Myra M. Hart

MBA Class of 1961 Professor of Management Practice, Retired

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Myra Hart's research focus is high potential entrepreneurship.  She has taught MBA and executive programs, co-chaired the entrepreneurship unit, and led several HBS initiatives. As a founding member of the Diana Group, Hart and a team of four other professors began a collaboration in 2000 and subsequently developed an international research consortium focused on female entrepreneurship.  She and her colleagues have co-authored Clearing the Hurdles: Women Building High Growth Businesses, Women Business Owners and Equity Capital: The Myths Dispelled, and Gatekeepers of Venture Growth: A Diana Project Report on the Role and Participation of Women in the Venture Capital Industry, as well as numerous journal articles, reports, and two edited books. In 2007, the founding team was recognized with the FSF Nutek International Award for Entrepreneurship and Small Business research. She has also developed more than 60 HBS cases and teaching notes.

Hart has significant experience in the retail industry. In 1985, she joined Tom Stemberg as one of the four founding officers of Staples. Prior to that she was Director of Marketing for Star Market, a division of Jewel Companies.

She has served as a trustee of Cornell University and Babson College and is a lifetime Cornell Presidential Councillor. She is on the national board of the Smithsonian Institution and the advisory board of the Harvard Smithsonian Astrophysics Observatory. She is a director of several public and private companies including Kraft Foods Inc, Office Depot, and Nina McLemore, Inc.  She also serves on Deloitte's Women's Initiative External Advisory Council.  Harvard Business School has recognized Professor Hart with the Apgar Award for innovation in teaching and the Greenhill Award for faculty leadership. She has been named to the Hall of Fame by Enterprising Women, CEO (Collegiate Entrepreneurs Organization) and the New England Business and Technology Association.

Publications

Books

  1. Growth-Oriented Women Entrepreneurs and Their Businesses: A Global Research Perspective

    Keywords: Growth and Development; Gender Characteristics; Entrepreneurship; Research; Perspective;

    Citation:

    Brush, C. G., N. M. Carter, E. J. Gatewood, P. G. Greene, and M. M. Hart, eds. Growth-Oriented Women Entrepreneurs and Their Businesses: A Global Research Perspective. London: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2006. View Details
  2. Clearing the Hurdles: Women Building High-Growth Businesses

    Keywords: Gender Characteristics; Growth and Development; Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida G., Nancy M. Carter, Elizabeth Gatewood, Patricia G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. Clearing the Hurdles: Women Building High-Growth Businesses. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Financial Times Prentice Hall, 2004. View Details
  3. Women Entrepreneurs, Their Ventures, and The Venture Capital Industry: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Gender Characteristics; Business Ventures; Information;

    Citation:

    Gatewood, Elizabeth, Nancy M. Carter, Candida G. Brush, Patricia G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. Women Entrepreneurs, Their Ventures, and The Venture Capital Industry: An Annotated Bibliography. Stockholm: Entrepreneurship and Small Business Research Institute (ESBRI), 2003. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. The Use of Bootstrapping by Women Entrepreneurs in Positioning for Growth

    Keywords: Growth and Development;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida G., Nancy M. Carter, Elizabeth J. Gatewood, Patricia G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "The Use of Bootstrapping by Women Entrepreneurs in Positioning for Growth." Venture Capital 8, no. 1 (January–March 2006): 15–31. View Details
  2. Women Entrepreneurs Who Break Through to Equity Financing: The Influence of Human, Social and Financial Capital

    Keywords: Human Capital; Entrepreneurship; Financing and Loans; Gender Characteristics; Capital; Equity;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Nancy M. Carter, Candida G. Brush, Patricia G. Greene, and Elizabeth Gatewood. "Women Entrepreneurs Who Break Through to Equity Financing: The Influence of Human, Social and Financial Capital." Venture Capital 5, no. 1 (January 2003): 1–28. View Details
  3. The Role of Social Capital and Gender in Linking Financial Suppliers and Entrepreneurial Firms: A Framework for Future Research.

    Keywords: Framework; Research; Gender Characteristics; Capital;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida G., Nancy M. Carter, Patricia G. Greene, Myra M. Hart, and Elizabeth Gatewood. "The Role of Social Capital and Gender in Linking Financial Suppliers and Entrepreneurial Firms: A Framework for Future Research." Venture Capital 4, no. 4 (October 2002): 305–323. View Details
  4. The Diana Project: Women Business Owners & Equity Capital: The Myths Dispelled.

    Keywords: Ownership; Gender Characteristics; Capital; Equity;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida G., Nancy M. Carter, Elizabeth Gatewood, Patricia G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "The Diana Project: Women Business Owners & Equity Capital: The Myths Dispelled." Venture Capital Review 10 (2002): 30–40. View Details
  5. From Initial Idea to Unique Advantage: The Entrepreneurial Challenge of Constructing a Resource Base

    Keywords: Competitive Advantage; Entrepreneurship; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida G., Patricia G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "From Initial Idea to Unique Advantage: The Entrepreneurial Challenge of Constructing a Resource Base." Academy of Management Executive 15, no. 1 (February 2001). (Executive Commentary by Harold S. Haller.) View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Enhancing Women's Financial Strategies for Entrepreneurial Success

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Gender Characteristics; Financial Strategy;

    Citation:

    Carter, N. M., E. J. Gatewood, P. G. Greene, and M. M. Hart. "Enhancing Women's Financial Strategies for Entrepreneurial Success." In Female Entrepreneurship: Implications for Education, Training & Policy, edited by N. M. Carter, C. Henry, B. O'Cinneide, and K. Johnston. London: Routledge, 2006. View Details
  2. Venture Capital Access in The New Economy: Is Gender an Issue?

