Linda A. Hill

Wallace Brett Donham Professor of Business Administration

Unit: Organizational Behavior

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Linda A. Hill is the Wallace Brett Donham Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. She is the faculty chair of the Leadership Initiative and has chaired numerous HBS Executive Education programs, including the Young Presidents' Organization Presidents' Seminar and the High Potentials Leadership Program. She was course-head during the development of the new Leadership and Organizational Behavior MBA required course. She is the co-author, with Kent Lineback, of Being the Boss: The 3 Imperatives of Becoming a Great Leader and Breakthrough Leadership, a blended cohort-based program that helps organizations transform midlevel managers into more effective leaders. Breakthrough Leadership was the winner of the 2013 Brandon Hall Group Award for Best Advance in Unique Learning Technology. The book was included in the Wall Street Journal as one of the “Five Business Books to Read for Your Career in 2011.” She is also the author of Becoming a Manager: How New Managers Master the Challenges of Leadership (2nd Edition). In 2014, Professor Hill co-authored a book entitled Collective Genius: The Art and Practice of Leading Innovation. It features thick descriptions of exceptional leaders of innovation in a wide range of industries—from information technology to law to design—and geographies—from the US and Europe to the Middle East and Asia. Business Insider named Collective Genius one of “The 20 Best Business Books” in summer 2014. Her books are available in multiple languages. She is author of course modules: Managing Your Career, Managing Teams, and Power and Influence and of award-winning multimedia management development programs High Performance Management, Coaching, and Managing for Performance. She is also the subject expert of numerous e-learning programs: Stepping up to Management (based in large measure on Becoming a Manager); Harvard ManageMentor, and advisor for the Change Management Simulation: Power and Influence. Hill has authored or co-authored numerous HBR articles, including “Where Will We Find Tomorrow’s Leaders;” “Winning the Race for Talent in Emerging Markets;” and “Are You a High Potential?” She is a contributor to the HBS Publishing series on Managing Up, Hiring, and Becoming a New Manager. She was named by Thinkers50 as one of the top ten management thinkers in the world.

Professor Hill’s consulting and executive education activities have been in the areas of leadership development, talent management, leading change and innovation, implementing global strategies, and managing cross-organizational relationships. Organizations with which Professor Hill has worked include General Electric, Reed Elsevier, Accenture, Pfizer, IBM, MasterCard, Mitsubishi, Morgan Stanley, the National Bank of Kuwait, AREVA, and The Economist.

Professor Hill is a member of the Board of Directors of State Street Corporation, Eaton Corp., and Harvard Business Publishing. She is a trustee of the The Bridgespan Group and the Art Center College of Design. She is on the Board of Advisors for the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund USA and a Special Representative to the Board of Trustees of Bryn Mawr College. She is a former member of the Board of Trustees of The Rockefeller Foundation. She is also on the Advisory Board of the Aspen Institute Business and Society Program.  She serves on the Editorial Board of the Leadership Quarterly.

Dr. Hill did a post-doctoral research fellowship at the Harvard Business School and earned a Ph.D. in Behavioral Sciences at the University of Chicago. She received her M.A. in Educational Psychology with a concentration in measurement and evaluation from the University of Chicago. She has a B.A., summa cum laude, in psychology from Bryn Mawr College.

Featured Work

Publications

Books

  1. Collective Genius: The Art and Practice of Leading Innovation

    Why can some organizations innovate time and again, while most cannot? You might think the key to innovation is attracting exceptional creative talent. Or making the right investments. Or breaking down organizational silos. All of these things may help—but there's only one way to ensure sustained innovation: you need to lead it—and with a special kind of leadership. Collective Genius shows you how. Preeminent leadership scholar Linda Hill, along with former Pixar tech wizard Greg Brandeau, MIT researcher Emily Truelove, and Being the Boss coauthor Kent Lineback, found among leaders a widely shared, and mistaken, assumption: that a "good" leader in all other respects would also be an effective leader of innovation. The truth is, leading innovation takes a distinctive kind of leadership, one that unleashes and harnesses the "collective genius" of the people in the organization. Using vivid stories of individual leaders at companies like Volkswagen, Google, eBay, and Pfizer, as well as nonprofits and international government agencies, the authors show how successful leaders of innovation don't create a vision and try to make innovation happen themselves. Rather, they create and sustain a culture where innovation is allowed to happen again and again—an environment where people are both willing and able to do the hard work that innovative problem solving requires. Collective Genius will not only inspire you; it will give you the concrete, practical guidance you need to build innovation into the fabric of your business.

    Keywords: innovation; leadership; Innovation Leadership;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Greg Brandeau, Emily Truelove, and Kent Lineback. Collective Genius: The Art and Practice of Leading Innovation. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press, 2014. View Details
  2. Being the Boss: The 3 Imperatives for Becoming a Great Leader

    You never dreamed being the boss would be so hard. You're caught in a web of conflicting expectations from subordinates, your supervisor, peers, and customers. You're constantly fighting fires. You're mired in office politics. You end each day exhausted and discouraged, wondering what, if anything, you've accomplished. You're not alone. As Linda Hill and Kent Lineback reveal in Being the Boss, becoming an effective manager is a painful, difficult journey. It's trial and error, endless effort, and slowly acquired personal insight. Many managers never complete the journey. At best, they just learn to get by. At worst, they become terrible bosses. This new book explains how to avoid that fate by mastering three imperatives: 1) Manage yourself: Learn that management isn't about getting things done yourself. It's about accomplishing things through others; 2) Manage a network: Understand how power and influence work in your organization and build a network of mutually beneficial relationships to navigate your company's complex political environment; and 3) Manage a team: Forge a high-performing "we" out of all the "I"s who report to you. Packed with compelling stories and practical guidance, Being the Boss is an indispensable guide for not only first-time managers but all managers seeking to master the most daunting challenges of leadership.

    Keywords: Employee Relationship Management; Leadership; Managerial Roles; Personal Development and Career; Groups and Teams; Social and Collaborative Networks;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kent Lineback. Being the Boss: The 3 Imperatives for Becoming a Great Leader. Harvard Business Review Press, 2011. View Details
  3. Managing Up

    Managing up is not political game playing. Rather, it's a conscious approach to working with your supervisor toward goals that are important to both of you. Through managing up, you build a productive working relationship with your boss and create a way to use the complementary strengths of you and your boss to deliver value to your company. This volume helps you: Understand the business results you produce by learning how to manage up; Cultivate a mutually beneficial relationship with your manager; Communicate effectively with your boss about priorities and problems; and Negotiate win-win solutions to on-the-job challenges with your supervisor.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Employees; Managerial Roles; Alliances; Value Creation;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. Managing Up. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press, 2008. (Mentor.) View Details
  4. Becoming a New Manager

    You've just been promoted to a managerial position for the first time—congratulations! But beware: the managerial role differs markedly from the individual contributor role. Go into the job with mistaken assumptions about what to expect, and you just may be blindsided by surprising realities. This book helps you lay the foundation for succeeding in your new role, explaining how to (1) discard the "doer" role of the individual contributor for the orchestrating role of the manager; (2) adjust your leadership style to maximize your team's performance; (3) balance conflicting expectations from your boss, peers, and direct reports; and (4) deal productively with the stresses and new emotions that come with being a manager.

    Keywords: Leadership; Management Skills; Management Style; Managerial Roles; Performance Improvement; Groups and Teams;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. Becoming a New Manager. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press, 2008. (Mentor.) View Details
  5. Becoming a Manager: How New Managers Master the Challenges of Leadership

    Keywords: Management; Problems and Challenges; Leadership;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. Becoming a Manager: How New Managers Master the Challenges of Leadership. 2nd ed. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2003. View Details
  6. Harvard ManageMentor

    Keywords: Higher Education;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. A. Harvard ManageMentor. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing, 1999. Electronic. View Details
  7. Coaching

    Keywords: Teaching;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. A. Coaching. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing, 1997. Multimedia. View Details
  8. High Performance Management

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. A. High Performance Management. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing, 1995. Electronic. View Details
  9. Power and Influence Customized Course Module

    Keywords: Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. A. Power and Influence Customized Course Module. Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing, 1995. View Details
  10. Becoming a Manager: Mastery of a New Identity

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Identity;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. A. Becoming a Manager: Mastery of a New Identity. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 1992. View Details
  11. Harvard Business Review: Essentials of Executive Development

    Keywords: Higher Education; Management; Growth and Development;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. A., ed. Harvard Business Review: Essentials of Executive Development. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing, 1985. (Reprint No. 12044.) View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Collective Genius

    Competitiveness depends in great part on the ability to innovate. The perennial challenge, then, is to build an organization capable of innovating again and again. Traditional, direction-setting leadership can work well when the solution to a problem is known and straightforward. But if the problem calls for a truly original response, no one can decide in advance what that response should be. So the role of a leader of innovation is not to set a vision and motivate others to follow it. It's to create a community that is willing and able to innovate.

    Keywords: innovation; leadership; Innovation Leadership; Innovation Leadership;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Greg Brandeau, Emily Truelove, and Kent Lineback. "Collective Genius." Harvard Business Review 92, no. 6 (June 2014): 94–102. View Details
  2. Building a Game-Changing Talent Strategy

    When most of the world's financial services giants were stumbling and retrenching in the aftermath of the 2008 recession, the asset management firm BlackRock was busy charting a course for growth. Its revenues, profits, and stock price all performed consistently through this tumultuous period. The authors looked at BlackRock and other game-changing companies—the Mumbai-based global conglomerate Tata Group and Envision, an entrepreneurial alternative energy company based in China—and found significant commonalities. These three companies demonstrate the essential attributes of a game-changing organization: they are driven by purpose, oriented toward performance, and guided by principles. In the process of conducting interviews with these companies, the authors discovered a fourth thread that weaves them even more tightly together: each is supported by a game-changing talent strategy. But, they write, the path to such a strategy seems rife with complexity and ambiguity. How can both strategy and execution be consistently superior? How can they support a collective culture yet enable high potentials to thrive as individuals? How can the strategy be global and local at the same time? And how can its policies endure yet be agile and constantly open to revitalization? BlackRock's approach provides the answers.

    Keywords: Talent and Talent Management; Success; Business Strategy; Financial Crisis; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Ready, Douglas A., Linda A. Hill, and Robert J. Thomas. "Building a Game-Changing Talent Strategy." Harvard Business Review 92, nos. 1-2 (January–February 2014): 62–68. View Details
  3. Are You a Good Boss-Or a Great One?

    Private moments of doubt and fear come even to managers who have spent years on the job. Any number of events can trigger them: an initiative is going poorly; you get a lukewarm performance review; your new assignment is daunting. HBS professor Linda Hill and executive Kent Lineback have long studied the question of how managers grow and advance. Their experience brings them to a simple but troubling observation: Most bosses reach a certain level of proficiency and stay there-short of what they could and should be. Why? Because they stop working on themselves. The authors offer what they call the three imperatives for every manager who seeks to avoid this stagnation: Manage yourself. Who you are as a person, the beliefs and values that drive your actions, and especially how you connect with others all matter to the people you must influence. Manage your network. Effective managers know they cannot avoid conflict and competition among organizational groups; they build and nurture ongoing relationships. Manage your team. Team members need to know what's required of them collectively and individually and what the team's values, norms, and standards are. The authors include a useful assessment tool to help readers get started.

    Keywords: Leadership; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Personal Development and Career; Groups and Teams; Power and Influence; Social and Collaborative Networks;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kent Lineback. "Are You a Good Boss-Or a Great One?" Harvard Business Review 89, nos. 1-2 (January–February 2011). View Details
  4. Are You a High Potential?

    Some employees are more talented than others, and nearly every company has its method for identifying their high-potential managers. So how can you get on your company's high-potential list? Douglas A. Ready, of the talent-management research center ICEDR; Jay A. Conger, of Claremont McKenna College; and Harvard Business School's Linda A. Hill have studied programs for high-potential leaders for 15 years. They have found that the rising stars who make the grade are remarkably similar in their core characteristics, the most intangible of which they call "X factors": a drive to excel, a catalytic learning capability, an enterprising spirit, and dynamic sensors that detect opportunities and obstacles. The authors' in-depth interviews with high potentials, their managers, and their HR departments reveal how you can develop your four X factors and, if you manage to get on your company's high-potential list, how to avoid falling off. The article also discusses the pros and cons companies face as they decide whether to make their high-potential lists transparent.

    Keywords: Talent and Talent Management; Employees; Leadership Development; Personal Development and Career; Personal Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Ready, Douglas A., Jay A. Conger, and Linda A. Hill. "Are You a High Potential?" Harvard Business Review 88, no. 6 (June 2010). View Details
  5. Winning the Race for Talent in Emerging Markets

    "This war for talent is like nothing we've ever seen before," write the authors, who have spent decades studying talent management and leadership development. Recently they interviewed executives at more than 20 global companies to identify strategies for attracting talent in developing economies - where, they learned, brand, opportunity, purpose, and culture play out in particular ways. A desirable brand affiliation in conjunction with inspirational leadership appeals to eager young high potentials suddenly awash in possibilities. Opportunity should imply an accelerated career track - or at least a fast-paced acquisition of skills and experience. Purpose ought to benefit a job candidate's home country and express the value of global citizenship. A company's culture should be meritocratic, value both individual and team accomplishments, and follow through on promises implied in recruitment. The authors claim that emerging markets pose special challenges for foreign multinationals. For instance, talent strategies that work at home will probably need extensive tailoring to succeed in the developing world, and an overreliance on fluency in English may impede spotting talent. It's critical to develop a core of local talent and to embrace and leverage diversity. In the talent race, a local company that creates genuine opportunities and exhibits the desired cultural conditions will often win out over a Western multinational offering higher pay.

