John A. Deighton

Harold M. Brierley Professor of Business Administration

Unit: Marketing

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John Deighton is the Harold M. Brierley Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School. He is an authority on consumer behavior and marketing, with a focus on digital and direct marketing. He initiated and has led the HBS Executive Education program in digital marketing and taught the elective MBA course, Digital Marketing Strategy.

His research on marketing management and consumer behavior has been published in a variety of journals including the Journal of Consumer Research, the Journal of Marketing Research, the Journal of Marketing, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, and the Harvard Business Review. His research has also received a number of commendations, including the American Marketing Association’s Best Article Award for an article in the Journal of Marketing and an honorable mention from the Journal of interactive Marketing. He received the European Case Clearing House Award in Marketing (2012), the Edward N. Mayer, Jr. Award for Education Leadership (2011), the Direct Marketing Education Foundation Robert B. Clarke Outstanding Educator Award (2002), and the University of Chicago's Hillel J. Einhorn Excellence in Teaching Award (1995). He has been a visiting scholar at the University of Tokyo, Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, and the Judge School of Business at Cambridge University.

He is the immediate past editor of the Journal of Consumer Research, a leading outlet for scholarly research on consumer behavior, and was the founding co-editor of the Journal of Interactive Marketing, which reports academic research on marketing and the Internet. He is the immediate past Executive Director of the Marketing Science Institute, a member of the Chairman’s Advisory Council of Marketing Edge, and a Director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. He has been with HBS since 1994 and received the Greenhill Award for outstanding service to the school.

Prior to joining HBS, he was on the faculties of the University of Chicago and the Tuck School of Business (Dartmouth College). He has a Ph.D. in Marketing from the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, and an MBA from the University of Cape Town. He also has a B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Natal. His applied research includes consulting with a number of U.S and international corporations.

Featured Work

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Research Priorities of the Marketing Science Institute, 2012–2014

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., Ross Rizley, and Susan Keane. "Research Priorities of the Marketing Science Institute, 2012–2014." Marketing Science 31, no. 6 (November–December 2012): 873–877. (Editorial.) View Details
  2. Adding Bricks to Clicks: Predicting the Patterns of Cross-Channel Elasticities over Time

    The authors propose a conceptual framework to explain whether and when the introduction of a new retail store channel helps or hurts sales in existing direct channels. A conceptual framework separates short- and long-term effects by analyzing the capabilities of a channel that help consumers accomplish their shopping goals. To test the theory, the authors analyze a unique data set from a high-end retailer using matching methods. The authors study the introduction of a retail store and find evidence of cross-channel cannibalization and synergy. The presence of a retail store decreases sales in the catalog but not the Internet channel in the short run but increases sales in both direct channels over time. Following the opening of the store, more first-time customers begin purchasing in the direct channels. These results suggest that adding a retail store to direct channels yields different results from adding an Internet channel to a retail store channel, as previous research has indicated.

    Keywords: marketing; channels; channels of distribution; Distribution; e-commerce; retailing; channel management; channel migration; multichannel retailing; Framework; Customers; Marketing Channels; Sales; Internet; Demand and Consumers; Competency and Skills; Distribution Channels; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Avery, Jill, Thomas J. Steenburgh, John Deighton, and Mary Caravella. "Adding Bricks to Clicks: Predicting the Patterns of Cross-Channel Elasticities over Time." Journal of Marketing 76, no. 3 (May 2012): 96–111. View Details
  3. Interactivity's Unanticipated Consequences for Markets and Marketing

    The digital interactive transformation in marketing is not unfolding, as some thought it would, on the model of direct marketing. That model anticipated that marketing, empowered by digital media using rich profiling data, would intrude ever more deeply and more precisely into consumer lives than broadcast media had been able to. Instead, the transformation is unfolding on a model of consumer empowerment, in which consumers use digital media to communicate with one another and deal with marketing's intrusions, showing none of the passivity displayed by mass media audiences. This paper categorizes five roles for the interactive consumer and draws implications for marketing practice. It concludes that the balance of power over marketplace meaning-making is shifting from marketer to consumer to the extent that media usage migrates from broadcasting to interactivity. The new marketplace rewards more participatory, more sincere, and less directive marketing styles than the old.

    Keywords: Communication Intention and Meaning; Interactive Communication; Marketing Communications; Consumer Behavior; Social and Collaborative Networks; Online Technology;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Interactivity's Unanticipated Consequences for Markets and Marketing." Journal of Interactive Marketing 23, no. 1 (winter 2009): 2–12. (First Runner-up and Winner of an Honorable Mention for the Best Paper published in the Journal of Interactive Marketing in 2009.) View Details
  4. The Territory of Consumer Research: Walking the Fences

    Keywords: Customers; Research;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "The Territory of Consumer Research: Walking the Fences." Journal of Consumer Research 34, no. 3 (October 2007): 279–282. View Details
  5. Forward-Looking Focus: Can Firms Have Adaptive Foresight?

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Planning;

    Citation:

    Zeithaml, Valarie A., Ruth Bolton, John Deighton, Timothy Kenningham, Katherine N. Lemon, and J. Andrew Peterson. "Forward-Looking Focus: Can Firms Have Adaptive Foresight?" Journal of Service Research 9, no. 2 (November 2006): 168–184. View Details
  6. Commentary on "Evolving to a New Dominant Logic in Marketing"

    Keywords: Marketing;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Das Narayandas. Commentary on "Evolving to a New Dominant Logic in Marketing". Journal of Marketing 68, no. 1 (January 2004): 18–27. View Details
  7. The Impact of Internet Exchanges on Business-to-Business Distribution

    Keywords: Online Technology; Communication; Business Ventures; Distribution;

    Citation:

    Narayandas, Narakesari, Mary N. Caravella, and John Deighton. "The Impact of Internet Exchanges on Business-to-Business Distribution." Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science 30, no. 4 (fall 2002). View Details
  8. Seven Barriers to Customer Equity Management

    Keywords: Equity; Management;

    Citation:

    Bell, D., J. Deighton, W. J. Reinartz, R. T. Rust, and G. Swartz. "Seven Barriers to Customer Equity Management." Journal of Service Research 5, no. 1 (August 2002): 77–85. View Details
  9. How Snapple Got Its Juice Back

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "How Snapple Got Its Juice Back." Harvard Business Review 80, no. 1 (January 2002). View Details
  10. Who Wanted Webvan to Survive

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "Who Wanted Webvan to Survive." Boston Globe (July 31, 2001). View Details
  11. Banner Advertising: Measuring Effectiveness and Optimizing Placement

    Keywords: Advertising; Measurement and Metrics;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Lee Sherman. "Banner Advertising: Measuring Effectiveness and Optimizing Placement." Journal of Interactive Marketing 15, no. 2 (spring 2001). View Details
  12. Digital Media: Cutting through the Hype

    Keywords: Media;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A., and Patrick Barwise. "Digital Media: Cutting through the Hype." Mastering Marketing. Financial Times (November 9, 1998), 2–4. View Details
  13. Commentary on 'Exploring the Implications of the Internet for Consumer Marketing'

    Keywords: Online Technology; Web; Customers; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "Commentary on 'Exploring the Implications of the Internet for Consumer Marketing'." Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science 25, no. 4 (fall 1997). View Details
  14. Choice in Computer-Mediated Environments

    Keywords: Technology; Decision Choices and Conditions;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Choice in Computer-Mediated Environments." Marketing Letters 8, no. 3 (July 1997). View Details
  15. The Future of Interactive Marketing

    Keywords: Marketing;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "The Future of Interactive Marketing." Harvard Business Review 74, no. 6 (November–December 1996): 151–160. View Details
  16. Manage Marketing by the Customer Equity Test

    Keywords: Marketing; Customers;

    Citation:

    Blattberg, Robert C., and J. A. Deighton. "Manage Marketing by the Customer Equity Test." Harvard Business Review 74, no. 4 (July–August 1996): 136–144. View Details
  17. Marketing and Seduction: Building Exchange Relationships by Managing Social Consensus

