Thomas J. DeLong

Philip J. Stomberg Professor of Management Practice

Unit: Organizational Behavior

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Thomas J. DeLong is the Philip J. Stomberg Professor of Management Practice in the Organizational Behavior area at the Harvard Business School. Before joining the Harvard Faculty, DeLong was Chief Development Officer and Managing Director of Morgan Stanley Group, Inc., where he was responsible for the firm’s human capital and focused on issues of organizational strategy and organizational change.

At Harvard, Professor DeLong teaches MBA and executive courses focused on leadership, organizational behavior, managing human capital, and career management. DeLong has served as course head for the required course on Leadership and Organizational Behavior.  He has designed MBA courses focusing on managing human capital in high performance organizations and strategic issues in professional service firms. He currently teaches an elective course on leadership.

DeLong teaches globally in a myriad of executive programs as well as executive courses on campus. He consults with leading organizations on the process of making individual and organizational change.  His new book, Flying Without a Net: Turn Fear of Change into Fuel for Success (Harvard Business School Press, 2011), centers on the challenges of helping talented professionals who are resistant to change.

DeLong co-authored two books focused on leading professional service firms, When Professionals Have to Lead: A New Model for High Performance (Harvard Business School Press, 2007) and Professional Services: Cases and Texts (McGraw-Hill/Irwin 2003). DeLong has coauthored two Harvard Business Review articles, “Let's Hear It for B Players” and “Why Mentoring Matters in a Hypercompetitive World”.  His Harvard Business Review articles focus on why high achieving professionals often unwittingly sabotage their effort to excel.

Professor DeLong received his undergraduate and master’s degrees from Brigham Young University and his Ph.D. from Purdue University in Industrial Supervision.  He received a post-doctoral fellowship from Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


Thomas J DeLong | E-mail: tdelong@hbs.edu

Featured Work

  1. Flying Without a Net: Turn Fear of Change into Fuel for Success

    Confronted by omnipresent threats of job loss and change, even the brightest among us are anxious. In response, we're hunkering down, blocking ourselves from new challenges. This response hurts us and our organizations, but we fear making ourselves even more vulnerable by committing mistakes while learning something new. In Flying Without a Net, Thomas DeLong explains how to draw strength from vulnerability. First, understand the forces that escalate anxiety in high achievers and the unproductive behaviors you turn to for relief. Then adopt practices that give you the courage to "do the right things poorly" before "doing the right things well." Drawing on his extensive research and consulting work, DeLong lays out (1) Roots of high achievers' anxiety: fear of being wrong, lack of a sense of purpose, and a craving for human connection; (2) Destructive behaviors we adopt to relieve our anxiety: busyness, comparing ourselves to others, and blaming others for our frustrations; (3) Behaviors we must adopt to gain strength from vulnerability: putting the past behind us and seeking honest feedback. Packed with practical advice and inspiring stories, Flying Without a Net is an invaluable resource for all leaders seeking to thrive in this age of anxiety.

Publications

Books

  1. Flying Without a Net: Turn Fear of Change into Fuel for Success

    Confronted by omnipresent threats of job loss and change, even the brightest among us are anxious. In response, we're hunkering down, blocking ourselves from new challenges. This response hurts us and our organizations, but we fear making ourselves even more vulnerable by committing mistakes while learning something new. In Flying Without a Net, Thomas DeLong explains how to draw strength from vulnerability. First, understand the forces that escalate anxiety in high achievers and the unproductive behaviors you turn to for relief. Then adopt practices that give you the courage to "do the right things poorly" before "doing the right things well." Drawing on his extensive research and consulting work, DeLong lays out (1) Roots of high achievers' anxiety: fear of being wrong, lack of a sense of purpose, and a craving for human connection; (2) Destructive behaviors we adopt to relieve our anxiety: busyness, comparing ourselves to others, and blaming others for our frustrations; (3) Behaviors we must adopt to gain strength from vulnerability: putting the past behind us and seeking honest feedback. Packed with practical advice and inspiring stories, Flying Without a Net is an invaluable resource for all leaders seeking to thrive in this age of anxiety.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Personal Development and Career; Problems and Challenges; Attitudes; Behavior;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. Flying Without a Net: Turn Fear of Change into Fuel for Success. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press, 2011.
  2. When Professionals Have to Lead: A New Model for High Performance

    For too long, professional services firms (PSFs) have relied on the "producer-manager" model, which works well in uncomplicated business environments. However, today's managing directors must balance conflicting roles, more demanding clients, tougher competitors, and associates with higher expectations of partners at all levels. "Leadership in Professional Services Firms" presents an overarching framework better suited to such complexity. It identifies the four critical activities for effective PSF leadership: setting strategic direction, securing commitment to this direction, facilitating execution, and setting a personal example. Through examples from consulting practices, accounting firms, investment banks, and other professional service organizations, industry veterans DeLong, Gabarro, and Lees show how this model works to: align your firm's culture and key organizational components; satisfy your clients' needs without sacrificing essential managerial responsibilities; and address matters of size, scale, and complexity while maintaining the qualities that make professional services firms unique. A valuable new resource, this book redefines the role of leadership in professional services firms.

    Keywords: Leadership; Management Practices and Processes; Service Operations; Performance Effectiveness; Strategy;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., John J. Gabarro, and Robert Lees. When Professionals Have to Lead: A New Model for High Performance. Harvard Business School Press, 2007.
  3. Professional Services: Text and Cases

    Keywords: Cases; Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Ashish Nanda. Professional Services: Text and Cases. New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2003.