    Keywords: Leadership Development; Selection and Staffing; Talent and Talent Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Organizational Culture; Recruitment; Diversity Characteristics; Developing Countries and Economies;

    Citation:

    Ready, Douglas A., Linda A. Hill, and Jay A. Conger. "Winning the Race for Talent in Emerging Markets." R0811C. Harvard Business Review 86, no. 11 (November 2008). View Details
  6. Where Will We Find Tomorrow's Leaders?

    Unless we challenge long-held assumptions about how business leaders are supposed to act and where they're supposed to come from, many people who could become effective global leaders will remain invisible, warns Harvard Business School professor Hill. Instead of assuming that leaders must exhibit take-charge behavior, broaden the definition of leadership to include creating a context in which other people are willing and able to guide the organization. And instead of looking for the next generation of global leaders in huge Western corporations and elite business schools, expand the search to developing countries. In this conversation with HBR senior editor Paul Hemp, Hill describes the changing nature of leadership and what we can learn from parts of the world where people have not, until recently, had opportunities to become globally savvy executives. In South Africa, for instance, the African National Congress has provided rigorous leadership preparation for many black executives. Hill has also observed two approaches - in developed and developing economies alike - that she believes will be necessary in an increasingly complex business environment. The first, leading from behind, involves letting people hand off the reins to one another, depending on their strengths, as situations change. The second, leadership as collective genius, calls for both unleashing and harnessing individuals' collective talents, particularly to spur innovation. Through her descriptions of these approaches in such companies as Sekunjalo Investments, HCL Technologies, and IBM, Hill highlights the challenges of finding and preparing people who can lead by stepping back and letting others come forward to make their own judgments and take risks.

    Keywords: Talent and Talent Management; Globalization; Innovation Leadership; Leadership Development; Leadership Style; Situation or Environment; Personal Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Where Will We Find Tomorrow's Leaders?" Special Issue on HBS Centennial. Harvard Business Review 86, no. 1 (January 2008): 123–129. (Interview.) View Details
  7. Becoming the Boss

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "Becoming the Boss." Harvard Business Review 85, no. 1 (January 2007). View Details
  8. New Manager Development for the 21st Century

    Keywords: Management; Growth and Development;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "New Manager Development for the 21st Century." Academy of Management Executive 18, no. 3 (August 2004): 121–126. View Details
  9. Book Review of Charismatic Leadership in Organizations

    Keywords: Leadership; Organizations;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Book Review of Charismatic Leadership in Organizations." Personnel Psychology 52, no. 3 (autumn 1999): 767–771. View Details
  10. Harvard Manage Mentor

    Keywords: Boston;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Harvard Manage Mentor." Intranet (1999). View Details
  11. Developing the Star Performer

    Keywords: Growth and Development; Performance;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Developing the Star Performer." Leader to Leader (1999). View Details
  12. Franco Bernabe: The Lone Strategist

    Keywords: Strategy;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and S. Wetlaufer. "Franco Bernabe: The Lone Strategist." Aspenia 4, no. 7 (December 1998). View Details
  13. Leadership When There Is No One to Ask: An Interview with ENI's Franco Bernabe

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and S. Wetlaufer. "Leadership When There Is No One to Ask: An Interview with ENI's Franco Bernabe." Harvard Business Review 76, no. 4 (July–August 1998). View Details
  14. Developing the Star Performer

    Keywords: Performance; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. A. "Developing the Star Performer." Leader to Leader 8 (spring 1998). View Details
  15. Leadership for New Managers

    Keywords: Leadership; Management;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., J. J. Gabarro, and J. Kotter. "Leadership for New Managers." Business Fundamentals as Taught at the Harvard Business School (1998). View Details
  16. Hardest Lessons for First-time Managers

    Keywords: Learning; Management;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Hardest Lessons for First-time Managers." Working Woman (February 1994), 18–21. View Details
  17. Book Review of Managers Managing: The Workings of an Administrative System, edited by Jane Hannaway

    Keywords: Management;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Book Review of Managers Managing: The Workings of an Administrative System, edited by Jane Hannaway." Administrative Science Quarterly 35, no. 4 (December 1990): 727–729. View Details
  18. Retraining Mid-career Managers: Career History and Self-efficacy Beliefs

    Keywords: Management Skills; Values and Beliefs;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and J. Elias. "Retraining Mid-career Managers: Career History and Self-efficacy Beliefs." Human Resource Management 29, no. 2 (summer 1990): 197–218. View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Managing Your Boss

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kent Lineback. "Managing Your Boss." Chap. 1 in Guide to Managing Up and Across, 7–11. Watertown, MA, 2011. View Details
  2. Unlocking the Slices of Genius in Your Organization: Leading for Innovation

    There is a widespread consensus that innovation is fast becoming the principal source of differentiation and competitive advantage in today's knowledge-intensive economy. But until we reframe our understanding of what innovation and leadership are all about, we fear that innovation will remain an "unnatural act" in many corporations. A sizeable body of research on engendering innovation exists; too little of this knowledge appears to have infiltrated the notions of leadership espoused in the literature or in practice. In this chapter, we share preliminary results from a collaborative project on leadership for innovation. We studied a dozen effective leaders of innovation in a wide range of industries and geographies, posing the following question: what do leaders of innovation really do? In this chapter, we describe what occurs inside of organizations as they develop novel and useful solutions to problems, and we offer a framework for how effective leaders of innovation think and act. Leadership for innovation is more about leading "from behind" than leading from the front. It is about shaping individual and collective experiences to foster innovation rather than about setting direction and mobilizing people to follow. In this chapter, we show what it takes to insure that an organization is willing and able to innovate. We conclude by posing questions for future research. The research will appear in more depth in a forthcoming book, Collective Genius.

    Keywords: Innovation and Invention; Leadership; Practice; Competitive Advantage;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Maurizio Travaglini, Greg Brandeau, and Emily Stecker. "Unlocking the Slices of Genius in Your Organization: Leading for Innovation." Chap. 21 in Handbook of Leadership Theory and Practice, edited by Nitin Nohria and Rakesh Khurana. Harvard Business Press, 2010. View Details
  3. A Gentler Capitalism: Black Business Leadership in the New South Africa

    Keywords: Economic Systems; Leadership; Race Characteristics; South Africa;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "A Gentler Capitalism: Black Business Leadership in the New South Africa." Chap. 27 in Business Solutions for the Global Poor: Creating Social and Economic Value, edited by V. Kasturi Rangan, John A. Quelch, Gustavo Herrero, and Brooke Barton. John Wiley & Sons, 2007. View Details
  4. Exercising Moral Courage: A Developmental Agenda

    Keywords: Ethics; Behavior;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda. "Exercising Moral Courage: A Developmental Agenda." Chap. 12 in Moral Leadership: The Theory and Practice of Power, Judgment, and Policy, edited by Deborah L. Rhode, 267–290. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2006. View Details
  5. Are We Preparing Ourselves to Lead?

    Keywords: Leadership Development;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Are We Preparing Ourselves to Lead?" Chap. 13 in The Difference "Difference" Makes: Women and Leadership, edited by Deborah Rhode, 144–167. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2003. View Details
  6. Leadership as Collective Genius

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "Leadership as Collective Genius." In Management 21C: New Visions for the New Millennium, edited by Subir Chowdry. New York: Financial Times Management, 1999. View Details
  7. Beyond the Myth of the Perfect Mentor

    Keywords: Training; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "Beyond the Myth of the Perfect Mentor." In Empleo y Carrerras Directivas, edited by J. Alvarez. Bibao, Spain: Ediciones Deusto, S.A., 1997. View Details
  8. Karen Leary (A), (B), (C), and Teaching Note

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "Karen Leary (A), (B), (C), and Teaching Note." In Managerial Excellence Through Diversity: Text and Cases, edited by Mary C. Gentile. Burr Ridge, IL: Irwin, 1995. View Details
  9. Joining Up Process

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "Joining Up Process." In The Blackwell Encyclopedic Dictionary of Organizational Behavior, edited by Nigel Nicholson. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1995. View Details
  10. Reality Shock

    Keywords: System Shocks;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "Reality Shock." In The Blackwell Encyclopedic Dictionary of Organizational Behavior, edited by Nigel Nicholson. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1995. View Details
  11. Management Development

    Keywords: Leadership Development; Management;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "Management Development." In The Blackwell Encyclopedic Dictionary of Organizational Behavior, edited by Nigel Nicholson. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1995. View Details
  12. Help for New Managers: Cultivating Critical Resources

    Keywords: Leadership Development;

    Citation:

    Hill, L. "Help for New Managers: Cultivating Critical Resources." In Career Development: Theory and Practice, edited by D. H. Montross and C. J. Shinkman. Chicago: Charles C. Thomas, 1992. View Details

Working Papers

  1. A Gentler Capitalism: Black Business Leadership in the New South Africa

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda, and Maria T. Farkas. "A Gentler Capitalism: Black Business Leadership in the New South Africa." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 06-057, June 2006. View Details
  2. Leadership Development: A Strategic Imperative for Higher Education

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Leadership Development: A Strategic Imperative for Higher Education." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 06-023, December 2005. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Interview: Man Jit Singh at Sony Entertainment Television

    Contains excerpts from an interview with Man Jit Singh. Singh discusses the results of events covered in the case "Man Jit Singh at Sony Entertainment Television," including his decision to begin evaluating employees on values as well as performance.
    This short video accompanies the case and can be shown in class or included in a digital coursepack.

    Keywords: change management; performance appraisals; Leading Change; Leadership; Emerging Markets; Organizational Culture; Performance Evaluation; Groups and Teams; Change Management; Media and Broadcasting Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Allison J. Wigen. "Interview: Man Jit Singh at Sony Entertainment Television." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 414-708, April 2014. View Details
  2. Man Jit Singh at Sony Entertainment Television (B)

    Supplement to (A) case: Explores the role of CEO Man Jit Singh and his senior management committee in leading Multi Screen Media Pvt. Ltd. (formerly SET Pvt. Ltd.), a leading television broadcaster in India. Describes Singh's decision to evaluate employees based on values as well as performance, and the management committee's response. Allows for discussion of: 1) the impact of leadership style on team culture, performance, and effectiveness; 2) the challenges of building a values-based organization; 3) the complexities of managing talent in a young industry, particularly within an emerging market; and 4) the final decision by CEO Man Jit Singh and the subsequent actions taken by members of the management committee.

    Keywords: performance appraisals; performance management; Performance Evaluation; Leadership Style; Managerial Roles; Organizational Culture; Groups and Teams; Management Teams; Change Management; Decision Making; Emerging Markets; Media and Broadcasting Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Dana M. Teppert, and Allison J. Wigen. "Man Jit Singh at Sony Entertainment Television (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 414-052, November 2013. (Revised January 2014.) View Details
  3. Man Jit Singh at Sony Entertainment Television (A)

    Explores the role of CEO Man Jit Singh and his senior management committee in leading Multi Screen Media Pvt. Ltd. (formerly SET Pvt. Ltd.), a leading television broadcaster in India. Describes Singh's decision to evaluate employees based on values as well as performance, and the management committee's response. Allows for discussion of: 1) the impact of leadership style on team culture, performance, and effectiveness; 2) the challenges of building a values-based organization; 3) the complexities of managing talent in a young industry, particularly within an emerging market; and 4) the final decision by CEO Man Jit Singh and the subsequent actions taken by members of the management committee.

    Keywords: performance appraisals; performance management; Performance Evaluation; Leadership Style; Managerial Roles; Organizational Culture; Groups and Teams; Management Teams; Change Management; Decision Making; Emerging Markets; Media and Broadcasting Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Dana M. Teppert, and Allison J. Wigen. "Man Jit Singh at Sony Entertainment Television (A)." Harvard Business School Case 414-028, November 2013. (Revised January 2014.) View Details
  4. Wendy Peterson (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Alisa Zalosh. "Wendy Peterson (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 913-561, May 2013. View Details
  5. Wendy Peterson

    Wendy Peterson was recently promoted to Vice President of Sales at the Plano, Texas, office of AccountBack, an accounting software and services company. To penetrate a perceived market niche, Peterson hires Fred (Xing) Wu, whose familiarity with and access to Chinese business leaders in Plano is valuable. Wu was born and raised in China, partly educated in the U.S., and immigrated to the U.S. in 2005. Within 12 months, he had signed his regional team's largest client, but Peterson has reservations about Wu's performance and is uneasy about their working relationship. Wu has requested an assistant—unprecedented within AccountBack's flat organizational structure. Peterson reflexively perceives the request as unreasonable, but in responding she must take into account the implications her decision will have on the rest of her sales team, as well as her own career. This case is ideal for courses on managing performance, managing conflict, leadership, cross-cultural differences, conflict and negotiation, employee development, and performance evaluation.

    Keywords: Leadership; Conflict Management; Salesforce Management; Rank and Position; Performance Evaluation; Management Teams; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Accounting Industry; Texas;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Alisa Zalosh. "Wendy Peterson." Harvard Business School Brief Case 913-560, May 2013. View Details
  6. Ibrahim Dabdoub at the National Bank of Kuwait

    Ibrahim Dabdoub, the Group chief executive of the National Bank of Kuwait (NBK), reflects on his past 30 years at the helm of the Bank. Under his leadership, NBK grew from a small local bank to one of the preeminent financial institutions in the region. However, following the global financial crisis of 2008 and the Arab Spring, NBK had to slow its regional expansion. Dabdoub wonders if the Bank is positioned to thrive and fulfill its collective ambition to become the Arab regional bank by 2020.

    Keywords: leadership; banking industry; globalization; Middle East; team leadership; Leadership Style; Leadership; Leadership Development; Groups and Teams; Growth and Development Strategy; Expansion; Banking Industry; Kuwait; Middle East;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Dana M. Teppert. "Ibrahim Dabdoub at the National Bank of Kuwait." Harvard Business School Case 413-107, June 2013. View Details
  7. Luca de Meo at Volkswagen Group

    Luca de Meo, chief marketing officer of Volkswagen Group, reflects on his time leading the marketing department at Volkswagen Passenger Cars brand. In particular, he thinks about the environmental sustainability initiative launched by marketing called "Think Blue" and its success throughout the company. During his time at Volkswagen, de Meo focused on transforming the marketing department into an engine of innovation. De Meo and his team in marketing worked together to build a strong global brand.