    Keywords: Prejudice and Bias; Venture Capital; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida G., Nancy M. Carter, Elizabeth Gatewood, Patricia G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "Venture Capital Access in The New Economy: Is Gender an Issue?" In The Emergence of Entrepreneurship Policy: Governance, Start-ups and Growth in the Knowledge Economy, edited by David Hart. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2003. View Details
  3. Financing Entrepreneurship: Is Gender an Issue?

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Gender Characteristics; Corporate Finance;

    Citation:

    Carter, Nancy M., Candida G. Brush, Elizabeth Gatewood, Patricia G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "Financing Entrepreneurship: Is Gender an Issue?" In Critical Junctures in Women's Economic Lives: A Collection of Symposium Papers, 45–51. Minneapolis, MN: Center for Economic Progress, 2003. View Details
  4. Women and Equity Capital: An Exploration of Factors Affecting Capital Access

    Keywords: Gender Characteristics; Capital; Equity;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida G., Patricia G. Greene, Myra M. Hart, Nancy M. Carter, and Elizabeth Gatewood. "Women and Equity Capital: An Exploration of Factors Affecting Capital Access." In Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 2000: Proceedings of the 20th Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, edited by Paul D. Reynolds, Erkko Autio, Candida G. Brush, and William D. Bygrave. Wellesley, MA: Babson College, 2000. (in collaboration with Julie Weeks, National Foundation of Women Business Owners (NFWBO)) View Details
  5. Exploration of the Venture Capital Industry: Is Gender An Issue?

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra, C. Brush, P. Greene, and P. Saparito. "Exploration of the Venture Capital Industry: Is Gender An Issue?" In Frontiers of Entrepreneurship, 1999: Proceedings of the 19th Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference. Edited by W. Bygrave et al.. Babson Park, MA: Babson College, 1999. View Details
  6. From Planning to Growth and Beyond: A Cross Industry Analysis of Entrepreneurial Priorities

    Keywords: Corporate Entrepreneurship; Business Plan; Business Growth and Maturation;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., C. Brush, and P. Greene. "From Planning to Growth and Beyond: A Cross Industry Analysis of Entrepreneurial Priorities." In Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 1998: Proceedings of the 18th Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, edited by W. Bygrave. Babson Park, MA: Babson College, 1999. View Details
  7. Resource Configurations Over the Life Cycle of Ventures

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Resource Allocation;

    Citation:

    Hart, M. M., C. Brush, and P. Greene. "Resource Configurations Over the Life Cycle of Ventures." In Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 1997: Proceedings of the 17th Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, edited by W. Bygrave. Babson Park, MA: Babson College, 1998. View Details
  8. Entrepreneurship: A Definition Revisited

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship;

    Citation:

    Hart, M. M., H. H. Stevenson, and J. Dial. "Entrepreneurship: A Definition Revisited." In Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 1995: Proceedings of 15th Annual Entrepreneurship Research Conference, edited by W. Bygrave. Babson Park, MA: Babson College, 1996. View Details
  9. Entrepreneurs and the Next Generation, Management Advantages and Challenges in a Family Business

    Keywords: Corporate Entrepreneurship; Family Business;

    Citation:

    Hart, M. M., and H. H. Stevenson. "Entrepreneurs and the Next Generation, Management Advantages and Challenges in a Family Business." In Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 1993: Proceedings of 13th Annual Conference, edited by N. C. Churchill, 646–660. Babson Park, MA: Babson College, 1994. View Details

Working Papers

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Stonewall Kitchen

    Jonathan King and Jim Stott, the founders of Stonewall Kitchen, started out in 1992 with a simple business selling jams and jellies at local farmers' markets. By 2004, they had grown the company into a $25 million organization with 250 employees. They expanded their range of services to include high-end specialty food manufacturing and wholesaling, as well as retailing through free-standing stores and catalogs. King, who serves as president and CEO, set an aggressive growth goal: to quadruple the business to $100 million within the next five years. Challenges students to consider product/market issues as well as organizational and cultural implications. Raises questions about the impact on the business and the founders of taking on new partners.

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Food; Expansion; Business Growth and Maturation; Entrepreneurship; Financing and Loans; Business Startups; Growth and Development Strategy; Retail Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Victoria Winston, Kristin Lieb, Kenna Wyllie Baudin, Alison Bell, and Leslie Simmons. "Stonewall Kitchen." Harvard Business School Case 805-006, January 2005. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  2. Mavens & Moguls: Because Marketing Matters...

    Mavens & Moguls is a virtual marketing-consulting firm of approximately 40 professionals. Examines the processes by which Paige Arnof-Fenn (an HBS grad with deep industry experience)draws on her experience and her network to create a high-quality marketing consulting operation that offers her and her stable of consultants challenging work, rewarding income, personal autonomy, and flexibility. Looks at the business concept, organizational structure, and value proposition of Mavens & Moguls. Because Arnof-Fenn is at the nexus of almost all the deals--and is the primary driver of Mavens & Moguls' growth--she might also be its biggest constraint.

    Keywords: Networks; Values and Beliefs; Business Growth and Maturation; Organizational Structure; Marketing; Entrepreneurship; Experience and Expertise; Growth and Development Strategy; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Kristin Lieb, and Victoria Winston. "Mavens & Moguls: Because Marketing Matters..." Harvard Business School Case 805-005, December 2004. (Revised April 2006.) View Details
  3. Carol Fishman Cohen: Professional Career Reentry (A)

    Explores the career challenges facing highly successful women who leave the full-time workforce for several years to manage family commitments. Carol Cohen is a 1985 Harvard MBA who has professional line experience in a manufacturing environment, followed by a successful transition into investment banking. Details Cohen's decision to return to a professional career after almost 11 years out of the full-time workforce. Describes her decision-making process, including discussions with her husband about shared parenting responsibilities, and provides details of her professional networking, resume development, and interview preparation. Concludes with a job offer to Cohen from Sankaty Advisors, a Bain Capital Partners company. Discussion centers on the decision to return to work, the strategic plan and specific steps, and concludes with questions about setting expectations--both at home and at work--and negotiating terms.

