David A. Garvin

C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration

Unit: General Management

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David A. Garvin is the C. Roland Christensen Professor of Business Administration at the Harvard Business School. He joined the Business School faculty in 1979 and has since then taught courses in leadership, general management, and operations in the MBA and Advanced Management programs, as well as serving as chair of the Elective Curriculum and faculty chair of the School's Teaching and Learning Center. He has also taught in executive education programs and consulted for over fifty organizations around the globe, including Amyris, Biogen Idec, Booz Allen Hamilton, Frito-Lay, Gillette, L. L. Bean, 3M, Mitsubishi, Morgan Stanley, Mueller, Novartis, PPG, Reed Elsevier, Seagate, Stryker, and the U.S. Forest Service.

Professor Garvin's research interests lie in the areas of general management and strategic change. He is especially interested in business and management processes, organizational learning, and the design and leadership of large, complex organizations. He is also deeply interested in case method teaching. He is the author or co-author of ten books, including Rethinking the MBA (selected by Strategy + Business as one of the Best Business Books of 2010), General Management: Processes and Action, Learning in Action, Education for Judgment, and Managing Quality; more than thirty-five articles, including "How Google Sold Its Engineers on Management," "Change Through Persuasion," "What Every CEO Should Know About Creating New Businesses," and "What You Don't Know About Making Decisions;" eight CD-ROMs and videotape series, including A Case Study Teacher in Action, Working Smarter, and Putting the Learning Organization to Work; and over sixty HBS case studies, multimedia exercises, and technical notes. He is a three-time winner of the McKinsey Award, given annually for the best article in Harvard Business Review; a winner of the Beckhard Prize, given annually for the best article on planned change and organizational development in Sloan Management Review; and a winner of the Smith-Weld Prize, given annually for the best article on the University in Harvard Magazine. He has been cited in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Los Angeles Times, Economist, Business Week, Fortune, and Fast Company.

Professor Garvin received an A.B. summa cum laude from Harvard College in 1974, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa, and a Ph.D. in economics from M.I.T. in 1979, where he held a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship and a Sloan Foundation Fellowship.

Prior to coming to the Business School, he worked as an economist for both the Federal Trade Commission, studying federal energy policies, and the Sloan Commission on Government and Higher Education, studying the impact of federal regulation on the academic and financial policies of colleges and universities. He has served on the Board of Overseers of the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award, the Manufacturing Studies Board of the National Research Council, and the Board of Directors of Emerson Hospital.

In his spare time, he enjoys hiking, bicycling, and travel. He lives in Lexington, Massachusetts with his wife, Lynn, and his daughters, Diana and Cynthia.

Featured Work

Publications

Books

  1. Rethinking the MBA: Business Education at a Crossroads

    "Business Schools Face Test of Faith." "Is It Time to Retrain B-Schools?" As these headlines make clear, business education is at a major crossroads. For decades, MBA graduates from top-tier schools set the standard for cutting-edge business knowledge and skills. Now the business world has changed, say the authors of Rethinking the MBA. and MBA programs must change with it. Increasingly, managers and recruiters are questioning conventional business education. Their concerns? Among other things, MBA programs aren't giving students the heightened cultural awareness and global perspectives they need. Newly minted MBAs lack essential leadership skills. Creative and critical thinking demand far more attention. In this compelling and authoritative new book, the authors document a rising chorus of concerns about business schools gleaned from extensive interviews with deans and executives as well as from a detailed analysis of current curricula and emerging trends in graduate business education; provide case studies showing how leading MBA programs have begun reinventing themselves for the better; and offer concrete ideas for how business schools can surmount the challenges that come with reinvention, including securing faculty with new skills and experimenting with new pedagogies. Rich with examples and thoroughly researched, Rethinking the MBA reveals why and how business schools must define a better pathway for the future.

    Keywords: Change Management; Transformation; Business Education; Curriculum and Courses; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., David A. Garvin, and Patrick Cullen. Rethinking the MBA: Business Education at a Crossroads. Boston: Harvard Business Press, 2010. (Selected by Strategy + Business as one of the Best Business Books of 2010.) View Details
  2. Cases in Operations Management: Strategy and Structure

    Keywords: Cases; Operations; Management; Strategy; Organizational Structure;

    Citation:

    Sasser, W. Earl, Kim B. Clark, David A. Garvin, Margaret B.W. Graham, Ramchandran Jaikumar, and David H. Maister. Cases in Operations Management: Strategy and Structure. Richard D. Irwin, 1982. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Can a Strong Culture Be Too Strong?

    The article presents a case study of a business enterprise with high employee turnover that is considering adopting a personnel management innovation, referred to as People Support, involving a group of managers whose role is to listen to and help resolve employees' work-related problems. It offers perspectives from two business experts who have opposing viewpoints on a family-like corporate culture and on whether the People Support plan is advisable.

    Keywords: Employee Relationship Management; Retention; Organizational Culture;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Can a Strong Culture Be Too Strong?" Harvard Business Review 92, nos. 1-2 (January–February 2014): 113–117. View Details
  2. How Google Sold Its Engineers on Management

    High-performing knowledge workers often question whether managers actually contribute much, especially in a technical environment. Until recently, that was the case at Google, a company filled with self-starters who viewed management as more destructive than beneficial and as a distraction from "real work." But when Google's people analytics team examined the value of managers, applying the same rigorous research methods the company uses in its operations, it proved the skeptics wrong. Mining data from employee surveys, performance reviews, and double-blind interviews, the team verified that managers indeed had a positive impact. It also pinpointed exactly how, identifying the eight key behaviors of great Google managers. In this article, I describe how Google has incorporated the detailed findings from the research into highly specific, concrete guidelines; classes; and feedback reports that help managers hone their essential skills. Because these tools were built from the ground up, using the staff's own input, they've been embraced by Google employees. Managers say that they've found their training to be invaluable, and managers' ratings from direct reports have steadily risen across the company.

    Keywords: management; leadership; organizational behavior; human resource management; managing change; Organizational change; analytics; Management; Leadership; Human Resources; Talent and Talent Management;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "How Google Sold Its Engineers on Management." R1312D. Harvard Business Review 91, no. 12 (December 2013): 74–82. View Details
  3. Where Implementation Breaks Down: Why Can't Companies Get the Job Done?

    A great plan for the future isn't so great if you can't execute it properly. Conceiving a project or initiative demands different approaches and skills than acting on it and following through. Here's a guide to removing the roadblocks on the path toward effective implementation.

    Keywords: Implementation; EXECUTIVE ability (Management); Management Practices and Processes; Performance Effectiveness; Management Skills;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Where Implementation Breaks Down: Why Can't Companies Get the Job Done?" Conference Board Review 50, no. 3 (Summer 2013): 38–45. View Details
  4. Rethinking the MBA: Business Education at a Crossroads

    The paper seeks to examine major challenges facing MBA programs and to argue that they will have to reconsider their value proposition. It aims to explore effective curricular and programmatic responses as opportunities for MBA programs to innovate. The paper also aims to call for collective action across the business school field to effectively address these challenges.

    Keywords: Business Education; Curriculum and Courses; Innovation and Invention; Problems and Challenges; Value Creation;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., David A. Garvin, and Patrick Cullen. "Rethinking the MBA: Business Education at a Crossroads." Journal of Management Development 30, no. 5 (2011). View Details
  5. The Multiunit Enterprise

    A multiunit enterprise is a geographically dispersed organization built from standard units (stores, restaurants, or branches) that are aggregated into larger geographic groupings (districts, regions, and divisions). Although this organizational structure has become the norm in several industries, it has received little attention from academics and consultants. Garvin and Levesque set out to fill that gap in management thinking with their research. The authors closely studied the office supply company Staples for two years and then collected data from 12 other multiunit enterprises. In this article, they discuss the unique problems that such corporations face, describe how managers tackle those challenges, and offer lessons that will help all types of organizations execute strategy. In a multiunit enterprise, four tiers of management constitute the field organization: store, district, regional, and divisional heads. All these managers are responsible for meeting targets set by corporate headquarters and implementing strategy. To do so, they adhere to five principles of organizational design. First, the field organization's different tiers have overlapping responsibilities; together they create a multilayered net to catch any problems that arise. Second, managers at all levels serve as integrators, coordinating diverse activities and optimizing the efforts of the whole organization rather than its parts. Third, higher-level managers filter data from headquarters to frontline managers, who otherwise might feel overwhelmed by a constant stream of initiatives. Fourth, regional and divisional heads in particular act as translators, defining in concrete terms how the field organization can roll out initiatives. Finally, all managers share responsibility for talent development.

