Richard L. Nolan

William Barclay Harding Professor of Business Administration, Emeritus

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Professor Nolan earned his B.A. from the University of Washington in Production and Operations Research in 1962, and his M.B.A and Ph.D. in 1963 and 1966, respectively. Professor Nolan, the William Barclay Harding Professor of Management of Technology, returned to the faculty of Harvard Business School in 1991, after serving as Chairman of Nolan, Norton & Co. from 1977.

Professor Nolan is studying business transformation, the process of creatively destroying industrial economy management principles and evolving a set of workable management principles for the information economy. Some industrial economy management principles are obsolete, some salvageable, and entirely new principles are needed to guide, for example, the management of information as a resource distinctively different from scarce, physical resources. Central to his research is an understanding of information technology's information resource management role in taking an enterprise from 'make and sell' to 'sense and respond' strategies. Nolan (with Stephan Haeckel) discussed the key ideas behind leveraging general management decisions through information technology in a Harvard Business Review article, 'Managing by Wire' and in their Chapter 7 'Managing by Wire: Using IT to Transform a Business from 'Make-and-Sell' to 'Sense-and-Respond,'' in Competing in the Information Age, Strategic Alignment in Practice, Jerry N. Luftman, editor, Oxford University Press, 1996. His article, along with F. Warren McFarlan, 'How to Manage an IT Outsourcing Alliance,' was published in the Sloan Management Review, Winter 1995. He co-authored, with David Croson, Creative Destruction: A Six-Stage Process for Transforming the Organization (HBS Press, 1995) and Reengineering the Organization, with Thomas Davenport, Donna L. Stoddard and Sirkka Jarvenpaa, Harvard Business School Publishing. 1995. His latest book is Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era, HBS Press, 1998, edited with Stephen P. Bradley. His latest book is dot vertigo, Wiley and Sons, 2001, which reports his case-based research on management lessons from both dot com companies and Industrial age companies incorporating the Internet into their operations.

Professor Nolan has contributed a number of Harvard Business Review articles on the management of information technology. His latest contribution to the Harvard Business Review, is the introduction to 'Connectivity and Control in the Year 2000 and Beyond,' July-August 1998 issue. He is the originator of the 'Stages Theory,' one of the most widely used management frameworks for information technology baselining and planning. He also has authored and co-authored a number of books, including Globalization, Technology and Competition (HBS Press, 1993) with Professor Stephen P. Bradley of the Harvard Business School and Professor Jerry A. Hausman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Building the Information Age Organization: Structure, Control, and Information Technologies (Richard D. Irwin, Inc., 1994) with Professors James I. Cash, Robert G. Eccles, and Nitin Nohria. In addition, Professor Nolan is also a member of the Board of Directors for Novell, The Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company and Arcstream.

[MultimediaColloquium] [IT, Business Strategy, &Public Policy] [Information Strategy and Reengineering]
[Video of Talk: 'The Exploding Interent: Impact on Business & Society']

Featured Work

Publications

Books

  1. Harder Than I Thought: Adventures of a Twenty-First Century Leader

    Being a great leader today is much harder than you think—meet Jim Barton. He's a newly minted CEO, rising leader of a firm in transition, and manager of massive complexity—thanks to our incredibly networked and increasingly unpredictable world of business. What if you were in his shoes? If you're a top executive today, you probably are. "Harder Than I Thought" is a fictional narrative that puts the increasingly complex job of Chief Executive in a very real context. It serves as a practical guide by allowing you to walk alongside Jim as he takes on his new role and all its attendant challenges. Jim's story—developed in collaboration with seasoned, real-life CEOs—includes crucial lessons for anyone hoping to master the new-world skills required of successful business leaders today. As the narrative unfolds, Jim grapples with an array of business crises, some he inherited and some of his own making. As events push this new leader to the edge of his abilities, he seeks counsel from a panel of advisers—resulting in a wealth of teaching moments bound to keep you captivated. Experts agree that many twentieth-century leadership practices won't work in the turbulent twenty-first century. This engaging book gives you the insights you'll need to navigate in a fast-changing business landscape.

    Keywords: Leadership; Complexity; Crisis Management; Problems and Challenges; Volatility;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., Richard L. Nolan, and Shannon O'Donnell. Harder Than I Thought: Adventures of a Twenty-First Century Leader. Harvard Business Review Press, 2012. View Details
  2. The Adventures of an IT Leader

    Becoming an effective IT manager presents a host of challenges-from anticipating emerging technology to managing relationships with vendors, employees, and other managers. Ultimately, a good IT manager must be a strong business leader, not just a technical specialist. By inviting you to "walk in the shoes" of an IT leader, this book will help you better understand the role of IT in your organization and navigate your own career with greater confidence. Accompany Jim Barton as he struggles through a challenging first year as the IT director of IVK Corporation, handling (and fumbling) situations that, although fictional, are based on true events. You can read this engaging narrative from beginning to end, like a regular book, or treat it as a series of cases. You can also skip around and use the book to satisfy your most pressing needs. For example, need to learn about crisis management and security? Read chapters 10-12. Or formulate your own responses to a CIO's management obstacles by reading the authors' recurring "Reflection" questions. You'll turn to this book again and again-thumbing through to reference critical chapters when you face troubling IT-related issues in your own career. [Amazon copy]

    Keywords: Books; Leadership; Crisis Management; Personal Development and Career; Relationships; Safety; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., Richard L. Nolan, and Shannon O'Donnell. The Adventures of an IT Leader. Harvard Business Press, 2009. View Details
  3. Seizing Strategic IT Advantage in China

    Keywords: Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Information Technology; China;

    Citation:

    McFarlan, F. Warren, Richard L. Nolan, and Guoqing Chen. Seizing Strategic IT Advantage in China. Beijing, China: Higher Education Press, 2003, Chinese Mandarin ed. (Available in Chinese Mandarin only.) View Details
  4. Dot Vertigo: Doing Business in a Permeable World

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. Dot Vertigo: Doing Business in a Permeable World. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2001. View Details
  5. Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era

    Keywords: Value; Networks;

    Citation:

    Bradley, S. P., and R. L. Nolan, eds. Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era. Harvard Business School Press, 1998. View Details
  6. Creatieve destructie: Zes fasen voor bedriftstransformatie

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Transformation;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., and D. C. Croson. Creatieve destructie: Zes fasen voor bedriftstransformatie. Amstredame/Antwerpen: Uitgeverij Contact, 1995, Dutch ed. View Details
  7. Creative Destruction: A Six-Step Process for Transforming the Organization

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Transformation;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., and D. C. Croson. Creative Destruction: A Six-Step Process for Transforming the Organization. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1995. View Details
  8. Destruicao Criativa: Um Processo de Seis Etapas para Transformar Sua Organizacao

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Transformation;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., and D. C. Croson. Destruicao Criativa: Um Processo de Seis Etapas para Transformar Sua Organizacao. Brasil: Editora Campus, 1995, Portuguese ed. View Details
  9. Reengineering the Organization

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., D. B. Stoddard, T. H. Davenport, and S. Jarvenpaa. Reengineering the Organization. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1995. View Details
  10. Reengineering the Organization, Transforming to Compete in the Information Economy Instructor's Guide