    Keywords: Work-Life Balance; Family and Family Relationships;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Robin J. Ely, and Susan Wojewoda. "Carol Fishman Cohen: Professional Career Reentry (A)." Harvard Business School Case 803-185, May 2003. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  4. ZOOTS--The Cleaner Cleaner

    A successful entrepreneur (retailing) starts a new venture in dry cleaning. The case focuses on transferable models, skills, and knowledge from one venture to the next. Areas of emphasis are: managing growth, challenges of operations, financing, and competitive moves.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Competitive Strategy; Operations; Knowledge Dissemination; Business Startups; Corporate Finance; Service Industry; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Sharon Peyus. "ZOOTS--The Cleaner Cleaner." Harvard Business School Case 801-114, September 2000. (Revised March 2006.) View Details
  5. Reactivity: A Case of Re-Invention

    By the time Glenn Osaka joined Reactivity as its new CEO in January 2001, the Internet bubble had burst, the financial markets had turned, and the company's core businesses were drying up. He was not hired to lead a turnaround, but Osaka found that the firm's future would depend on his ability to redirect the firm. He wanted the founders to come to this conclusion on their own. Looks at Osaka's leadership style, culture development, and consensus building. The founders of Reactivity (a software consulting and incubator start-up) were flying high when they closed on $23 million in venture capital in April 2000. Following the recommendation of their new VC board members, they began a search for an experienced manager/CEO who could lead the company's next stage of growth, but when he took over the reins, Osaka found that the challenges would be very different. Traces the company's history--from its organization in 1997 to late 2004, with primary focus on the transformation of the organization from consulting and incubating to a product-focused business.

    Keywords: Management Style; Venture Capital; Organizational Culture; Software; Leadership Style; Product; Transformation; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Entrepreneurship; Growth and Development Strategy; Information Technology Industry; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Sylvia Sensiper. "Reactivity: A Case of Re-Invention." Harvard Business School Case 806-025, October 2005. (Revised February 2006.) View Details
  6. Zipcar

    Provides a detailed description of the processes and tasks associated with creating a new venture in an emerging industry (subscription car-sharing for urban dwellers). Chronicles the entrepreneur's concept development, industry analysis, market research, identity definition, and brand building. Also provides background on writing the business plan, creating a budget and building financials, developing a management team, creating business partnerships, and financing the businesses.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Financing and Loans; Leadership Development; Venture Capital; Business Strategy; Growth and Development Strategy; Business Plan; Budgets and Budgeting; Management Teams; Partners and Partnerships; Marketing Strategy; Brands and Branding; Auto Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Wendy Carter. "Zipcar." Harvard Business School Case 802-085, October 2001. (Revised August 2005.) View Details
  7. Extend Fertility

    Focuses on the search for opportunity, the generation and evaluation of business concepts, creation of a business plan, and the start-up process. Follows experienced entrepreneur Christy Jones as she combines her business skills and personal experience to generate new business concepts. Jones' assessment of the market opportunity for the egg harvesting and cryopreservation business was based on firsthand observations of the needs of young professional women and extensive field and scientific research. The plan, which won the HBS business plan contest in 2004, provides a good example of the form and substance of a well-crafted plan. Provides an opportunity to discuss the underlying social issues that make it attractive for young women to purchase "fertility insurance" while they pursue professional careers.

    Keywords: Opportunities; Business Plan; Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Social Issues; Gender Characteristics; Business Startups; Biotechnology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Sylvia Sensiper. "Extend Fertility." Harvard Business School Case 805-065, December 2004. (Revised July 2005.) View Details
  8. Ilene Lang and the Catalyst Search (A)

    Catalyst, the nonprofit organization dedicated to championing women in professional ranks, is searching for a new president--only the third in its 42-year history. Ilene Lang, a corporate executive and entrepreneur with over 25 years of experience in high-tech ventures, considers whether and how to prepare herself to be the top candidate for the position. Challenges students to assess the key factors influencing such a career choice. Consider the fit between this particular candidate and Catalyst, and develop an action plan for successful pursuit of the candidacy. Reviews Lang's professional and personal history, Catalyst's history, and a general review of women in the workplace and in positions of top responsibility since the 1960s (statistics appear in exhibits). Lang's particular history also invites discussion of the role of women in top management, especially hi-tech management, along with work/family choices.

    Keywords: Strategy; Nonprofit Organizations; Work-Life Balance; Job Search; Gender Characteristics; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Laura L. Nash. "Ilene Lang and the Catalyst Search (A)." Harvard Business School Case 805-074, April 2005. (Revised July 2005.) View Details
  9. Levenger Company

    The Leveens started a high-end catalog business as a small home-based venture in 1987. It grew into a nationally recognized, $60 million company, offering products that ranged from unique pens and pencils to leather briefcases and fully furnished offices. In 1999, it reached saturation in the U.S. marketplace, and the owner-founders must consider new avenues of growth, including expansion of the catalog business into international markets; private labeling products for a large, national retailer; retailing in partnership with others; or retailing through company-owned, free-standing stores.

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Financial Liquidity; Business Exit or Shutdown; Expansion; Business Growth and Maturation; Value; Entrepreneurship; Financing and Loans; Globalization; Business Startups; Growth and Development Strategy; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Kristin Lieb, and Victoria Winston. "Levenger Company." Harvard Business School Case 805-004, December 2004. (Revised May 2005.) View Details
  10. Zipcar: Refining the Business Model

    Zipcar is a start-up organized around the idea of "sharing" car usage via a membership organization. This case describes several iterations of the Zipcar business model and financial plan. These iterations include a very early version and a version developed just prior to the launch of the business, as well as data from the first few months of operations. Students are called on to analyze the underlying economics and business model for the venture and to discover how these assumptions are holding up as the business is actually rolled out.