    Keywords: Marketing; Relationships; Management; Public Opinion;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Kent Grayson. "Marketing and Seduction: Building Exchange Relationships by Managing Social Consensus." Journal of Consumer Research 21 (April 1995). View Details
  18. When Worlds Collide: The Implications of Panel Data-Based Choice Models for Consumer Behavior

    Keywords: Data and Data Sets; Consumer Behavior; Decision Choices and Conditions;

    Citation:

    Winer, R. S., R.E. Bucklin, J. A. Deighton, J. Erdem, P.S. Fader, J.J. Inman, H. Katahira, Katherine N. Lemon, and A. Mitchell. "When Worlds Collide: The Implications of Panel Data-Based Choice Models for Consumer Behavior." Marketing Letters 5, no. 4 (October 1994). View Details
  19. The Effects of Advertising on Brand Switching and Repeat Purchasing

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Advertising;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A., C.M. Henderson, and S. Neslin. "The Effects of Advertising on Brand Switching and Repeat Purchasing." Journal of Marketing Research (JMR) 31 (February 1994). View Details
  20. Interactive Marketing: Exploiting the Age of Addressability

    Keywords: Marketing;

    Citation:

    Blattberg, R. C., and J. A. Deighton. "Interactive Marketing: Exploiting the Age of Addressability." Harvard Business Manager 15, no. 1 (1993): 5–14. View Details
  21. The Consumption of Performance

    Keywords: Performance;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "The Consumption of Performance." Journal of Consumer Research 19 (December 1992): 362–72. View Details
  22. Interactive Marketing: Exploiting the age of Addressability

    Keywords: Marketing;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A., and R. C. Blattberg. "Interactive Marketing: Exploiting the age of Addressability." MIT Sloan Management Review 33, no. 1 (fall 1991): 5–14. View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Consumer Identity Motives in the Information Age

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior; Motivation and Incentives; Identity; Behavior;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John. "Consumer Identity Motives in the Information Age." Chap. 12 in Inside Consumption: Consumer Motives, Goals, and Desires, edited by S. Ratneshwar and David Glen Mick, 233 – 250. New York: Routledge, 2005. View Details
  2. Market Solutions to Privacy Problems?

    Keywords: Knowledge Management; Information Management; Markets; Rights;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "Market Solutions to Privacy Problems?" Chap. 6 in Digital Anonymity and the Law - Tensions and Dimensions. Vol. II, edited by C. Nicoll, J.E.J. Prins, and M.J.M. van Dellen, 137 – 146. Information Technology & Law Series. The Hague: T.M.C. Asser Press, 2003. View Details
  3. Digital Marketing Communication

    Keywords: Marketing Communications; Online Advertising; Web Sites;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A., and Patrick Barwise. "Digital Marketing Communication." In Digital Marketing: Global Strategies from the World's Leading Experts, edited by Jerry Wind and Vijay Mahajan. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2002. View Details
  4. Service Markets and the Internet

    Keywords: Internet; Service Operations; Market Design;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "Service Markets and the Internet." In Services Marketing: People, Technology, Strategy, edited by Christopher Lovelock. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000. View Details
  5. Frequency Programs in Service Industries

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Consumer Behavior; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "Frequency Programs in Service Industries." Chap. 24 in Handbook of Services Marketing and Management, edited by Dawn Iacobucci and Teresa A. Swartz, 401–407. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1999. View Details
  6. Digital Media: Cutting Through the Hype

    Keywords: Media; Technology; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A., and Patrick Barwise. "Digital Media: Cutting Through the Hype." In Financial Times Mastering Marketing: The Complete MBA Companion in Marketing, edited by Tim Dickson. London: Pearson Education, 1999. View Details
  7. The Concept of Integrated Marketing Communications

    Keywords: Marketing Communications; Integration;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "The Concept of Integrated Marketing Communications." In The Advertising Business: Operations, Creativity, Media Planning, Integrated Communications, edited by John Philip Jones. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1999. View Details
  8. Integrated Marketing Communications in Practice

    Keywords: Marketing Communications; Integration;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John. "Integrated Marketing Communications in Practice." Chap. 33 in The Advertising Business: Operations, Creativity, Media Planning, Integrated Communications, edited by John Philip Jones, 339–355. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1999. View Details
  9. Features of Good Integration: Two Cases and Some Generalizations

    Keywords: Integration;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "Features of Good Integration: Two Cases and Some Generalizations." In Integrated Communications: The Search for Synergy in Communication Voices, edited by J. Moore and E. Thorsen. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1996. View Details
  10. Customer Transaction Databases: Present Status and Prospects

    Keywords: Customers; Market Transactions; Information Management; Data and Data Sets;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A., Don Peppers, and Martha Rogers. "Customer Transaction Databases: Present Status and Prospects." In The Marketing Information Revolution, edited by Robert C. Blattberg, Rashi Glazer, and John Little. Cambridge: Marketing Science Institute, 1994. View Details
  11. Managing Services When Service Is a Performance

    Keywords: Service Operations; Performance; Management; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A. "Managing Services When Service Is a Performance." In Service Quality: New Directions in Theory and Practice, edited by R. T. Trust and R. L. Oliver. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications, 1994. View Details
  12. Decomposing a Brand's Customer Franchise into Buyer Types

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Customers; Demand and Consumers;

    Citation:

    McQueen, J., J. Foley, and J. A. Deighton. "Decomposing a Brand's Customer Franchise into Buyer Types." In Brand Equity and Advertising: Advertising's Role in Building Strong Brands, edited by D. A. Aaker and A. L. Hillsdale. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1993. View Details
  13. Teaching Emotion with Drama Advertising

    Keywords: Teaching; Advertising; Advertising Industry; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A., and S. Hoch. "Teaching Emotion with Drama Advertising." In Advertising Exposure, Memory and Choice, edited by A. A. Mitchell. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1993. View Details
  14. Reactions to Political Advertising Depend on the Nature of the Voter-Candidate Bond

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Political Elections; Relationships; Attitudes; Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, J. A., L. F. Alwitt, and J. Grimm. "Reactions to Political Advertising Depend on the Nature of the Voter-Candidate Bond." In Television and Political Advertising. Vol. 1, edited by F. Biocca. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1991. View Details

Working Papers

  1. Digital Interactivity: Unanticipated Consequences for Markets, Marketing, and Consumers

    The digital interactive transformation in marketing is not unfolding, as many thought it would, on the model of direct marketing. That model anticipated that digital media using rich profiling data would intrude marketing messaging more deeply and more precisely into consumer lives than broadcast media had been able to do. But the technology that threatened intrusion is delivering seclusion. The transformation is unfolding on a model of consumer collaboration, in which consumers use digital media that lie beyond the control of marketers to communicate among one another, responding to marketing's intrusions by disseminating counterargument, information sharing, rebuttal, parody, reproach and, though more rarely, fandom. Globally the media of collaboration range from consumer review sites like Epinions and Trip Advisor, to collaborative networking sites like Bebo, Facebook, Orkut and Meetup, to trading sites like Craigslist and EBay, and user-generated content sites like YouTube, Cyworld, and blogs. This paper reviews five emerging paradigms governing marketing in the environment of these new media. It concludes that while meaning-making remains the central purpose of marketing communication, the shift from broadcasting to interaction within digital communities is moving the locus of control over meanings from marketer to consumer and rewarding more participatory, more sincere, and less directive marketing styles.