    Keywords: marketing; leadership; sustainability; auto industry; change management; branding; Leadership; Change Management; Environmental Sustainability; Auto Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Dana M. Teppert. "Luca de Meo at Volkswagen Group." Harvard Business School Case 413-124, April 2013. View Details
  8. Iz-Lynn Chan at Far East Organization

    Iz-Lynn Chan, assistant director of retail business group and service quality and vice president of Far East retail consultancy for Far East Organization, a private real estate developer group in Singapore, raises service standards in the company's hospitality portfolio, Far East Hospitality. Chan and her small team in the Service Quality and Standards Department (SQSD) for Far East Organization apply to the Singapore government for the National Customer Centric Initiative (CCI) for Far East Hospitality. After being awarded the CCI, Chan must make some tough decisions about how to carry out the CCI. Despite Far East Hospitality's leading market share in mid-tier hotels and serviced residences, there had been a number of new entrants into the market and competition is fierce in Singapore's hospitality industry.

    Keywords: leadership; change management; hospitality; organizational change and transformation; Leadership; Leading Change; Change Management; Service Industry; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Anthony J. Mayo, and Dana M. Teppert. "Iz-Lynn Chan at Far East Organization." Harvard Business School Case 413-060, February 2013. (Revised May 2013.) View Details
  9. Global Expansion at Sanford C. Bernstein (C)

    Robert van Brugge, CEO of Sanford C. Bernstein, a premier sell-side research firm, has recently appointed a new Director of Asian Research to lead the firm's Hong Kong office. Van Brugge wonders what advice he should give the new Director as the firm continues to expand their business in Asia.

    Keywords: collaboration; finance; globalization; leadership; organizational design; talent management; Leadership; Finance; Globalization; Organizational Culture; Financial Services Industry; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Dana Teppert. "Global Expansion at Sanford C. Bernstein (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 413-085, November 2012. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  10. Johannes Linden: Managing the Global Executive Committee (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Mark Rennella. "Johannes Linden: Managing the Global Executive Committee (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 913-510, July 2012. View Details
  11. Johannes Linden: Managing the Global Executive Committee

    Johannes Linden is the Director of the Washer and Dryer division of Fluss, a large Swiss appliance manufacturer. Soon after the company completes its revenue projections and bonus targets for the upcoming year, Linden shares some good news with his leadership team, the Global Executive Committee (GEC): an internal R&D effort to develop cheaper steel for the company's products has finished a year ahead of schedule. This will translate into a significant reduction in costs across the division. When Linden proposes readjusting revenue expectations and sales targets accordingly, he is surprised to find that the GEC does not agree with him. Among other issues, employee bonuses are involved. Linden, with a reputation for being open and knowledgeable yet sometimes intimidating, tries to convince the committee to come around to his way of thinking.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Groups and Teams; Organizational Culture; Management Style; Motivation and Incentives; Power and Influence; Multinational Firms and Management; Manufacturing Industry; Consumer Products Industry; Switzerland;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Mark Rennella. "Johannes Linden: Managing the Global Executive Committee." Harvard Business School Brief Case 913-509, July 2012. View Details
  12. Stepping Up to Management

    Enable new managers to learn their jobs—while performing their jobs—with content that's integrated into their day-to-day workflow. Stepping Up to Management puts new managers on the right track so they can hit the ground running while laying the foundation for a successful advancement into a management career.

    Keywords: Learning; Managerial Roles; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. Stepping Up to Management. Tool. Watertown, MA: Harvard Business Publishing, 2011. View Details
  13. Martha Rinaldi: Should She Stay or Should She Go?

    Martha Rinaldi has been an assistant product manager at leading beverage company Potomac Waters since graduating from business school. Rinaldi is frustrated by her relationships with her boss and a close co-worker. Even though she works hard to please her manager, she has received a negative performance evaluation for her first four months. Should Rinaldi leave Potomac for a standing job offer at a company she previously interned with or try to improve her current situation?

    Keywords: Interpersonal relations; management styles; power and influence; Managing up; career planning; Conflict, Organizational culture; Management Style; Interpersonal Communication; Personal Development and Career; Organizational Culture; Relationships; Performance Evaluation; Conflict and Resolution; Power and Influence; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Mark Renella. "Martha Rinaldi: Should She Stay or Should She Go?" Harvard Business School Brief Case 114-310, August 2011. View Details
  14. Martha Rinaldi: Should She Stay or Should She Go? (Brief Case)

    Teaching Note for 4310.

    Keywords: Interpersonal relations; management styles; power and influence; Managing up; career planning; conflict; organizational culture;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Mark Rennella. "Martha Rinaldi: Should She Stay or Should She Go? (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 114-313, August 2011. View Details
  15. Calit2: A UC San Diego, UC Irvine Partnership

    Larry Smarr, the founding director of the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2), reflects on the Institute's past 10 years of successes and challenges. In 2010, more than 700 university scientists, artists, engineers, and social scientists and over 300 non-university partners are associated with the Institute. Innovative and multi-disciplinary research projects are being carried out in diverse fields such as environmental monitoring, human/robotic communication, digital archaeology, nanotechnology, life sciences, information technology, and telecommunications. Calit2 was one of four new research initiatives created in 2000 in a partnership between the State of California, the University of California, and California industry in order to foster and drive entrepreneurial business growth and expand the California economy into new industries and markets. Calit2 was the result of a partnership between both the University of California, San Diego and University of California, Irvine. As Calit2's first decade comes to a close, Smarr considers the future of the Institute and, in particular, its leadership and sustainability.

    Keywords: Success; Problems and Challenges; Innovation and Invention; Projects; Leadership; Innovation Leadership; Partners and Partnerships; Information Technology Industry; Telecommunications Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Alison Berkley Wagonfeld. "Calit2: A UC San Diego, UC Irvine Partnership." Harvard Business School Case 411-105, June 2011. (Revised June 2011.) View Details
  16. David Fletcher

    David Fletcher, manager of the Emerging Growth Fund at a New York investment management firm, decides to assemble a team of analysts to which he can delegate part of his workload. The case explores the challenges of being a producing manager and Fletcher's efforts to select and manage a team of professionals.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Groups and Teams; Management Teams; Investment Funds; Management Style; Selection and Staffing; Financial Services Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Melinda B. Conrad. "David Fletcher." Harvard Business School Case 493-064, February 1993. (Revised June 2011.) View Details
  17. Kay Sunderland: Making the Grade at Attain Learning

    Kay Sunderland is an account director at Attain Learning Inc., a business training solutions company. In January 2011, one of Attain's most important clients, Juan Nunez of Gramen Equipment Company, contacts Sunderland with a request: Nunez would like Attain content development director Mike Morgan to stop contacting him directly. Sunderland is surprised that Morgan, an experienced and talented contributor, is potentially jeopardizing the account by ignoring Attain's communications policy of restricting client-facing communication to the account director. Now Sunderland must decide how to handle the situation with both the client and her colleague Morgan.

    Keywords: communication; Interpersonal relations; power and influence; Personal strategy & style; creativity; conflict; Interdepartmental relations; talent management; Management Style; Interpersonal Communication; Talent and Talent Management; Relationships; Conflict and Resolution; Communication Strategy; Power and Influence; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Heather Beckham. "Kay Sunderland: Making the Grade at Attain Learning." Harvard Business School Brief Case 114-289, April 2011. View Details
  18. Global Expansion at Sanford C. Bernstein

    Sanford C. Bernstein, a premier sell-side research firm, is expanding globally and has recently opened an office in Hong Kong. Global Director of Research Robert van Brugge must consider how best to organize the firm's research department to enhance cross-sector and cross-geography collaboration among the senior research analysts in order to adapt to the challenging realities of global expansion in the financial services industry.

    Keywords: Change Management; Talent and Talent Management; Globalized Firms and Management; Knowledge Sharing; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Design; Research; Financial Services Industry; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Dana Teppert. "Global Expansion at Sanford C. Bernstein." Harvard Business School Case 411-051, October 2010. (Revised July 2012.) View Details
  19. Toni Sacconaghi at Sanford C. Bernstein

    Toni Sacconaghi, a senior sell-side equity research analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein covering U.S. IT hardware companies, thinks about the challenges and opportunities presented by the firm's new office in Hong Kong. Sacconaghi was previously the only analyst covering IT hardware companies for Bernstein. However, the firm has recently hired an analyst to cover Asian IT hardware companies in Hong Kong. Sacconaghi thinks about the best way to work collaboratively with the new Asian analyst.

    Keywords: Employees; Knowledge Sharing; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Research; Social and Collaborative Networks; Financial Services Industry; Hong Kong; United States;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Dana Teppert. "Toni Sacconaghi at Sanford C. Bernstein." Harvard Business School Supplement 411-052, October 2010. (Revised July 2012.) View Details
  20. Robin Bienenstock at Sanford C. Bernstein

    Robin Bienenstock, a senior sell-side equity research analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein, considers how to build her research franchise given the changing nature of the industry and the firm. A collaborative research paper called "Computer in Your Pocket" was recently published by four of her colleagues, but she was not consulted or asked to contribute. As clients call Bienenstock asking for her response to the investment conclusions in the paper, Bienenstock wonders 1) how she should respond to the report and 2) how she can increase her collaborative work in the future. As she continues to grow her franchise in terms of both the number of companies under coverage and team members, she wonders how she can best organize her team in order to leverage herself effectively.

    Keywords: Employees; Knowledge Dissemination; Knowledge Sharing; Leadership; Groups and Teams; Research; Cooperation; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Dana Teppert. "Robin Bienenstock at Sanford C. Bernstein." Harvard Business School Supplement 411-053, October 2010. (Revised July 2012.) View Details
  21. Global Expansion at Sanford C. Bernstein (A) (Abridged)

    Sanford C. Bernstein, a premier sell-side research firm, is expanding globally, and has recently opened an office in Hong Kong. Global Director of Research Robert van Brugge must consider how best to organize the firm's research department to enhance cross-sector and cross-geography collaboration among the senior research analysts in order to adapt to the challenging realities of global expansion in the financial services industry.

    Keywords: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Globalized Firms and Management; Organizational Structure; Expansion; Financial Services Industry; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Dana Teppert. "Global Expansion at Sanford C. Bernstein (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 411-063, October 2010. (Revised December 2010.) View Details
  22. Change Management Simulation: Power and Influence

    In this single-player simulation, students play one of two roles at a sunglass manufacturing firm and face the challenges associated with implementing an organization-wide environmental sustainability initiative. The initiative seeks to change raw material inputs in order to make the company's products more "green," and also to address environmental waste issues. The simulation includes up to four scenarios with different combinations of two important factors for creating change: the relative power of the change agent and the relative urgency associated with the change initiative. In each scenario, students choose among different change levers in an attempt to persuade key members of the organization to adopt the change initiative. Students are assessed on their ability to achieve the greatest percentage of adopters within the company while simultaneously using the fewest resources. Appropriate for use in undergraduate, graduate and executive business programs.

    Keywords: Change Management; Power and Influence; Problems and Challenges; Environmental Sustainability; Production; Wastes and Waste Processing; Adoption;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and William Q. Judge. "Change Management Simulation: Power and Influence." Simulation and Teaching Note. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Publishing, 2010. Electronic. View Details
  23. Global Expansion at Sanford C. Bernstein (B) (Abridged)

    Sanford C. Bernstein, a premier sell-side research firm, is expanding globally, and has recently opened an office in Hong Kong. Global Director of Research Robert van Brugge must consider how best to organize the firm's research department to enhance cross-sector and cross-geography collaboration among the senior research analysts in order to adapt to the challenging realities of global expansion in the financial services industry.

    Keywords: Leadership; Problems and Challenges; Global Strategy; Perspective; Adaptation; Expansion; Organizational Culture; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Financial Services Industry; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Dana Teppert. "Global Expansion at Sanford C. Bernstein (B) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Supplement 411-066, October 2010. View Details
  24. Systems Infrastructure at Google (A)

    This case describes how a senior vice president of engineering at Google, Bill Coughran, leads a high-performing engineering organization. The case focuses specifically on Coughran's encouraging two teams of engineers to develop competing solutions for application storage systems. It also shows how Coughran assembled an informal brain trust of managers and technical leaders that assist him in leading his 2,000-person organization. This case will be relevant for those interested in what it takes to lead for sustained innovation, particularly of knowledge workers like engineers. It also sheds light on how to develop leaders in engineering organizations.

    Keywords: Independent Innovation and Invention; Innovation and Management; Innovation Leadership; Leadership Development; Product Design; Groups and Teams; Creativity; Motivation and Incentives; Competitive Strategy; Technology Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Systems Infrastructure at Google (A)." Harvard Business School Case 410-110, March 2010. (Revised August 2010.) View Details
  25. Systems Infrastructure at Google (B)

    This case is a thick description of how a Senior Vice President of Engineering at Google, Bill Coughran, leads a high-performing engineering organization. The case focuses specifically on Coughran's use of encouraging two teams of engineers to develop competing solutions for application storage systems. It also shows how Coughran assembled an informal brain trust of managers and technical leaders that assist him in leading his 2,000-person organization. This case will be relevant for those interested in what it takes to lead for sustained innovation, particularly of knowledge workers like engineers. It also sheds light on how to develop leaders in engineering organizations.

    Keywords: Innovation Leadership; Infrastructure; Management Teams; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Systems Infrastructure at Google (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 410-111, March 2010. (Revised August 2010.) View Details
  26. Karen Leary (A)

    Describes the evolution of the working relationship of Karen Leary, a new manager of a Merrill Lynch retail branch, and Ted Chung, a new financial consultant in the branch. Leary has some concerns about her working relationship with Chung and with his performance. Chung makes what Leary perceives to be an unreasonable request for a private office. Leary must respond to this request, taking into account the implications of her decision for her ambitions for the branch office and her career.