    Keywords: Service Operations; Renting or Rental; Business Model; Business Plan; Entrepreneurship; Economic Growth; Management Skills; Transportation; Business Startups; Financial Strategy; Corporate Finance; Growth and Development Strategy; Transportation Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Michael J. Roberts, and Julia Stevens. "Zipcar: Refining the Business Model." Harvard Business School Case 803-096, January 2003. (Revised May 2005.) View Details
  11. Mavens & Moguls: Creating a New Business Model

    Mavens & Moguls is a "virtual" marketing-consulting firm of approximately 40 professionals. Examines the processes by which its founder, Paige Arnof-Fenn, learns the business, builds a power network of industry experts and potential customers, and uses this expertise to build a new company that fulfills her career and life goals and also provides a wide range of work options to the consultants. Drawing on her experience and her network, she creates a high-quality marketing consulting operation that offers her and her stable of consultants challenging work, rewarding income, personal autonomy, and flexibility. Because Arnof-Fenn is at the nexus of almost all the deals, rapid growth has the potential to challenge the business model and threaten the fundamental values of the organization.

    Keywords: Online Technology; Values and Beliefs; Work-Life Balance; Organizational Structure; Organizational Culture; Operations; Networks; Business Model; Growth Management; Business Growth and Maturation; Entrepreneurship; Growth and Development Strategy; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Victoria Winston, and Kristin Lieb. "Mavens & Moguls: Creating a New Business Model." Harvard Business School Case 805-050, October 2004. (Revised November 2004.) View Details
  12. Eric Wood (A)

    Describes the early career of an MBA who went to work in a small business, bought the company, and is now contemplating an acquisition to expand the business. The issues involve personal/business finance and financial risk, as well as valuation and financial structuring.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Business Growth and Maturation; Mergers and Acquisitions; Risk and Uncertainty;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M. "Eric Wood (A)." Harvard Business School Case 897-074, October 1996. (Revised April 2004.) View Details
  13. Eric Wood (B)

    Describes Eric's purchase of the much larger Shaw Co. Describes the operating and financial problems that ensue, leaving Eric considering the option of bankruptcy. Issues include the overlap of business and personal finances, as well as the mechanics and implications of bankruptcy.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Operations; Entrepreneurship; Insolvency and Bankruptcy; Problems and Challenges; Acquisition;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M. "Eric Wood (B)." Harvard Business School Case 897-075, October 1996. (Revised April 2004.) View Details
  14. Orchid Partners: A Venture Capital Start-up

    The development of a new venture partnership and the challenges associated with raising its first fund are chronicled. The decision to focus on early-stage investments, the determination of the appropriate size of the fund, the fund-raising process, and the steps in closing are all examined. Also presents information on the relationships among the five partners, the division of responsibilities, and the compensation package. Provides personal background on each of the partners and explores their motivation for choosing this career change at this particular moment in their lives.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Venture Capital; Entrepreneurship; Problems and Challenges; Partners and Partnerships; Investment; Motivation and Incentives; Financing and Loans; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Kristin Lieb. "Orchid Partners: A Venture Capital Start-up." Harvard Business School Case 804-138, February 2004. (Revised April 2004.) View Details
  15. Sarah Vickers-Willis: Career Decisions (A)

    Sarah Vickers-Willis, HBS MBA 1999, faces a critical career decision: Does she redirect the Internet start-up she helped found or join in shaping a for-profit firm with a social mission? Sarah, a young Australian business executive, has always strived to "find space" for what's important to her in her career. Her career decisions began when she decided to interrupt a successful consulting career in Australia to attend Harvard Business School and continued through her founding (with three other HBS classmates) a fast-track Internet start-up. This case traces Sarah's increasing involvement with a small for-profit firm dedicated to improving the financial education of young women and ends with a decision point: Should she stay with the company she helped found, or should she move to the entrepreneurial firm with a social mission?

    Keywords: Decisions; Leadership; Internet; Social Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Gender Characteristics; Business Startups;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Lynda M. Applegate, Sarah Harden, and Susan Saltrick. "Sarah Vickers-Willis: Career Decisions (A)." Harvard Business School Case 802-111, December 2001. View Details
  16. Sarah Vickers-Willis: Career Decisions (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Decisions; Leadership; Internet; Social Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Gender Characteristics; Business Startups;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Lynda M. Applegate, Sarah Harden, and Susan Saltrick. "Sarah Vickers-Willis: Career Decisions (B)." Harvard Business School Case 802-112, December 2001. View Details
  17. Staples

    Provides information on the development of the office superstore concept, including building partnerships, creating the business plan, and recruiting a management team.

    Keywords: Business Plan; Recruitment; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Teams; Operations; Planning; Partners and Partnerships; Complexity; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M. "Staples." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 802-803, November 2001. View Details
  18. Motive Communications

    The founders of Motive Communications, Inc., a recent start-up dedicated to reinventing the support chain involved in the delivery of information technology support services, put in place a development process hinged on extensive customer feedback. As part of this, a select group of "lighthouse customers" agreed to pay $50,000 to participate in beta testing--but as a deadline approached, none had sent in their checks. The founders therefore reevaluate the lighthouse policy and its rationale.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Customer Relationship Management; Risk and Uncertainty; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Rayport, Jeffrey F., Marco Iansiti, Myra M. Hart, William W Chan, and Find Findsen. "Motive Communications." Harvard Business School Case 699-157, April 1999. (Revised October 2001.) View Details
  19. What a Great Idea

    Charles "Chic" Thompson has created a successful business as a professional speaker, consultant, and author of two books on creativity. He is challenged to institutionalize his knowledge and brand in an organization that will outlive his involvement. This case examines the question of how to leverage individual capabilities to create an enduring professional service/educational firm.