Journal Articles

  1. Should You Listen to the Customer?

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayaraghavan. "Should You Listen to the Customer?" Harvard Business Review 90, no. 9 (September 2012).
  2. How to Avoid Executive Stress

    When teaching various groups of executives, the author relates the story of a man addicted to prescription drugs and his brother who is addicted to achievement. Each group relates to these two professionally successful men and sees that they live largely on the edge of their own insatiable need to keep achieving at all costs. They realize their need to cross achievement markers off their lists. And they also realize that their lists of things to do keep getting longer and longer the more they achieve. They simply add to their list as they cross items off the top. This issue can be identified and dealt with in the same way as any form of addiction.

    Keywords: Behavior; Personal Development and Career; Personal Characteristics; Emotions;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "How to Avoid Executive Stress." Market Leader (March 2012), 50–52.
  3. The Paradox of Excellence

    Why is it that so many smart, ambitious professionals are less productive and satisfied than they could be? We argue that it's often because they're afraid to demonstrate any sign of weakness. They're reluctant to ask important questions or try new approaches that push them outside their comfort zones. For high achievers, looking stupid or incompetent is anathema. So they stick to the tasks they're good at, even while the rest of the organization may be passing them by. In short, they'd rather do the wrong thing well than do the right thing poorly. They get stuck in this unproductive and unfulfilling pattern and can't break free. Of course, leaders in organizations bear some of the blame for this type of play-it-safe mind-set. They don't always want to hear that a person is struggling, nor do they necessarily reward risk taking, even though they might pay lip service to innovative initiative. The authors outline several steps that individuals can take to shake off fear and paralysis, including looking at past negative experiences from somebody else's point of view and seeking out safe ways to allow themselves to become vulnerable.

    Keywords: Employees; Innovation and Invention; Strength and Weakness; Performance Productivity; Risk and Uncertainty; Motivation and Incentives; Satisfaction;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Sara DeLong. "The Paradox of Excellence." Harvard Business Review 89, no. 6 (June 2011).
  4. Why Mentoring Matters in a Hypercompetitive World

    Keywords: Competition; Relationships;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., John J. Gabarro, and Robert Lees. "Why Mentoring Matters in a Hypercompetitive World." Special Issue on HBS Centennial. Harvard Business Review 86, no. 1 (January 2008).
  5. Juggling Isn't the Same As Leading

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., John J. Gabarro, and Robert Lees. "Juggling Isn't the Same As Leading." American Lawyer (December 2007): 124–130. (Excerpt from the book When Professionals Have to Lead.)
  6. Let's Hear It for B Players

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayaraghavan. "Let's Hear It for B Players." Harvard Business Review 81, no. 6 (June 2003).

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Prelude & Co.

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas, Michael Calabrese, and Joseph Siesholtz. "Prelude & Co." Harvard Business School Case 412-080, March 2012.
  2. Schuberg Philis

    The Dutch professional service firm Schuberg Philis has within a few years grown into a well-known player in the Dutch IT outsourcing market and regularly wins high customer- satisfaction marks. The growing workload and 100% promise to customers have increased the pressure on its non-hierarchical teams of engineers, as well as the hiring speed, which some fear could dilute their corporate culture. The three owner-directors must decide whether it is time to stop customer acquisition for a while to "get their house in order." At that moment, though, one of Shuberg Philis perhaps most important business opportunities so far arises.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Organizational Culture; Management Style; Alignment; Information Technology Industry; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Daniela Beyersdorfer. "Schuberg Philis." Harvard Business School Case 412-092, March 2012.
  3. Leadership at Echoing Green (A)

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Battilana, Julie, Thomas DeLong, and James Weber. "Leadership at Echoing Green (A)." Harvard Business School Case 412-090, March 2012.
  4. The Union Carbide Deal (Abridged)

    On November 3, 1986, after a three-hour board of directors meeting, Union Carbide decided to accept First Boston's proposal to embark on a $2.5 billion recapitalization program. Jameson and his associates' efforts had paid off. Jameson had reason to be excited: He had changed a weak relationship between First Boston and Union Carbide into one that would generate tens of millions of dollars in revenues for his firm. In the highly competitive world of investment banking, it was a particularly sweet victory, since First Boston had won the business from Union Carbide's traditional banker, Morgan Stanley. A rewritten version of an earlier case for courses in service management.

    Keywords: Restructuring; Capital Structure; Investment Banking; Financial Strategy; Partners and Partnerships; Competition; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "The Union Carbide Deal (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 897-201, June 1997. (Revised February 2012.)
  5. Erik Peterson at Biometra (A)

    Describes the problems facing a recent MBA graduate in his job as general manager of a medical device company owned by a parent corporation. Raises issues of corporate divisional relationships and the difficulties facing an inexperienced manager who seems to be receiving little support. A redisguised and updated version of earlier case 494-005, reflecting the challenges of managing in innovation/R&D-driven industries and across multiple international sites.

    Keywords: Business Subsidiaries; Leadership; Managerial Roles; Product Launch; Organizational Structure; Problems and Challenges; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., Thomas J. DeLong, and Jevan Soo. "Erik Peterson at Biometra (A)." Harvard Business School Case 411-031, July 2010. (Revised August 2011.)
  6. Erik Peterson at Biometra (B)

    This one-paragraph case adds to the data presented in the (A) case. A redisguised and updated version of earlier case 494-006.

    Keywords: Business Units; Leadership; Management; Product Launch; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., Thomas J. DeLong, and Jevan Soo. "Erik Peterson at Biometra (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 411-032, July 2010. (Revised August 2011.)
  7. Erik Peterson at Biometra (D)

    Implicitly raises the question of what Peterson should do to extricate himself from his difficulties. Should he resign, go directly to his division's executive vice-president to seek relief, or attempt to clarify the situation within the company? A redisguised and updated version of earlier case 494-008.