    Keywords: Communication Intention and Meaning; Interactive Communication; Marketing Communications; Consumer Behavior; Social and Collaborative Networks; Online Technology; Search Technology;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Digital Interactivity: Unanticipated Consequences for Markets, Marketing, and Consumers." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 08-017, September 2007. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Harvard Business School Executive Education: Balancing Online and Offline Marketing

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Harvard Business School Executive Education: Balancing Online and Offline Marketing." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 514-123, April 2014. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  2. Olympic Rent-A-Car U.S.: Customer Loyalty Battles, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and James T. Kindley. "Olympic Rent-A-Car U.S.: Customer Loyalty Battles, Spreadsheet for Instructors (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 913-571, June 2013. View Details
  3. Olympic Rent-A-Car U.S.: Customer Loyalty Battles (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and James T. Kindley. "Olympic Rent-A-Car U.S.: Customer Loyalty Battles (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 913-569, June 2013. View Details
  4. Olympic Rent-A-Car U.S.: Customer Loyalty Battles

    The marketing and operations managers for Olympic Rent-A-Car meet to decide how to respond to changes in the loyalty rewards program at the market-leading competitor. The competitor's program gives awards based on dollars spent instead of days rented and eliminates blackout dates. Olympic expects the program to capture more of the valuable business traveler segment which rents cars more frequently and generally pays higher premiums than the leisure traveler segment. At the meeting, the team reviews the financial performance of the firm and the firm's reward program called Olympic Medalist. They consider whether they can afford to match the competitor's loyalty program terms as they have done in the past and also consider how the competitor's actions will affect the entire car rental industry. Ultimately, they must respond with a truly distinctive strategy. Students must perform a quantitative analysis of each possible response and consider the value of customers in loyalty programs.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Competitive Strategy; Marketing; Operations; Auto Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and James T. Kindley. "Olympic Rent-A-Car U.S.: Customer Loyalty Battles." Harvard Business School Brief Case 913-568, June 2013. View Details
  5. Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google

    Keywords: Amazon; Apple; Facebook; google; digital marketing; online platforms; e-commerce; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google ." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 513-100, April 2013. (Revised August 2013.) View Details
  6. The Ford Fiesta

    Keywords: Ford; Chantel Lenard; Ford Fiesta;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "The Ford Fiesta." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 513-704, March 2013. View Details
  7. The Ford Fiesta (TN)

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "The Ford Fiesta (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 513-092, April 2013. View Details
  8. Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google

    Four businesses had, by 2012, grown to dominate the infrastructure that all firms rely on to reach online customers. Will the balance of power among the four persist, will one take command at the expense of the other three, or are all four more vulnerable than they seem to outside forces? What are the implications for the pace at which consumers go online? Amara's Law claims that we tend to overestimate change in the short run, and underestimate it in the long run.

    Keywords: Online Technology; Internet; Competitive Advantage; Infrastructure; Mobile Technology; Growth and Development; Service Industry; Retail Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google." Harvard Business School Case 513-060, January 2013. (Revised December 2013.) View Details
  9. Bluefin Labs: The Acquisition by Twitter

    What is the value of Bluefin Labs's social listening data to Twitter? Acquired by Twitter in 2013, Bluefin had built a system that gathered millions of online comments in an effort to develop new metrics for TV programs and brand advertising. With data from Twitter and other social sites, expressions, not just impressions, could now be aggregated, measured, and used to calibrate brand performance and to sell media time. A second objective of the case is to understand the implications of social TV viewing, the audience engagement that results when people watch television with a smartphone or tablet in hand, participating in a virtual community of real-time TV watchers.

    Keywords: Measurement and Metrics; Data and Data Sets; Internet; Software; Communication Technology; Advertising; Social and Collaborative Networks; Acquisition; Television Entertainment; Advertising Industry; Media and Broadcasting Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Bluefin Labs: The Acquisition by Twitter." Harvard Business School Case 513-091, June 2013. (Revised November 2013.) View Details
  10. Bluefin Labs: The Acquisition by Twitter

    What is the value of Bluefin Labs's social listening data to Twitter? Acquired by Twitter in 2013, Bluefin had built a system that gathered millions of online comments in an effort to develop new metrics for TV programs and brand advertising. With data from Twitter and other social sites, expressions, not just impressions, could now be aggregated, measured, and used to calibrate brand performance and to sell media time. A second objective of the case is to understand the implications of social TV viewing, the audience engagement that results when people watch television with a smartphone or tablet in hand, participating in a virtual community of real-time TV watchers.

    Keywords: Knowledge Use and Leverage; Knowledge Acquisition; Marketing; Television Entertainment; Mobile Technology;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Bluefin Labs: The Acquisition by Twitter." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 513-094, April 2013. View Details
  11. Nettwerk: Digital Marketing in the Music Industry

    How is music marketed in the digital era? Nettwerk Music Group built on its foundation as a social, grassroots marketer of music and artists and emerged as a leader in the Internet-enabled social media environment. For most of the past decade Nettwerk CEO Terry McBride let fans consume music on their own terms. He encouraged file-sharing, the remixing of his artists' songs and videos, and an environment in which "the audience is the record company." In the digital marketplace compact discs mattered much less, said McBride. "Digital assets" were the currency, in the form of ad, television, movie, and videogame song placement, ringtones, mixes, and community-created content. But new artist-label contracts were needed if digital assets were going to flow freely. Moving away from the infrastructure of the music business also meant having to do without the financial, logistical, and promotional power of the major labels. To provide an alternative to the muscle of the major labels, the company is launching a venture capital project called "Polyphonic."

    Keywords: Music Entertainment; Product Marketing; Network Effects; Sales; Social and Collaborative Networks; Online Technology; Media and Broadcasting Industry; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Nettwerk: Digital Marketing in the Music Industry." Harvard Business School Case 510-055, October 2009. (Revised March 2012.) View Details
  12. Harvard Business School Executive Education: Balancing Online and Offline Marketing

    How does a small business set its online media budget? The HBS Executive Education Division can be viewed as a small-to-medium sized business unit with annual revenues of $107 million. As we watch it change its culture, practices, and organization from offline to online marketing, we have an opportunity not simply to see the metrics used in online marketing budget allocation, but also the stresses involved in the birth of a new go-to-market culture.

    Keywords: Transition; Marketing Strategy; Budgets and Budgeting; Technology Adoption; Online Advertising; Resource Allocation; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Harvard Business School Executive Education: Balancing Online and Offline Marketing." Harvard Business School Case 510-091, February 2010. (Revised March 2012.) View Details
  13. Google+

    Keywords: Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Google+." Harvard Business School Case 512-032, November 2011. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  14. Sony and the JK Wedding Dance (TN)

    Teaching Note for 510064.

    Keywords: Music Entertainment; Copyright; Situation or Environment; Online Technology; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Sony and the JK Wedding Dance (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 511-071, November 2010. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  15. Demand Media (TN)

    Teaching Note for 512021.

    Keywords: Search Technology; Media; Society; Transformation; Online Advertising; Business Model; Initial Public Offering; Customers; Behavior; Value; Information Technology Industry; California;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Demand Media (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 512-021, July 2011. (Revised January 2012.) View Details
  16. The Ford Fiesta

    Executives at Ford wondered if social media could be the marketing solution for the launch of the youth-oriented 2010 Fiesta. But with social media came a ceding of control. Some at the company believed that if Ford was going to move beyond its conservative brand image for the launch of the new subcompact chances had to be taken. Others erred on the side of caution. Chantel Lenard, Ford's Group Marketing Manager for Global Small Car and Midsize Vehicles and Connie Fontaine, Manager of Brand Content and Alliances championed a new approach for the new vehicle and set into motion a comprehensive 6-month social media initiative targeting a younger, ethnically diverse, and urban-based market, called "The Fiesta Movement". In doing so, a large portion of the marketing campaign was handed over to 20 and 30-somethings across America, and Ford had to acclimate to a new way of doing marketing. To what extent should the company guide the activities and messages of their army of bloggers? The case is set two months into the Movement, as the team evaluates the metrics from YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and their website, and wonder if they're doing everything they need to do in order to make the Fiesta a success with a new target market.

    Keywords: Advertising Campaigns; Online Advertising; Leadership; Goals and Objectives; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Product Launch; Market Entry and Exit; Standards; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "The Ford Fiesta." Harvard Business School Case 511-117, February 2011. (Revised December 2012.) View Details
  17. Demand Media

    Google search had helped Demand Media grow to be a $1.9 billion online publisher. Then, social media and smartphone apps began to change the way people navigated the Internet. How should Demand Media respond? The business ran on a radically new model in which a stable of 10,000 freelance contributors supplied content, the Internet's search engines brought it 75 million readers each month, and advertising generated revenue. It took the guesswork out of content production, with algorithms that indicated which topics were being searched and created content accordingly. Demand treated its 5,000 online articles published per day as an investment, not a cost, a reversal of the traditional media model. In addition to being able to infer consumers' interests with its algorithm, the company had a formula for estimating the lifetime value of each piece of content. As the business models of print and broadcast media declined, Demand had figured out how to leverage digital and social media tools to bring down the costs of creating content and to find an audience. In spring 2011, executives at the five-year-old company were pleased with the company's billion dollar IPO, the biggest Internet IPO since Google's, but changes in consumer behavior on the Internet were obliging a review of the model.