    Keywords: Knowledge Management; Entrepreneurship; Management Teams; Organizational Design; Technological Innovation; Technology Adoption; Service Industry; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Susan Harmeling. "What a Great Idea." Harvard Business School Case 802-030, August 2001. (Revised October 2001.) View Details
  20. Protection of Intellectual Property in the United States, The

    Presents an overview of U.S. laws/systems in place to safeguard intellectual property rights. Includes a brief history of the development of the laws. Attention is given to patents, licenses, copyrights, trade secrets, trade and service markets, and non-disclosure and non-compete agreements.

    Keywords: Trademarks; Patents; Copyright; Laws and Statutes; Agreements and Arrangements; United States;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Howard G. Zaharoff. "Protection of Intellectual Property in the United States, The." Harvard Business School Background Note 897-046, September 1996. (Revised December 2000.) View Details
  21. Women.com

    Entrepreneurs Ellen Pack and Marleen McDaniel have founded a women's online network and watched it grow from an online subscription service in 1992 to one of the best known, widely visited women's networks on the web in 1999. While the company's vision has remained consistent, the company has taken on new forms as the Internet world in which it operates changes. The company reincarnates its business model and creates new strategic partnerships in an Internet space that is rapidly filling with other women's media organizations. McDaniel's challenges include "getting her stars aligned" before an IPO. Does she have the proper systems in place to ensure that an IPO will be successful?

    Keywords: Business Model; Entrepreneurship; Internet; Partners and Partnerships; Initial Public Offering; Networks; Transition; Web; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Sarah S. Khetani. "Women.com." Harvard Business School Case 800-216, February 2000. (Revised November 2000.) View Details
  22. Model E: An Incubated Enterprise

    Provides a close-up view of an entrepreneurial search for opportunity, the role of incubators in the process, and the development of a viable business concept. Also depicts the changes made to the business concept as new people (with new expertise and experience) are added to the team. The challenge of blending "old economy" automotive veterans with "new economy" Internet employees is another important issue raised.

    Keywords: Business Model; Transformation; Entrepreneurship; Human Resources; Problems and Challenges; Internet;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M. "Model E: An Incubated Enterprise." Harvard Business School Case 801-257, November 2000. View Details
  23. Handspring

    Donna Dubinsky and Jeff Hawkins, founders of Palm Computing, have launched a new venture--Handspring. They are preparing for an IPO in the spring of 2000. When the markets begin to collapse and their investment bankers suggest a significantly lower price, they must decide among financing alternatives. Includes color exhibits.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Investment Banking; Initial Public Offering; Valuation; Business Processes; Computer Industry; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Mary Rotelli. "Handspring." Harvard Business School Case 801-112, October 2000. (Revised November 2000.) View Details
  24. Staples: A Year in the Life of a Start-Up

    The case provides information on the development of the office superstore concept, building partnerships, creating the business plan, and recruiting a management team. Focuses on the detailed level of decision making required to transform an idea into a viable business. Heavy emphasis is placed on operating plans and integration. A rewritten version of earlier cases.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Partners and Partnerships; Business Strategy; Recruitment; Management Teams; Integration; Information Technology; Entrepreneurship; Business Plan; Decision Making;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M. "Staples: A Year in the Life of a Start-Up." Harvard Business School Case 800-241, January 2000. (Revised October 2000.) View Details
  25. 3PLex.com

    A start-up team is faced with the challenge of building a senior management team with relevant industry experience. The marriage of e-commerce and the transportation logistics industry creates unusual problems in blending "old economy" employees and employee practices (compensation/equity) and company cultures.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Executive Compensation; Employee Stock Ownership Plan; Organizational Culture; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Technology Adoption; Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Judith Marie Dror. "3PLex.com." Harvard Business School Case 801-152, October 2000. (Revised October 2000.) View Details
  26. Eggrock Partners, LLC (A)

    Explores the challenges of choosing how to grow a professional services firm (PSF). Before developing a growth strategy, the partners need to agree on what business(es) the company should be in. Each of the three partners has differing views of what the company should be doing to develop and maintain strong customer relationships.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business or Company Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Business Model; Expansion; Business Processes; Industry Structures; Customer Focus and Relationships; Employees; Partners and Partnerships; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Myra M. Hart, and Sharon Peyus. "Eggrock Partners, LLC (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-047, September 1999. (Revised October 2000.) View Details
  27. TruckitNow.com Business Plan

    Presents an original business plan. Students are challenged to develop assumptions and create financial projections and statements based on business plan text.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Business Plan; Finance; Framework; Value Creation; Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Judith Marie Dror. "TruckitNow.com Business Plan." Harvard Business School Case 801-151, September 2000. View Details
  28. U.S. Gas Transportation, Inc.

    Presents a career dilemma for a husband/wife owner-manager team. Nanci and Len Mackenzie have received an offer for their highly successful entrepreneurial business, U.S. Gas Transportation, Inc. The Mackenzies are concerned about what the sale might do to their company's culture, the careers of their loyal employees, and their own lifestyle.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Family Ownership; Family Business; Personal Development and Career; Organizational Culture; Employees; Business Exit or Shutdown; Planning; Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Davis, John A., Myra M. Hart, and Sharon Peyus. "U.S. Gas Transportation, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 800-049, March 2000. (Revised May 2000.) View Details
  29. AsiaMail.com: What's in a Name?