    Keywords: Employee Relationship Management; Resignation and Termination; Leadership; Management; Product Launch; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., Thomas J. DeLong, and Jevan Soo. "Erik Peterson at Biometra (D)." Harvard Business School Supplement 411-034, August 2010. (Revised August 2011.)
  8. Richard Jenkins at SciMat

    Written from the point of view of Richard Jenkins, the Executive Vice-President of Medical Devices at SciMat. Presents his reflections on the series of events leading to the firing of one of SciMat's general managers, Erik Peterson. A redisguised and updated version of earlier case 494-113.

    Keywords: Resignation and Termination; Managerial Roles; Situation or Environment; Perspective; Medical Devices and Supplies Industry;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., Thomas J. DeLong, and Jevan Soo. "Richard Jenkins at SciMat." Harvard Business School Case 411-036, August 2010. (Revised August 2011.)
  9. AGENCY.COM (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-800-061) and (9-800-062).

    Keywords: Internet; Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Corporate Finance; Growth and Development; Web Services Industry; Consulting Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Thomas J. DeLong. "AGENCY.COM (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-014, September 2000. (Revised August 2011.)
  10. Hindustan Unilever Limited

    This case illustrates Hindustan Unilever Limited's conflict resolution and people development policies using a “leading from the middle” example. The story centers on the challenges faced by an HR manager at a factory who must meet organizational objectives while handling multiple trade unions that are resisting change as well as having conflicts amongst themselves.

    Keywords: Employee Relationship Management; Labor Unions; Leadership; Goals and Objectives; Managerial Roles; Conflict Management; Food and Beverage Industry; India;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Mona Srivastava. "Hindustan Unilever Limited." Harvard Business School Case 410-002, January 2010. (Revised July 2011.)
  11. Erik Peterson at Biometra (C)

    Describes the outcome of Erik Peterson's meetings over the course of two days with a number of senior executives from the parent company. Students should have read the (A) and (B) cases. The (C) case may be assigned with the (D) case. A redisguised and updated version of earlier case 494-007.

    Keywords: Conferences; Leadership; Management; Product Launch; Problems and Challenges;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., Thomas J. DeLong, and Jevan Soo. "Erik Peterson at Biometra (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 411-033, August 2010. (Revised July 2011.)
  12. Erik Peterson at Biometra (E)

    Presents the final outcome of the events. The Richard Jenkins at SciMat case presents a description from the executive vice-president's point of view of the series of events as reported in the Erik Peterson at Biometra (A), (B), (C), and (D) cases. The Jenkins at SciMat case can be assigned with Erik Peterson at Biometra (E) to give a broader perspective on Peterson's behavior and problems. This case can be handed out during class discussion of the (D) case. A redisguised and updated version of earlier case 494-009.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Leadership; Business or Company Management; Management Succession; Product Launch; Outcome or Result; Problems and Challenges; Behavior; Perspective;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., Thomas J. DeLong, and Jevan Soo. "Erik Peterson at Biometra (E)." Harvard Business School Supplement 411-035, August 2010. (Revised July 2011.)
  13. State of Emergency at Mercy Hospital

    Dr. Scott Gabu, Chairman of the Emergency Department of the world-renowned, university-based Mercy Hospital, was deeply disturbed when he read the letter from the family of John Samson, a patient who had come to the emergency room one week earlier, that described an incident that occurred at the hospital in which Dr. Jason Diliper, the attending Chief Resident in charge of Mr. Samson, irresponsibly threatened Mr. Samson's health by leaving his bedside while Mr. Samson was having difficulty breathing. Diliper had been a rising star at the hospital, but lately a number of reports about his behavior had concerned Gabu. Was Diliper burning out? What should Gabu do?

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Knowledge Acquisition; Leadership Development; Behavior; Personal Characteristics; Health Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Chirag D Shah. "State of Emergency at Mercy Hospital." Harvard Business School Case 409-048, October 2008. (Revised June 2010.)
  14. Echoing Green

    This case presents the leadership challenges that Cheryl Dorsey, the president of Echoing Green, faces in early 2009. Echoing Green is a fellowship program that seeks to improve society by identifying and supporting social entrepreneurs who launch organizations to attack some of the world's most difficult problems. After turning Echoing Green around and re-building an organization almost from scratch over the last 7 years, Dorsey feels that Echoing Green is at a crossroads as it is facing much more competition. Adding to Dorsey's challenges, in late 2008 the economy is in crisis and many Echoing Green supporters are reducing or delaying their donations. In this situation, Dorsey has to decide whether, and if so how, to change Echoing Green's strategy as well as whether she is the right person to continue to lead the organization.

    Keywords: Change Management; Financial Crisis; Social Entrepreneurship; Leadership Style; Organizational Structure; Personal Development and Career; Social Enterprise;

    Citation:

    Battilana, Julie, Thomas J. DeLong, and James Weber. "Echoing Green." Harvard Business School Case 410-013, July 2009. (Revised December 2009.)
  15. Managing a Global Team: Greg James at Sun Microsystems, Inc. (A)

    Greg James, a global manager at Sun Microsystems, Inc., sets out to meet with his entire 43-member customer implementation team spread across India, France, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States of America to resolve a dire customer system outage as required by a service agreement. Rather than finding a swift resolution to the rapidly escalating customer situation that motivated his trip, he finds himself facing distributed work, global collaboration, conflict, and management issues that are threatening to unravel his team.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Crisis Management; Service Delivery; Groups and Teams; Conflict and Resolution; Technology Industry; India; United Arab Emirates; France; United States;

    Citation:

    Neeley, Tsedal, and Thomas J. DeLong. "Managing a Global Team: Greg James at Sun Microsystems, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 409-003, July 2008. (Revised November 2009.)
  16. CapitaLand Ltd: CEO Selection

    In September 2007, the Group President of CapitaLand has to select a new CEO for a key subsidiary. The case presents the profiles of three candidates—two internal and one external—and ends with the senior management team debating the candidates' merits.