    Keywords: Management Style; Employee Relationship Management; Decision Choices and Conditions; Personal Development and Career; Performance Evaluation; Diversity Characteristics; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Karen Leary (A)." Harvard Business School Case 487-020, October 1986. (Revised July 2010.) View Details
  27. Digital Chocolate

    Trip Hawkins founded Digital Chocolate in Silicon Valley in 2003 to develop outstanding games for mobile devices. By 2008, the company had expanded its operations into four countries, and Digital Chocolate was one of the top developers of soloplayer games for standard mobile phones and iPhones. In 2009, Hawkins was eager for Digital Chocolate to start developing new types of mobile games that could be played by multiple players over a period of time. Hawkins wondered how to guide his company into this new area of social gaming without losing any of the tremendous creative momentum the team had built over the previous years.

    Keywords: Games, Gaming, and Gambling; Innovation and Management; Leading Change; Product Development; Groups and Teams; Creativity; Telecommunications Industry; Video Game Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Alison Berkley Wagonfeld. "Digital Chocolate." Harvard Business School Case 410-049, October 2009. View Details
  28. Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (C) - Video

    Video of Tricia Fulton, Sun Hydraulic's CFO, visiting Linda hill's executive education class in March of 2009

    Keywords: Florida;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (C) - Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 409-714, June 2009. View Details
  29. Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (D)

    Keywords: Leadership; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (D)." Harvard Business School Supplement 409-118, May 2009. View Details
  30. Lawson: Becoming the Community Store of 9,000 Japanese Communities

    Keywords: Retail Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Francisco de Asis Martinez-Jerez, Masako Egawa, Emily Stecker, and Mayuka Yamazaki. "Lawson: Becoming the Community Store of 9,000 Japanese Communities." Harvard Business School Case 409-112, April 2009. (Revised March 2013.) View Details
  31. Vineet Nayar at HCL Unstructure 2008

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Tarun Khanna, and Emily Stecker. "Vineet Nayar at HCL Unstructure 2008." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 409-712, April 2009. View Details
  32. HCL Technologies (A) (TN)

    Teaching Note for [408004].

    Keywords: Leading Change; Transformation; Competition; Globalized Markets and Industries; Employees; Computer Industry; Information Technology Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Khanna, Tarun, and Linda A. Hill. "HCL Technologies (A) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 409-077, January 2009. View Details
  33. Philipp Justus at eBay Germany (C)

    This case traces the development of eBay Germany, eBay Inc., and the career of eBay Germany's first country manager, Philipp Justus. The case covers from 2000 through the fall of 2007. This case details how eBay Germany, once a small start-up, became one of eBay's most successful locations. The case reveals how Justus added seasoned leaders and structure to the group, while allowing for improvisation. The case also traces Justus's career, as he moved to running eBay Europe and ultimately, the auctions group, which took him to headquarters. Like eBay Germany, eBay itself grew tremendously, in part from acquisitions like PayPal and Skype. But, growth in core areas, like auctions, had slowed. This case explains how eBay Inc. and eBay Germany tried to keep their "secret sauce."

    Keywords: Innovation and Management; Leadership; Auctions; Organizational Structure; Personal Development and Career; Internet; Germany;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Philipp Justus at eBay Germany (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 409-029, August 2008. View Details
  34. HCL Technologies (A)

    When Vineet Nayar became president of HCL Technologies, a global IT services business, in April 2005, he knew the company needed drastic change. Since its founding as a hardware company in the 1970s, HCL had grown into an enterprise with $3.7 billion in revenues and a market capitalization of $5.1 billion. The company had 41,000 employees in 11 countries, but it was ill-prepared for the increasingly competitive market. With the shift from hardware to software and services, HCL had slipped behind its Indian competitors and multinational companies. Details the first phase of the transformation Nayar led in hopes of rejuvenating the industry pioneer. The tagline for this phase was "Employee First, Customer Second."

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Multinational Firms and Management; Employee Relationship Management; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Competition; Information Technology Industry; Service Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Tarun Khanna, and Emily Stecker. "HCL Technologies (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-004, August 2007. (Revised July 2008.) View Details
  35. HCL Technologies (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Tarun Khanna, and Emily Stecker. "HCL Technologies (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-006, August 2007. (Revised July 2008.) View Details
  36. Kit Hinrichs at Pentagram (A)

    This case focuses on Kit Hinrichs, a 65-year-old partner at Pentagram, a privately owned multidisciplinary design firm. One of the world's most prestigious design firms, Pentagram was founded by five designers from different disciplines in London in the 1970s. By 2008, Pentagram remained small, with less than 30 partners, each a veritable star in his or her own right. Pentagram had two founding principles, the first of which was equality. The equality principle meant that leadership was evenly distributed; partners with seniority had no greater formal authority than newer partners, and the only formal leadership role was a chairman position, which, after being held with a founder for 30 years, was rotated every two years. Further, Pentagram had no corporate office; each partner was expected to manage his or her own financial, marketing, and human resource functions. Pentagram's second principle was generosity. All partners were equal shareholders in the firm. Pentagram branched out to New York in the early 1980s, and in the late 1980s, Hinrichs established a San Francisco location. This case traces Hinrichs as he builds Pentagram's San Francisco office, and it also details the evolution of Pentagram itself. In addition, this case offers a thick description of Hinrichs and his team working with a client. This case can be used in business and executive education courses on professional service firms, leading a creative organization, and the role of design in business. It should also be used by schools of design.

    Keywords: Arts; Business Offices; Customer Relationship Management; Design; Leadership; Personal Development and Career; Groups and Teams; Creativity; Service Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Kit Hinrichs at Pentagram (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-127, June 2008. (Revised July 2008.) View Details
  37. Kit Hinrichs at Pentagram (B)

    This case focuses on Kit Hindrichs, a 65 year-old partner at Pentagram, a privately-owned multidisciplinary design firm. One of the world's most prestigious design firms, Pentagram was founded by five designers from different disciplines in London in the 1970s. By 2008, Pentagram remained small, with less than 30 partners, each a veritable star in his or her own right. Pentagram had two founding principles, the first of which was equality. The equality principle meant that leadership was evenly distributed; partners with seniority had no greater formal authority than newer partners, and the only formal leadership role was a chairman position, which, after being held with a founder for 30 years, was rotated every two years. Further, Pentagram had no corporate office; each partner was expected to manage their own financial, marketing, and human resource functions. Pentagram's second principle was generosity. All partners were equal shareholders in the firm. Pentagram branched out to New York in the early 1980s, and in the late 1980s, Hinrichs established a San Francisco location. This case describes how Hinrichs grapples with the future of the San Francisco office, once learning he will be its only partner.

    Keywords: Business Offices; Design; Managerial Roles; Private Ownership; Business and Shareholder Relations; Partners and Partnerships; Equality and Inequality; London; San Francisco; New York (state, US);

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Kit Hinrichs at Pentagram (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-128, June 2008. View Details
  38. Kenny Kahn at Muzak (A)

    Founded in 1934, Muzak pioneered the industry of background music. Equipped with propriety technology and a vast music library, over the ensuing decades the Muzak franchise organization expanded geographically. Despite a history of innovation, by the late 1990s Muzak had anemic financials and low employee morale. When new CEO Bill Boyd took the helm in 1997, he assembled a new management team. The new VP of Marketing, Kenny Kahn, worked with design firm Pentagram to re-brand the company, not just for customers but to spark organizational change. But because Muzak was a franchise organization, Kahn had to convince independent affiliates to pay for what turned out to be an extensive re-branding. This case can be used to teach how branding can be used as a tool for spearheading culture change—not to exercise influence without authority—and how businesspeople can effectively work with a design firm.

    Keywords: Change Management; Design; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Brands and Branding; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Franchise Ownership; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Kenny Kahn at Muzak (A)." Harvard Business School Case 408-057, May 2008. (Revised June 2008.) View Details
  39. Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (A)

    Eighteen months after launching Nickelodeon Latin America, general manager Taran Swan must leave the company's Miami headquarters for her New York home because of complications with her pregnancy. Unable to travel for at least the next six months, Swan must decide how she will continue to run the channel from New York. Should she put an interim acting head in place, and if so, who among her team should it be? What adjustments will she need to make in her leadership style and working relationships with her team? The case describes the channel's launch and first 18 months on the air, focusing on how Swan puts together her team and crafts the company's culture.

    Keywords: Selection and Staffing; Leadership Style; Managerial Roles; Organizational Culture; Groups and Teams;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (A)." Harvard Business School Case 400-036, August 1999. (Revised June 2008.) View Details
  40. Wolfgang Keller at Konigsbrau-TAK (A) and (B) (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-498-045) and (9-498-046).

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry; Germany; Ukraine;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Wolfgang Keller at Konigsbrau-TAK (A) and (B) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 400-069, February 2000. (Revised May 2008.) View Details
  41. Kenny Kahn at Muzak (B)

    Supplemental Material for 408-057

    Keywords: Organizations; Geographic Location; Innovation and Invention; Employees; Management Teams; Brands and Branding; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Design; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Kenny Kahn at Muzak (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-069, May 2008. View Details
  42. Dr. Iqbal Survé at Sekunjalo Investment Group (B)

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Dr. Iqbal Survé at Sekunjalo Investment Group (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 407-054, April 2007. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  43. Dr. Iqbal Survé at Sekunjalo Investment Group (C)

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Dr. Iqbal Survé at Sekunjalo Investment Group (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 407-055, April 2007. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  44. Dr. Iqbal Survé at Sekunjalo Investment Group (D)

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Dr. Iqbal Survé at Sekunjalo Investment Group (D)." Harvard Business School Supplement 407-071, April 2007. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  45. Dr. Iqbal Survé at Sekunjalo Investment Group (A)

    Dr. Iqbal Surve, a self-described "medical doctor, philanthropist, and social entrepreneur," was born in 1963 and grew up in poverty, like virtually all non-white South Africans during apartheid. During the 1970s and 1980s, he served in leadership positions in the ANC, struggling against apartheid. After apartheid ended, Surve served as a medical doctor to many prominent South African leaders, like Nelson Mandela, and to the national soccer team. But by the mid-1990s, Surve, like many of his comrades, grew frustrated by the huge economic disparities that existed in South Africa, even though its progressive constitution afforded all citizens equal rights. It seemed the government's Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) policies were only enriching a few. In 1997, Surve and three of his comrades founded Sekunjalo, an investment holding company that sought to offer "a gentler capitalism" that stressed putting people before profits, and talent development as a means of raising the lives of previously disadvantaged South Africans. By 1999, the company listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange, making 36-year-old Surve the youngest CEO of a listed diversified conglomerate. From its inception, Sekunjalo only purchased controlling stakes in companies, hoping to empower black workers. In 1999, it had purchased a 5% stake in LeisureNet, a white-owned and -run South African company that operated health clubs globally and was seeking a BEE partner. Surve hoped to eventually purchase a majority stake in the company, but in 2000 the company went under in the biggest corporate scandal in South African history. In one day, Sekunjalo's stock dropped 44%. Surve, already a very public figure in South Africa, had to decide what to do, especially what to tell his loyal employees who had invested so much in Sekunjalo's mission.

    Keywords: Crime and Corruption; Social Entrepreneurship; Investment; Leadership; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Partners and Partnerships; South Africa;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Dr. Iqbal Survé at Sekunjalo Investment Group (A)." Harvard Business School Case 407-019, April 2007. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  46. Corey Robinson at Sprint Corporation (A)

    Corey Robinson is promoted to a new position at Sprint during a time of much internal change within the company. Asks readers to consider how he sets the tone to his new management team and how effective he is in building credibility in his new leadership role. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Management Skills; Management Teams; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Performance Effectiveness; Personal Development and Career; Power and Influence; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Anthony Mayo, and Lisa Pode. "Corey Robinson at Sprint Corporation (A)." Harvard Business School Case 405-094, June 2005. (Revised January 2008.) View Details
  47. Willa Seldon at Tides Center (A)

    Willa Seldon, an African-American woman with 16 years of for-profit experience, was hired as executive director of Tides Center, a nonprofit in San Francisco, CA. Tides Center was a fiscal sponsor dedicated to supporting individuals and groups working toward social change. In her first few months as executive director, Seldon quickly and deliberately rolled out initiatives to ensure that Tides Center became a customer-centric organization capable of delivering exceptional fiscal sponsorship services and steady organizational growth. One aspect of this involved conducting a comprehensive performance management review. Examines the transition from the for-profit to the nonprofit sector and deals with change management.

    Keywords: For-Profit Firms; Nonprofit Organizations; Transition; Change Management; Leadership Style; Performance; Customer Satisfaction; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Willa Seldon at Tides Center (A)." Harvard Business School Case 406-072, May 2006. (Revised November 2006.) View Details
  48. Analyzing Work Groups

    Work groups are the building blocks of organizations. They are found in all areas of an organization, from research and development to customer service, and at all levels, from the executive suite to the factory floor. Some are incredibly successful, while others are dismal failures. Team work is hard work, and all too often groups do not live up to their potential. Provides a framework for analyzing work groups so that group leaders and members can identify actions that will enhance their effectiveness. Helps provide insight into the factors most profoundly shaping the development, dynamics, and effectiveness of task-performing groups and, in particular, group culture, its antecedents, and consequences. To illustrate how the framework is used, it looks at and analyzes an actual work group: the new product team of the Merit Corporation. Examines the impact of leadership style on group culture and outcomes and describes how one leader's individual style can affect the way teams operate and perform.

    Keywords: Framework; Leadership Style; Service Operations; Organizational Culture; Performance Effectiveness; Groups and Teams; Research and Development; Behavior;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Michel Anteby. "Analyzing Work Groups." Harvard Business School Background Note 407-032, August 2006. View Details
  49. Willa Seldon at Tides Center (B)

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Emily Stecker. "Willa Seldon at Tides Center (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 406-087, June 2006. View Details
  50. Matt Leeds (A)

    A new associate in a consulting firm attempts to navigate his way through the norms and culture of a new setting and to manage his relationships with his superiors and peers, which got off to a poor start.