    Keywords: Globalized Firms and Management; Organizational Structure; Global Range; Research; Business Ventures; Problems and Challenges; Business or Company Management; Business Headquarters; Organizational Design; Talent and Talent Management; Goals and Objectives;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Lynne C. Levesque. "The Multiunit Enterprise." Harvard Business Review 86, no. 6 (June 2008). View Details
  6. Is Yours a Learning Organization?

    This article includes a one-page preview that quickly summarizes the key ideas and provides an overview of how the concepts work in practice along with suggestions for further reading. An organization with a strong learning culture faces the unpredictable deftly. However, a concrete method for understanding precisely how an institution learns and for identifying specific steps to help it learn better has remained elusive. A new survey instrument from professors Garvin and Edmondson of Harvard Business School and assistant professor Gino of Carnegie Mellon University allows you to ground your efforts in becoming a learning organization. The tool's conceptual foundation is what the authors call the three building blocks of a learning organization. The first, a supportive learning environment, comprises psychological safety, appreciation of differences, openness to new ideas, and time for reflection. The second, concrete learning processes and practices, includes experimentation, information collection and analysis, and education and training. These two complementary elements are fortified by the final building block: leadership that reinforces learning. The survey instrument enables a granular examination of all these particulars, scores each of them, and provides a framework for detailed, comparative analysis. You can make comparisons within and among your institution's functional areas, between your organization and others, and against benchmarks that the authors have derived from their surveys of hundreds of executives in many industries. After discussing how to use their tool, the authors share the insights they acquired as they developed it. Above all, they emphasize the importance of dialogue and diagnosis as you nurture your company and its processes with the aim of becoming a learning organization. The authors' goal--and the purpose of their tool--is to help you paint an honest picture of your firm's learning culture and of the leaders who set its tone.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Learning; Surveys; Leading Change; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Organizational Culture;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., Amy C. Edmondson, and Francesca Gino. "Is Yours a Learning Organization?" Harvard Business Review 86, no. 3 (March 2008). View Details

Working Papers

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. A Note on Seeking, Receiving, and Giving Advice

    This note examines the processes of seeking, receiving, and giving advice by drawing on both academic research and the lessons of skilled practitioners. It begins with a discussion of the potential benefits and costs of advice-seeking and advice-giving. The note then defines and distinguishes four related activities: advising, counseling, coaching and mentoring. Next, it describes the primary stages or steps in the advising process; each stage is examined from the perspective of both advice-seekers and advice-givers. The note concludes with recommendations for practice, listing a number of pitfalls to avoid when seeking, receiving, and giving advice as well as several guidelines and best practices.

    Keywords: advice taking; coaching; decision-making; leadership; management skills; Leadership; Interpersonal Communication; Personal Development and Career; Management Skills;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Joshua D. Margolis. "A Note on Seeking, Receiving, and Giving Advice." Harvard Business School Technical Note 314-071, June 2014. View Details
  2. Decision Making at the Top: The All-Star Sports eBusiness Division

    Describes a senior management team's strategic decision-making process. The division president faces three options for redesigning the process to address several key concerns. The president has extensive quantitative and qualitative data about the process to guide him as he and the senior team attempt to make improvements.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Management Teams; Performance Improvement; Planning; Mathematical Methods; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael A. Roberto. "Decision Making at the Top: The All-Star Sports eBusiness Division." Harvard Business School Case 314-010, October 2013. View Details
  3. Americhem: The Gaylord Division (A-1)

    The Gaylord Division of Americhem, a large chemical company, is in the midst of the first use of a new zero-base budgeting system. The general manager of the division leading the process is experiencing disagreement and conflict among the members of the senior management team. This case describes a difficult meeting. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Leadership; Management Practices and Processes; Strategic Planning; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Americhem: The Gaylord Division (A-1)." Harvard Business School Case 314-011, October 2013. View Details
  4. Management Levels at Staples (A): Company and Organization (Abridged)

    Abridged version of one of six cases that describe the roles and responsibilities of managers at each of the hierarchical levels of management within the U.S. Stores business unit of Staples, the world's largest office supply company. Together, the cases form a complete integrated package. Explores five distinct jobs—store manager, district manager, regional vice-president, division senior vice-president, and president of the U.S. Stories business units—and, for each level, describes the key management tasks, planning, decision-making, and leadership processes and critical choices that lead to superior execution and operational performance. Provides background information on Staples' organization and strategy.

    Keywords: Strategy; Managerial Roles; Organizational Design; Management Practices and Processes; Job Design and Levels; Business Processes; Consumer Products Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Management Levels at Staples (A): Company and Organization (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 314-004, September 2013. View Details
  5. Google's Project Oxygen: Do Managers Matter?

    Google's Project Oxygen started with a fundamental question raised by executives in the early 2000s: do managers matter? The topic generated a multi-year research project that ultimately led to a comprehensive program, built around eight key management attributes, designed to help Google employees become better managers. By November 2012, the program had been in place for several years, and the company could point to statistically significant improvements in managerial effectiveness and performance. Now executives were wondering: how could Google build on the success of this project, extending it to senior leaders, teams, and other constituencies while striving to create truly amazing managers?

    Keywords: organizational behavior; management; leadership; business policy; general management; human resource management; Management; Leadership; Human Resources;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Google's Project Oxygen: Do Managers Matter?" Harvard Business School Teaching Note 314-016, July 2013. View Details
  6. Google's Project Oxygen: Do Managers Matter?

    Google's Project Oxygen started with a fundamental question raised by executives in the early 2000s: do managers matter? The topic generated a multi-year research project that ultimately led to a comprehensive program, built around eight key management attributes, designed to help Google employees become better managers. By November 2012, the program had been in place for several years, and the company could point to statistically significant improvements in managerial effectiveness and performance. Now executives were wondering: how could Google build on the success of this project, extending it to senior leaders, teams, and other constituencies while striving to create truly amazing managers?

    Keywords: organizational behavior; management; leadership; business policy; general management; human resource management; Management; Leadership; Human Resources;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., Alison Berkley Wagonfeld, and Liz Kind. "Google's Project Oxygen: Do Managers Matter?" Harvard Business School Case 313-110, April 2013. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  7. Growing Pains at Stroz Friedberg (Abridged)

    In late spring 2009, Stroz Friedberg co-presidents Edward Stroz and Eric Friedberg had to set growth targets for 2010. The leading global consulting firm they had built specialized in managing digital risk and uncovering digital evidence and had grown very rapidly. With the firm's CFO, they believed that the firm could grow from $58 million to $72 million, a growth rate of 27% over the preceding year. However, the firm's 11 offices had submitted first draft FY 2010 plans that together added up to firm-wide revenues of only $53 million, a growth rate of negative 10.2%. The preceding years of rapid growth had been successful but challenging, and a thorough review of the firm's culture, systems, structure, and processes in late 2008 had resulted in a significant set of changes to which the organization was still adjusting. Stroz and Friedberg wondered whether to push for continued, aggressive growth.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Change Management; Transition; Growth and Development Strategy; Growth Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Organizational Structure; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael Norris. "Growing Pains at Stroz Friedberg (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 313-023, August 2012. View Details
  8. The National Geographic Society (Abridged)

    In January 2010, John Fahey, president, CEO, and chairman of the board of trustees' executive committee of the Washington, D.C.–based National Geographic Society (NGS), must decide how best to organize the 121-year old mission-driven organization for a world of accelerating digital convergence and decreasing magazine sales. Historically a proponent of evolutionary change, he is considering a radical move: creating a senior management position responsible for e-commerce to coordinate web-based offerings and outreach across the Society's various departments, transition NGS from its many disparate and independent direct mail efforts to a more integrated and strategic e-commerce strategy, and leverage the NGS relationship with its members—currently defined as magazine subscribers, since a subscription comes with Society membership. Putting the final touches on the position and its reporting arrangements has led to significant debate within the organization, and Fahey is torn about how to proceed.

    Keywords: general management; change management; media and publishing; digital convergence; strategy development; business models; organizational structure; Information Publishing; Online Technology; Business Model; Organizational Structure; Business Strategy; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Annelena Lobb. "The National Geographic Society (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 312-120, May 2012. (Revised October 2013.) View Details
  9. Ctrip: Scientifically Managing Travel Services

    Ctrip is a $437 million Chinese on-line travel services company with a scientific, data driven approach to management. The case explores Ctrip's founding and early growth, its expansion into multiple market segments including hotel reservations, air ticketing, leisure travel, and corporate travel, and the sources of its competitive advantage. The firm's culture, organization and call center operations are described in detail, as are its decision-making and business processes. At the end of the case, executives are considering whether Ctrip should actively pursue either the budget or luxury travel segments, which would mean shifting attention from the company's core customer base of Frequent Independent Travelers.