    Keywords: Selection and Staffing; Management Teams; Managerial Roles; Personal Characteristics;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Michael Shih-ta Chen, and G.A. Donovan. "CapitaLand Ltd: CEO Selection." Harvard Business School Case 410-055, September 2009.
  17. Leading from the Side

    Harriet Cornwall, a partner at the law firm of Kensington Palmer, LLP, is made lead over a fellow group of attorneys. Put in charge of guiding her colleagues in their annual goal-setting initiative, she notices four that need special attention. Cornwall must address their poor performance and goals as a colleague rather than as a manager.

    Keywords: Goals and Objectives; Managerial Roles; Performance Evaluation; Partners and Partnerships;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "Leading from the Side." Harvard Business School Case 409-023, July 2008.
  18. The Producing Manager: A Double-Barreled Role

    The purpose of this note is to ground and amplify on the characteristics and challenges of the producing manager role. It is in response to requests from participants for a piece of "take away" material that can be shared with colleagues in professional service firms that is detailed and operational in nature.

    Keywords: Managerial Roles; Production; Service Operations; Practice;

    Citation:

    Gabarro, John J., and Thomas J. DeLong. "The Producing Manager: A Double-Barreled Role." Harvard Business School Background Note 908-415, May 2008.
  19. Antegren: A Beacon of Hope (C)

    Keywords: Crisis Management;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., Thomas J. DeLong, and Terence Heymann. "Antegren: A Beacon of Hope (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-027, November 2007. (Revised April 2008.)
  20. Antegren: A Beacon of Hope (D)

    Keywords: Crisis Management;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., Thomas J. DeLong, and Terence Heymann. "Antegren: A Beacon of Hope (D)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-028, November 2007. (Revised April 2008.)
  21. A Framework for Pursuing Diversity in the Workplace

    Assesses the costs and benefits of pursuing diversity and pinpoints the primary barriers to creating diverse workplaces. It also proposes some options for advancing diversity in an organization.

    Keywords: Cost vs Benefits; Organizational Culture; Problems and Challenges; Diversity Characteristics;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Michael Brookshire. "A Framework for Pursuing Diversity in the Workplace." Harvard Business School Background Note 407-029, August 2006. (Revised November 2007.)
  22. Antegren: A Beacon of Hope

    The CEO of Biogen Idec faces a set of difficult decisions regarding a promising drug for Multiple Sclerosis that is headed for early approval by the FDA. The first in a series focuses on operational decisions triggered by the drive for early approval. Sparks discussion about a leader's economic, legal, and ethical responsibilities to multiple constituencies and how a leader can guide a company to execute effectively, fulfilling those responsibilities, in a complex situation. Decisions facing the company include how to sustain credible research on the drug's efficacy and safety, how to increase manufacturing capacity to meet expected demand, and how to secure insurer reimbursement. All of these challenges arise against the backdrop of the accelerated approval process, uncertainty about what the FDA will ultimately decide, and whether the company should indeed pursue early approval.

    Keywords: Demand and Consumers; Leadership; Ethics; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Decision Choices and Conditions; Crisis Management; Health Testing and Trials; Biotechnology Industry; Pharmaceutical Industry;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., Thomas J. DeLong, and Terence Heymann. "Antegren: A Beacon of Hope." Harvard Business School Case 408-025, November 2007.
  23. Antegren: A Beacon of Hope (B)

    Keywords: Crisis Management;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., Thomas J. DeLong, and Terence Heymann. "Antegren: A Beacon of Hope (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 408-026, November 2007.
  24. Shinsei Bank: Developing an Integrated Firm

    Tom Pedersen, newly appointed chief learning officer (CLO) of Shinsei Bank in Japan, pondered how he could facilitate development of an integrated culture and transformation of the organization. Shinsei Bank had not developed longstanding tradition or a strong corporate culture. The bank, which was made up of professionals with extremely diverse backgrounds, had to develop an integrated organizational culture. Pedersen had just administered a new performance evaluation program for 17 senior executives. This was the first time that they had been measured against competencies aligned with the corporate vision and values revised in late 2005. He thought the evaluation program was critical for permeating the vision and values throughout the bank and was eager to roll out the program to a larger number of employees next year. Pedersen wondered how he should improve the performance evaluation, and if this was the right process to influence the culture of the bank? He also wondered what other measures might be effective to get employees with diverse backgrounds to work together. How could he create a learning organization at Shinshei Bank?

    Keywords: Integration; Mission and Purpose; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Talent and Talent Management; Organizational Culture; Performance Evaluation; Cooperation; Diversity Characteristics; Japan;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Masako Egawa. "Shinsei Bank: Developing an Integrated Firm." Harvard Business School Case 407-006, September 2006. (Revised October 2007.)
  25. Shinsei Bank: Developing an Integrated Firm (B)

    Keywords: Banks and Banking; Business Ventures; Integration; Growth and Development; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Terence Heymann. "Shinsei Bank: Developing an Integrated Firm (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 407-103, June 2007.
  26. Shapiro Global

    Su Yee Goh, a director in a Singapore office, considers a proposal by a pregnant female executive for an alternative work arrangement so that she could both continue to work and spend more time with her family. Goh wants to keep the executive at Shapiro Global, but is afraid an alternative role would be disruptive to the marketing team and could create dissension among the other employees.