    Keywords: Business Model; Information Publishing; Consumer Behavior; Customization and Personalization; Internet; Online Technology; Publishing Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Demand Media." Harvard Business School Case 511-043, March 2011. (Revised December 2012.) View Details
  18. Coca-Cola on Facebook

    In late 2008, executives at Coca-Cola had to decide what to do with a fan-created page on Facebook that had amassed over one million followers in three months. From a legal point of view the fan-created page was in violation of Facebook's terms of service as a non-copyright holder was using the imagery and logo associated with a known brand. Facebook contacted Michael Donnelly, Group Director, Worldwide Interactive Marketing for The Coca-Cola Company to let him know that he was in the position to take down the hugely popular, fan-created site; or, conversely, he could take it over and make it an official marketing channel for the company. Coke was already revisiting its social media policies, with the Diet Coke & Mentos user-generated video incident fresh in its memory. Those videos, which featured elaborate geysers with Diet Coke as their main ingredient, were among the most viewed online videos at the time, but were not initially sanctioned by the company. Donnelly knew that opening up the brand to creative consumers was necessary, but he and his team had to figure out how and to what extent they should do so, while still protecting one of the world's most valuable brands.

    Keywords: Change Management; Governance Controls; Policy; Brands and Branding; Marketing Channels; Social and Collaborative Networks; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Coca-Cola on Facebook." Harvard Business School Case 511-110, February 2011. (Revised December 2012.) View Details
  19. Porsche: The Cayenne Launch

    Can an online discussion forum supply insight into the evolution of brand meaning? In 2003 Porsche launched a sport utility vehicle, dividing Porsche purists from newcomers to the brand. Vocal members of online and offline Porsche communities ridiculed the Cayenne SUV and disapproved of the new breed of driver. Some opposed offering Porsche club membership to them, and some even refused to extend the fraternal Porsche 'wave' or headlight flicking to them on the road. Porsche's values of speed, luxury, and a certain masculine zeal resonated strongly with its devotees, while drivers of the Cayenne (which came to be known as 'the SUV for soccer moms') tended to be safety-conscious, family-oriented, and conservative. Evolving debates on forums allow a class to debate whether the brand had strayed too far from its core values and was at risk.

    Keywords: Knowledge Sharing; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Risk Management; Brands and Branding; Product Launch; Product Positioning; Social and Collaborative Networks; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, Jill Avery, and Jeffrey Fear. "Porsche: The Cayenne Launch." Harvard Business School Case 511-068, February 2011. (Revised December 2012.) View Details
  20. Herborist

    Global brands such as L'Oreal and Oil of Olay dominate China's skin care market. A Chinese domestic brand, after some success in partnership with Sephora in Europe, aspires to challenge the French and U.S. brands' hold on the China market. It must decide how to segment the market, how to position against global assurances of quality and purity, and how to balance its Chinese heritage claims with claims of modernity. The China skin care market is growing extraordinarily fast. Is that an asset or a liability?

    Keywords: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Product Marketing; Product Positioning; Demand and Consumers; Competitive Strategy; Segmentation; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; China;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, Leora Kornfeld, Yanqun He, and Qingyun Jiang. "Herborist." Harvard Business School Case 511-051, August 2010. (Revised December 2012.) View Details
  21. Sony and the JK Wedding Dance

    Executives at Sony Music Entertainment faced a dilemma: a user-generated video featuring controversial artist Chris Brown's music was netting millions of views per week on YouTube. Sony held the copyright to the song, and was entitled to issue a takedown notice to the party that uploaded the video. How should Sony act? This case looks at the issues faced by marketers in an environment in which consumers disseminate content without the assistance, or approval, of gatekeepers.

    Keywords: Music Entertainment; Copyright; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Network Effects; Social and Collaborative Networks; Internet; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "Sony and the JK Wedding Dance." Harvard Business School Case 510-064, December 2009. (Revised December 2012.) View Details
  22. The Cheezburger Network (TN)

    Keywords: Networks;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "The Cheezburger Network (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 512-053, November 2011. View Details
  23. The Cheezburger Network

    Cheezburger Network was a Web publisher of humorous, user-contributed content, using social media for dissemination, and selling advertising against the traffic of 1 billion page views per quarter. In January 2011, it raised $30 million in venture capital for the network of 50 websites that featured an entertaining array of user-generated content. Beginning with a site based on pictures of cats with whimsical captions, it had grown into a small but impressive digital empire, riding waves of viral content. CEO Ben Huh prided himself on his ability to go from idea to implementation in just a few days, but this just-in-time method made strategic planning difficult. Profitable from day one and with $5 million of revenue across 50 brand identities, Huh's challenge was to evaluate his growth to date, to look critically at the digital media landscape, and to figure out how to best to spend the $30 million.

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Online Advertising; Customer Relationship Management; Venture Capital; Emerging Markets; Strategic Planning; Sales; Online Technology; Web Sites; Publishing Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Leora Kornfeld. "The Cheezburger Network." Harvard Business School Case 511-091, February 2011. (Revised November 2013.) View Details
  24. United Breaks Guitars

    When social media propagate a complaint about poor customer service, an international media event ensues. How do viral videos spread and what can firms do about them? This case dissects an incident in which a disgruntled customer used YouTube and Twitter to spread a music video detailing United's mishandling of his $3,500 guitar and the company's subsequent refusal to compensate him. The song was called "United Breaks Guitars." Within one week it received 3 million views and mainstream news coverage followed, with CNN, The Wall Street Journal, BBC, the CBS Morning Show, and many other print and electronic outlets picking up on the story. The mechanics of viral propagation are uncovered, and the limited opportunities for response by the firm are revealed. The case supports the notion of the Internet as an insurgent medium, better at attack than at defense.

    Keywords: Communication Technology; Customer Satisfaction; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Network Effects; Service Delivery; Social and Collaborative Networks; Internet; Air Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "United Breaks Guitars." Harvard Business School Case 510-057, January 2010. (Revised August 2011.) View Details
  25. The Case Method of Instruction

    Keywords: Cases; Education;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John. "The Case Method of Instruction." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 512-027, August 2011. View Details
  26. Designs by Kate: The Power of Direct Sales

    The sales representatives at Designs by Kate (DBK) sell private label jewelry at hosted parties and through online social media channels. They are also responsible for recruiting, training, and managing new sales reps. CEO and founder Kate Creevey designed the commission plan to encourage sales reps to build teams and become leadersfor their teams. The strategy has been very successful over the company's first five years. Now the CEO is concerned that growth in top-line revenue is slowing, possibly due to an unwillingness by current sales representatives to build and manage their own sales teams. A survey reveals that many sales reps believe their incomes from jewelry sales decline when they add members to their sales teams due to increased competition for hosting parties within the same geographic area. The CEO must revisit the commission structure to determine if it is still an effective incentive. The case includes a quantitative assignment that students should complete as part of case analysis.

    Keywords: Direct sales; Consumer marketing; marketing management; marketing strategy; Personal selling; Sales compensation; Sales organization; Motivation and Incentives; Marketing Strategy; Salesforce Management; Performance; Compensation and Benefits; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Sarah Abbott. "Designs by Kate: The Power of Direct Sales." Harvard Business School Brief Case 114-284, April 2011. View Details
  27. Designs by Kate: The Power of Direct Sales (Brief Case)

    Teaching Note to 4277.