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., D. L. Stoddard, T. H. Davenport, and S. Jarvenpaa. Reengineering the Organization, Transforming to Compete in the Information Economy Instructor's Guide. Harvard Business School Publishing, 1995. View Details
  11. Building the Information-Age Organization: Structure, Control, and Information Technologies

    Keywords: Organizational Structure; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Cash, J. I., Jr., R. G. Eccles, N. Nohria, and R. Nolan. Building the Information-Age Organization: Structure, Control, and Information Technologies. 3rd ed. Irwin Case Book Series in Information Systems Management. Irwin, 1994. View Details
  12. Globalization, Technology, and Competition: The Fusion of Computers and Telecommunications in the 1990s

    Keywords: Economic History; Computer Industry; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, S. P., J. A. Hausman, and R. L. Nolan, eds. Globalization, Technology, and Competition: The Fusion of Computers and Telecommunications in the 1990s. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1993, Korean ed. View Details
  13. Managing the Data Resource Function

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. Managing the Data Resource Function. 2nd ed. St. Paul, MN: West Publishing Company, 1982. View Details
  14. Management Accounting and Control of Data Processing

    Keywords: Management; Cost Accounting; Data and Data Sets;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. Management Accounting and Control of Data Processing. NY: National Association of Accountants, 1977. View Details
  15. The Information Systems Handbook

    Keywords: Information Management;

    Citation:

    McFarlan, F. W., and R. L. Nolan, eds. The Information Systems Handbook. Homewood, IL: Dow Jones-Irwin, 1975. View Details
  16. Curriculum Recommendations for Graduate Professional Programs in Information Systems

    Keywords: Higher Education; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    McFarlan, F. W., R. L. Nolan, and D. P. Norton. Curriculum Recommendations for Graduate Professional Programs in Information Systems. NY: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1973. View Details
  17. Information Systems Administration

    Keywords: Information Management;

    Citation:

    McFarlan, F. W., R. L. Nolan, and D. P. Norton. Information Systems Administration. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1973. View Details
  18. BASIC initiation rapide a l'ordinateur, L'Informatique

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. BASIC initiation rapide a l'ordinateur, L'Informatique. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston of Canada, 1971, French ed. View Details
  19. FORTRAN IV Computing and Applications

    Keywords: Information Technology; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. FORTRAN IV Computing and Applications. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1971. View Details
  20. DYNFOR: A General Business and Economic Systems Simulator

    Keywords: Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. DYNFOR: A General Business and Economic Systems Simulator. University of Washington Press Monographs. Seattle, WA: University of Washington Press, 1970. View Details
  21. Introduction to Computing through the BASIC Language

    Keywords: Information Management; Information Technology; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. Introduction to Computing through the BASIC Language. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1969. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. The Technology Manager's Journey: An Extended Narrative Approach to Educating Technical Leaders

    Technology management poses particular challenges for educators because it requires a facility with different kinds of knowledge and wide-ranging learning abilities. We report on the development and delivery of an information technology (IT) management course designed to address these challenges. Our approach is built around a narrative, the "IVK extended case series," a fictitious but reality-based story about a newly appointed, not technically trained chief information officer (CIO) in his first year on the job. We designed the course around a narrative and composed the narrative in a specific way to achieve two key objectives. First, this format allowed us to combine the active student orientation typical of case-based approaches with the systematic construction of cumulative theoretical frameworks more characteristic of lecture-based methods. Second, basing the narrative on the monomyth—a literary pattern common to important narratives around the world that encourages students to more fully inhabit the story's hero—leads to fuller engagement and more active learning. We report results using this approach with undergraduate and graduate students in two universities located in different countries, with executives at a major multinational corporation, and with participants in an open-enrollment program at a major business school. Student course feedback and a follow-up survey administered about one year after the course suggest that the extended narrative approach mostly achieves its design objectives. We suggest that the approach might be used more widely in teaching technology management, particularly with "digital natives," who have come of age in an environment crowded with engaging approaches to communication and entertainment competing for their attention.

    Keywords: Information Technology; Management; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Business Education; Multinational Firms and Management; Entertainment; Communication; Curriculum and Courses; Framework; Design; Goals and Objectives; Learning; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., Richard L. Nolan, and Shannon O'Donnell. "The Technology Manager's Journey: An Extended Narrative Approach to Educating Technical Leaders." Academy of Management Learning & Education 8, no. 3 (September 2009). View Details
  2. A 'Novel' Approach to the Design of an IS Management Course

    Keywords: Design; Management;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., Richard L. Nolan, and Shannon O'Donnell. "A 'Novel' Approach to the Design of an IS Management Course." Communications of the Association for Information Systems 24, no. 1 (2009). View Details
  3. Bridging the Gap Between Stewards and Creators

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., and Richard L. Nolan. "Bridging the Gap Between Stewards and Creators." MIT Sloan Management Review 48, no. 2 (winter 2007): 29–36. (

    Winner of Richard Beckhard Memorial Prize For the most outstanding MIT Sloan Management Review article on planned change and organizational development​

    .) View Details
  4. Information Technology and the Board of Directors

    Keywords: Information Technology; Governance;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard, and F. Warren McFarlan. "Information Technology and the Board of Directors." Harvard Business Review 83, no. 10 (October 2005). View Details
  5. In Search of the Next "Killer App"

    Keywords: Online Technology;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., and Richard L. Nolan. In Search of the Next "Killer App". MIT Sloan Management Review 46, no. 4 (summer 2005): 96. View Details
  6. Renaissance CIOs

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Renaissance CIOs." CIO Insight (January 2002). View Details
  7. Connectivity and Control in the Year 2000 and Beyond

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Connectivity and Control in the Year 2000 and Beyond." Harvard Business Review 76, no. 4 (July–August 1998). View Details
  8. How to Manage an IT Outsourcing Alliance

    Keywords: Management; Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Information Technology; Alliances;

    Citation:

    McFarlan, F. W., and R. L. Nolan. "How to Manage an IT Outsourcing Alliance." MIT Sloan Management Review 36, no. 2 (winter 1995): 9–24. View Details
  9. Managing by Wire

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Haeckel, S. H., and R. L. Nolan. "Managing by Wire." Harvard Business Review 71, no. 5 (September–October 1993): 122–132. View Details
  10. The Strategic Potential of Information Technology

    Keywords: Strategy; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "The Strategic Potential of Information Technology." Financial Executive 7, no. 4 (July–August 1991): 25–27. View Details
  11. Transforming Higher Education in the Information Age: Presidents Respond

    Keywords: Higher Education; Information;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Transforming Higher Education in the Information Age: Presidents Respond." Cause/Effect 14, no. 13 (fall 1990). View Details
  12. Outsourcing: Harbinger of IS's Transformation

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Transformation;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Outsourcing: Harbinger of IS's Transformation." Stage by Stage (1990): 1–9. View Details
  13. Too Many Executives Today Just Don't Get It

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Too Many Executives Today Just Don't Get It." Cause/Effect 13, no. 4 (winter 1990). View Details
  14. Steering DP through a Recession

    Keywords: Economics;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Steering DP through a Recession." Harvard Business Review 60, no. 5 (September–October 1982). View Details
  15. Managing Information Systems by Committee