    Keywords: Disruption; Globalized Firms and Management; Employee Relationship Management; Retention; Work-Life Balance; Singapore;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Michael Brookshire, Monica Haugen, Michelle Kravetz, and Sarah Sommer. "Shapiro Global." Harvard Business School Case 407-003, August 2006. (Revised June 2007.)
  27. King Arthur Flour

    Steve Voigt, the CEO of King Arthur Flour, must determine how the company can continue to grow, whilst preserving its unique culture. In 1996, the company was sold to employees in as ESOP transaction. The following decade saw significant growth, despite declining sales for the industry as a whole. The success could be attributed both to the quality of the product and to the company culture, which treated employee-owners with respect and allowed them to meaningfully contribute to the future direction of the company. By 2006, King Arthur flour had grown from 60 employees to over 200 and Voigt was left questioning whether the unique culture, and ESOP structure, would continue to function as the company continued to expand.

    Keywords: Employee Stock Ownership Plan; Business or Company Management; Organizational Culture; Employee Ownership;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., James Holian, and Joshua Weiss. "King Arthur Flour." Harvard Business School Case 407-012, October 2006. (Revised May 2007.)
  28. Cirque Du Soleil (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-403-006).

    Keywords: Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Jaan Margus Elias. "Cirque Du Soleil (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 403-158, May 2003. (Revised May 2007.)
  29. Shinsei Bank: Developing an Integrated Firm (TN)

    Keywords: Banks and Banking; Business Ventures; Integration;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Terence Heymann. "Shinsei Bank: Developing an Integrated Firm (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 407-101, May 2007.
  30. Alex Montana at ESH Manufacturing Co. (TN)

    Keywords: Manufacturing Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Terence Heymann. "Alex Montana at ESH Manufacturing Co. (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 407-102, May 2007.
  31. Bradley Marquez: Reduction in Force (TN) (A) and (B)

    Keywords: Job Cuts and Outsourcing;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Terence Heymann. "Bradley Marquez: Reduction in Force (TN) (A) and (B)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 407-091, March 2007.
  32. King Arthur Flour (TN)

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Terence Heymann. "King Arthur Flour (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 407-013, February 2007.
  33. King Arthur Flour--video

    Keywords: Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "King Arthur Flour--video." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 407-701, December 2006.
  34. Infosys (B): Strategic Human Resource Management

    Keywords: Human Resources; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Jaya Tandon. "Infosys (B): Strategic Human Resource Management." Harvard Business School Supplement 406-011, October 2005. (Revised October 2006.)
  35. Infosys (A): Strategic Human Resource Management

    Hema Ravichandar, head of human resources, was given a new and aggressive milestone to reach: ensure Infosys is on the Top 10 lists of both Best Performing Companies and Best Employers by 2007. No large organization had ever been able to achieve this distinction because of the tension between the need to control costs for financial performance and the expenditure required for employee satisfaction. Ravichandar was aware of the humbling experiences of the past that made Infosys cognizant of the difficulties ahead as it transitioned from a small to a large company.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Transition; Cost; Human Resources; Employee Relationship Management; Problems and Challenges; Competitive Strategy; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Jaya Tandon, and Ganesh Rengaswamy. "Infosys (A): Strategic Human Resource Management." Harvard Business School Case 406-010, October 2005. (Revised October 2006.)
  36. Taj Hotel Group (TN)

    Keywords: Accommodations Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Jaan Margus Elias, and Terence Heymann. "Taj Hotel Group (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 407-034, September 2006.
  37. Infosys (A): Strategic Human Resource Management (TN)

    Keywords: Human Resources; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and George Lambros Karris. "Infosys (A): Strategic Human Resource Management (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 406-105, May 2006.
  38. Alex Montana at ESH Manufacturing Co.

    Alex Montana sat at his desk pondering the career decision before him. Alex was director of the North American division of ESH Manufacturing, a $4.6 billion, Cleveland-based company with operations on three continents. ESH's CEO had just offered Montana a promotion to global vice-president. Normally, Montana would have jumped at such an opportunity, but he worried about its impact on his already strained personal life. Since his last promotion, he had trouble balancing an increasingly demanding workload with his responsibilities to his wife and daughter at home. Montana felt pressure to accept the promotion. His boss expected him to accept; in fact, his boss had emphasized that he had no second choice. He had always dreamed of making it big in the business world. Success in this new role could put him in the running for COO and, eventually, CEO. But at what cost?

    Keywords: Decision Making; Decision Choices and Conditions; Personal Development and Career; Work-Life Balance; Manufacturing Industry; Cleveland;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Michael Kernish. "Alex Montana at ESH Manufacturing Co." Harvard Business School Case 405-106, June 2005. (Revised May 2006.)
  39. Xilinx, Inc. (A)

    Is it possible to create a great business and a company? Wim Roelandts sets out, in the context of Xilinx, to create a high-performance organization without sacrificing the human dimension. Roelandts experiences additional pressure when the company is affected by a downturn in business.