    Keywords: Scientific Management; Data-driven management; Management; Expansion; Business Growth and Maturation; Market Entry and Exit; Mathematical Methods; Business Processes; Information Management; Travel Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Nancy Hua Dai. "Ctrip: Scientifically Managing Travel Services." Harvard Business School Case 312-092, January 2012. (Revised March 2013.) View Details
  10. Bergerac Systems: The Challenge of Backward Integration

    Bergerac Systems is a small, rapidly growing manufacturer of diagnostic instruments used in veterinary practices. The company introduced the OmniVue chemistry analyzer, which enables veterinarians to run a wide range of blood and blood chemistry tests on their animal patients in the office instead of sending them to outside laboratories. OmniVue is easy to operate and produces highly reliable results using a proprietary cartridge for holding the blood specimen during the analysis. Sales of these single-use cartridges are an important part of the revenue stream for the product line. The firm relies on two outside suppliers for the plastic components of the cartridges. The CEO is concerned about inconsistent delivery from the cartridge suppliers which have resulted in shortages and stock-outs. To address the supply chain problems, the CEO considers acquiring one of the suppliers, GenieTech, while the director of planning proposes building the required capabilities within the company's existing manufacturing facilities. Students must perform a quantitative and qualitative analysis of a "make vs. buy" decision while considering expected production capacities, market forecasts, and the company's overall sourcing strategy.

    Keywords: financial analysis; Vertical Integration; Manufacturing strategy; supply chain management; strategy; Production; Supply Chain Management; Vertical Integration; Performance Capacity; Financial Strategy; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Sunru Yong. "Bergerac Systems: The Challenge of Backward Integration." Harvard Business School Brief Case 114-381, December 2011. View Details
  11. Bergerac Systems: The Challenge of Backward Integration (Brief Case)

    Teaching Note for Product # 4381

    Keywords: financial analysis; Vertical Integration; Manufacturing strategy; supply chain management; strategy; Production; Analysis; Supply Chain Management; Vertical Integration; Finance;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Sunru Yong. "Bergerac Systems: The Challenge of Backward Integration (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 114-382, December 2011. View Details
  12. Zensar: The Future of Vision Communities (A)

    Zensar is a rapidly growing, mid-sized Indian IT services company with a collaborative management philosophy and innovative HR policies. One of its practices, Vision Communities, is an inclusive forum for innovation and strategy formulation. As the company grows, managers must decide how to scale the Vision Community process so that it retains its spirit of employee involvement and engagement while encompassing a larger, more geographically dispersed group of participants.

    Keywords: Human Resources; Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Leadership Style; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Practices and Processes; Organizational Culture; Cooperation; Information Technology Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Rachna Tahilyani. "Zensar: The Future of Vision Communities (A)." Harvard Business School Case 311-024, June 2010. (Revised November 2011.) View Details
  13. Zensar: The Future of Vision Communities (B)

    Zensar is a rapidly growing, mid-sized Indian IT services company with a collaborative management philosophy and innovative HR policies. One of its practices, Vision Communities, is an inclusive forum for innovation and strategy formulation. As the company grows, managers must decide how to scale the Vision Community process so that it retains its spirit of employee involvement and engagement while encompassing a larger, more geographically dispersed group of participants.

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Leadership Style; Employee Relationship Management; Decision Choices and Conditions; Information Technology; Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Business or Company Management; Expansion; Information Technology Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Rachna Tahilyani. "Zensar: The Future of Vision Communities (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 311-025, July 2010. (Revised November 2011.) View Details
  14. MindTree: A Community of Communities

    MindTree is a mid-sized Indian IT services company known for its knowledge management practices, its collaborative communities, and its strong culture and values. The CEO has set a goal of becoming a $1 billion company by 2014; to reach that goal, employees must create several new businesses. The head of knowledge management must decide how his function should change in order to become more supportive of innovation and new business development.

    Keywords: Learning; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Employee Relationship Management; Innovation and Invention; Knowledge Management; Leadership; Organizational Culture; Social and Collaborative Networks; Information Technology Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Rachna Tahilyani. "MindTree: A Community of Communities." Harvard Business School Case 311-049, August 2010. (Revised November 2011.) View Details
  15. The National Geographic Society

    In January 2010, John Fahey, president, CEO, and chairman of the board of trustees' executive committee of the Washington, D.C.-based National Geographic Society (NGS), must decide how best to organize the 121-year old mission-driven organization for a world of accelerating digital convergence and decreasing magazine sales. Historically a proponent of evolutionary change, he is considering a radical move: creating a senior management position responsible for e-commerce to coordinate web-based offerings and outreach across the Society's various departments, transition NGS from its many disparate and independent direct mail efforts to a more integrated and strategic e-commerce strategy, and leverage the NGS relationship with its members-currently defined as magazine subscribers, since a subscription comes with Society membership. Putting the final touches on the position and its reporting arrangements has led to significant debate within the organization, and Fahey is torn about how to proceed.

    Keywords: Business Model; Information Publishing; Leadership Style; Leading Change; Growth and Development Strategy; Managerial Roles; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Organizational Structure; Internet; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "The National Geographic Society." Harvard Business School Case 311-002, January 2011. (Revised November 2011.) View Details
  16. Ganesh Natarajan, CEO of Zensar: In-Class Comments, 4/7/11

    Zensar is a rapidly growing, mid-sized Indian IT services company with a collaborative management philosophy and innovative HR policies. One of its practices, Vision Communities, is an inclusive forum for innovation and strategy formulation. As the company grows, managers must decide how to scale the Vision Community process so that it retains its spirit of employee involvement and engagement while encompassing a larger, more geographically dispersed group of participants.

    Keywords: Management; Service Operations; Family and Family Relationships; Behavior; Information Technology; Information Technology Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Ganesh Natarajan, CEO of Zensar: In-Class Comments, 4/7/11." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 312-705, October 2011. View Details
  17. An Interview with Ganesh Natarajan, CEO of Zensar

    Zensar is a rapidly growing, mid-sized Indian IT services company with a collaborative management philosophy and innovative HR policies. One of its practices, Vision Communities, is an inclusive forum for innovation and strategy formulation. As the company grows, managers must decide how to scale the Vision Community process so that it retains its spirit of employee involvement and engagement while encompassing a larger, more geographically dispersed group of participants.

    Keywords: Decisions; Human Resources; Employees; Leadership Style; Management; Organizational Culture; Information Technology Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "An Interview with Ganesh Natarajan, CEO of Zensar." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 312-706, October 2011. View Details
  18. An Interview with Jack Hughes, Founder and Chairman of TopCoder

    TopCoder's crowdsourcing-based business model, in which software is developed through online tournaments, is presented. The case highlights how TopCoder has created a unique two-sided innovation platform consisting of a global community of over 225,0000 developers who compete to write software modules for its over 40 clients Provides details of a unique innovation platform where complex software is developed through ongoing online competitions. By outlining the company's evolution, the challenges of building a community and refining a web-based competition platform are illustrated. Experiences and perspectives from TopCoder community members and clients help show what it means to work from within or in cooperation with an online community. In the case, the use of distributed innovation and its potential merits as a corporate problem solving mechanism is discussed. Issues related to TopCoder's scalability, profitability and growth are also explored.

    Keywords: Growth and Development; Technological Innovation; Problems and Challenges; Motivation and Incentives; Competition; Online Technology; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "An Interview with Jack Hughes, Founder and Chairman of TopCoder." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 312-708, October 2011. View Details
  19. Jack Hughes, Founder and Chairman of TopCoder, In-class comments 4/8/11

    TopCoder's crowdsourcing-based business model, in which software is developed through online tournaments, is presented. The case highlights how TopCoder has created a unique two-sided innovation platform consisting of a global community of over 225,000 developers who compete to write software modules for its over 40 clients. Provides details of a unique inovation platform where complex software is developed through ongoing online competitions. By outlining the company's evolution, the challenges of building a community and refining a web-based competition platform are illustrated. Experiences and perspectives from TopCoder community members and clients help show what it means to work from within or In cooperation with an online community. In the case, the use of distributed innovation and its potential merits as a corporate problem solving mechanism is discussed. issues related to TopCoder's scalability, profitability and growth are also explored.

    Keywords: Business Model; Growth and Development; Technological Innovation; Problems and Challenges; Motivation and Incentives; Competition; Online Technology; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Jack Hughes, Founder and Chairman of TopCoder, In-class comments 4/8/11." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 312-709, October 2011. View Details
  20. Interview with Raj Datta, Former Chief Knowledge Officer of MindTree

    MindTree is a mid-sized Indian IT services company known for its knowledge management practices, its collborative communities, and its strong culture and values. The CEO has a set a goal of becoming a $1 billion company by 2014; to reach that goal, employees must create several new businesses. The head of knowledge management must decide hos his function should change in order to become more supportive of innovation and new business development.