    Keywords: Information; System; Groups and Teams;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Managing Information Systems by Committee." Harvard Business Review 60, no. 4 (July–August 1982). View Details
  16. Managing the Crises in Data Processing

    Keywords: Management; Data and Data Sets;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Managing the Crises in Data Processing." Harvard Business Review 57, no. 2 (March–April 1979). View Details
  17. Controlling the Costs of Data Services

    Keywords: Cost; Data and Data Sets;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Controlling the Costs of Data Services." Harvard Business Review 55, no. 4 (July–August 1977). View Details
  18. Business Needs a New Breed of EDP Manager

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Business Needs a New Breed of EDP Manager." Harvard Business Review 54, no. 2 (March–April 1976). View Details
  19. At Last, Major Roles for Minicomputers

    Keywords: Technology;

    Citation:

    Burnett, G. J., and R. L. Nolan. "At Last, Major Roles for Minicomputers." Harvard Business Review 53, no. 3 (May–June 1975). View Details
  20. Personal Privacy versus the Corporate Commuter

    Citation:

    Goldstein, K., and R. L. Nolan. "Personal Privacy versus the Corporate Commuter." Harvard Business Review 53, no. 2 (March–April 1975). View Details
  21. What Kind of Corporate Modeling Functions Best?

    Keywords: Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Hayes, R. H., and R. L. Nolan. "What Kind of Corporate Modeling Functions Best?" Harvard Business Review 52, no. 3 (May–June 1974). View Details
  22. Computerization of the ABC Company: Lessons of the Decade

    Keywords: Technology; Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., and Eric Knudsen. "Computerization of the ABC Company: Lessons of the Decade." Datamation 20, no. 4 (April 1974): 71–76. View Details
  23. Managing the Four Stages of EDP Growth

    Keywords: Growth and Development;

    Citation:

    Gibson, C. F., and R. L. Nolan. "Managing the Four Stages of EDP Growth." Harvard Business Review 52, no. 1 (January–February 1974). View Details
  24. Assessing Computer Costs and Benefits

    Keywords: Cost; Technology;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., and Eric Knudsen. "Assessing Computer Costs and Benefits." Journal of Systems Management 25, no. 1 (January/February 1974): 28–34. View Details
  25. How to Control the Computer Resource

    Keywords: Technology;

    Citation:

    Dearden, J., and R. L. Nolan. "How to Control the Computer Resource." Harvard Business Review 51, no. 6 (November–December 1973). View Details
  26. Computer Data Bases: The Future Is Now

    Keywords: Technology; Information;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Computer Data Bases: The Future Is Now." Harvard Business Review 51, no. 5 (September–October 1973). View Details
  27. Plight of the EDP Manager

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Plight of the EDP Manager." Harvard Business Review 51, no. 3 (May–June 1973). View Details
  28. Organizational Issues in the Stages of EDP Growth

    Keywords: Growth and Development;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., and Cyrus F. Gibson. "Organizational Issues in the Stages of EDP Growth." Data Base 5, nos. 2-4 (winter 1973): 50–63. View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Information Technology Management Since 1960

    Keywords: Information Technology; Information Management; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Information Technology Management Since 1960." In A Nation Transformed by Information: How Information Has Shaped the United States from Colonial Times to the Present, edited by A. Chandler and J. Cortada. Oxford University Press, 2000. View Details
  2. Foreword

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "Foreword." Evaluating Success of a Y2000 Project, edited by B. Robbins and H. Rubin. Information Economics Press, 1998. View Details
  3. Capturing Value in the Network Era

    Keywords: Value; Networks;

    Citation:

    Bradley, S. P., and R. L. Nolan. "Capturing Value in the Network Era." In Sense and Respond: Capturing Value in the Network Era, edited by Stephen P. Bradley and Richard L. Nolan. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1998. View Details
  4. The Role of Technology in an Information Age: Transforming Symbols into Action

    Keywords: Technology; Information; Knowledge;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L., and S. H. Haeckel. "The Role of Technology in an Information Age: Transforming Symbols into Action." In The Knowledge Economy: The Nature of Information in the Twenty-first Century. Institute for Information Studies, 1994. View Details
  5. Global Competition in Technology

    Keywords: Globalized Markets and Industries; Competition; Technology; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., R. L. Nolan, and J. A. Hausman. "Global Competition in Technology." In Globalization, Technology, and Competition: The Fusion of Computers and Telecommunications in the 1990s, edited by S. P. Bradley, J. A. Hausman, and R. L. Nolan. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1993, Korean ed. View Details
  6. The Stages Theory: A Framework for IT Adoption and Organizational Learning

    Keywords: Information Technology; Technology Adoption; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Mathematical Methods; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, R. L. "The Stages Theory: A Framework for IT Adoption and Organizational Learning." In America's Information Technology Agenda, edited by J. Mechling and C. Rosenberg. Cambridge: John F. Kennedy School of Government, 1992. View Details

Working Papers

  1. Management: Theory and Practice, and Cases

    This working paper reports on a major Harvard Business School project designed to enhance MBA and practicing executives in case learning. The work is built on the foundation of HBS field cases employing the monomyth "hero's journey" classic story structure along with the creation of associated fictional case characters designed to engage readers in the dimensions of human behavior, decision-making, and judgments in carrying out the work of the modern corporation.

    A most fortuitous event in starting the project was the engagement of our research assistant with a theater academic background, and experience as a scriptwriter and director at a repertory theater. Shannon O'Connell noted that our collection of field cases on learning to become a successful functional manager had the potential to be organized into an executive's "hero's journey." This setoff a process: (1) completing our field cases to encompass the issue domain of an IT functional manager; (2) recrafting the cases from multiple industries to include one industry; (3) integrating the key characters of monomyth hero's journey, and (4) writing the case dialogue for the protagonist's, Jim Barton, hero's journey. The result was our novel-based Harvard Business Press book: Adventures of an IT Leader (2009).

    In our Adventures book, we experimented with mechanisms to facilitate active learning such as Jim Barton's "living whiteboard," whereby Barton kept a running list of ideas associated with a set of evolving principles of IT management. Another mechanism we used to facilitate reader/student introspection was end-of-chapter/cases Reflections. Also, we experimented with audio versions of book chapters in the classroom.

    We went on to continue Jim Barton's hero's journey in a second Harvard Business Press book using the same novel format, but a different industry and executive context: Harder Than I Thought: Adventures of a Twenty-first Century Leader (2013). Harder focuses on CEO leadership in the global economy and the fast-changing IT-enabled pace of business. We extended the mechanism of Barton's living white board to interludes in the book of simulations and avatars to explore CEO decision-making.