    Keywords: Business Ventures; Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Organizational Design;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Christina Darwall. "Xilinx, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 403-136, June 2003. (Revised January 2006.)
  40. Xilinx, Inc. (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Christina Darwall. "Xilinx, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Case 403-137, June 2003. (Revised January 2006.)
  41. SG Cowen: New Recruits

    Chip Rae, director of recruiting at SG Cowen, must decide which recruits to keep after the final interview process for new outside associate hires. Along with team captains assigned to each school, he reviews the criteria used to make hiring decisions. Their new strategy is to look beyond the top 10 core business schools for the best of class in the top 25, avoiding people in the middle of their class. After some initial resistance, senior managers eventually see the wisdom of the new strategy.

    Keywords: Recruitment; Selection and Staffing; Decision Making; Management Practices and Processes; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayaraghavan. "SG Cowen: New Recruits." Harvard Business School Case 402-028, May 2002. (Revised January 2006.)
  42. Coach Roy Williams: What Next? (A)

    Roy Williams, head coach of the Kansas University Men's Basketball Team, was facing a major decision. The recent resignation of the coach at the University of North Carolina (UNC) had lead to speculation that Williams, a UNC alumnus, would be named as its new coach. Williams had actually been offered the head coaching job at UNC in 2000, but he turned it down to remain at Kansas. However, circumstances had drastically changed in the past three years, making the impending decision substantially more complicated. Recently, Williams had grown increasingly frustrated with his boss, whose philosophy on college athletics drastically differed from his own. Meanwhile, UNC, an institution with an unparalleled history of college basketball success, had suffered from several disappointing seasons and was in search of a new leader to restore the program to its original stature. For Williams, the opportunity to return to his beloved alma mater and rescue the program from its recent woes was both electrifying and humbling, but it was offset by his deep loyalty to Kansas. Williams knew that the upcoming championship game would be difficult, but he recognized that it paled in comparison to the decision he would be forced to make after the game. Williams must not only confront the decision but struggle with issues of succession planning, career development, and leadership.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Resignation and Termination; Job Offer; Leading Change; Management Succession; Performance Improvement; Personal Development and Career; Sports; Kansas; North Carolina;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Christoper Chang, and Scott Schweitzer. "Coach Roy Williams: What Next? (A)." Harvard Business School Case 405-070, June 2005. (Revised October 2005.)
  43. Coach Roy Williams: What Next? (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Sports; Sports Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Christopher Chang, and Scott Schweitzer. "Coach Roy Williams: What Next? (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 405-093, June 2005. (Revised October 2005.)
  44. C&S Wholesale Grocers: Self-Managed Teams (TN)

    Keywords: Food; Management Teams; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "C&S Wholesale Grocers: Self-Managed Teams (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 406-049, September 2005.
  45. Changing Times at the NBA

    David Stern, commissioner of the National Basketball Association (NBA), faces myriad challenges: globalization of product, young players entering the league, loss of fan base, etc. Stern must put together a plan for the Board of Governors that confronts these challenges to create a more dynamic, profitable, and strategic organization.

    Keywords: Business Plan; Governing and Advisory Boards; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Problems and Challenges; Sports; Competitive Strategy;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Tonika Cheek-Clayton, and Daniel Reed. "Changing Times at the NBA." Harvard Business School Case 405-004, January 2005. (Revised August 2005.)
  46. Proctor & Gamble: Global Business Services (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-404-124).

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "Proctor & Gamble: Global Business Services (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 406-030, August 2005.
  47. De La Salle Academy (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-404-024).

    Keywords: Education Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Laura Donohue. "De La Salle Academy (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 406-031, August 2005.
  48. Utah Symphony and Utah Opera: A Merger Proposal (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-404-116).

    Keywords: Governing and Advisory Boards; Arts; Mergers and Acquisitions; Design; Organizational Culture; Voting; Integration; Human Capital; Music Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "Utah Symphony and Utah Opera: A Merger Proposal (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 406-027, July 2005.
  49. Procter & Gamble: Global Business Services

    Dave Walker, vice-president of business service opportunities and chairman of the governance team at Procter & Gamble, must decide what to do with P&G's 5,700 employee Global Business Services (GBS) group. GBS brought together internal services such as finance, accounting, employee services, customer logistics, purchasing, and information technology into a single, global organization supporting all P&G business units. Recently, P&G CEO A.G. Lafley questioned whether continued investment in GBS represented the best use of P&G's resources. Walker and the other members of the governance team must decide whether to spin off GBS, outsource GBS services to an outside company, outsource the GBS divisions separately to best-of-breed companies, or keep the group in-house. In making the decision, Walker and the members of the team must consider the impact on the organization of altering the existing relationships between the members of GBS and the other employees at P&G. Teaching Purpose: To consider the issues inherent in any decision to outsource services and the impact of such a change on the company.

    Keywords: Business Units; Change Management; Decision Making; Globalized Firms and Management; Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Organizational Design;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Warren Brackin, Alex Cabanas, Phil Shellhammer, and David L. Ager. "Procter & Gamble: Global Business Services." Harvard Business School Case 404-124, June 2004. (Revised July 2005.)
  50. Thomas Weisel Partners (A)

    Thomas Weisel, longtime leader of Montgomery Securities, realizes that the sale of Montgomery to NationsBank was the biggest mistake of his life. After his exit from NationsBanc Montgomery Securities, Weisel develops a business plan for a new merchant bank, Thomas Weisel Partners.

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Business Plan; Financial Institutions; Management Teams; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, Boris Groysberg, Matthew C. Lieb, and Scott D Landry. "Thomas Weisel Partners (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-215, March 2000. (Revised February 2005.)
  51. Thomas Weisel Partners (B): Year One

    After its launch in February 1999, Thomas Weisel Partners experiences rapid growth in its first year. This case details the inaugural year's development and probes what steps the firm should take to continue the momentum.