    Keywords: Direct sales; Consumer marketing; marketing management; marketing strategy; Personal selling; Sales compensation; Sales organization;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Sarah Abbott. "Designs by Kate: The Power of Direct Sales (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 114-285, April 2011. View Details
  28. Designs by Kate: The Power of Direct Sales, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Sarah Abbott. "Designs by Kate: The Power of Direct Sales, Spreadsheet Supplement (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 114-286, April 2011. View Details
  29. Designs by Kate: The Power of Direct Sales, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)

    Keywords: Direct sales; Consumer marketing; marketing management; marketing strategy; Personal selling; Sales compensation; Sales organization;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Sarah Abbott. "Designs by Kate: The Power of Direct Sales, Faculty Spreadsheet (Brief Case)." Harvard Business School Spreadsheet Supplement 114-288, April 2011. View Details
  30. Porsche: The Cayenne Launch (TN)

    Teaching Note for 511-068.

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Sports; Product Development; Value; Safety; Online Technology; Communication Technology; Auto Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John, and Jill Avery. "Porsche: The Cayenne Launch (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 511-069, February 2011. View Details
  31. Nettwerk: Digital Marketing in the Music Industry (TN)

    Teaching Note for 510055.

    Keywords: Music Entertainment; Internet; Contracts; Arts; Projects; Venture Capital; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Nettwerk: Digital Marketing in the Music Industry (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 511-056, October 2010. View Details
  32. Slanket: Responding to Snuggie's Market Entry

    How does a pioneer in a new product category deal with the runaway success of a follower? Can search engine marketing and social media help? In 2008 Slanket CEO, Gary Clegg, found that his product, a blanket with sleeves, had been eclipsed by The Snuggie, another sleeved blanket. Snuggie made a brazen entry into the market with a $10 million spend on television infomercials. The Snuggie quickly became a pop culture phenomenon, talked about on popular television programs such as Oprah and The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, and paid mock tribute to on web sites such as YouTube, where hundreds of video parodies could be found. Clegg had been counting on building his Slanket brand. Will the coming of Snuggie mean the end of Slanket?

    Keywords: Online Advertising; Brands and Branding; Product Launch; Market Entry and Exit; Social and Collaborative Networks; Search Technology;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Slanket: Responding to Snuggie's Market Entry." Harvard Business School Case 510-034, August 2009. (Revised August 2010.) View Details
  33. Slanket: Responding to Snuggie's Market Entry (TN)

    Teaching Note for [510034].

    Keywords: Market Entry and Exit;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Slanket: Responding to Snuggie's Market Entry (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 510-098, March 2010. (Revised August 2010.) View Details
  34. United Breaks Guitars (TN)

    Teaching Note for 510057.

    Keywords: Internet; Media; Customers; Opportunities;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "United Breaks Guitars (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 510-123, June 2010. View Details
  35. Obama versus Clinton: The YouTube Primary

    What was the role of the Internet in the contest for the Democratic presidential nomination between Senators Obama and Clinton? How does the role change in the shift from the Primary to the National election? The case examines media and content choices by each candidate and allows students to explore the role of new media in political campaigns. The focus is on fundraising in 2007 and campaigning for Primary delegate votes in 2008.

    Keywords: Political Elections; Knowledge Use and Leverage; Marketing Channels; Media; Internet; United States;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Obama versus Clinton: The YouTube Primary." Harvard Business School Case 509-032, October 2008. (Revised November 2009.) View Details
  36. Obama versus Clinton: The YouTube Primary (TN)

    Teaching Note for [509032].

    Keywords: Internet; Media; Political Elections; Advertising Campaigns;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leora Kornfeld. "Obama versus Clinton: The YouTube Primary (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 509-038, January 2009. View Details
  37. Dove: Evolution of a Brand - Advertising Supplement

    Keywords: Advertising; Brands and Branding; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Dove: Evolution of a Brand - Advertising Supplement." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 508-704, May 2008. View Details
  38. Dove: Evolution of a Brand (TN)

    Teaching Note for [508-047].

    Keywords: Consumer Products Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Dove: Evolution of a Brand (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 508-109, April 2008. View Details
  39. Marketing Chateau Margaux (TN)

    Teaching Note for [507033].

    Keywords: Brands and Branding; Management Teams; Distribution; Sales; Market Entry and Exit; Price; Luxury; Demand and Consumers; Growth and Development Strategy; Governance Controls; Food and Beverage Industry; France;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Leyland Pitt. "Marketing Chateau Margaux (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 508-107, April 2008. View Details
  40. Dove: Evolution of a Brand

    Examines the evolution of Dove from functional brand to a brand with a point of view after Unilever designated it as a masterbrand, and expanded its portfolio to cover entries into a number of sectors beyond the original bath soap category. The development causes the brand team to take a fresh look at the cliches of the beauty industry. The result is the controversial Real Beauty campaign. As the campaign unfolds, Unilever learns to use the Internet, and particularly social network media like YouTube, to manage controversy.

    Keywords: History; Expansion; Marketing Strategy; Social Marketing; Online Advertising; Brands and Branding; Consumer Products Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Dove: Evolution of a Brand." Harvard Business School Case 508-047, October 2007. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  41. Marketing Chateau Margaux

    Chateau Margaux, luxury brand or connoisseur brand? Although France is awash with unsold wine, demand has never been stronger for the very finest Bordeaux. How should Margaux sustain and grow its business? The Chateau management team is wondering if it can take more control of distribution instead of leaving it to the Bordeaux wine merchants. Also, can the Chateau build marketing and sales capabilities on its own? Who is the target market, wine connoisseurs or the newly rich? Corinne Mentzelopoulous, who took over the estate from her father in 1980, wonders whether a new lower-priced wine should be added to the portfolio.

    Keywords: Price; Growth and Development Strategy; Brands and Branding; Distribution; Luxury; Food and Beverage Industry; France;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., Leyland Pitt, Vincent Marie Dessain, Daniela Beyersdorfer, and Anders Sjoman. "Marketing Chateau Margaux." Harvard Business School Case 507-033, October 2006. (Revised August 2007.) View Details
  42. Gary Loveman of Harrah's at Harvard Business School: Harrah's Total Rewards

    Keywords: Games, Gaming, and Gambling; Accommodations Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Gary Loveman of Harrah's at Harvard Business School: Harrah's Total Rewards." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 506-709, February 2006. View Details
  43. Marketing James Patterson

    Can a successful novelist use direct-to-consumer marketing to grow his brand? The author, who in a previous career ran a major advertising agency, uses advertising with great success to build his stature as a crime fiction writer. Further, he applies his experience at managing the advertising creative process to employ co-authors on a "literary assembly line," turning out more product than any other best-selling author. Now he considers whether book clubs can be used to systematically build buzz for his new releases. Is it time for a shift to direct mail and one-to-one marketing, or is fame in the book business only won in the limelight of publicity and broadcast marketing?

    Keywords: Advertising; Debates; Surveys; SWOT Analysis; Brands and Branding; Marketing Channels; Product Marketing; Consumer Behavior; Outcome or Result; Sales;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Marketing James Patterson." Harvard Business School Case 505-029, August 2004. (Revised February 2006.) View Details
  44. Nectar: Making Loyalty Pay (TN)

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Nectar: Making Loyalty Pay (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 506-048, December 2005. View Details
  45. Nectar: Making Loyalty Pay

    Loyalty Management UK (LMUK) manages British supermarket chain Sainsbury's frequent-shopper card program, called Nectar. LMUK uses Sainsbury's sponsorship as the magnet to attract other retailers into a profitable, multisponsor loyalty network. Examines the economics and consumer behavior of retail loyalty programs and allows comparison of the brand-building power of a single-sponsor program to the promotional power of a multisponsor program. Describes the launch of the program and its first 18 months of growth, at the end of which it is the largest loyalty program in Britain. Illustrates the use of the program to deliver customer-specific promotions to the 13.5 million-member database and how the program evaluates the success or failure of specific promotions.