    PLEASE NOTE: This case was revised in January 2014. Some language and incidents have been lightly edited, to bring the case up-to-date.

    Keywords: Power and Influence; Rank and Position; Organizational Culture; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Matt Leeds (A)." Harvard Business School Case 403-111, December 2002. (Revised January 2014.) View Details
  51. Irene Charnley at Johnnic Group (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry; South Africa;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Irene Charnley at Johnnic Group (B)." Harvard Business School Case 403-171, June 2003. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  52. Corey Robinson at Sprint Corporation (B)

    Supplements the (A) case. A rewritten version of an earlier supplement.

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Anthony Mayo, and Lisa Pode. "Corey Robinson at Sprint Corporation (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 405-095, June 2005. (Revised January 2006.) View Details
  53. Meg Whitman at eBay Inc. (A)

    Meg Whitman takes over as CEO of eBay from the founder. She must figure out how to lead the company through a stage of phenomenal growth without compromising eBay's unique external customer culture and internal culture--its key success factors. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Change Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Growth Management; Organizational Culture; Success;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Meg Whitman at eBay Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 401-024, November 2000. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  54. Irene Charnley at Johnnic Group (A) (Abridged)

    When she becomes chairperson of a large telecommunications board, Irene Charnley must transform the mostly white-led company to be more representative of South Africa's demographics.

    Keywords: Change Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Demographics; Communication Technology; Telecommunications Industry; South Africa;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Irene Charnley at Johnnic Group (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 405-060, January 2005. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  55. Irene Charnley at Johnnic Group (A)

    When she becomes chairperson of a large telecommunications board, Irene Charnley must transform the mostly white-led company to be more representative of South Africa's demographics. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Change Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Demographics; Communication Technology; Telecommunications Industry; South Africa;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Irene Charnley at Johnnic Group (A)." Harvard Business School Case 405-059, January 2005. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  56. Peter Isenberg at Fischer Stevens (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Peter Isenberg at Fischer Stevens (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 403-129, January 2003. (Revised January 2005.) View Details
  57. Peter Isenberg at Fischer Stevens (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Peter Isenberg at Fischer Stevens (B)." Harvard Business School Case 403-128, January 2003. (Revised January 2005.) View Details
  58. Peter Isenberg at Fischer Stevens (A)

    Having made managing director at an elite investment bank, Peter Isenberg struggles to understand his new role in the firm. He feels as though little has changed, although it is clear to him that those around him have new expectations.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Jobs and Positions; Management Teams; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Peter Isenberg at Fischer Stevens (A)." Harvard Business School Case 403-127, January 2003. (Revised January 2005.) View Details
  59. Irene Charnley at Johnnic Group (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry; South Africa;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Irene Charnley at Johnnic Group (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 405-061, January 2005. View Details
  60. Kate Burnett

    Supplements Peter Isenberg at Jones Mendel (A).

    Keywords: Managerial Roles;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Kate Burnett." Harvard Business School Supplement 403-130, January 2003. (Revised September 2003.) View Details
  61. Joline Godfrey: Update 1992-2002

    Supplements Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corp. (A).

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Joline Godfrey: Update 1992-2002." Harvard Business School Case 403-068, October 2002. (Revised May 2003.) View Details
  62. Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (A) (Abridged)

    Sun Hydraulics, 32-year-old global hydraulics engineering and manufacturing company headquartered in Sarasota, Florida; confronts tough choices due to the economic downturn in 2001. The company leadership debates how to maintain profitability and reduce labor costs without destroying the company's innovative culture, which is based on horizontal management and has no defined corporate hierarchy. This case includes an overview of the company's history, from its founding in 1970 to its IPO in 1997, and asks students to step into the shoes of Allen Carlson, Sun's president and CEO, to recommend specific cost-cutting actions.

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Mission and Purpose; Financial Crisis; Crisis Management; Manufacturing Industry; Florida;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 403-139, May 2003. View Details
  63. Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (A)

    Sun Hydraulics, 32-year-old global hydraulics engineering and manufacturing company headquartered in Sarasota, Florida, confronts tough choices due to the economic downturn in 2001. The company leadership debates how to maintain profitability and reduce labor costs without destroying the company's innovative culture, which is based on the idea of horizontal management and has no defined corporate hierarchy. This case includes an overview of the company's history, from its founding in 1970 to its IPO in 1997, and asks students to step into the shoes of Allen Carlson, Sun's president and CEO, to recommend specific cost-cutting actions.

    Keywords: Organizational Culture; Mission and Purpose; Financial Crisis; Crisis Management; Manufacturing Industry; Florida;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (A)." Harvard Business School Case 403-069, January 2003. (Revised April 2003.) View Details
  64. Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Florida;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Sun Hydraulics: Leading in Tough Times (B)." Harvard Business School Case 403-121, February 2003. (Revised April 2003.) View Details
  65. Dawn Riley at America True (A)

    Dawn Riley is the CEO/Captain of America True, the first coed syndicate to race for the America's Cup. Over three years, based on her vision for America True, she built the syndicate from scratch, bringing on investors and sponsors, designing and building a boat, and hiring a sailing crew to race it. In June 1999, Riley must decide how to handle the San Francisco office now that America True's base of operations is moving to Auckland, New Zealand, where racing will begin in four months. She is facing pressure to phase out the office to cut down on costs, but Riley believes that the people in San Francisco and the work they are doing are key to her vision for America True. She must weigh the tension between immediate pressures to win and the longer-term sustainability of her vision.

    Keywords: Management Style; Leadership; Problems and Challenges; Sports; Gender Characteristics; Business Startups; North and Central America; New Zealand; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Dawn Riley at America True (A)." Harvard Business School Case 401-006, July 2000. (Revised June 2002.) View Details
  66. A Note on Building and Leading Your Senior Team

    As performance demands intensify in fast-moving global markets, more executives are coming to rely on senior teams for strategic and operational assistance. Team building with powerful senior executives presents special challenges, including competition for their boss' position. Examines those challenges and describes in detail two primary responsibilities of managing such teams effectively: managing team boundaries, that is, the political dynamics of the team; and team process-leading the team. Contains a special appendix discussing leading and building global teams. To discuss how to build an effective team culture by harnessing the energies of talented, diverse individuals to create coordinated action.

    Keywords: Talent and Talent Management; Globalized Markets and Industries; Selection and Staffing; Leadership; Management Teams; Operations; Organizational Culture; Rank and Position; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "A Note on Building and Leading Your Senior Team." Harvard Business School Background Note 402-037, January 2002. (Revised June 2002.) View Details
  67. Paula Evans and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (C)

    Supplements the (A) case and Bobbie D'Alessandro and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Strategy; Secondary Education; Restructuring; Leadership; Education Industry; Cambridge;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Paula Evans and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (C)." Harvard Business School Case 402-005, April 2002. View Details
  68. Perlegen Sciences

    As a biotech start-up company involved in studying human genomes, Perlegen needed to develop an organization that fostered innovation and teamwork among a group of highly trained professionals from both the science and technology fields. Perlegen's CEO, Brad Margus, had joined Perlegen from the shrimp processing business after learning that two of his three sons had been diagnosed with a rare genetic disease. A Harvard MBA and self-trained geneticist, Margus looked forward to the opportunity to dedicate himself to Perlegen's scientific mission. During his first nine months on the job, Margus had hired a number of junior-level and mid-level employees; now it was time to fill out the senior management team. Margus's first senior management hire was Greg Brandeau, the former vice president of computer operations at Pixar Animation Studios, who signed on to be Perlegen's CEO. Brandeau faced a number of challenges as he integrated into the Perlegen organization, including the fact that he lacked a science background, his two direct reports had already been hired, and he would be the third leg of a tight-knit, two-person senior management team already in place.

    Keywords: Innovation Leadership; Groups and Teams; Management Teams; Problems and Challenges; Business Startups; Genetics; Talent and Talent Management; Innovation Strategy; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Nicole Tempest. "Perlegen Sciences." Harvard Business School Case 402-026, October 2001. (Revised March 2002.) View Details
  69. Franco Bernabe at ENI (A)

    Describes Franco Bernabe's ascent to leadership at ENI, Italy's national oil and gas company. Illustrates Bernabe's early career experiences in academia, as the chief economist at Fiat. Then describes his arrival at ENI during the early 1980s, where he became first the assistant to the CEO and then director of strategic planning. In 1992, Bernabe was unexpectedly appointed by the Italian government to head the company's privatization process. Bernabe was only 42 years old at the time. Immediately after his appointment, Bernabe dealt with many crises, including Italy's Clean Hands corruption scandals, which implicated his entire executive team. This case focuses on his first year as CEO.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Personal Development and Career; Management Teams; Management Style; Strategic Planning; Crisis Management; Privatization; Italy;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Jennifer Suesse, and Mara Willard. "Franco Bernabe at ENI (A)." Harvard Business School Case 498-034, December 1997. (Revised February 2002.) View Details
  70. Managing Performance

    Encourages managers to think critically about how to prepare for and give a performance appraisal interview. Presents frameworks for evaluating subordinates' work and suggestions for coaching them.

    Keywords: Performance Evaluation; Framework;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., and Linda A. Hill. "Managing Performance." Harvard Business School Background Note 496-022, October 1995. (Revised January 2002.) View Details
  71. Philipp Justus at eBay Germany (A)

    A week after becoming country manager of eBay's recently acquired German auction site, Philipp Justus must steer the company through a massive technical integration with eBay's Web site. Throughout the seven-month project, Justus and his team must master the challenge of working with counterparts thousands of miles away and determine how much they can change their online trading site without completely alienating their user community.

    Keywords: Organizational Design; Leadership; Online Technology; Globalized Firms and Management; Mergers and Acquisitions; Managerial Roles; Management Teams; Management Practices and Processes; Auctions; Retail Industry; Information Technology Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Philipp Justus at eBay Germany (A)." Harvard Business School Case 402-007, October 2001. (Revised January 2002.) View Details
  72. Meg Whitman and eBay Germany

    After acquiring the German online auction company Alando.de, eBay CEO Meg Whitman and her team must integrate Alando's Web site with the company's existing platform. The acquisition is the first step of eBay's journey to become a global trading platform. In addition to the challenge of a technical integration of massive scale, the case explores the inner workings of eBay's senior team. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Acquisition; Integration; Technology Platform; Online Technology; Globalized Markets and Industries; Germany;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Meg Whitman and eBay Germany." Harvard Business School Case 402-006, October 2001. View Details
  73. Philipp Justus at eBay Germany (B)

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "Philipp Justus at eBay Germany (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 402-015, October 2001. View Details
  74. A Note on Team Process

    When tasks are highly complex, demand a diversity of skills, or require a commitment from the involved parties, teams are usually the most effective way to approach them. But a group of people working together does not automatically equally a team, and groups are often inefficient and ineffective. Provides detailed information on team development, team management, and team process. Also suggests specific interventions that any team member can make to improve decision making and participation, as well as ways to influence dynamics and resolve conflicts.

    Keywords: Competency and Skills; Decision Making; Management; Business Processes; Performance Effectiveness; Performance Efficiency; Groups and Teams; Conflict and Resolution;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Maria Farkas. "A Note on Team Process." Harvard Business School Background Note 402-032, October 2001. View Details
  75. Bobbie D'Alessandro and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School

    Bobbi D'Alessandro, the superintendent of the school system in Cambridge, MA, has just hired a new principal to lead a major redesign effort in the city's only high school. The need for reform had been evident since the late 1980s when school statistics highlighted substantial disparities in academic achievement rates across race and income level. Reform efforts over the past decade have met with little success. One of the most significant challenges in undertaking school redesign is managing the complex constituencies involved with the Cambridge school system, including students, parents, teachers, the teachers' union, and the school committee. D'Alessandro has been in the superintendent role less than two years and wonders how she can best create the conditions under which the new principal and the redesign effort will achieve success.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Business and Stakeholder Relations; Performance Improvement; Change Management; Secondary Education; Selection and Staffing; Leading Change; Education Industry; Cambridge;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Kristin Doughty, and Ellen Pruyne. "Bobbie D'Alessandro and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School." Harvard Business School Case 402-002, July 2001. View Details
  76. Paula Evans and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (A)

    Paula Evans is in her second year as principal of the only high school in Cambridge, MA. Her mandate when she arrived was to redesign the high school so that long-standing inequities in academic achievement rates across race and socioeconomic class were removed. In her first year, she succeeded in obtaining approval for her proposed redesign and completing the physical and administrative restructuring of the high school. Now in her second year, the reforms in how teachers teach and how the school operates are fully under way. From early indications, she and her hand-picked leadership team are moving the school in the desired direction. But the school committee has just made a policy decision that Evans and her team believe will undo all of the redesign efforts that have been made thus far. Evans has threatened to resign and now ponders what she will tell her leadership team and the faculty the next day.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Strategy; Secondary Education; Restructuring; Leadership; Conflict Management; Education Industry; Cambridge;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Kristin Doughty, and Ellen Pruyne. "Paula Evans and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (A)." Harvard Business School Case 402-003, July 2001. View Details
  77. Paula Evans and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Strategy; Secondary Education; Restructuring; Leadership; Education Industry; Cambridge;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Kristin Doughty, and Ellen Pruyne. "Paula Evans and the Redesign of the Cambridge Rindge and Latin School (B)." Harvard Business School Case 402-004, July 2001. View Details
  78. Francisco de Narvaez at TIA: Selling the Family Business

    Francisco de Narvaez reflects on the process of selling his family's retail business.

    Keywords: Family Business; Business Exit or Shutdown;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Francisco de Narvaez at TIA: Selling the Family Business." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 401-803, March 2001. View Details
  79. Francisco de Narvaez at Tia: Selling the Family Business

    In January 1999, Francisco de Narvaez sold Tia, his family's retail business in Argentina. De Narvaez reflects on the decision to sell and the selling process.