    Three founders of an international Internet company (e-mail-based marketing) struggle with naming the company. As they prepare to invest more than $10 million of first-round venture funding in advertising and marketing, they search for a name that will have power and breadth, but will be simple and functional in many different Asian countries.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Venture Capital; Brands and Branding; Internet; Entrepreneurship; Advertising; Marketing; Information Technology Industry; Service Industry; Asia;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Sharon Peyus. "AsiaMail.com: What's in a Name?" Harvard Business School Case 800-132, January 2000. (Revised April 2000.) View Details
  30. Magdalena Yesil

    Magdalena Yesil, investor and former entrepreneur, must decide whether to become a venture partner at US Venture Partners. This case discusses career progression, entrepreneurship, and deciding among career alternatives. Yesil's entrepreneurial experiences include UUNET, CyberCash, and MarketPay.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Partners and Partnerships;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Mary Rotelli. "Magdalena Yesil." Harvard Business School Case 800-350, March 2000. View Details
  31. Weight Watchers Mexico

    Weight Watchers must decide how to react to the Mexican financial crisis. Options include exiting, reducing investment, or continuing previous operations.

    Keywords: Business Exit or Shutdown; Restructuring; Volatility; Economy; Investment; Marketing; Problems and Challenges; Mexico;

    Citation:

    Arnold, David J., Myra M. Hart, and Susan Harmeling. "Weight Watchers Mexico." Harvard Business School Case 500-010, October 1999. (Revised January 2000.) View Details
  32. greatEntertaining.com

    GreatEntertaining.com is the result of years of planning, testing, and adapting the concept before committing to launch the business. Focus, value creation, and productive partnerships are key issues.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Strategic Planning; Partners and Partnerships; Adaptation; Value Creation; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Nicole Tempest. "greatEntertaining.com." Harvard Business School Case 800-274, January 2000. View Details
  33. Explore, Inc.

    Documents the creation of a national before and after-school day care program aimed at bridging the gap between school and parents' work schedules. This high-growth, for-profit social enterprise organization operated in what was historically the domain of nonprofit or government sectors. Tensions emerge 1) pressure to grow and the need to maintain quality, 2) pursuit of a noble mission and a desire to create personal wealth, 3) creation of a national organization and a local program delivery capability, and 4) meeting investor expectations while maintaining the purity of the programs.

    Keywords: Microeconomics; Growth and Development; Order Taking and Fulfillment; Mission and Purpose; Performance Expectations; Quality; Social Enterprise; Travel Industry;

    Citation:

    Grossman, Allen S., James E. Austin, Myra M. Hart, and Sharon Peyus. "Explore, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 300-011, September 1999. (Revised November 1999.) View Details
  34. CitySoft, Inc.

    Two entrepreneurs are discussing how to scale-up their new company. They face a variety of issues, ranging from hiring and training to strategy and focus.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Business Strategy; Business Growth and Maturation; Selection and Staffing; Internet; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Marco Iansiti, Andrea H. Chermayeff, and Diana S. Gardner. "CitySoft, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 698-080, April 1998. (Revised November 1999.) View Details
  35. Inktomi: Scaling the Internet

    Presents the early months of Inktomi, a company that invented the world's first truly scalable architecture for the Internet. This core technology provides a platform for a variety of innovative applications. The company must decide the direction it wants to take.

    Keywords: Technological Innovation; Leadership; Corporate Strategy; Internet;

    Citation:

    Iansiti, Marco, Myra M. Hart, and Richard Bergin. "Inktomi: Scaling the Internet." Harvard Business School Case 699-156, April 1999. View Details
  36. CRA Managed Care, Inc. (B)

    An entrepreneur's transition from chairman/CEO of a large privately held company, to chairman of a public company, to leadership in several large nonprofit organizations is chronicled.

    Keywords: Leadership; Nonprofit Organizations; Governing and Advisory Boards; Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Susan Harmeling. "CRA Managed Care, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 899-069, October 1998. (Revised December 1998.) View Details
  37. CRA Managed Care, Inc. (A)

    Silverman and her co-founder, Don Larson, own the largest privately held injury-management and cost-containment services firm in the United States. When their $80+ million company attracts substantial interest of investment bankers and venture capitalists, the two must weigh the pros and cons of allowing "outsiders" into their company. Though the two have different professional and personal agendas, both want to do what is best for the business and each other. This case focuses on developing an exit strategy from CRA that maximizes value, ensures continuity, and meets both partners needs.

    Keywords: Transition; Leadership Development; Venture Capital; Business Exit or Shutdown; Investment; Business or Company Management; Nonprofit Organizations; Personal Development and Career; Entrepreneurship; Service Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Jennifer Starr. "CRA Managed Care, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 899-068, October 1998. View Details
  38. CRA Managed Care, Inc. (C)

    Chronicles an entrepreneur's transition from chairman/CEO of a large privately held company, to chairman of a public company, to board member, to president of several major nonprofit boards, to founder of a new nonprofit for women business owners and founder of a new business journal for women.

    Keywords: Transition; Leadership; Nonprofit Organizations; Governing and Advisory Boards; Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Gender Characteristics; Management Skills; United States;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Susan Harmeling. "CRA Managed Care, Inc. (C)." Harvard Business School Case 899-070, October 1998. View Details
  39. Staples (A)

    Chronicles development of a new business concept. Starts with Stemberg's search for a new employment opportunity, then provides details of his decision to launch a new venture concept through careful matching of personal capabilities and experience against a variety of marketing opportunities. Stemberg redefines his supermarket skills as distribution skills and systematically searches for industries where they can be applied.

    Keywords: Marketing; Personal Development and Career; Entrepreneurship; Management Skills; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Marco Iansiti, and Barbara Feinberg. "Staples (A)." Harvard Business School Case 898-157, January 1998. (Revised September 1998.) View Details
  40. Palm Computing, Inc. 1995: Financing Challenges

    The president, Donna Dubinsky, and the chairman and founder, Jeff Hawkins, discuss an opportunity to sell their company to U.S. Robotics. They must weigh this option versus accepting venture capital funding, partnering with a large company that could provide distribution channels and capital, or continuing a search for capital from other sources.