    Keywords: Competitive Strategy; Financial Institutions; Management Teams; Growth Management; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scott D Landry. "Thomas Weisel Partners (B): Year One." Harvard Business School Case 800-331, March 2000. (Revised February 2005.)
  52. The Power of Supporting Players in High-Performance Industries

    Keywords: Management Style; Groups and Teams;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "The Power of Supporting Players in High-Performance Industries." Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing Class Lecture, 2005. Electronic. (Faculty Lecture: HBSP Product Number 9-825-8C.)
  53. Utah Symphony and Utah Opera: A Merger Proposal

    Anne Ewers, general director of Utah Opera, is awaiting the decision of the members of the board of the Utah Symphony and Utah Opera about whether to merge Utah's top two arts organizations. If the vote favors the merger, Ewers will be asked to assume the helm of the newly created organization and take responsibility for integrating the two organizations. Challenges students to consider the merits of the merger and to develop an action plan for how Ewers would integrate the two organizations, including how to design the new firm, how to manage various constituents--many of whom are upset by the announcement--and how to create a new corporate culture. Students also need to specify what Ewers would do in the first few days if the vote were to favor merging the two organizations. Teaching Purpose: To explore the human capital issues related to mergers and acquisitions.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Change Management; Organizational Culture; Human Resources; Management; Fine Arts Industry; Music Industry; Utah;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and David L. Ager. "Utah Symphony and Utah Opera: A Merger Proposal." Harvard Business School Case 404-116, June 2004. (Revised June 2004.)
  54. Venture Law Group (A)

    Craig Johnson, Venture Law Group's (VLG) chairman, founded VLG in 1993 with a goal of "zero voluntary turnover." In late 1998, Johnson faces the departure of three important partners, prompting himself to ask what VLG can do in the midst of an "economic hurricane" that is luring VLG attorneys to leave and enter dot.com companies.

    Keywords: Business Model; Customer Relationship Management; Partners and Partnerships; Retention; Legal Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scott D Landry. "Venture Law Group (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-065, February 2000. (Revised March 2004.)
  55. C&S Wholesale Grocers: The Challenge of Self-Managed Teams

    Keywords: Management Teams; Food and Beverage Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "C&S Wholesale Grocers: The Challenge of Self-Managed Teams." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 404-802, March 2004.
  56. International Profit Associates

    Describes the work environment, systems, and processes that allow International Profit Associates (IPA) to follow a systematic four-step approach to providing advisory service to small business owners.

    Keywords: Organizational Structure; Business Processes; Business Model; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Monica Mullick. "International Profit Associates." Harvard Business School Case 801-397, March 2001. (Revised February 2004.)
  57. Mellon Investor Services (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-402-036).

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Jaan Margus Elias. "Mellon Investor Services (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 404-093, January 2004.
  58. Anne F. Baird

    Presents profiles written by six members of the HBS Class of 1976 from the 10th and 20th reunions. The six alumni represent a cross section of the class of 1976 and provide a snapshot of life at the time of the reunions.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Perlow, Leslie A., and Thomas J. DeLong. "Anne F. Baird." Harvard Business School Supplement 403-086, November 2002. (Revised October 2003.)
  59. Ottawa Voyageurs, The

    Manuel Tertuliano, head coach of a professional soccer club, must make some difficult decisions about the compensation of six of his players. Specifically, he must decide how to allocate $850,000 among these six players in a way that will benefit his team, which has just finished second to last in the league and faces being eliminated from the league if team performance and game attendance don't improve. Tertuliano realizes that compensation is a key tool in motivating his players. In deciding on these six players' compensation, Tertuliano must ensure that he not only recognizes them, but also the other players on the team for the value each individual contributes to the team.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Compensation and Benefits; Performance; Motivation and Incentives; Sports; Groups and Teams; Sports Industry; Entertainment and Recreation Industry; Canada;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Scott Baldwin, Chris Strong, Andrew Feng, Eliza Moody, and David Ager. "Ottawa Voyageurs, The." Harvard Business School Case 404-023, July 2003. (Revised October 2003.)
  60. C&S Wholesale Grocers: Self-Managed Teams

    Rick Cohen, president and CEO of C&S Wholesale Grocers, is trying to decide whether and how to implement the self-managed teams concept in his warehouse. Eight months earlier, C&S had begun to act as principal wholesaler to A&P throughout New England, a decision that was consistent with the firm's growth strategy, but that also represented a significant increase in daily throughput. Cohen was concerned about whether the company's existing operations would be able to meet the needs of all its customers and maintain the high levels of customer satisfaction for which the company was known throughout New England. When implemented successfully, the self-managed teams concept had been credited with enhancing an organization's productivity and competitiveness. Cohen wondered how such a concept could be implemented in the context of a labor-intensive, unionized warehouse environment.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Decision Making; Labor Unions; Growth and Development Strategy; Distribution Channels; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Structure; Groups and Teams; New England;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Tejal Mody, and David Ager. "C&S Wholesale Grocers: Self-Managed Teams." Harvard Business School Case 404-025, August 2003. (Revised October 2003.)
  61. Trilogy University (TN)

    Teaching Note to (9-403-012).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Jaan Margus Elias. "Trilogy University (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 404-067, September 2003.
  62. De La Salle Academy

    Brother Brian Carty, headmaster and founder of De La Salle Academy, a private school for academically talented, economically disadvantaged children in grades six to eight in New York City, is scheduled to meet with the school's board of directors to discuss how the school and its education concept can be extended to more children. Over 750 children apply each year for the 50 spaces at De La Salle, and most have few other options if rejected but to enroll in the New York Public School system. The school relies on the financial support of the local community and charitable foundations to cover operating expenses, as most of the students are unable to pay the tuition of approximately $9,000 a year to attend. Not only do the school's graduates go on to elite preparatory and independent schools in the Northeast, but they also attend some of the most well-regarded colleges in the country, including Brown, Harvard, Stanford, and Yale.

