:

    Paine, Lynn. Global Standards of Corporate Conduct: What are the Prospects?" Speaker. "Regulatory Policy Program: Business and Government Seminar Series. New Directions in Regulation Seminar Series, Harvard Kennedy School Regulatory Policy Program, Cambridge, MA, April 27, 2006. View Details