    Keywords: Family Business; Business Exit or Shutdown; Decisions; Argentina;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Francisco de Narvaez at Tia: Selling the Family Business." Harvard Business School Case 401-017, October 2000. View Details
  80. Jeanne Lewis at Staples, Inc. (A) (Abridged)

    Jeanne Lewis, after six years with Staples, Inc., is promoted to senior vice president of marketing. She is to work for fifteen months alongside her predecessor, a legacy in the organization, "learning the ropes" before he moves on. This case is set nine months after she begins working with the marketing department. At this time, Staples has just emerged from a period of prolonged litigation because of an FTC antitrust suit challenging Staples' attempted merger with Office Depot. Post-merger, Lewis must determine how the marketing department can most effectively and efficiently help the company maintain its competitive edge in an increasingly competitive and complex market. Looks at the challenges a middle manager faces "taking charge" and managing change in a revitalization situation in which a more evolutionary approach is appropriate.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Management Style; Change Management; Marketing Strategy; Management Succession; Competitive Advantage; Problems and Challenges; Management Teams; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Jeanne Lewis at Staples, Inc. (A) (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 400-065, March 2000. (Revised July 2000.) View Details
  81. Dawn Riley at America True (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Management Style; Leadership; Problems and Challenges; Sports; Gender Characteristics; Business Startups; North and Central America; New Zealand; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Dawn Riley at America True (B)." Harvard Business School Case 401-007, July 2000. View Details
  82. Dawn Riley at America True (C)

    Dawn Riley and America True are based in Auckland, New Zealand, where racing will begin in six weeks. The senior management team will be meeting in August 1999 to decide whether or not to make changes to Tag, the practice boat that they are using as a testing platform. Riley has striven to create a consensus-based approach to decision-making, and see herself as a "participant" in these meetings. She wonders if things have gotten "too democratic," and if she should step in and lead this meeting. Would changing her behavior now about such a seminal matter compromise her effort to create a collaborative decision making approach? This case provides information on sailing and design programs, and explores in depth Riley's role as a "producing manager."

    Keywords: Management Style; Leadership; Behavior; Groups and Teams; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Sports; Gender Characteristics; Management Teams; New Zealand;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Dawn Riley at America True (C)." Harvard Business School Case 401-008, July 2000. View Details
  83. Dawn Riley at America True (D)

    Supplements the (C) and (C1) cases.

    Keywords: Management Style; Leadership; Groups and Teams; Decision Making; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Gender Characteristics; Management Teams; Sports; Business Startups; New Zealand; North and Central America;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Dawn Riley at America True (D)." Harvard Business School Case 401-009, July 2000. View Details
  84. Dawn Riley at America True (E)

    Supplements the (C) and (C1) cases.

    Keywords: Management Style; Leadership; Groups and Teams; Decision Making; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Gender Characteristics; Management Teams; Sports; Business Startups; New Zealand; North and Central America;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Dawn Riley at America True (E)." Harvard Business School Case 401-010, July 2000. View Details
  85. Dawn Riley at America True (C1)

    This version of the (C) case can be taught independently of the (A) and (B) cases. Dawn Riley, CEO/Captain of America True, the first coed syndicate to race for the America's Cup, is based in Auckland, New Zealand, where racing will begin in six weeks. Riley has built a culture focused on open communication and shared decision making. But the practice of consensus-based decision making does not seem to be working for two critical issues that have recently come up: a design question about the training boat and an issue about Riley's position on the boat. Riley wonders if it is time to step in. This case describes how Riley built the syndicate, provides information on the sailing and design program, and explores Riley's role as a "producing manager."

    Keywords: Management Style; Leadership; Groups and Teams; Decision Making; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Gender Characteristics; Management Teams; Sports; Business Startups; New Zealand; North and Central America;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Dawn Riley at America True (C1)." Harvard Business School Case 401-011, July 2000. View Details
  86. Jeanne Lewis at Staples, Inc. (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Management Style; Change Management; Marketing Strategy; Management Succession; Competitive Advantage; Problems and Challenges; Management Teams; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Jeanne Lewis at Staples, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 499-042, November 1998. (Revised June 2000.) View Details
  87. Jeanne Lewis at Staples, Inc. (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Management Style; Change Management; Marketing Strategy; Management Succession; Competitive Advantage; Problems and Challenges; Management Teams; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Jeanne Lewis at Staples, Inc. (C)." Harvard Business School Case 400-054, March 2000. (Revised June 2000.) View Details
  88. Franco Bernabe: Reflections on Telecom Italia (B) CD

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Franco Bernabe: Reflections on Telecom Italia (B) CD." Harvard Business School Supplement 400-506, June 2000. View Details
  89. Old Colony Associates

    Presents performance management interviews between James Cranfield and Eugene Kearney of Old Colony Associates.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Management; Performance;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Old Colony Associates." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 400-507, May 2000. View Details
  90. Franco Bernabe: Reflections on Telecom Italia (A)

    In November 1998, Franco Bernabe left ENI to become CEO of Telecom Italia, Italy's primary telecommunications provider. Three months later, Roberto Colaninno, CEO of Olivetti SpA, an Italian computer and telecom company one fifth the size of Telecom Italia, launched a hostile takeover of Telecom Italia. In this case, Bernabe reflects on his departure from ENI, his experiences at Telecom Italia during the takeover, and his plans moving forward in November 1999.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Mergers and Acquisitions; Planning; Telecommunications Industry; Italy;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Franco Bernabe: Reflections on Telecom Italia (A)." Harvard Business School Case 400-060, December 1999. (Revised April 2000.) View Details
  91. Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corporation (A)

    Describes how Joline Godfrey, an intrapreneur at the Polaroid Corp., introduced and developed a project that could help Polaroid move to a more service- as opposed to product-oriented focus. Also depicts the mentor-protege relationship between Godfrey and Gerald Sudbey, a senior executive in the company. Addresses two issues: intrapreneurship and mentor-protege relationships. Allows the students to explore the process of intrapreneurship, what it takes to effectively be a change agent in an organization. In addition, provides them with a textured understanding of mentor-protege relationships--the various stages they go through, and the challenges and benefits they represent.

    Keywords: Corporate Entrepreneurship; Rank and Position; Leading Change; Problems and Challenges; Change; Electronics Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Nancy A Kamprath. "Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corporation (A)." Harvard Business School Case 492-037, March 1992. (Revised April 2000.) View Details
  92. Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (D)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Media and Broadcasting Industry; Latin America;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (D)." Harvard Business School Case 400-039, August 1999. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  93. Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Latin America; Miami;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (C)." Harvard Business School Case 400-038, August 1999. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  94. Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Latin America; Miami;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (B)." Harvard Business School Case 400-037, August 1999. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  95. What It Really Means to Manage: Exercising Power and Influence

    Describes the realities versus the myths of what it means to be a manager. In particular, it focuses on the limitations of formal authority as a source of power and identifies other sources of power that effective managers rely upon. Also outlines a framework of exercising influence (law of reciprocity) and building networks of mutually beneficial alliances with direct reports, bosses, and peers.

    Keywords: Framework; Management Teams; Alliances; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "What It Really Means to Manage: Exercising Power and Influence." Harvard Business School Background Note 400-041, August 1999. (Revised February 2000.) View Details
  96. Franco Bernabe: Reflections on Telecom Italia (B)

    Supplements the video.

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry; Italy;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Franco Bernabe: Reflections on Telecom Italia (B)." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 400-070, February 2000. View Details
  97. Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (A)-(D) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-400-036), (9-400-037), (9-400-038), and (9-400-039).

    Keywords: Latin America; Miami;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (A)-(D) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 400-071, February 2000. View Details
  98. Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (Video)

    Taran Swan talks with HBS students about the events covered in the case. She discusses her definition of a leader, how she built the team, leaving Miami, and her relationship with headquarters management.

    Keywords: Business Headquarters; Leadership; Management Teams; Relationships; Situation or Environment; Latin America; Miami;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America (Video)." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 400-505, January 2000. View Details
  99. Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (Abridged)

    Business unit manager Tom Hutton has empowered a group of hourly workers to purchase grit blast equipment for two cells. The capital purchase decision runs into some problems when the two cells fail to reach an agreement on which equipment to purchase. A rewritten version of two earlier cases.

    Keywords: Business Units; Decision Making; Labor; Managerial Roles; Failure; Problems and Challenges; Power and Influence; Hardware;

    Citation:

    Bowen, H. Kent, Jeffrey L. Bradach, Linda A. Hill, and Kristin Doughty. "Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (Abridged) ." Harvard Business School Case 499-050, February 1999. (Revised June 1999.) View Details
  100. Jeanne Lewis at Staples (Video)

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Jeanne Lewis at Staples (Video)." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 499-504, June 1999. View Details
  101. Leadership and Organizational Behavior (LEAD), Course Overview (Abridged)

    Course overview for the first-year required MBA course Leadership and Organizational Behavior (LEAD).

    Keywords: Leadership; Organizations; Behavior;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Leadership and Organizational Behavior (LEAD), Course Overview (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 499-067, June 1999. View Details
  102. Lark International Entertainment, Ltd. (Video)

    Keywords: Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Lark International Entertainment, Ltd. (Video)." Harvard Business School Video Case 499-502, January 1999. View Details
  103. Technology Transfer at a Defense Contractor (Abridged)

    Covers the same material concerning the specific transfer of technology as described in the longer version but summarizes the environmental and organizational context of the transfer. Most appropriate when the instructor wishes to focus on the action questions.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Conflict Management; Managerial Roles; Management Teams; Employees; Competitive Strategy; Projects;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Technology Transfer at a Defense Contractor (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 490-094, May 1990. (Revised December 1998.) View Details
  104. Managing Your Career

    Designed to serve as background reading for the "Managing Your Career" module of the second-year MBA elective Power and Influence. Describes the way in which managers learn and develop through on-the-job experience. Outlines a model for launching a "success syndrome" by building power and influence over the course of one's career. Also identifies some of the special challenges of: 1) managing one's early career, 2) developing power as a minority in the organization and the "glass ceiling" phenomenon, and 3) developing ethical judgment. Focusing special attention on the importance of self-assessment and introspection in building a successful career, the note concludes with a list of questions individuals should ask themselves periodically to take stock of their career and personal development.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Managing Your Career." Harvard Business School Background Note 494-082, March 1994. (Revised December 1998.) View Details
  105. Jeanne Lewis at Staples, Inc. (A)

    Jeanne Lewis, after six years with Staples, Inc., is promoted to senior vice president of marketing. She is to work for fifteen months alongside her predecessor, a legacy in the organization, "learning the ropes" before he moves on. This case is set nine months after she begins working with the marketing department. Staples has just emerged from a period of prolonged litigation around an FTC antitrust suit challenging Staples' attempted merger with Office Depot. Post-merger, Lewis must determine how the marketing department can most effectively and efficiently help the company maintain its competitive edge in an increasingly competitive and complex market. Looks at the challenges a middle manager faces "taking charge" and managing change in a revitalization situation in which a more evolutionary approach is appropriate.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Management Style; Change Management; Marketing Strategy; Management Succession; Competitive Advantage; Problems and Challenges; Management Teams; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Kristin Doughty. "Jeanne Lewis at Staples, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 499-041, November 1998. (Revised December 1998.) View Details
  106. Franco Bernabe, Video

    Contains interview excerpts. Franco Bernabe discusses becoming a leader, reflections on leadership vision, ethics, leadership style, changes in the future of ENI.

    Keywords: Change; Ethics; Leadership Development; Leadership Style;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Franco Bernabe, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 499-501, December 1998. View Details
  107. Lark International Entertainment Ltd. (A)

    Two HBS MBA's leave McKinsey and Morgan Stanley to become entrepreneurs in Hong Kong. Together they start up a cinema chain throughout Asia. This case describes the experiences of managing a team in their Wuhan, China cinema. Looks at the challenges of managing growth in an entrepreneurial venture in an emerging market; leading a multicultural team; and coping with headquarter-field relationships.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Problems and Challenges; Business Growth and Maturation; Business Startups; Emerging Markets; Leadership Style; Leadership; Groups and Teams; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Hong Kong; China; Asia;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Lark International Entertainment Ltd. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 499-023, August 1998. (Revised October 1998.) View Details
  108. Lark International Entertainment Ltd. (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Hong Kong; China; Asia;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Lark International Entertainment Ltd. (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 499-024, August 1998. View Details
  109. Lark International Entertainment Ltd. (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Hong Kong; China; Asia;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Lark International Entertainment Ltd. (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 499-025, August 1998. View Details
  110. Randy Haykin: The Making of an Entrepreneur (A)

    An MBA graduate, 10 years out, reflects on his career path. Randy Haykin is currently running his own venture catalyst organization in the Silicon Valley.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Venture Capital; Personal Development and Career; Leadership Style; Organizations; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jennifer Suesse. "Randy Haykin: The Making of an Entrepreneur (A)." Harvard Business School Case 498-044, December 1997. (Revised August 1998.) View Details
  111. Beyond the Myth of the Perfect Mentor: Building a Network of Developmental Relationships

    Instead of embarking on an odyssey for the perfect mentor, individuals should pursue a strategy of building a network of developmental relationships. In this note, we explore the process by which such a network can be established and cultivated: 1) What functions can developmental relationships serve? 2) How are these relationships formed and maintained? 3) With whom in an organization can an individual establish such relationships? and 4) What are some of the special challenges those in the minority face in building these relationships? In summary, we offer guidelines for building a constellation of developmental relationships.

    Keywords: Relationships; Networks;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Beyond the Myth of the Perfect Mentor: Building a Network of Developmental Relationships." Harvard Business School Background Note 491-096, March 1991. (Revised June 1998.) View Details
  112. InterSoft of Argentina (A)

    Focuses on InterSoft of Argentina, a growing software company in Argentina. In 1993, InterSoft acquires a Russian software company and Emilo Lopez, the vice president and director of InterSoft's Systems Software Lab, must manage a creative, cross-cultural, "virtual" team. This case illustrates InterSoft's origins and highlights the relationship between the founding partners, Lopez and Felix Racca.