    Keywords: Knowledge Management; Social and Collaborative Networks; Innovation and Invention; Organizational Culture; Learning; Values and Beliefs; Information Technology Industry; Service Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Interview with Raj Datta, Former Chief Knowledge Officer of MindTree." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 312-704, August 2011. View Details
  21. Raj Datta, Former Chief Knowledge Officer of MindTree, In-Class Comments, April 1, 2011

    MindTree is a mid-sized Indian IT services company known for its knowledge management practices, its collaborative communities, and its strong culture and values. The CEO has set a goal of becoming a $1 billion company by 2014; to reach that goal, employees must create several new businesses. The head of knowledge management must decide how his function should change in order to become more supportive of innovation and new business development.

    Keywords: Knowledge Management; Social and Collaborative Networks; Innovation and Invention; Organizational Culture; Learning; Values and Beliefs; Information Technology Industry; Service Industry; India;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Raj Datta, Former Chief Knowledge Officer of MindTree, In-Class Comments, April 1, 2011." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 312-703, August 2011. View Details
  22. John Fahey, President and CEO of National Geographic Society, In-Class Comments, 2/11/11

    In January 2010, John Fahey, president, CEO, and chairman of the board of trustees' executive committee of the Washington, D.C.-based National Geographic Society (NGS), must decide how best to organize the 121-year old mission-driven organization for a world of accelerating digital convergence and decreasing magazine sales. Historically a proponent of evolutionary change, he is considering a radical move: creating a senior management position responsible for e-commerce to coordinate web-based offerings and outreach across the Society's various departments, transition NGS from its many disparate and independent direct mail efforts to a more integrated and strategic e-commerce strategy, and leverage the NGS relationship with its members—currently defined as magazine subscribers, since a subscription comes with Society membership. Putting the final touches on the position and its reporting arrangements has led to significant debate within the organization, and Fahey is torn about how to proceed.

    Keywords: Transformation; Leadership Style; Business or Company Management; Brands and Branding; Sales; Environmental Sustainability; Business Strategy; Web Sites; Publishing Industry; Washington (state, US);

    Citation:

    Garvin, David. "John Fahey, President and CEO of National Geographic Society, In-Class Comments, 2/11/11." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 312-701, August 2011. View Details
  23. An Interview with John Fahey, President and CEO of National Geographic Society

    In January 2010, John Fahey, president, CEO, and chairman of the board of trustees' executive committee of the Washington, D.C.-based National Geographic Society (NGS), must decide how best to organize the 121-year old mission-driven organization for a world of accelerating digital convergence and decreasing magazine sales. Historically a proponent of evolutionary change, he is considering a radical move: creating a senior management position responsible for e-commerce to coordinate web-based offerings and outreach across the Society's various departments, transition NGS from its many disparate and independent direct mail efforts to a more integrated and strategic e-commerce strategy, and leverage the NGS relationship with its members—currently defined as magazine subscribers, since a subscription comes with Society membership. Putting the final touches on the position and its reporting arrangements has led to significant debate within the organization, and Fahey is torn about how to proceed.

    Keywords: Transformation; Leadership Style; Business or Company Management; Brands and Branding; Problems and Challenges; Sales; Natural Environment; Business Strategy; Web Sites;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David. "An Interview with John Fahey, President and CEO of National Geographic Society." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 312-702, August 2011. View Details
  24. MindTree: A Community of Communities (TN)

    Teaching Note for 311049.

    Keywords: Knowledge Management; Management Practices and Processes; Civil Society or Community; Goals and Objectives; Leadership Style; Innovation and Invention; Business or Company Management; Organizational Culture; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "MindTree: A Community of Communities (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 312-023, July 2011. View Details
  25. Growing Pains at Stroz Friedberg

    In late spring 2009, Stroz Friedberg co-presidents Edward Stroz and Eric Friedberg had to set growth targets for 2010. The leading global consulting firm they had built specialized in managing digital risk and uncovering digital evidence and had grown very rapidly. With the firm's CFO, they believed that the firm could grow from $58 million to $72 million, a growth rate of 27% over the preceding year. However, the firm's 11 offices had submitted first draft FY 2010 plans that together added up to firm-wide revenues of only $53 million, a growth rate of negative 10.2%. The preceding years of rapid growth had been successful but challenging, and a thorough review of the firm's culture, systems, structure, and processes in late 2008 had resulted in a significant set of changes to which the organization was still adjusting. Stroz and Friedberg wondered whether to push for continued, aggressive growth.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Change Management; Transition; Growth and Development Strategy; Growth Management; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Organizational Structure; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Growing Pains at Stroz Friedberg." Harvard Business School Case 311-008, December 2010. (Revised March 2013.) View Details
  26. The Center for Creative Leadership (TN)

    Teaching Note for [308013].

    Keywords: Creativity; Leadership Development; Problems and Challenges; Organizations; Research; Programs; Design; Service Delivery; Business Education;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., and David A. Garvin. "The Center for Creative Leadership (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 310-097, May 2010. View Details
  27. TopCoder (A): Developing Software through Crowdsourcing

    TopCoder's crowdsourcing-based business model, in which software is developed through online tournaments, is presented. The case highlights how TopCoder has created a unique two-sided innovation platform consisting of a global community of over 225,000 developers who compete to write software modules for its over 40 clients. Provides details of a unique innovation platform where complex software is developed through ongoing online competitions. By outlining the company's evolution, the challenges of building a community and refining a web-based competition platform are illustrated. Experiences and perspectives from TopCoder community members and clients help show what it means to work from within or in cooperation with an online community. In the case, the use of distributed innovation and its potential merits as a corporate problem solving mechanism is discussed. Issues related to TopCoder's scalability, profitability, and growth are also explored.

    Keywords: Business Model; Innovation and Invention; Two-Sided Platforms; Motivation and Incentives; Social and Collaborative Networks; Competition; Software; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Lakhani, Karim R., David A. Garvin, and Eric Lonstein. "TopCoder (A): Developing Software through Crowdsourcing." Harvard Business School Case 610-032, January 2010. (Revised May 2012.) View Details
  28. RL Wolfe: Implementing Self-Directed Teams (Brief Case)

    Teaching Note for 4063

    Keywords: Work force management; Employee empowerment; motivation; Motivation and Incentives; Employee Relationship Management;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Elizabeth Collins. "RL Wolfe: Implementing Self-Directed Teams (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 094-064, November 2009. View Details
  29. INSEAD

    In the spring of 2008, INSEAD offered a one-year MBA, PhD, executive MBA, and non-degree management education programs to nearly 900 MBA students, 64 PhD candidates, and over 8,500 executive education students. With two campuses, one in Europe and one in Asia, INSEAD had been a pioneer in setting up a secondary campus as a way to push the internationalization of its faculty and curriculum. The case explores INSEAD's approach to business education in a global context and how it functions with a dual-campus setting.

    Keywords: Curriculum and Courses; Geographic Location; Business Education; Globalization; Diversity Characteristics; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., David A. Garvin, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "INSEAD." Harvard Business School Case 308-009, February 2008. (Revised May 2009.) View Details
  30. The Center for Creative Leadership

    The Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) was founded in 1970 on the notion that leadership was not innate but could be learned. CCL evolved into one of the world's top leadership development organizations, involved in both research and program design and delivery. This case explores CCL's approach to leadership and management education for executives and presents some of the challenges the CCL faces as many different types of leadership development providers continue to emerge.

    Keywords: Competency and Skills; Learning; Training; Leadership Development; Personal Characteristics;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., David A. Garvin, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "The Center for Creative Leadership." Harvard Business School Case 308-013, February 2008. (Revised May 2009.) View Details
  31. Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

    On January 7, 2002, Paul Levy became CEO of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He took over a troubled organization, in serious financial difficulty. This multimedia case describes the situation Levy inherited, his negotiations prior to taking the job, and his first six months as CEO. Includes extensive video interviews with Levy, conducted every two to four weeks during his first six months; a detailed timeline and calendar of events; excerpts from Levy's daily schedule, e-mail correspondence, internal reports, and memoranda; and selected Boston Herald newspaper articles. This case presents students with an unvarnished view of the gritty details of day-to-day general management.

    Keywords: Communication Strategy; Decision Choices and Conditions; Leadership Style; Leading Change; Managerial Roles; Organizational Culture; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael Roberto. "Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center." Harvard Business School Video Case 303-058, April 2003. (Revised April 2009.) View Details
  32. Harvard Business School

    In 2008 the Boston-based Harvard Business School would turn 100. As the centennial year began, the HBS community and leadership were reflecting on how the School might fulfill its mission to "develop business leaders who make a difference in the world" in the next century. This case focuses on the school's commitment to general management education and its implementation in an increasingly globalized business world.