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Partners and Partnerships; Business Exit or Shutdown; Decision Choices and Conditions; Computer Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Stephanie Dodson. "Palm Computing, Inc. 1995: Financing Challenges." Harvard Business School Case 898-090, November 1997. (Revised August 1998.) View Details
  41. Boston Duck Tours,1996: Has Boston Gone Quackers?

    While on vacation in Memphis, former investment manager Andy Wilson discovers a unique "tour bus" that travels over land and through water. He decides to transplant the concept to Boston and to add both historical and theatrical features to the amphibious tour. As he tries to start up Boston Duck Tours, Wilson must figure out how to organize and fund the new venture. The challenges seem overwhelming. He has no relevant experience and very little money. The market is untested and, at best, seasonal. Furthermore, the regulatory barriers are high. Wilson's persistence and creativity provide some solutions, but create additional challenges when it comes to harvesting financial value. This case is particularly useful in the Resourcing and Organizing module of a course on New Ventures.

    Keywords: Opportunities; Creativity; Entrepreneurship; Financing and Loans; Problems and Challenges; Business Startups; Tourism Industry; Tennessee; Boston;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Stephanie Dodson. "Boston Duck Tours,1996: Has Boston Gone Quackers?" Harvard Business School Case 898-189, March 1998. (Revised July 1998.) View Details
  42. Katie Burke (A)

    Follows the career of Katie Burke, HBS MBA 1995. Offers the opportunity to discuss a variety of issues, including innovation, software development, entrepreneurship, new venture design, and career choices.

    Keywords: Information Technology; Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Business Startups; Innovation and Invention;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Marco Iansiti, and Barbara Feinberg. "Katie Burke (A)." Harvard Business School Case 698-092, April 1998. View Details
  43. X-IT Products, LLC

    Two entrepreneurs, Andrew Ive and Aldo DiBerlardino, are poised to launch their first product. The decisions they make will have a crucial impact on the future of their company.

    Keywords: Forecasting and Prediction; Entrepreneurship; Product Launch; Outcome or Result;

    Citation:

    Iansiti, Marco, Myra M. Hart, and Barbara Feinberg. "X-IT Products, LLC." Harvard Business School Case 698-084, April 1998. View Details
  44. Staples (C)

    The search for appropriate hardware and software to support the launch of a new large-scale retail operation forces the management team to define their goals at a very detailed level and to make all underlying assumptions explicit.

    Keywords: Goals and Objectives; Hardware; Software; Business Startups; Management Teams; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Marco Iansiti, and Barbara Feinberg. "Staples (C)." Harvard Business School Case 898-159, January 1998. (Revised March 1998.) View Details
  45. Arbor Health Care Company

    A venture-funded start-up runs into trouble when health care reimbursement policies change radically. With the help of its board, the company develops a new strategy, becomes profitable, and makes a public offering. The second wave of changes introduced by Clinton health-care initiatives create the need for strategic reevaluation and operational changes. The case traces the development and strategic changes

    Keywords: Industry Structures; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Succession; Business Startups; Transformation; Strategy; Venture Capital; Policy; Initial Public Offering; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., and Stephanie Dodson. "Arbor Health Care Company." Harvard Business School Case 897-132, February 1997. (Revised December 1997.) View Details
  46. BANC ONE - 1993

    From a small local bank, Banc One has grown to one of the largest and most profitable banks in the United States under the leadership of its CEO, John B. McCoy. It has an impressive track record of improving the performance of its acquisitions while retaining the previous management and transferring its corporate culture. Banc One's uncommon partnership and its "share and compare" practices are viewed as key to its success. How long will it be able to sustain its stellar track record, particularly when confronted with mounting industry pressures? It has broadened its strategy, resulting in a number of organizational challenges. What lessons can be learned, particularly in terms of Banc One's acquisition approach? How is Banc One responding to the changing industry and how does it organizationally manage this change?

    Keywords: Leadership; Acquisition; Organizational Culture; Policy; Adaptation; Business Growth and Maturation; Strategy; Performance Improvement; Industry Structures; Banking Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Uyterhoeven, Hugo, and Myra M. Hart. "BANC ONE - 1993." Harvard Business School Case 394-043, October 1993. (Revised September 1996.) View Details
  47. Palm Computing, Inc. (A)

    Discusses patents, licenses, and deal making in a start-up venture. The entrepreneur, Jeff Hawkins, holds a patent on Palm Print, a pattern recognition algorithm. After licensing Palm Print to his employer, he led three years of development of commercial products for the company. Focuses on Hawkins's efforts to start a new, noncompeting venture that requires cross-licenses for the Palm Print enhancements. The employer wants Hawkins to stay to develop the new products "in-house" and resists making an agreement.

    Keywords: Intellectual Property; Patents; Agreements and Arrangements; Negotiation Deal; Business Startups; Management Teams;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M. "Palm Computing, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 396-245, January 1996. View Details
  48. Bright Horizons Children's Centers, Inc.-1987

    The founders of Bright Horizons have developed a distinctive strategy and raised venture capital money. Now they are ready to make their dream come true. How should they proceed in implementing their strategy?

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Management Style; Management Systems; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Uyterhoeven, Hugo, and Myra M. Hart. "Bright Horizons Children's Centers, Inc.-1987." Harvard Business School Case 394-031, July 1993. (Revised March 1994.) View Details
  49. Peanut Butter Fantasies

    Addresses the interrelated challenges of marketing and finance faced by a small, struggling packaged foods company.