    Keywords: Software; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Business Growth and Maturation; Mergers and Acquisitions; Management Teams; Groups and Teams; Partners and Partnerships; Information Technology Industry; Argentina; Russia;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Stacy Palestrant. "InterSoft of Argentina (A)." Harvard Business School Case 497-025, September 1996. (Revised June 1998.) View Details
  113. InterSoft of Argentina (B)

    Focuses on InterSoft of Argentina, a growing software company in Argentina. In 1993, InterSoft acquires a Russian software company and Emilo Lopez, the vice president and director of InterSoft's Systems Software Lab, must manage a creative, cross-cultural, "virtual" team. This case reveals a quarrel that arises over e-mail between an Argentine programmer and a Russian programmer. Lopez, as the manager of the development team, must decide how to handle the situation. Since the exchanges between these programmers were preserved in e-mail files, this case provides a unique opportunity to analyze a conflict situation as it escalates.

    Keywords: Software; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Business Growth and Maturation; Mergers and Acquisitions; Management Teams; Groups and Teams; Partners and Partnerships; Conflict Management; Information Technology Industry; Argentina; Russia;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Stacy Palestrant. "InterSoft of Argentina (B)." Harvard Business School Case 497-026, September 1996. (Revised June 1998.) View Details
  114. A Note for Analyzing Work Groups

    Presents a model for understanding the behavior and evolution of primary, stable work groups over time. The model describes contextual factors, design factors, and emergent culture as determinants of group behavior and performance. Describes emergent behavior, norms, roles, and rituals as aspects of group life. A rewritten version of an earlier note.

    Keywords: Groups and Teams; Balance and Stability; Behavior; Situation or Environment;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "A Note for Analyzing Work Groups." Harvard Business School Background Note 496-026, August 1995. (Revised April 1998.) View Details
  115. Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (A)

    Pratt & Whitney is a leader in the development and manufacturing of gas turbine engines for commercial and military aircraft. Economic conditions for the airline and defense industries are forcing the airplane engine builders to restructure. Ed Northern, a new general manager of one of Pratt & Whitney's largest plants, is determined to transform the North Haven plant into a world-class manufacturing organization.

    Keywords: Transformation; Restructuring; Production; Opportunities; Economy; Aerospace Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Connecticut;

    Citation:

    Bowen, H. Kent, Linda A. Hill, Andrew P. Burtis, Sylvie Ryckebusch, and John Schiavone. "Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (A)." Harvard Business School Case 696-066, November 1995. (Revised January 1998.) View Details
  116. Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (B)

    As part of the restructuring effort underway at the Pratt & Whitney North Haven plant, Ed Northern and a group of Japanese consultants are transforming the manufacturing process from a batch process to a single-piece flow, and are organizing the machines and workers in product cells. Vane Cell 6 is the first cell to be created at North Haven. Business Unit Manager Garrett Mikits is faced with a challenge as the creation of Vane Cell 6 nears completion. A new order, which represents a large volume increase, challenges Mikita and his workers to find a way to increase production.

    Keywords: Restructuring; Business Processes; Production; Machinery and Machining; Human Resources; Product; Connecticut;

    Citation:

    Bowen, H. Kent, Linda A. Hill, Andrew P. Burtis, Sylvie Ryckebusch, and John Schiavone. "Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (B)." Harvard Business School Case 696-067, November 1995. (Revised January 1998.) View Details
  117. Franco Bernabe at ENI (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Personal Development and Career; Management Teams; Management Style; Strategic Planning; Crisis Management; Privatization; Italy;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Jennifer Suesse, and Mara Willard. "Franco Bernabe at ENI (B)." Harvard Business School Case 498-035, December 1997. View Details
  118. Franco Bernabe at ENI (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Italy;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Jennifer Suesse, and Mara Willard. "Franco Bernabe at ENI (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 498-040, December 1997. View Details
  119. Francisco de Narvaez at Tia (A)

    Describes Francisco de Narvaez's leadership efforts to transform his family-owned business into a market-driven, professionally run global company. Covers the events from 1989 to 1992.

    Keywords: Leading Change; Family Business; Family Ownership; Global Strategy; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Stacy Palestrant. "Francisco de Narvaez at Tia (A)." Harvard Business School Case 496-012, November 1995. (Revised October 1997.) View Details
  120. Technology Transfer at a Defense Contractor

    At a time of great changes in the corporate environment, Larry Yoshino, a design lab manager at Parsons Controls Corp., faces a delay in a costly defense project due to the inability of one of his subordinates to gain the cooperation of engineers at Parsons' manufacturing plant. The physical distance between the plants, different functions, and unequal power relations feed the conflict, forcing Yoshino to reexamine his role. The case promotes discussion of 1) friction between design and manufacturing, 2) managing self-managing professionals, and 3) changing behaviors to reflect new competitive situations.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Conflict Management; Managerial Roles; Management Teams; Employees; Competitive Strategy; Projects;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Technology Transfer at a Defense Contractor." Harvard Business School Case 489-084, November 1988. (Revised July 1997.) View Details
  121. Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corp. (A) Video

    Keywords: Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corp. (A) Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 497-504, June 1997. View Details
  122. Francisco de Narvaez at Tia (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Stacy Palestrant. "Francisco de Narvaez at Tia (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 496-013, November 1995. (Revised May 1997.) View Details
  123. Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions

    Suzanne de Passe talks to an MBA class in October 1996 and discusses her perspective on leadership, her experience making "Lonesome Dove," and her company: de Passe Entertainment. Designed for use with Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (A) (9-487-042), (A1) (9-497-015), and (B) (9-494-014).

    Keywords: Leadership; Perspective; Organizational Culture; Personal Development and Career; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Mara Willard. "Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 497-502, May 1997. View Details
  124. Francisco de Narvaez at Tia

    Harvard Business School students question Francisco de Narvaez about his family store, Tia, from the late 1980s to the present, as he attempts to transform it from a family-owned business into a market-driven, professionally-run global company.

    Keywords: Globalized Firms and Management; Family Business; Transformation;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Mara Willard. "Francisco de Narvaez at Tia." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 497-503, May 1997. View Details
  125. Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (A1)

    Illustrates: 1) the impact of a manager's leadership style on corporate culture, direction, and performance; 2) the concept of fit between leadership style and the requirements of situations in which managers find themselves; and 3) the need for managers to adapt their styles as situational requirements change. More specifically, it provides an opportunity to look at some of the special issues of: 1) being a black woman manager; 2) the advantages and disadvantages associated with a "family corporate culture"; and 3) managing in a creative business. Does not substantially differ from the (A) case, but it does emphasize more strongly Suzanne de Passe's success. Students have misunderstood the standards of the entertainment industry, and this case makes Motown's accomplishments clearer.

    Keywords: Management Style; Race Characteristics; Organizational Culture; Success; Leadership Style; Gender Characteristics; Management Teams; Change Management; Situation or Environment; Creativity; Relationships; Music Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Jaan Elias. "Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (A1)." Harvard Business School Case 497-015, August 1996. (Revised October 1996.) View Details
  126. Building Effective One-on-One Work Relationships

    Addresses how to build effective one-on-one work relationships. Spells out the importance of analyzing your network and understanding on whom you are dependent. Also provides some criteria for assessing the quality of your relationships. Finally, it discusses how to manage conflict based on the Senge Model of advocacy, inquiry, and mental models, all of which encourage people to uncover their assumptions.

    Keywords: Performance Effectiveness; Quality; Networks; Conflict and Resolution;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Building Effective One-on-One Work Relationships." Harvard Business School Background Note 497-028, October 1996. View Details
  127. InterSoft of Argentina (C)

    Supplements the (A) and (B) cases. Designed to be handed out at the end of class.

    Keywords: Software; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Business Growth and Maturation; Mergers and Acquisitions; Management Teams; Groups and Teams; Partners and Partnerships; Conflict Management; Information Technology Industry; Argentina; Russia;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Stacy Palestrant. "InterSoft of Argentina (C)." Harvard Business School Case 497-027, September 1996. View Details
  128. Rudi Gassner and the Executive Committee of BMG International (B)

    Describes the final decision by CEO Rudi Gassner and the subsequent actions taken by the members of the executive committee.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Decisions; Music Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Rudi Gassner and the Executive Committee of BMG International (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 494-056, November 1993. (Revised February 1996.) View Details
  129. Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (E)

    Gives the conclusion of the (C) and (D) cases.

    Keywords: Connecticut;

    Citation:

    Bowen, H. Kent, Linda A. Hill, Andrew P. Burtis, Sylvie Ryckebusch, and John Schiavone. "Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (E)." Harvard Business School Case 696-070, December 1995. View Details
  130. Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (C)

    As part of the Pratt & Whitney North Haven restructuring effort, Ed Northern and his business unit managers are encouraging workers to make decisions and take an active role in improving the manufacturing process at North Haven. Business Unit Manager Tom Hutton has empowered a group of hourly workers to purchase grit blast equipment for two cells. The capital purchase decision runs into some problems when the two cells, the vapor coat and pack coat cells, fail to reach an agreement about which equipment to purchase.

    Keywords: Restructuring; Decisions; Capital; Human Resources; Agreements and Arrangements; Production; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Bowen, H. Kent, Linda A. Hill, Andrew P. Burtis, Sylvie Ryckebusch, and John Schiavone. "Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (C)." Harvard Business School Case 696-068, November 1995. View Details
  131. Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (D)

    Because of conflicts between the vapor coat and pack coat cells over the decision to purchase new grit blast equipment, Business Unit Manager Tom Hutton has decided to form a second capital purchase team that will represent the pack coat cell. Meanwhile, the first capital purchase team has decided to purchase MacCormick equipment, traditionally considered less reliable than other equipment. Hutton is having misgivings about his decision to empower workers to purchase equipment, and wonders whether he should approve the purchase.

    Keywords: Decisions; Capital; Employees; Organizational Culture;

    Citation:

    Bowen, H. Kent, Linda A. Hill, Andrew P. Burtis, Sylvie Ryckebusch, and John Schiavone. "Transformation of Pratt & Whitney North Haven (D)." Harvard Business School Case 696-069, November 1995. View Details
  132. Rudi Gassner and the Executive Committee of BMG International (A)

    Explores the roles of CEO Rudi Gassner and the 9-person executive committee in leading BMG International. BMG International is the international music subsidiary of Bertlesmann, a German company that is the second-largest media conglomerate in the world. Describes a 1993 decision that Gassner and the executive committee must make about whether or not to change managers' business plans and bonus targets as a result of a newly negotiate reduced manufacturing cost. Allows for discussion of a number of timely and important issues: 1) the complexities of managing and growing a large global business; 2) the tensions between centralized corporate control and decentralized local management in a global organization; 3) the impact of leadership style on corporate culture and performance; 4) the challenges of leading a senior mangement team; and 5) the final decision by CEO Rudi Gassner and the subsequent actions taken by the members of the executive committee.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Management Teams; Decision Making; Business Plan; Growth and Development Strategy; Global Strategy; Leadership Style; Organizational Culture; Business Subsidiaries; Business Conglomerates; Cost Management; Change Management; Music Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Germany;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Rudi Gassner and the Executive Committee of BMG International (A)." Harvard Business School Case 494-055, November 1993. (Revised October 1995.) View Details
  133. Rudi Gassner and the Executive Committee of BMG International (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-494-055) and (9-494-056).

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Rudi Gassner and the Executive Committee of BMG International (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-122, May 1994. (Revised October 1995.) View Details
  134. Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (A)

    Illustrates: 1) the impact of a manager's leadership style on corporate culture, direction, and performance; 2) the concept of fit between leadership style and the requirements of situations in which managers find themselves; and 3) the need for managers to adapt their styles as situational requirements change. More specifically, it provides an opportunity to look at some of the special issues of: 1) being a black woman manager, 2) the advantages and disadvantages associated with a "family corporate culture," and 3) managing in a creative business.

    Keywords: Management Style; Race Characteristics; Organizational Culture; Leadership Style; Gender Characteristics; Management Teams; Change Management; Situation or Environment; Creativity; Relationships; Music Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (A)." Harvard Business School Case 487-042, November 1986. (Revised October 1995.) View Details
  135. Orientation for Viewing the Cranfield-Kearney Performance Appraisal Interview

    Presents the background information to watching the video reenactment of the Cranfield-Kearney Performance Appraisal Interview.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Compensation and Benefits; Performance; Motivation and Incentives;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., and Linda A. Hill. "Orientation for Viewing the Cranfield-Kearney Performance Appraisal Interview." Harvard Business School Supplement 496-009, October 1995. View Details
  136. Slade Plating Department, The

    Describes a conflict between the values and norms of a segment of an internal social system and those of management and the wider culture. Includes decision opportunity. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Conflict and Resolution; Values and Beliefs; Organizational Culture; Decision Making;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Slade Plating Department, The." Harvard Business School Case 496-018, August 1995. View Details
  137. Orientation to the Subarctic Survival Situation

    An orientation to the "Subartic Survival Situation" (designed by and available from Human Synergistics, Inc., Plymouth, MI, tel. 313-459-1030), an experiental exercise that gives students an opportunity to learn about their personal influence style and their effectiveness as a team leader or member. As a simulation, the exercise provides conditions analogous to those managers face every day: They must make critical decisions from incomplete and often ambiguous information and must live with imperfect solutions; the problem is urgent and they have to cope with the stresses and emotions associated with working under pressure; they will have to work with others to solve a common problem (in this regard, this exercise perhaps simulates most closely a newly instituted cross-functional task force). Outlines the rationale for the exercise and gives a brief overview of how the simulation will unfold.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Performance Effectiveness; Performance Evaluation; Decisions; Power and Influence; Groups and Teams; Decision Choices and Conditions;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Orientation to the Subarctic Survival Situation." Harvard Business School Background Note 494-073, November 1993. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  138. Lyndon Baines Johnson TN

    Teaching Note for Reprint (1-488-001).