    Keywords: Business Education; Cases; Leadership Development; Management; Management Skills; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Planning; Problems and Challenges; Segmentation; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., David A. Garvin, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Harvard Business School." Harvard Business School Case 308-012, February 2008. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  33. Yale School of Management

    In the fall of 2006, the Yale School of Management launched a new core curriculum in its MBA program. The new curriculum eliminated traditional discipline-based courses such as finance and marketing and replaced them with courses that sought to integrate teaching and learning across functions and from the perspective of the constituents with whom leaders typically interacted, such as customers, competitors, and investors. This case examines the implementation of the new curriculum and how it transformed business education at the Yale School of Management.

    Keywords: Transformation; Business Education; Curriculum and Courses; Learning; Teaching; Integration;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., David A. Garvin, and James Weber. "Yale School of Management." Harvard Business School Case 308-011, February 2008. (Revised February 2008.) View Details
  34. University of Chicago Graduate School of Business

    The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business offered a discipline-based, flexible MBA program to full time, evening, weekend, and executive MBA students. At a time when other MBA programs were introducing significant changes to their curricula, Chicago felt its traditional approach worked well, and it was not contemplating significant change. This case describes Chicago's approach to MBA education and the challenges it faced.

    Keywords: Change Management; Higher Education; Training; Management Style; Problems and Challenges; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., David A. Garvin, and James Weber. "University of Chicago Graduate School of Business." Harvard Business School Case 308-014, February 2008. (Revised February 2008.) View Details
  35. Stanford Graduate School of Business

    In fall 2007, Stanford Graduate School of Business (GSB) adopted a new curriculum that it heralded as a "revolutionary change in management education." The new approach aimed at increasing the level and quality of student academic engagement. This case describes the concept and described its implementation and early challenges.

    Keywords: Experience and Expertise; Business Education; Higher Education; Globalization; Research and Development; Cognition and Thinking; Adaptation; Education Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Datar, Srikant M., David A. Garvin, and Carin-Isabel Knoop. "Stanford Graduate School of Business." Harvard Business School Case 308-010, February 2008. (Revised February 2008.) View Details
  36. Management Levels at Staples (A): Company and Organization

    One of six cases that describe the roles and responsibilities of managers at each of the hierarchical levels of management within the U.S. Stores business unit of Staples, the world's largest office supply company. Together, the cases form a complete integrated package. Explores five distinct jobs--store manager, district manager, regional vice-president, division senior vice-president, and president of the U.S. Stories business units--and, for each level, describes the key management tasks, planning, decision-making, and leadership processes and critical choices that lead to superior execution and operational performance. Provides background information on Staples' organization and strategy.

    Keywords: Cost vs Benefits; Leadership; Management Practices and Processes; Managerial Roles; Operations; Performance Effectiveness; Strategic Planning; Perspective; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Lynne Levesque. "Management Levels at Staples (A): Company and Organization." Harvard Business School Case 307-037, August 2006. (Revised May 2007.) View Details
  37. A Note on Scenario Planning

    Describes the process, components, and detailed action steps involved in using scenario planning in any organization. Provides detailed examples that use the process.

    Keywords: Planning;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Lynne Levesque. "A Note on Scenario Planning." Harvard Business School Background Note 306-003, November 2005. (Revised July 2006.) View Details
  38. Strategic Planning at United Parcel Service

    In March 2005, CEO Michael Eskew has asked the Corporate Strategy Group to recommend changes to the strategic process to ensure it allows United Parcel Service (UPS) to continue to transform itself over the next several years. Describes the evolution of UPS's strategic process, with special attention on the company's use of scenario planning techniques, as well as other critical elements of the process: the development of the company charter, strategic planning, strategic decision making, and strategy implementation. Also discusses the roles of the various players in the process, focusing especially on the CEO and corporate strategy staff.

    Keywords: Change; Decisions; Globalization; Growth and Development Strategy; Managerial Roles; Strategic Planning; Creativity; Corporate Strategy;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Lynne Levesque. "Strategic Planning at United Parcel Service." Harvard Business School Case 306-002, November 2005. (Revised June 2006.) View Details
  39. Executive Decision Making at General Motors

    Describes the evolution of General Motors' strategy, organizational structure, and management processes from its founding to the present day. Focuses on the role of GM's management committee--the senior-decision-making body at the company, now called the Automotive Strategy Board (ASB)--and how it operates under Rick Wagoner, its current CEO. In October 2004, Wagoner and the ASB are wrestling with recent changes in GM's planning and budgeting processes and how they will affect the balance between global and local needs.

    Keywords: Globalized Firms and Management; Management Practices and Processes; Organizational Structure; Competitive Strategy; Decision Making; Management Teams; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Lynne Levesque. "Executive Decision Making at General Motors." Harvard Business School Case 305-026, December 2004. (Revised February 2006.) View Details
  40. Emerging Business Opportunities at IBM (A)

    By June 2003, IBM had made significant progress in changing the way it managed new, emerging businesses. Describes the development of a separate management program at IBM designed to identify, fund, and shepherd new businesses through growth. Traces the history of the program, its evolution, and the current challenges senior management faces in scaling up the program.

    Keywords: History; Business or Company Management; Talent and Talent Management; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Corporate Strategy;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Lynne Levesque. "Emerging Business Opportunities at IBM (A)." Harvard Business School Case 304-075, March 2004. (Revised February 2005.) View Details
  41. Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (TN) (A), (B), and (C)

    Teaching Note for (9-303-008), (9-303-080), and (9-303-081).

    Keywords: Health Industry; Israel;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael Roberto. "Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (TN) (A), (B), and (C)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 303-126, June 2003. View Details
  42. Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (A)

    On January 7, 2002, Paul Levy became CEO of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, a troubled organization, in serious financial difficulty. This case describes the situation Levy inherited, his negotiations prior to taking the job, and his first six months as CEO.

    Keywords: Communication Strategy; Decision Making; Financial Crisis; Leadership Style; Crisis Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Negotiation; Health Industry; Israel;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael Roberto. "Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (A)." Harvard Business School Case 303-008, October 2002. (Revised January 2003.) View Details
  43. A Note on Corporate Venturing and New Business Creation

    Presents an introduction and overview of corporate venturing. Describes the need for companies to create new businesses, the stages in the process, predictable problems and challenges, the strengths and weaknesses of alternative approaches such as internal venture divisions and corporate venture capital funds, and guidelines for successful practice.

    Keywords: Business Plan; Business Startups; Forecasting and Prediction; Venture Capital; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "A Note on Corporate Venturing and New Business Creation." Harvard Business School Background Note 302-091, March 2002. (Revised December 2002.) View Details
  44. Transition to General Management Website

    Describes the transition from functional to general management. Describes the distinctive challenges of the general manager's job as well as how best to manage the short-term results of assuming a position as general manager.

    Keywords: Transition; Business or Company Management; Managerial Roles; Outcome or Result; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Jeffrey Berger. "Transition to General Management Website." Harvard Business School Background Note 300-126, March 2000. (Revised August 2000.) View Details
  45. R.R. Donnelley & Sons: The Digital Division

    In June 1995, Barbara Schetter, VP and general manager of R.R. Donnelley's Digital Division, is struggling to gain acceptance from other groups and divisions at the printing giant. The Digital Division employs radically new technology--digital printing presses and transactions management systems--to deliver short-run, customized printing. But it is based on a completely different business model than Donnelley's traditional businesses and is finding it difficult to overcome informal resistance.

    Keywords: Business Divisions; Business Model; Business Plan; Leading Change; Problems and Challenges; Groups and Teams; Technology Adoption; Value Creation;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Artemis March. "R.R. Donnelley & Sons: The Digital Division." Harvard Business School Case 396-154, January 1996. (Revised March 2000.) View Details
  46. Decision-Making Exercise (A)

    Provides questionnaires so students can compare their experiences with different decison-making processes. Students read "Growing Pains," a Harvard Business Review (HBR) case study, and then work in teams to come up with recommendations using a consensus approach to decison making. The next day using Decision-Making Exercise (B) and (C) and "Case of the Unhealthy Hospital," another HBR case study, and working in the same teams, use either a dialectical inquiry or devil's advocacy approach to decision making.

    Keywords: Conflict Management; Decision Making; Management Skills;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael Roberto. "Decision-Making Exercise (A)." Harvard Business School Exercise 397-031, August 1996. (Revised February 2000.) View Details
  47. Decision-Making Exercise (B)

    Provides questionnaires so students can compare their experiences with different decison-making processes. Students read "Growing Pains," a Harvard Business Review (HBR) case study, and then work in teams to come up with recommendations using a consensus approach to decison making. The next day they use Decision-Making Exercise (B) and (C) and "Case of the Unhealthy Hospital," another HBR case study and, working in the same teams, use either a dialectical inquiry or devil's advocacy approach to decision making.