    Keywords: cases; innovation; management; CIO; CEO; hero's journey; monomyth; Management; Practice; Cases; Theory; Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Management: Theory and Practice, and Cases." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 14-026, September 2013. View Details
  2. Stewards versus Creators

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., and Richard L. Nolan. "Stewards versus Creators." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 06-001, July 2005. View Details
  3. Governance in the Information Economy

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and F. Warren McFarlan. "Governance in the Information Economy." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 05-045, January 2005. View Details
  4. On Identifying and Tracking the Next "Killer App"

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., and Richard L. Nolan. On Identifying and Tracking the Next "Killer App". Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 05-027, October 2004. View Details
  5. Information Technology Consulting

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Larry Bennigson. "Information Technology Consulting." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 03-069, January 2003. View Details
  6. Manage ERP Initiatives as New Ventures, Not IT Projects

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., and Richard L. Nolan. "Manage ERP Initiatives as New Ventures, Not IT Projects." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 99-024, December 1998. View Details
  7. Information Technology Management from 1960-2000

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Information Technology Management from 1960-2000." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 99-018, August 1998. View Details
  8. A Knowledge-based Model of IT Outsourcing for the Network Era

    Citation:

    Sole, Deborah L., F. Warren McFarlan, and Richard L. Nolan. "A Knowledge-based Model of IT Outsourcing for the Network Era." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 97-076, October 1997. View Details
  9. Capturing Value in the Network Era

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., and Richard L. Nolan. "Capturing Value in the Network Era." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 97-061, February 1997. View Details
  10. The Effect of Information Technology on Organizational Structure: A Critical Review

    Citation:

    Galal, Hossam, and Richard L. Nolan. "The Effect of Information Technology on Organizational Structure: A Critical Review." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 96-011, October 1995. View Details
  11. IT Architectures and Organizational Information Processing Capacity: A Synthesis and Illustration

    Citation:

    Francalanci, Chiara, and Richard L. Nolan. "IT Architectures and Organizational Information Processing Capacity: A Synthesis and Illustration." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 96-002, July 1995. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. The iPhone at IVK

    The CIO addresses a decision to replace salesmen netbook PC's with iPhones, including converting the company's sales and customer applications to the iPhone platform

    Keywords: Mobile Technology; Technology Platform; Salesforce Management; Transition; Technology Adoption; Hardware; Software; Change Management;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Robert D. Austin. "The iPhone at IVK." Harvard Business School Case 911-413, October 2010. View Details
  2. Harley-Davidson: Preparing for the Next Century

    Harley-Davidson Co. exemplifies a remarkable management-led business transformation of a long standing manufacturing company. The company successfully met global competition and continues to innovate to maintain its market position.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Transformation; Change Management; Innovation and Invention; Competitive Strategy; Manufacturing Industry; Motorcycle Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Suresh Kotha. "Harley-Davidson: Preparing for the Next Century." Harvard Business School Case 906-410, March 2006. (Revised April 2007.) View Details
  3. The Boeing Company: Moonshine Shop

    Describes how the "Moonshine Shop," a group of plant-savvy creative generalists, is helping a great industrial company become more innovative. Chronicles the history of the Moonshine Shop, its successes and failures, and describes innovations they've helped put in place. The group routinely creates savings equal to multiples of their own budge through front-lines process innovation and support of staff on-the-floor.

    Keywords: History; Business Model; Saving; Programs; Creativity; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Research and Development; Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Business Processes; Aerospace Industry;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., Richard L. Nolan, and Shannon O'Donnell. "The Boeing Company: Moonshine Shop." Harvard Business School Case 607-130, April 2007. View Details
  4. Esterline Technologies: Lean Manufacturing (TN)

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Karen A. Brown, and Subodha Kumar. "Esterline Technologies: Lean Manufacturing (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 907-401, July 2006. View Details
  5. Esterline Technologies: Lean Manufacturing

    Raises the issue of the appropriate role of IT in lean manufacturing. Most large manufacturing companies have implemented ERP IT systems to support lean manufacturing practices. The Kerry plant of Esterline Technologies attempted an ERP implementation and then terminated it. Now the Kerry plant is revisiting the appropriate use of IT in an environment of highly innovative lean manufacturing.

    Keywords: Decisions; Technological Innovation; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Management Systems; Production; Information Technology; Technology Adoption; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Karen A. Brown, and Subodha Kumar. "Esterline Technologies: Lean Manufacturing." Harvard Business School Case 906-417, May 2006. View Details
  6. Harley-Davidson: Preparing for the Next Century (TN)

    Keywords: Motorcycle Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Suresh Kotha. "Harley-Davidson: Preparing for the Next Century (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 906-412, March 2006. View Details
  7. Cisco Systems: Web-enablement

    Describes how Cisco web-enabled their ERP systems and developed the "front office" systems to electronically link to their customers and suppliers. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Internet; Information Technology; Technological Innovation; Search Technology; Service Operations; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Kelley Porter, and Christina Akers. "Cisco Systems: Web-enablement." Harvard Business School Case 301-056, October 2000. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  8. Cisco Systems Architecture: ERP and Web-enabled IT

    In a seven-year process, Cisco built its strategic I-Net. Beginning in 1994, Cisco completely replaced its back-office legacy systems. At that time, the company standardized Internet protocols. In addition, the company shifted strategic focus from IT back-office applications to front-office applications. After ERP (enterprise resource planning), the company spent the next two years electronically connecting with customers. A rewritten version of two earlier cases. A consolidated version of the Cisco Systems ERP and Cisco Systems Web-enablement cases. Designed to be taught in one class session (if two class sessions are available, it is recommended that Cisco ERP Systems be used for one session followed by Cisco Systems Web-enablement).

    Keywords: Internet; Information Technology; Technological Innovation; Search Technology; Management Practices and Processes; Technology Adoption; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Kelley Porter, and Christina Akers. "Cisco Systems Architecture: ERP and Web-enabled IT." Harvard Business School Case 301-099, March 2001. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  9. Boeing 787: The Dreamliner

    Boeing dominated the commercial airline manufacturing business since bringing out the first commercial airline jet airliner. But in 2005, it delivered fewer new planes than its fast-moving competitor, Airbus. Boeing responded by transforming its manufacturing business and introducing the first "all-composite" commercial airplane: the 787 (the Dreamliner). In addition to being a revolutionary new commercial airliner, the 787 attempts to change the large "spoke-and-hubs" airport operation to nonstop travel between many new "city-pairs" worldwide.

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Risk Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Air Transportation Industry; Manufacturing Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Suresh Kotha. "Boeing 787: The Dreamliner." Harvard Business School Compilation 305-101, April 2005. (Revised June 2005.) View Details
  10. Boeing 787: The Dreamliner (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-305-101).

    Keywords: Commercialization; Competition; Production; Transformation; Service Operations; Air Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Suresh Kotha. "Boeing 787: The Dreamliner (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 305-104, April 2005. View Details
  11. Creative Destruction of Industrial Age Management Principles and Creative Construction of Information Age Management Principles

    Traces the creative destruction of industrial age management principles and creative construction of new management principles more appropriate for the information age. Includes self-administered questionnaire to permit managers to assess the status of the transformation of management principles in their companies. Teaching Objective: To analyze current management principles.

    Keywords: Transformation; Disruptive Innovation; Goals and Objectives; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Personal Development and Career; System; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Creative Destruction of Industrial Age Management Principles and Creative Construction of Information Age Management Principles." Harvard Business School Background Note 301-153, June 2001. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  12. Novell: CEO-led Turnaround and Growth Strategy

    Novell CEO Jack Messman tried to return the company to its leadership position in the software industry through a strategy that embraces Linux and other open source software. This case serves as an introduction to open source software and strategies based on open source and offers opportunities to discuss organizational change and corporate turnaround approaches. Mostly told in Messman's own words. One key issue is how to capture value via a strategy that emphasizes intellectual property in the public domain.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Value Creation; Open Source Distribution; Software; Intellectual Property; Business Strategy; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Robert D. Austin. "Novell: CEO-led Turnaround and Growth Strategy." Harvard Business School Case 605-004, July 2004. (Revised September 2004.) View Details
  13. China's Telecommunications Sector

    In mid-2003, China was the fastest-growing telecom market. Telecom subscribers are estimated at 472 million. With the size and growth of telecom, China is a hot spot for new telecom and IT technologies. Furthermore, China's sheer market power provides a strong position for establishing telecom policies and standards that have important global and economic implications. This case provides the underlying background to discuss the key issues and decisions facing China's policymakers.