    Keywords: Government and Politics;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Lyndon Baines Johnson TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-089, March 1994. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  139. Excerpts from Blind Ambition TN

    Teaching Note for Reprint (1-480-025).

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Joshua D. Margolis. "Excerpts from Blind Ambition TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-124, April 1994. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  140. Karen Leary (A), (B), and (C), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-487-020), (9-487-021), and (9-487-022).

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Karen Leary (A), (B), and (C), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 487-071, June 1987. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  141. Karen Green, Teaching Note

    The video depicts Karen Green, a manager in her early thirties, on a company retreat. She is being considered for a project manager position, a promotion she does not receive. During the retreat, the circumstances that influenced the decision become evident. The material is very rich and raises a number of timely and controversial issues including: gender differences in management styles, the impact of gender on mentor-protege relationships, tokenism, and work/family balance. Designed for use with Sex Bias in the Workplace: May the Best Man Win (order No. 6191M), a video vignette available from Coronet M.T.I., the video division of Simon and Schuster (tel. 1-800-621-2131). A one-page Orientation to Viewing Karen Green (9-494-068) is also available.

    Keywords: Work-Life Balance; Personal Development and Career; Gender Characteristics; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Karen Green, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 490-095, May 1990. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  142. Orientation for Viewing ""Karen Green""

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. Orientation for Viewing ""Karen Green"". Harvard Business School Background Note 494-068, November 1993. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  143. Orientation for Viewing ""Ted Smith and the Lyric Copier""

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. Orientation for Viewing ""Ted Smith and the Lyric Copier"". Harvard Business School Background Note 494-069, November 1993. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  144. Power, Greed and Glory on Wall Street: The Fall of Lehman Brothers, Parts I and II TN

    Teaching Note for Reprints (1-285-151) and (1-286-042).

    Keywords: Power and Influence; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Power, Greed and Glory on Wall Street: The Fall of Lehman Brothers, Parts I and II TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-091, March 1994. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  145. Ted Smith and the Lyric Copier, Teaching Note

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Ted Smith and the Lyric Copier, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-118, April 1994. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  146. Subarctic Survival Situation TN

    Keywords: Geographic Scope;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Subarctic Survival Situation TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-129, April 1994. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  147. Lisa Benton (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-494-114) and (9-494-115).

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Lisa Benton (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-112, March 1994. (Revised April 1995.) View Details
  148. Karen Leary (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Karen Leary (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 487-021, October 1986. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  149. Karen Leary (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Karen Leary (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 487-022, October 1986. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  150. De Passe Entertainment and Creative Partners

    After 24 years at Motown Industries, Hollywood executive Suzanne de Passe has decided to go out on her own to start two new businesses. The case describes de Passe's career from her beginning as Berry Gordy's assistant at Motown Records to her presidency of Gordy/de Passe Productions. Upon Gordy's departure from the production business, de Passe decides to become an entrepreneur, forming both an independent production company and an artist management company. In the management venture, de Passe has a business partner, and in the production company she hires a president and COO. Focuses on her decision to become an entrepreneur and on the working partnerships she has developed with the executives of the two companies.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Entrepreneurship; Partners and Partnerships; Business or Company Management; Entertainment; Personal Development and Career; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Music Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "De Passe Entertainment and Creative Partners." Harvard Business School Case 494-013, January 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  151. Craig Weatherup, Supplement

    A biographical information sheet about Craig Weatherup, president and CEO of Pepsi Cola, North America.

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Craig Weatherup, Supplement." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 494-125, March 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  152. Craig Weatherup TN

    Teaching Note for video (9-494-518).

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Craig Weatherup TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-130, April 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  153. de Passe Entertainment and Creative Partners TN

    Teaching Note for (9-494-013).

    Keywords: Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Joshua D. Margolis. "de Passe Entertainment and Creative Partners TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-123, June 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  154. Managing Your Team

    Designed as an overview note for the Managing Your Team module of the MBA second year elective course Power and Influence. Identifies some criteria for evaluating team effectiveness and outlines in detail the key areas of responsibility of team managers: managing the team's boundary, and managing the team itself (including designing the team and facilitating the team's process). Also contains a brief appendix on managing transnational teams as well as substantial bibliographic references for further reading.

    Keywords: Groups and Teams; Performance Evaluation; Management; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Managing Your Team." Harvard Business School Background Note 494-081, March 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  155. Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corporation (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-492-037) and (9-492-038).

    Keywords: Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corporation (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-119, May 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  156. Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corp. (B)

    Supplements Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corp. (A).

    Keywords: Corporate Entrepreneurship; Rank and Position; Leading Change; Problems and Challenges; Change; Electronics Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Joline Godfrey and the Polaroid Corp. (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 492-038, March 1992. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  157. Kevin Simpson

    Follows Kevin Simpson, a second-year Harvard Business School 1990 student, through his job search to his final decision between two very attractive but different job offers: a job as an international marketing manager at Eli Lilly and Co., a leading multinational health product corporation; and a position as the assistant to the president of Haemonetics, an entrepreneurial company in the biomedical equipment field. Addresses the factors Simpson should consider when making job choices as well as the issues he faces as an African-American professional.

    Keywords: Job Offer; Race Characteristics; Job Search; Decision Choices and Conditions; Decision Making;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Kevin Simpson." Harvard Business School Case 492-041, March 1992. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  158. Kevin Simpson TN

    Teaching Note for (9-492-041).

    Keywords: Health Industry; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Kevin Simpson TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-088, April 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  159. Amelia Rogers at Tassani Communications (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-492-034) and (9-492-035).

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "Amelia Rogers at Tassani Communications (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-098, March 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  160. Power Dynamics in Organizations

    Designed to introduce the concepts of power and power dynamics to students in the MBA second-year elective course Power and Influence. Defines "power" and "influence," and explores the role of power dynamics in managerial work and in the life of organizations. Combats popular notions that "power is evil" and that "power corrupts" by illustrating how power is necessary to bring about productive and creative resolutions to organizational conflict. Describes the positional and personal sources of individual power, and concludes with implications for assessing power dynamics in organizations as an important element of one's career management.

    Keywords: Power and Influence; Organizations; Conflict and Resolution;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Power Dynamics in Organizations." Harvard Business School Background Note 494-083, January 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  161. David Fletcher TN

    Teaching Note for (9-493-064).

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Katherine Seger Weber. "David Fletcher TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-117, March 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  162. Bernd Sterzel at the IVth Medizinische Klinik (A), (B), and (C) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-493-059), (9-493-060), and (9-493-061).

    Keywords: Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., and Joshua D. Margolis. "Bernd Sterzel at the IVth Medizinische Klinik (A), (B), and (C) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-121, May 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  163. Bernd Sterzel at the IVth Medizinische Klinik (A)

    After 10 years of running a small laboratory at Yale Medical School, Dr. R. Bernd Sterzel assumes leadership of a nephrology clinic in Nurnberg and Erlangen, Germany. In his ambitious efforts to transform the clinic into a leading academic research institution, he encounters numerous challenges associated with health care management in a socialized medicine context.

    Keywords: Change Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Problems and Challenges; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Health Industry; Germany; Connecticut;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Bernd Sterzel at the IVth Medizinische Klinik (A)." Harvard Business School Case 493-059, February 1993. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  164. Bernd Sterzel at the IVth Medizinische Klinik (C)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Bernd Sterzel at the IVth Medizinische Klinik (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 493-061, February 1993. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  165. Amelia Rogers at Tassani Communications (A)

    Describes a conflict that has arisen between an account manager and a creative director at Tassani Communications, a Chicago-based advertising agency which is making the transition from entrepreneurial to professional management. The client, the marketing director of a muffler repair chain, has called the account manager to complain about the creative director's behavior. The account manager must figure out what to do. The object is to provide students with an opportunity to grapple with the challenges of managing relationships with peers and superiors. Students can discuss managing 1) cross-departmental relationships, 2) interpersonal conflicts, and 3) creativity.

    Keywords: Rank and Position; Conflict Management; Change Management; Entrepreneurship; Practice; Behavior; Creativity; Problems and Challenges; Advertising Industry; Chicago;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Amelia Rogers at Tassani Communications (A)." Harvard Business School Case 492-034, February 1992. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  166. Amelia Rogers at Tassani Communications (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Amelia Rogers at Tassani Communications (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 492-035, February 1992. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  167. Technology Transfer at a Defense Contractor & (Abridged), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-489-084) and (9-490-094).

    Keywords: Technology Adoption; Job Design and Levels;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Technology Transfer at a Defense Contractor & (Abridged), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 489-076, January 1989. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  168. Bernd Sterzel at the IVth Medizinische Klinik (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Bernd Sterzel at the IVth Medizinische Klinik (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 493-060, February 1993. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  169. Evaluating an Action Plan

    Managers report that action planning to resolve interpersonal and organizational challenges is far more demanding than diagnosing them. Although there are many frameworks for evaluating their diagnoses, there are few for evaluating their action plans. Reviews the major criteria for assessing an action plan. Includes a short list of "Key Elements of Action Planning," and a longer list of "Criteria for Evaluating an Action Plan." The list of criteria is written as a series of questions to ask yourself when assessing an action plan.

    Keywords: Planning;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Evaluating an Action Plan." Harvard Business School Background Note 494-090, January 1994. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  170. Power and Influence, Course Overview and Syllabus

    Keywords: Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Power and Influence, Course Overview and Syllabus." Harvard Business School Background Note 494-079, January 1994. (Revised November 1994.) View Details
  171. Rudi Gassner at BMG International, Video

    Shows excerpts from a class discussion with Gassner and an MBA class. He describes his leadership style and the challenges he faces as the senior executive of a global entertainment enterprise.

    Keywords: Entertainment; Globalization; Leadership Style; Problems and Challenges; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Rudi Gassner at BMG International, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 494-524, June 1994. View Details
  172. Exercising Influence

    Provides a framework for understanding the exercise of interpersonal influence in organizations. Describes some of the "myths and realities" of management that new managers discover--specifically, that managers are dependent on a complex network of relationships to get work done, and that they must influence others by relying on sources of power other than their formal positional authority. Describes influence as exchange within these networks of mutually beneficial relationships. Also discusses tactics for avoiding the abuse of power and influence.

    Keywords: Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Exercising Influence." Harvard Business School Background Note 494-080, February 1994. (Revised May 1994.) View Details
  173. Lisa Benton (A)

    Lisa Benton is in her fourth month as an assistant product manager at Houseworld, a leading consumer products company. She has been on the job since graduating from the Harvard Business School, and she has been frustrated from the start by a lack of responsibility, by her poor relationship with her boss and a colleague, and recently, by the negative performance review she received. Concerned about her future at Houseworld, Benton is considering calling her former boss from her summer job to inquire about a position. An updated version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Problems and Challenges; Jobs and Positions; Power and Influence; Relationships; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Lisa Benton (A)." Harvard Business School Case 494-114, March 1994. (Revised May 1994.) View Details
  174. Lisa Benton (B)

    Provides a follow-up to Lisa Benton (A).

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Lisa Benton (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 494-115, March 1994. (Revised May 1994.) View Details
  175. Power and Influence, Instructor's Course Overview

    Keywords: Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Power and Influence, Instructor's Course Overview." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-131, April 1994. (Revised May 1994.) View Details
  176. Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (B)

    Provides an update of the (A) case. Describes de Passe's career from 1986 to 1993.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 494-014, January 1994. (Revised April 1994.) View Details
  177. Influence Style Questionnaire, Teaching Note

    Keywords: Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Influence Style Questionnaire, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 494-086, March 1994. View Details
  178. Kevin Simpson at Haemonetics, Video

    Contains excerpts from an interview with Kevin Simpson (HBS 1990) about his decision to join Haemonetics, a medical equipment company, after receiving his MBA. Simpson discusses his experiences on the job during the first three months while he was the assistant to the president and CEO.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Experience and Expertise; Decisions; Recruitment; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Kevin Simpson at Haemonetics, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 494-516, March 1994. View Details
  179. Craig Weatherup Video

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Craig Weatherup Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 494-518, March 1994. View Details
  180. Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (A), (A1), and (B), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-487-042), (9-497-015), and (9-494-014).

    Keywords: Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions (A), (A1), and (B), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 487-010, June 1987. (Revised January 1994.) View Details
  181. Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions, Video

    Updates events in the case and draws a tighter focus on managing a start-up and women in leadership.

    Keywords: Management; Leadership; Gender Characteristics; Business Startups;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A. "Suzanne de Passe at Motown Productions, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 889-508, January 1989. View Details

Other Publications and Materials

  1. State-of-the-Art Council Report

    Keywords: Reports;

    Citation:

    Caimano, V., P Canavan, and L. Hill. "State-of-the-Art Council Report." Report, Human Resource Planning Society, Orlando, FL, September 1998. View Details
  2. State-of-the-Art Council Report

    Keywords: Reports;

    Citation:

    Caimano, V., P Canavan, and Linda Hill. "State-of-the-Art Council Report." Report, Human Resource Planning Society, San Francisco, CA, September 1997. View Details

    Research Summary

  1. Leadership, Innovation, and Talent Management

    Hill is working on three research projects. The first, Leadership as Collective Genius, explores the relationships among leadership, creativity and diversity, more specifically the kind of collaborative work necessary for innovation in today's global enterprise. The second, Being the Boss, gives the particular challenges and opportunities of doing business in the 21st Century (e.g., drivers of competitive advantage, demographic trends, redefinition of the role of business in society).  The third, A Gentler Capitalism: Black Business Leadership in the New South Africa, is a study of the experiences of the emerging black business elite in South Africa and the role of business in transforming society.

      Awards & Honors

    1. Thinkers50 Leadership Award: Included as one of the 2011 Thinkers50—the definitive listing of the world’s top 50 business thinkers.