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Business or Company Management; Supply Chain Management; Marketing Strategy; Networks; Marketing Channels; Advertising Campaigns; Outcome or Result; Growth and Development; Retail Industry; Great Britain;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Nectar: Making Loyalty Pay." Harvard Business School Case 505-031, December 2004. (Revised December 2005.) View Details
  46. Hilton HHonors Worldwide: Loyalty Wars

    Hilton Hotels regards the frequent guest program as the industry's most important marketing tool, directing marketing efforts at the heavy user. What is Hilton to do then, when a competitor ups the ante? This case illustrates the economics of frequency marketing in industries with a very distinct "heavy half" to their customer base, and lets students debate what to do when Sheraton and Westin seemingly overdo a good thing.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Decision Choices and Conditions; Brands and Branding; Competitive Strategy; Accommodations Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Stowe Shoemaker. "Hilton HHonors Worldwide: Loyalty Wars." Harvard Business School Case 501-010, October 2000. (Revised November 2005.) View Details
  47. Marketing James Patterson (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-505-029).

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Marketing James Patterson (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 505-033, September 2004. View Details
  48. Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Parts 1, 2, and 3 (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-503-021), (9-503-022), and (9-503-023).

    Keywords: Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Das Narayandas. "Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Parts 1, 2, and 3 (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 504-087, March 2004. View Details
  49. Snapple

    Tells the story of Snapple's rise and fall, and poses the question "Can it recover?" Many soft-drink brands flourished in the 1980s serving New York's Yuppies, but only Snapple made the big time. It went from local to national success and was poised to go international when the founders sold out to Quaker. The brand proved harder to manage than Quaker anticipated and in 1997 was sold for a fraction of its acquisition price. The case presents factors accounting for the growth and decline and provides a qualitative study of the brand. What action should the new owners take?

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Industry Growth; Failure; Brands and Branding; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Snapple." Harvard Business School Case 599-126, June 1999. (Revised December 2003.) View Details
  50. Webvan: Groceries on the Internet

    What are the prospects for grocery shopping on the Web? This case invites a comparison of seven business models, with particular emphasis on Webvan. Why does the investment community value Webvan at $7.8 billion after less than six months of operating experience, and Peapod, which has had seven years to learn the ropes, at $200 million? Explores online consumer-shopping behavior, the economics of online and offline grocery distribution, and the challenges of uniting a pure information business with a mundane package delivery service.

    Keywords: Business Model; Experience and Expertise; Investment; Information; Marketing; Distribution Channels; Service Delivery; Cognition and Thinking; Internet; Online Technology; Retail Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Kayla Bakshi. "Webvan: Groceries on the Internet." Harvard Business School Case 500-052, November 1999. (Revised March 2003.) View Details
  51. Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 2

    How does a $2 million software sale happen? This case traces efforts by Siebel Systems to sell lead management software to discount broker Quick & Reilly. The buying process is mapped out over four years. Covers in detail the last six months--from Siebel's initial involvement to a challenge from competitor Oracle to the climax. The structure of Quick & Reilly's buying center is mapped, as is the role of its parent, Fleet Bank. The fortunes of the sale rise and fall as the Siebel account manager faces one obstacle after another. Presented in three parts, with opportunities to debate the account manager's choices and actions at each state. Part 2 describes the start of the sale from the buyer's perspective.

    Keywords: Business Cycles; Leadership; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Organizational Structure; Behavior; Competition; Software; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Das Narayandas. "Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 2." Harvard Business School Case 503-022, August 2002. (Revised February 2003.) View Details
  52. Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 1

    How does a $2 million software sale happen? This case traces efforts by Siebel Systems to sell lead management software to discount broker Quick & Reilly. The buying process is mapped out over four years. Covers in detail the last six months--from Siebel's initial involvement to a challenge from competitor Oracle to the climax. The structure of Quick & Reilly's buying center is mapped, as is the role of its parent, Fleet Bank. The fortunes of the sale rise and fall as the Siebel account manager faces one obstacle after another. Presented in three parts, with opportunities to debate the account manager's choices and actions at each stage. Part 1 describes the start of the sale from the seller's perspective.

    Keywords: Leadership; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Organizational Structure; Behavior; Competition; Software; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Das Narayandas. "Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 1." Harvard Business School Case 503-021, August 2002. (Revised January 2003.) View Details
  53. Webvan: Groceries on the Internet (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-500-052).

    Keywords: Retail Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Webvan: Groceries on the Internet (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 503-049, November 2002. View Details
  54. Centra Software (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-502-009).

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Centra Software (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 503-047, November 2002. View Details
  55. Centra Software

    Centra is a pioneer in software eLearning. It is debating how to modify its go-to-market strategy, adding telesales to improve sales force productivity. At the same time, its market is evolving, and management thinks it may be about to "cross the chasm" in Geoffrey Moore's terminology. Should it "fish where the fish are biting" or should it concentrate on the enterprise customer and exclude small and mid-size corporations? If a shakeout is coming, how can Centra ensure that it either survives or is acquired by one of the survivors?

    Keywords: Software; Learning; Emerging Markets; Growth Management; Salesforce Management; Conflict Management; Information Technology Industry; Education Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Laetitia Pouliquen. "Centra Software." Harvard Business School Case 502-009, July 2001. (Revised October 2002.) View Details
  56. Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 3

    How does a $2 million software sale happen? This case traces efforts by Siebel Systems to sell lead management software to discount broker Quick & Reilly. The buying process is mapped out over four years. Covers in detail the last six months--from Siebel's initial involvement to a challenge from competitor Oracle to the climax. The structure of Quick & Reilly's buying center is mapped, as is the role of its parent, Fleet Bank. The fortunes of the sale rise and fall as the Siebel account manager faces one obstacle after another. Presented in three parts, with opportunities to debate the account manager's choices and actions at each state. Part 3 describes the unfolding of the sale over a 4-year period.

    Keywords: Sales; Decision Choices and Conditions; Competitive Strategy; Customer Relationship Management; Product Marketing; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Das Narayandas. "Siebel Systems: Anatomy of a Sale, Part 3." Harvard Business School Case 503-023, August 2002. View Details
  57. MicroFridge, TN

    Teaching Note for (9-599-049) and (9-503-017).

    Keywords: Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "MicroFridge, TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 503-030, August 2002. View Details
  58. MicroFridge: The Execution

    Supplements the case.

    Keywords: Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "MicroFridge: The Execution." Harvard Business School Case 503-017, August 2002. View Details
  59. MicroFridge: The Concept

    Robert Bennett, who has a Master's degree in engineering, wants to exploit his idea to combine a refrigerator, freezer, and 500-watt microwave into an 87-pound, 4-foot-high appliance to sell to college students. Bennett must decide which markets to serve, which competitors he must contend with, with whom to collaborate, and what core capabilities to build.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Decision Choices and Conditions; Leadership Style; Sales; Product Development; Competitive Strategy; Partners and Partnerships; Demand and Consumers; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "MicroFridge: The Concept." Harvard Business School Case 599-049, August 1998. (Revised August 2002.) View Details
  60. Note on Marketing and the Internet

    The World Wide Web is new, a comprehensive marketing environment. It is a medium for direct marketing, for retailing and distribution, for the delivery of service and product elements, for marketing research, and even for posting and testing prices. This note explores the features of this environment. It contrasts the web with older, broadcast media and evaluates the web as a medium for doing business. It examines the structure of the industry that is emerging to support marketing on the web.

    Keywords: Marketing; Web; Online Advertising;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., Alison Berkley, and John Barabino. "Note on Marketing and the Internet." Harvard Business School Background Note 597-037, December 1996. (Revised July 2002.) View Details
  61. Brita Products Company, The TN

    Teaching Note for (9-500-024).

    Keywords: United States;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Brita Products Company, The TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 501-067, February 2001. (Revised January 2002.) View Details
  62. Brita Products Company, The

    Clorox's Brita skillfully exploits a tide of water safety concerns, growing a home water (filtration) business from inception to a 15% U.S. household penetration in ten years. The dilemma in the case arises as the period of increasing returns seems to be drawing to a close, and management must use its legacy, an installed based and a strong brand equity, to take the business forward into a less friendly environment. Students can model the relation between the primary demand for pitchers and the derived demand for filters to decide where they want to put future investments.