    Keywords: Globalized Markets and Industries; Technological Innovation; Policy; Decision Choices and Conditions; Competition; Telecommunications Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Stephen P. Bradley. "China's Telecommunications Sector." Harvard Business School Background Note 904-416, November 2003. (Revised June 2004.) View Details
  14. Managing Business Risk of Information Technology

    Sets up a situation in which participants must create presentations that assess the IT risk of a large company.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Robert D. Austin. "Managing Business Risk of Information Technology." Harvard Business School Case 604-004, July 2003. (Revised June 2004.) View Details
  15. Working with Your Shadow Partner in Analyzing IT Strategic Partnering

    A team-based exercise allowing students to conduct a strategy analysis of the leading companies in the IT business. Involves searching on the web for both public information sources and company information sources. The teams work together to analyze the information and ferret out the unique strategies of three different companies.

    Keywords: Business Strategy; Information Technology; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Working with Your Shadow Partner in Analyzing IT Strategic Partnering." Harvard Business School Exercise 301-003, August 2000. (Revised September 2002.) View Details
  16. Cisco Systems, Inc.: Implementing ERP

    Reviews Cisco System's approach to implementing Oracle's Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) software product. This case chronologically reviews the diverse, critical success factors and obstacles facing Cisco during its implementation. Cisco faced the need for information systems replacement based on its significant growth potential and its reliance on failing legacy systems. The discussion focuses on where management was particularly savvy in contrast to where it was the beneficiary of good fortune.

    Keywords: Information Technology; Software; Technology Adoption; Complexity; Information Management;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., Richard L. Nolan, and Mark J. Cotteleer. "Cisco Systems, Inc.: Implementing ERP." Harvard Business School Case 699-022, September 1998. (Revised May 2002.) View Details
  17. Cisco Systems: Building Leading Internet Capabilities

    Cisco has invested in building a leading IT, Internet-based infrastructure. This case describes Cisco's latest efforts to broaden Internet capabilities in the company from 30% to 60% penetration. The strategy is intended to sustain Cisco's double-digit revenue growth through the decade.

    Keywords: Internet; Information Technology; Technological Innovation; Revenue; Growth and Development Strategy; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Christina L. Darwall. "Cisco Systems: Building Leading Internet Capabilities." Harvard Business School Case 301-133, May 2001. (Revised December 2001.) View Details
  18. Cisco Systems, Pete Solvik, Sr VP and CIO

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Cisco Systems, Pete Solvik, Sr VP and CIO." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 302-801, October 2001. View Details
  19. Working with Your "Shadow Partner": Building a High Tech Investment Portfolio

    Team-based exercise designed to illustrate the use of the Internet directly by executives. Requires going on the Internet to search for information required to construct a high-tech investment portfolio.

    Keywords: Investment Portfolio; Groups and Teams; Internet; Information Management;

    Citation:

    Crane, Dwight B., and Richard L. Nolan. Working with Your "Shadow Partner": Building a High Tech Investment Portfolio. Harvard Business School Exercise 302-029, July 2001. View Details
  20. Cisco Systems, Inc. Series TN

    Teaching Note for (9-301-056), (9-301-099), (9-301-133), and (9-699-022).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Cisco Systems, Inc. Series TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-143, June 2001. View Details
  21. Cisco Systems, Inc.: Implementing ERP TN

    Teaching Note for (9-699-022).

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Robert D. Austin, and Mark J. Cotteleer. "Cisco Systems, Inc.: Implementing ERP TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 699-031, October 1998. (Revised June 2001.) View Details
  22. Ten Components of a Strategic I-Net, The

    Identifies the 10 key components of a strategic I-Net. May be used with any case or discussion about building strategic IT infrastructures.

    Keywords: Buildings and Facilities; Business Model; Management; Infrastructure; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Ten Components of a Strategic I-Net, The." Harvard Business School Background Note 301-154, June 2001. View Details
  23. Dot com Business Models

    Describes dot com business models. Intended to be used as a handout with a case about dot com companies following case discussion.

    Keywords: Business Model; Business or Company Management; Web Sites; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Dot com Business Models." Harvard Business School Background Note 301-152, June 2001. View Details
  24. Information Technology Management from 1960-2000

    Covers the history of IT management from 1960 to the present. Applies the Stages Theory as a basis to trace the evolution of the three dominant IT designs (mainframes, microcomputers, networks) and how companies used and managed IT in each era.

    Keywords: Management; Information Technology; Industry Growth;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Information Technology Management from 1960-2000." Harvard Business School Background Note 301-147, June 2001. View Details
  25. Cisco Systems: Building Leading Internet Capabilities TN

    Teaching Note for (9-301-133).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Cisco Systems: Building Leading Internet Capabilities TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-146, June 2001. View Details
  26. Teaching IT Executive Education Courses TN

    In the information age, it is important that IT be addressed in an effective way accessible to practicing executives. Teaching IT to executives continues to change in concepts and content as IT penetrates deeply into every area of business. Driven by Moore's Law, the economics of using IT in business has changed from computers costing millions of dollars to hundreds of thousands of dollars to a few thousand dollars. The technology for applying computers has improved to the point where business can build IT infrastructures allowing them to connect their businesses through the shared Internet to millions of computers around the world. The improving economics and the improving technology of IT has major implications for almost every facet of the practicing executive's job. This teaching note describes the approach used at the Harvard Business School to incorporate IT into the various formats of general manager education courses. The approach involves the uses of recently developed field cases together with short technical notes available through Harvard Business School Publishing.

    Keywords: Transformation; Developing Countries and Economies; Business Education; Managerial Roles; Organizational Structure; Performance Effectiveness; Performance Improvement; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Teaching IT Executive Education Courses TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-151, June 2001. View Details
  27. IT Asset: the "Legacy" System Problem

    Describes the legacy system problem facing traditional companies as they strive to build strategic I-Nets. Identifies the key trends amplifying legacy system problems that cause IT assets to become IT liabilities.

    Keywords: Trends; Management Systems; Problems and Challenges; Business Strategy; Information Technology;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. IT Asset: the "Legacy" System Problem. Harvard Business School Background Note 301-148, June 2001. View Details
  28. Cisco Systems Architecture: ERP and Web-enabled IT TN

    Teaching Note for (9-301-099).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Cisco Systems Architecture: ERP and Web-enabled IT TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-145, June 2001. View Details
  29. Cisco Systems: Web-enablement TN

    Teaching Note for (9-301-056).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Cisco Systems: Web-enablement TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-144, June 2001. View Details
  30. ZEFER: Building and Positioning an e-Business Consulting Company

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., George Francis Westerman III, and Matthew Sandoval. "ZEFER: Building and Positioning an e-Business Consulting Company." Harvard Business School Case 301-010, July 2000. (Revised February 2001.) View Details
  31. ZEFER: Building and Positioning an e-Business Consulting Company TN

    Keywords: Product Positioning; Internet; Business Ventures; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and George Francis Westerman III. "ZEFER: Building and Positioning an e-Business Consulting Company TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-090, January 2001. View Details
  32. IBM Corporation Turnaround TN

    Teaching Note for (9-600-098).