    Keywords: Decision Making;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael Roberto. "Decision-Making Exercise (B)." Harvard Business School Exercise 397-032, August 1996. (Revised February 2000.) View Details
  48. Decision-Making Exercise (C)

    Provides questionnaires so students can compare their experiences with different decison-making processes. Students read "Growing Pains," a Harvard Business Review (HBR) case study, and then work in teams to come up with recommendations using a consensus approach to decison making. The next day they use Decision-Making Exercise (B) and (C) and "Case of the Unhealthy Hospital," another HBR case study and, working in the same teams, use either a dialectical inquiry or devil's advocacy approach to decision making.

    Keywords: Conflict Management; Decision Making; Management Skills;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael Roberto. "Decision-Making Exercise (C)." Harvard Business School Exercise 397-033, August 1996. (Revised February 2000.) View Details
  49. Decision Making at the Top: The All-Star Sports Catalog Division

    Describes a senior management team's strategic decision-making process. The division president faces three options for redesigning the process to address several key concerns. The president has extensive quantitative and qualitative data about the process to guide him as he and the senior team attempt to make improvements.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Management Teams; Performance Improvement; Planning; Mathematical Methods; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Michael Roberto. "Decision Making at the Top: The All-Star Sports Catalog Division." Harvard Business School Case 398-061, October 1997. (Revised May 1998.) View Details
  50. Note on Knowledge Management, A

    Provides an overview of knowledge management, including descriptions of knowledge management strategies, processes, organization, infrastructure, systems, and challenges. Describes the approaches at two leading consulting firms, Arthur Andersen and Ernst & Young, that have been pioneers in knowledge management strategies.

    Keywords: Knowledge Management; Management Style; Management Systems; Infrastructure; Organizations; Business Strategy;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Artemis March. "Note on Knowledge Management, A." Harvard Business School Background Note 398-031, November 1997. View Details
  51. Americhem: The Gaylord Division (A)

    The Gaylord Division of Americhem, a large chemical company, is in the midst of the first use of a new zero-base budgeting system. The general manager of the division leading the process is experiencing disagreement and conflict among the members of the senior management team. This case describes a difficult meeting. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Leadership; Management Practices and Processes; Strategic Planning; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Americhem: The Gaylord Division (A)." Harvard Business School Case 396-180, January 1996. (Revised October 1997.) View Details
  52. Harvard Business School Publishing

    Linda Doyle, president and CEO of Harvard Business School Publishing Corp., has succeeded in turning around the organization after several difficult years. She has launched several strategic and organizational initiatives, and has instilled a new philosophy and vision. Now, however, there are disagreements over the use of the centralized marketing organization and the degree of autonomy still held by the product groups.

    Keywords: Change Management; Leading Change; Business or Company Management; Goals and Objectives; Growth and Development Strategy; Organizational Structure; Strategic Planning; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Artemis March. "Harvard Business School Publishing." Harvard Business School Case 397-028, November 1996. (Revised June 1997.) View Details
  53. Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (A)

    Describes a comprehensive manufacturing strategy designed to reduce substantially the cycle time of orders (i.e. the time between the placement of an order by a customer and its delivery to the customer). To launch the strategy Digital has adopted manufacturing resource planning (MRP II). The case allows students to assess the pros and cons of the strategy which requires rapid information flows and tight manufacturing discipline, the usefulness of MRP II which integrates manufacturing with overall business plans, and the implementation process to date.

    Keywords: Business Plan; Information; Time Management; Production; Strategic Planning; Strategy; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (A)." Harvard Business School Case 688-059, January 1988. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  54. Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model Series, Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-688-059, (9-688-060), (9-688-061), (9-688-062), and (9-688-063).

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Norman Klein. "Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model Series, Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 691-047, March 1991. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  55. Serengeti Eyewear: Entrepreneurship Within Corning, Inc.

    An entrepreneurial division within Corning, Serengeti Eyewear, has grown rapidly in its brief 10-year history. Now it must decide whether to launch a new line of sunglasses and take on the industry leader. The company has prospered by developing and cultivating relationships with suppliers, customers, employees, and retailers. Its leader, Zaki Mystafa, has created a remarkable, flexible, and responsive organization. The case describes Mystafas's highly informal managerial style, and his skill at managing "up" to his superiors at Corning.

    Keywords: Organizational Design; Management Style; Competitive Strategy; Customer Relationship Management; Employee Relationship Management; Business and Stakeholder Relations; Talent and Talent Management; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Jonathan West. "Serengeti Eyewear: Entrepreneurship Within Corning, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 394-033, September 1993. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  56. SAP America

    SAP America has grown at an explosive rate. This case describes the company's strategy, organization, and culture, with special attention to its approach to partnering and its sales and consulting process, which have been instrumental in allowing growth to proceed. Now in 1996, the company has reorganized in response to increased competition, new competitive demands, and the need to shift from an entrepreneurial to a more professional approach to management.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Change Management; Entrepreneurship; Growth Management; Demand and Consumers; Organizational Culture; Alliances; Competitive Strategy; Corporate Strategy; United States;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Artemis March. "SAP America." Harvard Business School Case 397-057, November 1996. (Revised December 1996.) View Details
  57. Watermill Ventures

    Watermill Ventures acquires and turns around an underperforming business. The case describes the criteria the company uses to identify acquisition candidates, its screening and selection process, and the way it introduces strategic thinking at the business it acquires. Steve Karol, Watermill's founder, is concerned because the company has only acquired two companies in its three years of operation. He is considering a number of actions, including establishing a Web site to broaden the base of contact.

    Keywords: Acquisition; Transformation; Standards; Performance Improvement; Business Strategy; Web Sites;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Artemis March. "Watermill Ventures." Harvard Business School Case 397-010, August 1996. View Details
  58. Pepsi's Regeneration, 1990-1993

    Craig Weatherup, the president and CEO of Pepsi Cola, leads a change process that completely transforms his company. It includes a new vision, operating philosophy, strategy, and organizational structure. He also introduces process improvement techniques and builds new performance metrics around these processes and the newly desired behaviors.

    Keywords: Transformation; Leading Change; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Systems; Standards; Organizational Structure; Outcome or Result; Performance Improvement; Problems and Challenges; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Donald N. Sull. "Pepsi's Regeneration, 1990-1993." Harvard Business School Case 395-048, November 1994. (Revised March 1996.) View Details
  59. Harvey Golub: Recharging American Express

    Harvey Golub, CEO American Express, initiated and led a large-scale change process. The case describes the organization he inherited, two successive waves of reengineering, his "principles-driven" approach to decision making, and his goal of converting American Express from a diversified financial supermarket to one unified operating company.

    Keywords: Transformation; Decision Choices and Conditions; Engineering; Leadership Style; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Core Relationships; Integration; Value;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Artemis March. "Harvey Golub: Recharging American Express." Harvard Business School Case 396-212, February 1996. (Revised March 1996.) View Details
  60. Arthur D. Little, Inc.

    Charlie LeMantia, the president and CEO of Arthur D. Little (ADL), a leading consulting firm, is trying to decide whether the firm has a complete and effective corporate strategy. The case traces ADL's history, its rise to prominence and subsequent decline, and LeMantia's efforts to turn the organization around. Special attention is devoted to his introduction of process thinking and process management, and their impact on the way the company is managed.

    Keywords: Management; Management Practices and Processes; Corporate Strategy; Business or Company Management;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Sanjay Bhatnagar. "Arthur D. Little, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 396-060, November 1995. (Revised February 1996.) View Details
  61. Allstate Chemical Company: The Commercialization of Dynarim

    Raises three issues: the different requirements for competing in specialty and commodity chemicals; the steps a new idea follows in moving from research, applied research, and development to manufacturing and marketing; and the role of a commercial development organization in facilitating new product development. Students must evaluate the role of the commercial development group, especially its goals, management criteria for accepting new projects, and the criteria for passing on projects to established divisions.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Production; Marketing; Product Development; Goals and Objectives; Research; Managerial Roles; Business Divisions; Chemical Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Allstate Chemical Company: The Commercialization of Dynarim." Harvard Business School Case 687-010, November 1986. (Revised February 1996.) View Details
  62. Peterson Industries: Louis Friedman

    Louis Friedman, the president and CEO of Peterson Industries, must make decisions about two engineering projects and the level at which they should be funded. In the process, he must manage the overall resource allocation process and the company. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Motivation and Incentives; Resource Allocation; Budgets and Budgeting; Projects; Engineering;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Peterson Industries: Louis Friedman." Harvard Business School Case 396-182, January 1996. (Revised February 1996.) View Details
  63. Time Life, Inc. (A)

    Time Life has historically been a continuity book publisher, selling 20-volume book series via direct mail. Now, however, music and video/TV divisions have been added, and the CEO is trying to craft a strategy that will align the divisions so they can produce multimedia products. There is also an immediate decision facing the CEO about the advertising for a new book and TV series, and questions for the division managers about how to shape and improve their businesses' creative processes.