    Keywords: Customer Value and Value Chain; Acquisition; Retention; Safety; Natural Environment; Emerging Markets; Investment Return; Equity; Demand and Consumers; United States;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Brita Products Company, The." Harvard Business School Case 500-024, August 1999. (Revised January 2002.) View Details
  63. Peppers and Rogers Group, The

    Can two successful authors build a scalable consulting practice based on their unique view of customer relationship management (CRM)? Should they emphasize strategy or execution? The case describes how Peppers and Rogers grew from two people earning speaker fees to a 160-person publishing, consulting, and Internet technology promotion company. Now they want to grow faster and take advantage of the IPO capital market that has enabled the birth of competitors like Scient, Viant, and Zefer in the market for e-commerce and dot.com consulting.

    Keywords: Customer Relationship Management; Growth and Development; Information Publishing; Going Public; Strategy; Competition; Internet; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Peppers and Rogers Group, The." Harvard Business School Case 500-096, April 2000. (Revised September 2001.) View Details
  64. Alloy.com: Marketing to Generation Y TN

    Teaching Note for (9-500-048).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Alloy.com: Marketing to Generation Y TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 501-043, October 2000. (Revised August 2001.) View Details
  65. DoubleClick Buys Abacus (A)

    By acquiring Abacus, DoubleClick won the power to serve ads with unprecedented precision, because it brought together Web surfers' online and offline identities. Several competitors had developed advanced systems for serving ads on the web, but DoubleClick had the advantage of an early start and a large installed base of clients. When DoubleClick modified its privacy declaration to allow it to use the full potential of its combined database however, it became the focus of a privacy furor.

    Keywords: Online Advertising; Acquisition; Customer Focus and Relationships; Measurement and Metrics; Social Issues; Competitive Advantage; Internet; Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "DoubleClick Buys Abacus (A)." Harvard Business School Case 500-091, April 2000. (Revised June 2001.) View Details
  66. DoubleClick Buys Abacus (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "DoubleClick Buys Abacus (B)." Harvard Business School Case 501-085, June 2001. View Details
  67. CVS: The Web Strategy

    How should America's second-largest pharmacy chain respond to the challenge from online drugstores? What threat does the web pose to bricks and mortar distribution of prescription drugs and the other items that make up 50% of a drugstore's sales? This case describes the purchase of Soma.com by CVS, and its integration into the corporation. A number of tactical questions remain to be answered, and then there is the larger strategic question--why do this at all? Teaching purpose: Issues in the integration of traditional retailing with online channels.

    Keywords: Leveraged Buyouts; Marketing Channels; Distribution Channels; Service Operations; Corporate Strategy; Pharmaceutical Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Anjali C. Shah. "CVS: The Web Strategy." Harvard Business School Case 500-008, December 1999. (Revised February 2001.) View Details
  68. CVS: The Web Strategy TN

    Teaching Note for (9-500-008).

    Keywords: Pharmaceutical Industry; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "CVS: The Web Strategy TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 501-064, February 2001. View Details
  69. Hilton HHonors Worldwide: Loyalty Wars TN

    Teaching Note for (9-501-010).

    Keywords: Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Hilton HHonors Worldwide: Loyalty Wars TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 501-059, December 2000. View Details
  70. Alloy.com: Marketing to Generation Y

    A profitable dot com company? Alloy.com retails clothing to teens by catalog. Alloy uses a Web site to convert prospects and build community. The result is a business with the economics of a direct marketer and the market capitalization of an Internet start-up. The case presents the decision of whether to partner with AOL or to persevere with the current mix of customer acquisition methods.

    Keywords: Marketing Strategy; Web Sites; Business and Community Relations; Partners and Partnerships; Customer Relationship Management; Decision Choices and Conditions; Business Startups; Information Technology Industry; Consumer Products Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Gil McWilliams. "Alloy.com: Marketing to Generation Y." Harvard Business School Case 500-048, January 2000. (Revised June 2000.) View Details
  71. USA TODAY Online

    How should USA TODAY use its brand franchise to build a publishing business on the World Wide Web? Advertising Age described the first steps as "a case study in how not to do it," but by the end of 1997 USA TODAY Online is the most visited news site on the Web. Now the challenge is to become profitable. The case explores the migration of a powerful newspaper brand to the Internet, the design of the product and delivery system, and alternative sources of revenue.

    Keywords: Online Advertising; Design; Profit; Revenue; Brands and Branding; Marketing Strategy; Web; Information Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Anthony St. George. "USA TODAY Online." Harvard Business School Case 598-133, March 1998. (Revised November 1999.) View Details
  72. USA TODAY Online TN

    Teaching Note for (9-598-133).

    Keywords: Journals and Magazines; Journalism and News Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "USA TODAY Online TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 599-097, February 1999. (Revised November 1999.) View Details
  73. Snapple TN

    Teaching Note for (9-599-126).

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Snapple TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 500-033, October 1999. View Details
  74. Adesemi Communications International: African Communications Group

    Presents a May 1999 interview with CEO Monique Maddy and CFO Lome Lague that updates the case and describes plans for the future.

    Keywords: Management Teams; Communication Technology; Telecommunications Industry; Africa;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Anita M. McGahan. "Adesemi Communications International: African Communications Group." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 799-504, June 1999. View Details
  75. Dendrite International (Condensed)

    This version has been shortened to concentrate on the issue of managing a long selling process and long post-sale account relationship. The focus on the pharmaceutical industry in the United States, Europe, and Japan is preserved. Broader questions of expansion into other industries and the development of new products have been written out.

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Marketing Strategy; Product Development; Sales; Expansion; Chemical Industry; Japan; Europe; United States;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Dendrite International (Condensed)." Harvard Business School Case 597-072, January 1997. (Revised July 1998.) View Details
  76. First Year Marketing Module Summary: Evolution of Marketing TN

    Describes the organization of a four- or five-case module that concludes the Marketing Management course in the First Year curriculum at Harvard Business School and offers a look to the future. Covers introductory remarks to students at the start of the module, some connective commentary, and a brief summary lecture of perhaps 15 minutes to wrap up the module. Should be read together with the teaching notes for the individual cases.

    Keywords: Forecasting and Prediction; Learning; Information; Marketing;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "First Year Marketing Module Summary: Evolution of Marketing TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 598-017, July 1997. View Details
  77. Consumer Behavior Exercise (A) - (F) (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-596-039)--(9-596-044).

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Susan M. Fournier. "Consumer Behavior Exercise (A) - (F) (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 597-041, May 1997. View Details
  78. Rogers Communications, Inc.: The Wave TN

    Teaching Note for (9-597-050).

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "Rogers Communications, Inc.: The Wave TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 597-078, March 1997. View Details
  79. IDS Financial Services (condensed) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-596-045).

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "IDS Financial Services (condensed) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 596-061, October 1995. (Revised February 1997.) View Details
  80. Consumer Behavior Exercise (A)

    Students are instructed to interview a recent purchaser of a low-involvement product or service in depth about his/her buying decision. The exercise provides students with first-hand understanding of important concepts in consumer choice domain (e.g., stages in the buying process, decision-making roles, habit versus deliberation).

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Susan M. Fournier. "Consumer Behavior Exercise (A)." Harvard Business School Exercise 596-039, August 1995. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  81. Consumer Behavior Exercise (B)

    Students are instructed to interview a recent purchaser of a high-involvement/utilitarian product or service in depth about his/her buying decision. The exercise provides students with first-hand understanding of important concepts in consumer choice domain (e.g., stages in the buying process, decision-making roles, habit versus deliberation).

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Susan M. Fournier. "Consumer Behavior Exercise (B)." Harvard Business School Exercise 596-040, August 1995. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  82. Consumer Behavior Exercise (C)

    Students are instructed to interview a recent purchaser of a high-involvement/ego-expressive product or service in depth about his/her buying decision. The exercise provides students with first-hand understanding of important concepts in consumer choice domain (e.g., stages in the buying process, decision-making roles, habit versus deliberation).