    Keywords: Computer Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "IBM Corporation Turnaround TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-073, January 2001. View Details
  33. IBM Corporation Turnaround

    Describes the details of IBM's dramatic corporate turnaround in the early 1990s led by CEO Louis V. Gerstner. Accounts of events are from interviews with IBM executives. Covers the factors that led to the company's decline and actions taken to recover.

    Keywords: Transformation; Restructuring; Management Teams; Management Practices and Processes; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Computer Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., and Richard L. Nolan. "IBM Corporation Turnaround." Harvard Business School Case 600-098, March 2000. (Revised November 2000.) View Details
  34. Novell: World's Largest Network Software Company TN

    Teaching Note for (9-300-038).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Novell: World's Largest Network Software Company TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 301-068, November 2000. View Details
  35. Working with your "Shadow Partner" in the healthcare industry (A)

    Intended to introduce individuals to search engines and databases on the Internet, in particular those that are available to HBS. This exercise is a more difficult version of Working with Your "Shadow Partner" and is intended for those with some previous Internet research experience.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Search Technology; Internet; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. Working with your "Shadow Partner" in the healthcare industry (A). Harvard Business School Exercise 399-177, June 1999. (Revised May 2000.) View Details
  36. drugstore.com

    On a clear day in August 1999 in the new headquarters of drugstore.com, against a backdrop of the Blue Angels flying in formation over Lake Washington practicing for their hydroplane Seafare Cup performance, Peter Neupert was pleased with his company's IPO performance. Just last month, on July 28, 1999, drugstore.com had burst to life as a public company. Shares priced at $18 had soared as high as $69 on the first day of trading, providing a total valuation for drugstore.com of more than $2.9 billion--and a record: drugstore.com was the fastest company ever to reach a valuation of $1 billion. The team had built a virtual drugstore on the Web. During the first six months of its existence more than 160,000 customers had come to shop for more than 17,000 drugstore products and prescription drugs. Customer orders were electronically sent to distribution centers run by Walsh Distribution and RxAmerica, both located in Texas. Drugstore.com had entered into outsourcing agreements/partnerships for fulfilling the orders with these two firms. For six months ending July 4, 1999, drugstore.com sold products to approximately 168,000 customers, and had net sales of $4.2 million with an operating loss of $30 million. In June of 1999, drugstore.com had 980,000 unique visits to its Web site compared to 560,000 unique visits of its competitor PlanetRx.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Internet; Problems and Challenges; Business Startups; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "drugstore.com." Harvard Business School Case 300-036, September 1999. (Revised April 2000.) View Details
  37. Novell: World's Largest Network Software Company

    After phenomenal growth and market leadership in networking, founder and CEO Ray Noorda made a frontal assault on Microsoft's core strengths. In 1994, Noorda spend over $1.5 billion acquiring companies such as WordPerfect to combat Microsoft Word, products such as Borland's Quattro Pro to combat Microsoft Excel, and a PC operating system to combat Microsoft MS-DOS. Novell's stock reached a high of $35 1/4 in March 1993 before beginning to slide downward as head-to-head competition with Microsoft was seen as a questionable strategy. Robert Frankenberg, an executive at Hewlett-Packard brought in to replace Ray Noorda, reversed course and sold many of the acquired companies. But time was running out for Novell. Microsoft had not only already won the head-to-head competition, but had mounted a counterattack with its NT server product that was fast eroding Novell's stronghold in Network Operating Systems (NOSs). Coming from an only 2 percent market share in 1993, by 1997 Microsoft's NT Server operating license unit sales were 997 million growing at 36 percent, compared to Novell's NetWare server operating license unit sales of 744 million growing at 13 percent. In early 1997, Novell's stock price had dropped to $7.

    Keywords: Technology Networks; Software; Competition; Internet; Strategic Planning; Corporate Strategy; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Novell: World's Largest Network Software Company." Harvard Business School Case 300-038, September 1999. (Revised April 2000.) View Details
  38. drugstore.com TN

    Teaching Note for (9-300-036).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "drugstore.com TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 300-057, November 1999. View Details
  39. Edmund's-www.edmunds.com (Supplement)

    Supplements the case.

    Keywords: Auto Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Stephen P. Bradley, John J. Sviokla, and Kelley Porter. "Edmund's-www.edmunds.com (Supplement)." Harvard Business School Supplement 399-036, September 1998. (Revised September 1999.) View Details
  40. VeriFone (1997)

    VeriFone, a leading manufacturer of payment systems technology, was acquired by Hewlett-Packard in June 1997. The case describes the strategic challenges that VeriFone faces as it positions itself to compete in the Internet payment systems marketplace.

    Keywords: Information Technology; Internet; Innovation Strategy; Technological Innovation; Business Strategy; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Anne Donnellon, and Donna B. Stoddard. "VeriFone (1997)." Harvard Business School Case 398-030, August 1997. (Revised March 1999.) View Details
  41. Sun Microsystems and the N-tier Architecture

    Sun Microsystems is a pioneer in networking computing. Sun's servers maintain a large market share and are considered highly scaleable. The case describes the n-tier architecture for building and managing large networks in which thousands of workers and customers are connected to enterprise servers.

    Keywords: Technology Networks; Information Technology; Technological Innovation; Business Strategy; Innovation Strategy; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Kelley Porter. "Sun Microsystems and the N-tier Architecture." Harvard Business School Case 399-037, September 1998. (Revised March 1999.) View Details
  42. Tektronix, Inc.: Global ERP Implementation

    Reviews Tektronix's implementation of an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) solution in all three of its global business divisions. This case tells the story of three implementations, each with its own character and requirements. Tektronix managers needed to synchronize the requirements of each division with the company's overall need to standardize business practices and its desire to adhere to a common business model across the enterprise. Details the difficulty of major business change in a mature business and technical environment.

    Keywords: Business Model; Transformation; Globalized Markets and Industries; Information Management; Management Skills; Management Style; Strategic Planning; Problems and Challenges; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., Richard L. Nolan, George Francis Westerman III, and Mark J. Cotteleer. "Tektronix, Inc.: Global ERP Implementation." Harvard Business School Case 699-043, February 1999. View Details
  43. XcelleNet, Inc. (A)

    XcelleNet, a $35 million system software company based in Atlanta, was founded in 1986 to address the computing needs of a class of remote and mobile users and data that were rarely connected to a network. Though the clear first mover and leader in the remote enterprise computing segment in 1996, XcelleNet and its market had been stalled by successive waves of networking technology--remote LAN Access, Groupware, and the Internet/Intranet. The company's founder and CEO, Dennis Crumpler, must formulate a strategy for capitalizing on XcelleNet's first-mover advantage and responding to the opportunities created by these emerging technologies.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Opportunities; Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Technology Networks; Computer Industry; Atlanta;

    Citation:

    Bradley, Stephen P., Richard L. Nolan, and James Leonard. "XcelleNet, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 796-189, June 1996. (Revised January 1999.) View Details
  44. Working with your "Shadow Partner" TN

    Teaching Note for (9-399-051).