    Keywords: Business Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Business Divisions; Horizontal Integration; Production; Creativity; Alignment; Advertising; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Jonathan West. "Time Life, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 395-012, September 1994. (Revised May 1995.) View Details
  64. Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (B1)

    Should follow Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (A). The plant manager has been promoted and students must decide what kind of individual--background, training, personal style, etc.--they would like to replace him.

    Keywords: Training; Leadership Style; Management Succession; Identity; Technology; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (B1)." Harvard Business School Supplement 688-060, January 1988. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  65. Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (B2)

    Should follow Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (B1). A new plant manager has been hired; the case describes her experience, management philosophy, goals in the plant, and handling of a production problem.

    Keywords: Experience and Expertise; Goals and Objectives; Production; Problems and Challenges; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (B2)." Harvard Business School Supplement 688-061, January 1988. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  66. Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (C1)

    To follow Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (B2). The division has just received a request for dramatically increased production. If it complies with the request, it will have to expedite production, override the MRP II system and the planned schedule. Should it accept the order? The case forces students to consider the tensions between an uncertain market and environment and disciplined manufacturing plans.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Markets; Production; Planning; Risk and Uncertainty; Situation or Environment; System;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (C1)." Harvard Business School Supplement 688-062, January 1988. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  67. Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (C2)

    To follow Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (C1). Students must assess what their next steps would be as plant manager and group manufacturing manager.

    Keywords: Factories, Labs, and Plants; Business Model; Business or Company Management; Production; Technology; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Digital Equipment Corp.: The Endpoint Model (C2)." Harvard Business School Supplement 688-063, January 1988. (Revised March 1995.) View Details
  68. Note on High-Commitment Work Systems

    Describes the history, theory, and practice of high-commitment work systems. The history reviews classical approaches (i.e. Frederick Taylor), the human relations movement, the human resources approach, quality of work life, and empowerment. The theory examines the underlying principles of design. The practice section reviews the experiences to date with these systems, including such innovations as gainsharing and such problems as defining the role of supervisor.

    Keywords: Design; Human Resources; Innovation and Invention; Managerial Roles; Work-Life Balance; Problems and Challenges; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Norman Klein. "Note on High-Commitment Work Systems." Harvard Business School Background Note 693-080, April 1993. View Details
  69. PPG: Developing a Self-Directed Work Force (A)

    PPG has built a state-of-the-art glass plant in Berea, Kentucky. The plant is pursuing the goal of a "self-directed workforce." The case describes the progress to date and the unresolved issues faced by management. These include questions about shift rotation, promotion opportunities, employee evaluation and supervision, the role of employees in policy setting, and whether or not to introduce a system of peer review. Explores the process of creating a self-directed workforce, the underlying theoretical model, and the difficulties and tensions inherent in that approach.

    Keywords: Employees; Employee Relationship Management; Organizational Culture; Managerial Roles; Management Style;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A., and Norman Klein. "PPG: Developing a Self-Directed Work Force (A)." Harvard Business School Case 693-020, November 1992. View Details
  70. Boeing 767: From Concept to Production (A)

    Describes the evolution of the Boeing 767 from the conception of the project to the start of manufacturing. Shows how the company manages an enormously complex and risky project and introduces students to a variety of estimating and management tools. The decision issue involves the shift from three-person to two-person cockpits and whether rework should be done in-line (without removing planes from the flow of production) or off-line (after initial assembly has been completed).

    Keywords: Production; Product Design; Product Development; Decisions; Risk and Uncertainty; Risk Management; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Air Transportation Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Boeing 767: From Concept to Production (A)." Harvard Business School Case 688-040, April 1988. (Revised April 1991.) View Details
  71. Boeing 767: From Concept to Production (B)

    Updates the (A) case to the present day. The issue facing students is whether Boeing's approach to managing new airplane programs must be modified to fit with this new environment.

    Keywords: Production; Change Management; Product Development; Product Marketing; Situation or Environment; Air Transportation Industry; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Boeing 767: From Concept to Production (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 688-041, April 1988. (Revised March 1991.) View Details
  72. Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (B)

    In the (A) case, Copeland had to choose between focusing its Sidney plant by product line or by manufacturing process. Now that it has made that decision, a plant layout must be selected from two alternatives.

    Keywords: Factories, Labs, and Plants; Decisions; Product; Production; Design; Strategy; Manufacturing Industry; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 686-089, February 1986. (Revised March 1990.) View Details
  73. Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (C)

    In the preceding case, Copeland had to choose between two alternative plant layouts for organizing its Sidney plant. Now it must get work force approval for a change in "bumping" rules before proceeding with the change. Management must decide how to proceed--to continue with the reorganization, delay the moving of equipment and personnel, or drop the project completely.

    Keywords: Strategy; Production; Factories, Labs, and Plants; Labor and Management Relations; Restructuring; Decisions; Change Management; Manufacturing Industry; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 686-090, February 1986. (Revised March 1990.) View Details
  74. Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (D)

    Summarizes Copeland's focused factory approach, and updates the company's efforts at the Sidney, Hartselle, Shelby, and Richville plants. Concludes with a brief discussion of future prospects for Copeland's manufacturing strategy.

    Keywords: Strategy; Production; Factories, Labs, and Plants; Manufacturing Industry; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (D)." Harvard Business School Supplement 686-091, February 1986. (Revised March 1990.) View Details
  75. A Note on Quality: The Views of Deming, Juran, and Crosby

    Describes the three distinct approaches to quality management represented by W. Edwards Deming, Joseph Juran, and Philip B. Crosby. Designed to introduce students to the elements of statistical quality control, structured approaches to quality improvement, and zero defects programs and to show them that there is more than one way to improve quality.

    Keywords: Quality; Performance Improvement; Mathematical Methods;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "A Note on Quality: The Views of Deming, Juran, and Crosby." Harvard Business School Background Note 687-011, September 1986. (Revised February 1990.) View Details
  76. Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (A)

    Describes the evolution of a company's manufacturing strategy over an eight-year period. Copeland had pursued a strategy of building freestanding focused plants devoted to single processes or product lines, and then moving products from the home plant at Sidney, Ohio to the new facility. Sidney is now left with a jumble of unrelated products and processes, and management must decide whether it should be reorganized by product line or manufacturing processes. HBR reprint number 85117 "Competing Through Manufacturing," January-February 1985, by S.C. Wheelwright and R.H. Hayes may be taught with these cases.

    Keywords: Factories, Labs, and Plants; Product; Production; Strategy; Restructuring; Geographic Location; Manufacturing Industry; Ohio;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (A)." Harvard Business School Case 686-088, February 1986. (Revised November 1989.) View Details
  77. General Electric--Thermocouple Manufacturing (A)

    GE is considering introducing a "just-in-time" production system to reduce inventory in its thermocouple manufacturing area. The case presents students with a description of the present inventory management system, the production process, and the perspectives of different individuals in the plant. The issue is how GE should proceed with introducing this system.

    Keywords: Factories, Labs, and Plants; Time Management; Production; Supply Chain; Perspective; Energy Industry; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "General Electric--Thermocouple Manufacturing (A)." Harvard Business School Case 684-040, December 1983. (Revised July 1988.) View Details
  78. Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (A), (B), (C), and (D), Teaching Note

    Teaching Note for (9-686-088), (9-686-089), (9-686-090), and (9-686-091).

    Keywords: Sydney;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Copeland Corp.: Evolution of a Manufacturing Strategy--1975-82 (A), (B), (C), and (D), Teaching Note." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 688-074, February 1988. View Details
  79. Note on Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II)

    Describes Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II), a production technique designed to couple business and financial plans with manufacturing plans. It is an important tool for aligning manufacturing with a company's overall strategy and goals. Describes MRPII, distinguishing it from its predecessor, Material Requirements Planning (MRP); discusses the technique's basic elements; and reports survey results that show the factors distinguishing the most successful adopters of the technique.

    Keywords: Design; Finance; Surveys; Goals and Objectives; Resource Allocation; Production; Mission and Purpose; Strategic Planning; Business Strategy;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Note on Manufacturing Resource Planning (MRP II)." Harvard Business School Background Note 687-097, May 1987. (Revised June 1987.) View Details
  80. Copeland Corp.: The Focused Factory, Video

    Introduces students to the products, shows the company's focused factories, introduces the principal managers, and describes the process the company went through in executing a major change in manufacturing strategy and philosophy. Can be used independently to introduce students to machinery and assembly operations by taking them on a series of "factory tours."

    Keywords: Factories, Labs, and Plants; Change; Machinery and Machining; Product; Production; Strategy;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Copeland Corp.: The Focused Factory, Video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 887-527, May 1987. View Details
  81. Sensormatic Electronics Corp.

    Describes the decision faced by a rapidly growing firm in the merchandise security systems business on whether it should integrate backward into the injection molding of plastic parts. Financial analysis, comparative economics, and manufacturing strategy in an industry with rapid technological change are all important elements in the analysis.