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Susan M. Fournier. "Consumer Behavior Exercise (C)." Harvard Business School Exercise 596-041, August 1995. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  83. Consumer Behavior Exercise (D)

    Students are instructed to interview a recent purchaser of a low-involvement product or service in depth about his/her ownership and usage experiences. The exercise provides students with first-hand understanding of important concepts in consumption domain (e.g., customer satisfaction, product meaning, brand loyalty).

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Susan M. Fournier. "Consumer Behavior Exercise (D)." Harvard Business School Exercise 596-042, August 1995. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  84. Consumer Behavior Exercise (E)

    Students are instructed to interview a recent purchaser of a high-involvement product or service in depth about his/her ownership and usage experiences. The exercise provides students with first-hand understanding of important concepts in consumption domain (e.g., customer satisfaction, product meaning, brand loyalty).

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Susan M. Fournier. "Consumer Behavior Exercise (E)." Harvard Business School Exercise 596-043, August 1995. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  85. Consumer Behavior Exercise (F)

    Students are instructed to interview a recent purchaser of a high-involvement/ego-expressive product or service in depth about his/her ownership and usage experiences. The exercise provides students with first-hand understanding of important concepts in consumption domain (e.g., customer satisfaction, product meaning, brand loyalty).

    Keywords: Consumer Behavior;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., and Susan M. Fournier. "Consumer Behavior Exercise (F)." Harvard Business School Exercise 596-044, August 1995. (Revised January 1997.) View Details
  86. SiteSpecific: www.sitespecific.com

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., John Barabino, and Alison Berkley. "SiteSpecific: www.sitespecific.com." Harvard Business School Case 596-117, June 1996. (Revised December 1996.) View Details
  87. Rogers Communications, Inc.: The Wave

    Rogers Communications, Inc., Canada's largest cable television provider, is deciding how it should respond to developments that appear to portend the convergence of its industry with the computing and telecommunications industries. In particular, it is investigating how it should test the market for high-speed Internet access via cable modem. This case describes decisions that need to be made to bring this service to market in a suburb of Toronto.

    Keywords: Decisions; Innovation and Invention; Marketing Strategy; Market Entry and Exit; Internet; Wireless Technology; Consumer Behavior; Technology Adoption; Telecommunications Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A., Karsten Voermann, and Reginal Gilyard. "Rogers Communications, Inc.: The Wave." Harvard Business School Case 597-050, November 1996. (Revised December 1996.) View Details
  88. IDS Financial Services (Condensed)

    Highlights the decision that must be made on balancing customer acquisition and retention and de-emphasizing the structural issues involved in administering the independent contractor sales force.

    Keywords: Customers; Customer Focus and Relationships; Decisions; Corporate Governance; Salesforce Management; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Deighton, John A. "IDS Financial Services (Condensed)." Harvard Business School Case 596-045, August 1995. (Revised October 1996.) View Details

    Research Summary

  1. Marketing Intrusion and Consumer Resistance

    Although marketing is customarily described as the process of identifying and satisfying consumer needs, its history can also be read as progressive refinement of the arts of intrusion and surveillance on the side of the seller, from door-to-door selling through direct mail to cookies on browsers.   Early in the Internet era, it looked as if new powers were about to be available to marketers.  Data profiling and digital media would allow for deeper targeting and more intrusion into consumers’ lives than broadcast marketing ever could.  However the technologies that enabled intrusion have also enabled defense against intrusion. Tivo, Caller ID and a new generation of consumer-side technologies, as well as consumer access to video broadcasting on YouTube and other  social media, are giving consumers ways to assert privacy and respond to unwelcome intrusion. This research project explores the play between intrusive marketing and consumer resistance.
  2. Viral Propagation of Consumer-Generated Content

    Within the last decade it has become possible for people with no special talent or technology to generate video content and disseminate it widely. Each year sees a number of "amateur" video products reaching global audiences of 5 million to 100 million. Some of these communication products have large economic consequences, for example in shaping consumer tastes in music and other entertainment industries, but also in propagating rumors and consumer complaints. This project models the way these audiences are built. It examines the interplay among new and traditional media in the dissemination process. It investigates the relative importance of specific media in the early and later stages of the process, as a function of the network properties of their audiences, their audience sizes, and the time to cycle content on each medium.
  3. Anonymity and Identity

    In most consumer markets, consumers are accustomed to operating in relative anonymity. A complex social adjustment is occurring as people realize that anonymity is often no longer their default condition - it must be sought and in some cases bought. New conceptions of privacy are being constructed by processes of public policymaking and marketplace negotiation in settings that range from healthcare to security in air travel to email spam. This research is building a conceptual framework and empirical evidence on consumer preferences for anonymity and identity.
  4. Social Media and Their Consequences for Celebrity

    Social media have had negative consequences for entertainment industries such as music and motion pictures, but they have had positive implications too. This project is concerned with one aspect of these social media effects: changes in the process by which talented people achieve individual success. It investigates how people rise to celebrity when they cannot or chose not to rely on traditional media entertainment industry infrastructures. It explores how, and to what extent, a more populist process is enabled by social media, in which we the people make fame. It studies the balance between celebrity manufactured for us, and celebrity manufactured by us.

    Teaching

  1. Digital Marketing Strategy

    When the tools of marketing change, strategies change too. The focus of this course is on firms trying to navigate the transition from offline to online market-making and strategy development. Our concern is primarily with corporations that have products and services to sell, and secondarily with the challenges of developing the tools of digital marketing.

    Digital media, and in particular social media like Youtube, Facebook, Blogs, and Twitter, represent radically new tools for reaching customers, collaborating with them, building relationships, and spreading ideas virally. Paid search advertising tools like Google's Adsense make "free to consumer" a strategic option. Digital distribution channels change the relationship between manufacturers and retailers, and destabilize entire industry ecosystems, This course examines how pioneering corporations are using these tools to build digital marketing and Web branding strategies for large companies and small, and the course identifies techniques and frameworks to generalize from these pioneering practices.

    The course teaches how to use search engine marketing, social media display advertising, and mobile display advertising, with the help of a hands-on class project in which real funds are spent to achieve in-market results. Next it uses cases on viral propagation to teach some of the mechanics by which social media transmit and create persuasive content. Third, the course explores how marketing companies adopt some of the methods of digital age publishers to disintermediate traditional publishers and take content directly to their customers and prospects.

    The career focus of students taking the course is likely to include both people with an interest in Web-based entrepreneurship, but also people interested in general consumer marketing and general management careers. Given the way marketing media are evolving and patterns of consumer engagement with media are changing, our goal as a class will be to anticipate trends that, while novel and relatively unexplored today, will be mainstream in the next decade.

  2. Marketing Strategies for Profitable Growth—China

    Maintaining quality standards and sustaining profitable growth in China's rapidly evolving marketplace requires powerful marketing strategies that enable organizations to build and nurture long-term customer relationships. To help executives meet this challenge, this course focuses on the critical marketing components required to compete both in China and globally and explores the leading marketing practices from around the world that can be applied to create and sustain competitive advantage in Asia and beyond.

  3. Strategic Marketing Management

    This course offers new insights into the marketing discipline as well as a framework that presents marketing as a value creation process. This course provides instruction in how to design integrated, customer-centric marketing plans and appraise go-to-market programs.

    Awards & Honors

  1. European Case Clearing House (ecch) Award in the Marketing category : Won a 2012 European Case Clearing House (ecch) Award in the Marketing category for his case "Dove: Evolution of a Brand" (HBS Case 508-047).

  2. Edward N. Mayer, Jr. Award for Education Leadership: Received the 2011 Edward N. Mayer Jr. Education Leadership Award from the Direct Marketing Educational Foundation (DMEF).

  3. Robert B. Clarke Outstanding Educator Award: Received the 2002 Robert B. Clarke Outstanding Educator Award from the Direct Marketing Education Foundation.

  4. Hillel J. Einhorn Excellence in Teaching Award: Received the Hillel J. Einhorn Excellence in Teaching Award in 1995.

26 Nov 2012
HBS Working Knowledge
23 Mar 2012
Boston Business Journal
01 Mar 2012
Marketing Management
06 Feb 2012
Boston Globe