    Keywords: Search Technology; Data and Data Sets; Internet;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. Working with your "Shadow Partner" TN. Harvard Business School Teaching Note 399-072, November 1998. View Details
  45. Working with Your "Shadow Partner"

    Intended to introduce individuals to search engines and databases on the Internet, in particular those that are available to HBS.

    Keywords: Internet; Search Technology; Education Industry; Boston;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Kelley Porter. Working with Your "Shadow Partner". Harvard Business School Exercise 399-051, September 1998. (Revised September 1998.) View Details
  46. Managing in the Information Age (MIA98): Course Overview Program for Management Development (PMD)

    Presents an overview of the PMD course, Managing in the Information Age (MIA98).

    Keywords: Management Succession;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Managing in the Information Age (MIA98): Course Overview Program for Management Development (PMD)." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 399-042, September 1998. View Details
  47. Intranets and Middleware

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Stephen J. Gallagher, and Mark E. Ledbetter. "Intranets and Middleware." Harvard Business School Background Note 397-118, May 1997. View Details
  48. Process of Creative Destruction, The: Business Transformation

    Keywords: Creativity; Transformation;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Process of Creative Destruction, The: Business Transformation." Harvard Business School Background Note 196-018, July 1995. (Revised December 1996.) View Details
  49. Union Bank of Switzerland: Strategic Options When Outsourcing ATM Services

    Keywords: Strategy; Planning; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Robert S. Borsi. "Union Bank of Switzerland: Strategic Options When Outsourcing ATM Services." Harvard Business School Case 397-013, October 1996. View Details
  50. Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), Technology Note

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Robert S. Borsi. "Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), Technology Note." Harvard Business School Background Note 397-014, October 1996. View Details
  51. CIGNA Property and Casualty Reengineering (B)

    In 1993 CIGNA Property and Casualty embarked on a full transformation effort under a new leadership team headed by Gerry Isom. This case presents progress through September 1995.

    Keywords: Transformation; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Human Resources; Leading Change; Organizational Design; Groups and Teams;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Donna B. Stoddard, Chiara Francalanci, and Elise C Martin. "CIGNA Property and Casualty Reengineering (B)." Harvard Business School Case 196-014, February 1996. View Details
  52. Rank Xerox U.K. (A) (B) TN

    Citation:

    Davenport, Thomas H., and Richard L. Nolan. "Rank Xerox U.K. (A) (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 396-116, December 1995. View Details
  53. KPMG Peat Marwick: The Shadow Partner TN

    Teaching Note for (9-492-002).

    Citation:

    Applegate, Lynda M., Richard L. Nolan, and Janis Lee Gogan. "KPMG Peat Marwick: The Shadow Partner TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 196-066, December 1995. View Details
  54. Overview and Syllabus for a Course on Business Process Reengineering

    Citation:

    Davenport, Thomas H., and Richard L. Nolan. "Overview and Syllabus for a Course on Business Process Reengineering." Harvard Business School Background Note 396-058, November 1995. View Details
  55. Reengineering the Organization, Course Overview and Syllabus

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Restructuring;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Donna B. Stoddard. "Reengineering the Organization, Course Overview and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 396-057, November 1995. View Details
  56. Reengineering a Business Process

    Describes the six steps included in most reengineering initiatives: selecting the processes for reengineering; identifying change enablers; developing a business vision of process objectives; understanding and measuring existing processes; designing and prototyping the new processes; and implementing the new processes.

    Keywords: Goals and Objectives; Management Practices and Processes; Change Management; Measurement and Metrics;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Thomas H. Davenport. "Reengineering a Business Process." Harvard Business School Background Note 396-054, November 1995. View Details
  57. Mrs. Fields' Cookies TN

    Teaching Note for (9-189-056).

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Mrs. Fields' Cookies TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 196-047, September 1995. View Details
  58. CIGNA Property and Casualty Reengineering (A)

    Reengineering was introduced at CIGNA Corp. in 1988. CIGNA entered a second wave reengineering effort through a major project at CIGNA P&C, one of CIGNA's larger businesses. P&C was in financial crisis and as a result brought in a new executive team in 1991 to head the transformation effort. This case analyzes the phases of P&C transformation, P&C's business process redesign, their use of information technology in the form of client/server architecture to support the strategy, and the use of the balanced scorecard to drive transformation. Presents the progress of P&C's effort as of January 1995--marking the end of Phase I (analysis and design) and looking forward to Phase 2 (implementation).

    Keywords: Transformation; Cost vs Benefits; Design; Growth and Development; Data and Data Sets; Growth and Development Strategy; Balanced Scorecard; Financial Crisis; Crisis Management; Projects; Information Technology; Insurance Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Donna B. Stoddard, Chiara Francalanci, and Elise C Martin. "CIGNA Property and Casualty Reengineering (A)." Harvard Business School Case 196-059, August 1995. (Revised August 1995.) View Details
  59. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: IT Organization and Architecture Challenges

    Presents the outcome of Air Products ICON decentralization projects. New issues are explored, including the challenges of having a decentralized MIS staff, global network, client/server architecture, new data center issues, outsourcing, a new highly strategic customer interface, object-oriented programming (OOPS), and the future of the MIS organization. A rewritten version of two earlier cases.

    Keywords: Information Technology; Technology Networks; Software; Organizational Design; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: IT Organization and Architecture Challenges." Harvard Business School Case 196-017, August 1995. View Details
  60. Xerox: Outsourcing Global Information Technology Resources TN

    Teaching Note for (9-195-158).

    Keywords: Revenue; Information Technology; Technological Innovation; Contracts; Decisions; Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Xerox: Outsourcing Global Information Technology Resources TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 196-055, August 1995. View Details
  61. State Street Boston Corporation: Leading with Information Technology TN

    Teaching Note (5-196-058).

    Keywords: Information Technology; Financial Institutions; Transformation; Technology Adoption; Information Management; Competitive Strategy; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Donna B. Stoddard, and Chiara Francalanci. "State Street Boston Corporation: Leading with Information Technology TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 196-058, August 1995. View Details
  62. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: IT Organization and Architecture Challenges TN

    Teaching Note for (9-196-017).

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: IT Organization and Architecture Challenges TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 196-089, August 1995. View Details
  63. KPMG Peat Marwick: The Shadow Partner TN

    Teaching Note for (9-492-002).

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "KPMG Peat Marwick: The Shadow Partner TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 196-046, August 1995. View Details
  64. CIGNA Property and Casualty Reengineering (A) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-196-059).

    Keywords: Insurance Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "CIGNA Property and Casualty Reengineering (A) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 196-015, August 1995. View Details
  65. VeriFone: The Transaction Automation Company (A)

    Describes VeriFone's new organizational model and its role in catapulting VeriFone to a market leadership position. Examines the impact of information technology and information access on the ability to leverage global resources, market responsiveness, and organizational structure and behavior.