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Finance; Business or Company Management; Marketing; Distribution; Problems and Challenges; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Bhide, Amar, and Myra M. Hart. "Peanut Butter Fantasies." Harvard Business School Case 391-072, October 1990. (Revised August 1991.) View Details

Presentations

  1. Perceptions of Women in Business: The Good, the Bad and the Interesting.

    Keywords: Gender Characteristics; Business Ventures; Perception;

    Citation:

    Brush, C. G., N. M. Carter, E. J. Gatewood, P. G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "Perceptions of Women in Business: The Good, the Bad and the Interesting." Paper presented at the Athena Signature Series, San Diego, CA, December 09–11, 2004. View Details
  2. The Role and Participation of Women in the Venture Capital Industry

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Brush, C. G., N. M. Carter, E. J. Gatewood, P. G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "The Role and Participation of Women in the Venture Capital Industry." Women's Association of Venture & Equity, New York, NY, September 22–25, 2004. View Details
  3. Becoming a Heroine

    Citation:

    Brush, C. G., N. M. Carter, E. J. Gatewood, P. G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "Becoming a Heroine." Paper presented at the WISE Symposium, Syracuse, NY, April 21–23, 2004. View Details
  4. Women, Money and Wealth Creation: Investigating the Myths.

    Keywords: Gender Characteristics; Money; Wealth;

    Citation:

    Brush, C. G., N. M. Carter, E. J. Gatewood, P. G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "Women, Money and Wealth Creation: Investigating the Myths." Paper presented at the Consortium of Social Science Associations Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, January 04–07, 2004. View Details
  5. Venture Capital Access in the New Economy: Is Gender an Issue?

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Gender Characteristics; Economy;

    Citation:

    Hart, Myra M., Candida Brush, Nancy Carter, Elizabeth Gatewood, and Patricia Greene. "Venture Capital Access in the New Economy: Is Gender an Issue?" Paper presented at the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management Fall Research Conference, Washington, DC, October 26, 2001. View Details

Other Publications and Materials

  1. Gatekeepers of Venture Growth: A Diana Project Report on the Role and Participation of Women in the Venture Capital Industry

    Keywords: Venture Capital; Gender Characteristics; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Brush, C. G., N. M. Carter, E. Gatewood, P. G. Greene, and M. M. Hart. "Gatekeepers of Venture Growth: A Diana Project Report on the Role and Participation of Women in the Venture Capital Industry." Report Series, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO, October 2004. View Details
  2. Women Entrepreneurs, Growth, and Implications for the Classroom

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Education; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Brush, C. G., N. M. Carter, E. J. Gatewood, P. G. Greene, and Myra M. Hart. "Women Entrepreneurs, Growth, and Implications for the Classroom." Coleman Foundation White Paper , United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship (USASBE), January 2004. View Details
  3. An Investigation of Women-Led Firms and Venture Capital Investment

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Venture Capital; Gender Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida G., Patricia G. Greene, Myra M. Hart, Nancy Carter, and Elizabeth Gatewood. "An Investigation of Women-Led Firms and Venture Capital Investment." Report, CB Associates, Duxbury, MA, September 2001. (Final Report to Small Business Administration.) View Details
  4. The Diana Project: Women Business Owners and Equity Capital: The Myths Dispelled

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Gender Characteristics; Capital;

    Citation:

    Brush, Candida, Nancy Carter, Elizabeth Gatewood, Patricia Green, and Myra M. Hart. "The Diana Project: Women Business Owners and Equity Capital: The Myths Dispelled." Report, Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership, January 2001. View Details

    Research Summary

  1. Resource-Based Entrepreneurship

    Myra M. Hart is investigating the relationship between an entrepreneur's industry-specific experience and the success of large-scale startups. Her work focuses on the links between the entrepreneur's knowledge and reputation resources-developed in the same or a closely related industry-and success in launching a new venture, maintaining organizational viability throughout the first five years, and reaching five-year financial targets. Hart's research is intended to enrich the understanding of entrepreneurial assets and skills that are significant determinants of new-venture success. It also extends the resource-based theory of the firm to newly forming organizations in which the entrepreneur and his or her resources can be considered synonymous with the firm. Field research and an extensive survey of entrepreneur participants in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Enterprise Forum were used to develop an empirical database. Hart's findings suggest that replication is as important as innovation in founding large-scale new ventures, and that the entrepreneur's industry-related knowledge and reputation contribute substantially to a new venture's success, particularly as mediated by the venture partner's qualifications.

  2. Women Entrepreneurs

    Professor Hart is currently conducting research on women entrepreneurs pursuing high growth strategies. Hart is a member of the Diana Research Group, a team of five professors who have collaborated in an on-going investigation of the unique oppportunities and obstacles that women entrepreneurs encounted as they create and lead high growth enterprises. Her particular areas of interest are the equity financing challenges of women entrepreneurs and the organization, structure, and membership of the venture capital industry. The Diana Research team includes Professors Candida Brush (Boston University), Nancy Carter (University of St. Thomas), Elizabeth Gatewood (University of Indiana), and Dean Patricia Greene (Babson College). Working together since 1999, they have written 2 books, 2 book chapters, 3 refereed journal articles, made invited presentations at more than 30 conferences, and have organized an international research sypmposium that currently includes researchers from 18 countries.
  3. Models of Success

    Myra Hart is conducting research on the career and personal paths that Harvard Business School alumnae pursue over the course of their lives. She is developing programs to encourage and support the creation of dynamic and multi-facted models of success. These programs include personal assessment, strategic plan, and creative tools for alumni/ae.
    1. Global Award for Entrepreneurship Research: Received the 2007 FSF-NUTEK Award for research on entrepreneurship and small business (with Candida Brush, Nancy Carter, Elizabeth Gatewood, and Patricia Greene).This international prize is given annually by the Swedish Business Development Agency and the Swedish Foundation for Small Business Research.