    Keywords: Change; Decisions; Economics; Financial Strategy; Production; Integration; Technology; Electronics Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Sensormatic Electronics Corp." Harvard Business School Case 681-095, May 1981. (Revised January 1987.) View Details
  82. Steinway & Sons

    Considers whether Steinway should reintroduce a long-discontinued product line to meet competition from the Japanese. Raises the issue of just how quality is defined in this market. Looks closely at a production process relying on craft skills. Students have the opportunity to consider issues of quality.

    Keywords: Experience and Expertise; Brands and Branding; Production; Quality; Competition;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "Steinway & Sons." Harvard Business School Case 682-025, September 1981. (Revised September 1986.) View Details
  83. General Electric--Thermocouple Manufacturing (B)

    Describes what has happened since the introduction of just-in-time production techniques were developed to reduce inventory. Reviews the progress to date in such areas as process rationalization; set-up reduction; quality improvement and leveling the scheduling; and discusses options for the future. The aim of the case is to show students the details of implementing a new production method.

    Keywords: Supply Chain; Logistics; Production; Business Processes; Technological Innovation; Quality; Performance Improvement; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    Garvin, David A. "General Electric--Thermocouple Manufacturing (B)." Harvard Business School Case 685-062, February 1985. View Details

    Research Summary

  1. Learning Organizations

    David A. Garvin is studying how companies pursue improvement and change through efforts to stimulate organizational learning. He has found the following activities to be common in learning organizations: intelligence gathering; experimentation; learning from experience; learning from the best practice of others; systematic problem solving; and transferring knowledge internally. The most successful organizations have developed a wide range of mechanisms and tools to support these activities, including after-action reviews, demonstration projects, simulations, lessons learned units, and incentive systems that encourage risk-taking, as well as innovative approaches to measuring learning.

    Garvin reported the findings of his research in a Harvard Business School Press book Learning in Action, a Harvard Business Review article 'Building a Learning Organization,' and two HBS Video Series Putting the Learning Organization to Work and Working Smarter. Both the publications and videos feature a wide range of case studies and examples drawn from organizations as diverse as Allegheny Ludlum Steel, GE, L. L. Bean, the U. S. Army, Timken, and Xerox. Most recently, he has worked with Amy Edmondson and Francesca Gino to develop an assessment tool for evaluating learning organizations. That tool, which permits individuals to assess their teams, departments, and organizations on their learning climates, learning processes, and learning leadership behaviors, is described in a March 2008 Harvard Business Review article entitled "Is Yours a Learning Organization?"

  2. Managing Processes

    David A. Garvin is examining the nature and use of managerial and organizational processes—the means by which work is accomplished—including strategic processes that chart corporate direction, resource allocation processes that distribute funds, decision-making processes that resolve conflicts and select among alternatives, managerial processes that negotiate roles and responsibilities and oversee and orchestrate work, and change processes that fundamentally revamp and improve organizational performance. The general manager's role is to set these processes in motion, monitor them continuously, and shape and direct them as they unfold over time. Over a dozen new cases have been derived from this research and serve as the basis for the second-year MBA elective General Management: Processes and Action, an Advanced Management Program course by the same name, and a casebook of the same title published by Irwin/McGraw-Hill in 2002. Included in these materials is a multimedia case, 'Paul Levy: Taking Charge of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center,' that examines the taking charge process of a new chief executive by drawing on real-time video interviews, emails, and internal memoranda and reports.

    To learn more about the leadership of process-oriented organizations, Garvin led a roundtable discussion with CEOs who have pioneered these approaches that has been published in Harvard Business Review as 'Leveraging Processes for Strategic Advantage.' He has also written a conceptual paper, 'The Processes of Organization and Management,' published in Sloan Management Review, that summarized the literature in the field, provided an organizing framework, and developed implications for managers, as well as co-authoring an article on decision-making processes, published in Harvard Business Review as 'What You Don't Know About Decision Making.'

    Currently, he is studying innovation and decision making processes in large, complex, multibillion dollar corporations. He is particularly interested in the challenges that these organizations face in creating and growing new businesses, which led to the articles 'What Every CEO Should Know About Creating New Businesses' and 'Meeting the Challenge of Corporate Entrepreneurship," and in the role that executive committees and senior management teams play in coordinating, integrating, and overseeing diverse activities. He is also studying the multiple types and levels of general managers (e.g. store managers, district managers, regional managers, and division presidents at large retailers) to understand how their responsibilities and day-to-day tasks differ. That research, conducted with Lynne Levesque, has resulted in a series of cases on the multiple levels of management at Staples as well as an article, "The Multiunit Enterprise," that appeared in the June 2008 issue of Harvard Business Review.

  3. The Future of MBA Education

    David Garvin, together with Srikant Datar and Patrick Cullen, is examining the future of MBA education and the evolving role of business schools. The research has several components: interviews with business school deans and business executives to identify the challenges and opportunities facing MBA programs today; an analysis of the statistics on MBA applications, enrollments, staffing, and economics to identify industry trends; a detailed examination of first-year curricula and course content at eleven major business schools to assess similarities and differences across programs; a synthesis and review of the published critiques of business education; and six case studies on leading business programs and their recent innovations, including the Center for Creative Leadership, Chicago, Harvard Business School, INSEAD, Stanford, and Yale. This research served as the basis for the School's 2008 Centennial Colloquium on the Future of MBA Education, as well as a book, Rethinking the MBA: Business Education at a Crossroads, published by Harvard Business Press in 2010.

    Teaching

  1. General Management: Processes and Action

    General Management: Processes and Action (GMPA) focuses on implementation and the way that general managers get things done.  Typically, they work through processes—sequences of tasks and activities that unfold over time, like strategic planning, business development, and budgeting—to move their organizations forward and achieve results.  Skill at influencing the design, direction, and functioning of processes is therefore essential to effective general management, and the aim of GMPA is to develop in students a deeper understanding of these activities and their links to performance.  It does so by describing a number of critical organizational and managerial processes, outlining their basic elements and operating characteristics, and exploring how they are best influenced and led.  Throughout, the focus is on high-level processes that are of interest to general managers; for this reason, case protagonists are typically division presidents or higher.

    Keywords: Change Management; Communication Strategy; Decision Making; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Technological Innovation; Knowledge Management; Leadership Development; Leadership Style; Leading Change; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Practices and Processes; Management Skills; Management Style; Management Teams; Managerial Roles; Resource Allocation; Business Processes; Mission and Purpose; Organizational Culture; Organizational Design; Organizational Structure; Strategic Planning; Conflict and Resolution; Power and Influence; Business Strategy; Competitive Strategy; Competitive Advantage; Auto Industry; Computer Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Financial Services Industry; Health Industry; Information Industry; Legal Services Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Publishing Industry; Retail Industry; Video Game Industry; China; India; United States;

  2. AMP 170 - General Management: Processes and Action

    The Harvard Business School Advanced Management Program (AMP) helps drive corporate performance by honing individual capabilities to the highest level of performance. The result is a personal transformation with profound organizational implications. Participants return to their sponsoring organizations with the tools and knowledge to make the toughest decisions, skillfully and confidently. They also bring a greater understanding of global business and the constantly expanding responsibilities of executive leadership. Most important, they return with the confidence and determination to act on that understanding in innovative ways that will further enhance the performance of their organizations.

    David A. Garvin works with the highest level of executive to examine the nature and use of managerial and organizational processes - the means by which work is accomplished - including strategic processes that chart corporate direction, resource allocation processes that distribute funds, decision-making processes that resolve conflicts and select among alternatives, managerial processes that negotiate roles and responsibilites and oversee and orchestrate work, and change processes that fundamentally revamp and improve organizational performance. Cases exploring the general manager's role in setting these processes in motion, monitoring them continuously, and shaping and directing them as they unfold over time serve as the basis for this Advanced Management Program course.

  1. Rethinking the MBA: Business Education at a Crossroads (Datar, Garvin, Cullen, Harvard Business Press, 2010) was selected by Strategy + Business as one of the Best Business Books of 2010.

  2. Robert F. Greenhill Award for service, Harvard Business School, 2005.

  3. Smith-Weld Prize for the best Harvard Magazine article about the University, 2003.

  4. Richard Beckhard Memorial Prize for the best MIT Sloan Management Review article on planned change and organizational development, 1998.

  5. McKinsey Award, Second Place for the best article in Harvard Business Review, 1993.

  6. National University Continuing Education Association Frandson Award for Outstanding Publication in Higher Education, 1992.

  7. International Film and TV Festival of New York, Finalist, Film, Video, Slide and A/V Productions Competition, 1991.

  8. McKinsey Award, First Place for the best article in Harvard Business Review, 1982.

  9. McKinsey Award, First Place for the best article in Harvard Business Review, 1981.