    Keywords: Leading Change; Leadership Development; Market Transactions; Information Technology; Organizational Design; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Organizational Structure; Information Management; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Donna B. Stoddard, and Hossam Galal. "VeriFone: The Transaction Automation Company (A)." Harvard Business School Case 195-088, July 1994. (Revised July 1995.) View Details
  66. Reengineering: Competitive Advantage and Strategic Jeopardy

    Keywords: Competitive Advantage; Risk and Uncertainty;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Reengineering: Competitive Advantage and Strategic Jeopardy." Harvard Business School Background Note 196-019, July 1995. View Details
  67. Laura Ashley (B): Defining a Strategy

    A turnaround CEO engineers a business transformation and formulates short-term and long-term strategy after assessing the business situation.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Management Teams; Business Strategy; Consumer Products Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Laura Ashley (B): Defining a Strategy." Harvard Business School Case 194-143, May 1994. (Revised May 1995.) View Details
  68. Laura Ashley (A): A New CEO Takes Charge

    In a turnaround situation, a new CEO must take actions in the short term to gain control and exercise executive leadership and lay groundwork to formulate a long-term strategy to rebuild a viable business.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Management Teams; Business Strategy; Consumer Products Industry; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Laura Ashley (A): A New CEO Takes Charge." Harvard Business School Case 194-142, April 1994. (Revised May 1995.) View Details
  69. Note on Reengineering, Transformation and New Management Principles

    Keywords: Management Practices and Processes;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Note on Reengineering, Transformation and New Management Principles." Harvard Business School Background Note 195-226, February 1995. View Details
  70. Role of Management Consulting in Reengineering

    Keywords: Management Practices and Processes;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Role of Management Consulting in Reengineering." Harvard Business School Background Note 195-200, February 1995. View Details
  71. Note on Estimating the Value of the "IT Asset" Part II

    Keywords: Information Technology; Valuation; Assets;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. Note on Estimating the Value of the "IT Asset" Part II. Harvard Business School Background Note 195-199, December 1994. View Details
  72. Note on Estimating the Value of the "IT Asset" Part I

    Keywords: Information Technology; Valuation; Assets;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. Note on Estimating the Value of the "IT Asset" Part I. Harvard Business School Background Note 195-197, December 1994. View Details
  73. Frito-Lay, Inc: The Stages Assessment

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Frito-Lay, Inc: The Stages Assessment." Harvard Business School Case 195-194, December 1994. View Details
  74. H.E. Butt Grocery Company: A Leader in ECR Implementation

    Keywords: Supply Chain Management; Strategy;

    Citation:

    McKenney, James L., Richard L. Nolan, Theodore H. Clark, and David Croson. "H.E. Butt Grocery Company: A Leader in ECR Implementation." Harvard Business School Case 195-125, October 1994. View Details
  75. Laura Ashley (D)

    Describes the resignation of the CEO hired three years earlier to transform the company.

    Keywords: Transformation; Resignation and Termination; Management Succession; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Laura Ashley (D)." Harvard Business School Case 194-146, May 1994. View Details
  76. Laura Ashley (C): Rebuilding and Transforming a Global Brand

    Over the course of two years a CEO executes a business transformation strategy and key decisions.

    Keywords: Transition; Decisions; Performance Consistency; Performance Improvement; Business Strategy;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Laura Ashley (C): Rebuilding and Transforming a Global Brand." Harvard Business School Case 194-144, May 1994. View Details
  77. Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.: IT Support of Corn Research and Development

    Keywords: Plant-Based Agribusiness; Research and Development; Information Technology; Agriculture and Agribusiness Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., Donna B. Stoddard, and Sorin A. Bodea. "Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.: IT Support of Corn Research and Development." Harvard Business School Case 193-010, July 1992. (Revised June 1993.) View Details
  78. Stages Theory, The: A Framework for IT Adoption and Organizational Learning

    Describes Professor Richard Nolan's Stages Theory of Information Technology adoption by organizations.

    Keywords: Information; Body of Literature; Information Management; Information Publishing; Adoption; Organizational Structure; Organizational Design; Decision Making; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., David Croson, and Katherine Seger. "Stages Theory, The: A Framework for IT Adoption and Organizational Learning." Harvard Business School Background Note 193-141, March 1993. View Details
  79. Note on Information Technology and Strategy

    Provides a context for the evolution of information technology in business organizations, explains the emergence of information as an important resource to be managed, and provides a framework for assessing the strategic potential of information in the firm.

    Keywords: Information; Information Management; Information Technology; Business Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Cooperation; Adoption; Body of Literature; Archives; Annual Reports; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L., and Katherine Seger. "Note on Information Technology and Strategy." Harvard Business School Background Note 193-137, March 1993. View Details
  80. Sturdivant Electric Corp.

    A unit manager on a field computer installation job is faced with recurring conflict between a programmer and his immediate supervisor.

    Keywords: Planning; Rank and Position; Problems and Challenges; Conflict and Resolution; Attitudes; Jobs and Positions; Management Teams; Managerial Roles; Public Relations Industry; Computer Industry;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Sturdivant Electric Corp." Harvard Business School Case 172-123, October 1971. (Revised September 1983.) View Details
  81. Airwick Industries, Inc.

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Airwick Industries, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 173-022, August 1972. View Details
  82. Hannaford Brothers Co. (B)

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Hannaford Brothers Co. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 172-298, May 1972. (Revised May 1972.) View Details
  83. Hannaford Brothers Co. (A)

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Hannaford Brothers Co. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 172-297, May 1972. View Details

Other Publications and Materials

  1. Remaking the IT Management Curriculum: A 'Novel' Approach

    Keywords: Information Technology; Management; Curriculum and Courses;

    Citation:

    Austin, Robert D., Richard L. Nolan, and Shannon O'Donnell. "Remaking the IT Management Curriculum: A 'Novel' Approach." Association of Information Systems, October 2008. View Details
  2. Economic Functions of Central Cities

    Keywords: Economics; Urban Scope;

    Citation:

    Nolan, Richard L. "Economic Functions of Central Cities." DBA thesis, University of Washington, January 1966. View Details

    Research Summary

  1. The Process of Managing Business Transformation

    Richard L. Nolan is examining the process of business transformation, which he characterizes as the creative destruction of industrial economy management principles and the evolution of a set of workable management principles for the information economy. According to Nolan, some industrial-economy management principles are obsolete and should be discarded; others are salvageable. To fill the gaps and manage information differently from scarce resources, new principles are required. Central to Nolan's research is an understanding of the role information technology plays in managing information so as to enable an enterprise to progress from a make-and-sell to a sense-and-respond strategy. Nolan presents the findings of his research in Creative Destruction: A Six-Step Process for Transforming the Organization (coauthored with David C. Croson), Sense and Respond(edited with Stephen P. Bradley, 1998), and dot vertigo, 2001. In addition, Nolan is reporting on his in-process research on the management lessons learned in the creation and building of the Internet in a number of HBS Working Papers.

      Awards & Honors

    1. Richard Beckhard Memorial Prize: Won the 2008 Richard Beckhard Memorial Prize with Rob Austin for their paper "Bridging the Gap Between Stewards and Creators" (Volume 48 of MIT Sloan Management Review). The prize is awarded to the authors of the most outstanding SMR article on planned change and organizational development published in the previous year.