    Keywords: Middle School Education; Corporate Accountability; Giving and Philanthropy; Business and Community Relations; Management Succession; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Organizational Design; Success; Growth and Development; Education Industry; New York (city, NY);

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and David Ager. "De La Salle Academy." Harvard Business School Case 404-024, July 2003.
  63. S.G. Cowen: New Recruits (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-402-028).

    Keywords: Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Jaan Margus Elias. "S.G. Cowen: New Recruits (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 403-154, May 2003. (Revised June 2003.)
  64. Harrah's Entertainment, Inc: Rewarding Our People (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-403-008).

    Keywords: Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Jaan Margus Elias. "Harrah's Entertainment, Inc: Rewarding Our People (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 403-155, May 2003.
  65. North East Medical Services

    Sophie Wong, president and CEO of North East Medical Services, a health care organization dedicated to serving the underprivileged Asian American community in San Francisco, must decide how to reposition the organization to serve patients from multiple income levels without compromising the mission of the clinic. Wong must reconcile issues surrounding divergent stakeholder preferences and beliefs about the quality of service offered at the clinic.

    Keywords: Health Care and Treatment; Human Resources; Leadership; Business and Stakeholder Relations; Health Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Wendy Carter. "North East Medical Services." Harvard Business School Case 403-002, July 2002. (Revised March 2003.)
  66. Harrah's Entertainment, Inc: Rewarding Our People

    Marilyn Winn, head of human resources at Harrah's Entertainment, must make a recommendation to the company's president and CEO about whether the existing bonus payout program is effective at motivating employees or whether it should be revised and/or replaced. A recent downturn in economic conditions led Winn to wonder whether customer service payouts were the most efficient way to make Harrah's a service-driven and customer-driven company.

    Keywords: Customer Satisfaction; Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Compensation and Benefits; Employees; Human Capital; Management Style; Motivation and Incentives; Alignment; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayaraghavan. "Harrah's Entertainment, Inc: Rewarding Our People." Harvard Business School Case 403-008, July 2002. (Revised January 2003.)
  67. Mercer Management Consulting (A)

    Insurance giant Marsh & McLennan acquires management consulting firms Temple, Barker & Sloane (TBS) in 1987 and Strategic Planning Associates (SPA) in 1990 and sets out to merge the two. The merger proceeds slowly and painfully. Following the February 1990 merger, George Overholser and Ware Adams face difficult decisions. Overholser, a principal at Mercer, must decide how to meet the challenge of leading an effort to integrate the two firms. Adams, a Mercer associate, must decide whether to leave the firm to join Dean & Co., a spin-off recently founded by former partners Dean Wilde and Dean Silverman. Overholser, who had also been invited to join the Deans, had already declined the offer when the case opens. Overholser, Adams, Wilde, and Silverman are all formerly of SPA, a firm whose culture and business model differed markedly from that of TBS. Walker Lewis, founder of SPA, arrived at the terms "industry knowledge consulting" and "expertise consulting" to describe TBS's approach and "analytical consulting" and "model-driven consulting" to describe SPA's.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Business Model; Decision Making; Organizational Culture; Personal Development and Career; Horizontal Integration; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Michael Echenberg. "Mercer Management Consulting (A)." Harvard Business School Case 403-009, July 2002. (Revised December 2002.)
  68. Mercer Management Consulting (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Michael Echenberg. "Mercer Management Consulting (B)." Harvard Business School Case 403-010, July 2002. (Revised December 2002.)
  69. Linda Fay Harris

    Presents profiles written by six members of the HBS Class of 1976 from the 10th and 20th reunions. The six alumni represent a cross section of the class of 1976 and provide a snapshot of life at the time of the reunions.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Perlow, Leslie A., and Thomas J. DeLong. "Linda Fay Harris." Harvard Business School Supplement 403-081, November 2002.
  70. Samuel Allston

    Presents profiles written by six members of the HBS Class of 1976 from the 10th and 20th reunions. The six alumni represent a cross section of the class of 1976 and provide a snapshot of life at the time of the reunions.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Perlow, Leslie A., and Thomas J. DeLong. "Samuel Allston." Harvard Business School Supplement 403-082, November 2002.
  71. Patricia Hughes Mason

    Presents profiles written by six members of the HBS Class of 1976 from the 10th and 20th reunions. The six alumni represent a cross section of the class of 1976 and provide a snapshot of life at the time of the reunions.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Perlow, Leslie A., and Thomas J. DeLong. "Patricia Hughes Mason." Harvard Business School Supplement 403-083, November 2002.
  72. Matthew J. Martin

    Presents profiles written by six members of the HBS Class of 1976 from the 10th and 20th reunions. The six alumni represent a cross section of the class of 1976 and provide a snapshot of life at the time of the reunions.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Perlow, Leslie A., and Thomas J. DeLong. "Matthew J. Martin." Harvard Business School Supplement 403-084, November 2002.
  73. Richard Oliva

    Presents profiles written by six members of the HBS Class of 1976 from the 10th and 20th reunions. The six alumni represent a cross section of the class of 1976 and provide a snapshot of life at the time of the reunions.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Perlow, Leslie A., and Thomas J. DeLong. "Richard Oliva." Harvard Business School Supplement 403-085, November 2002.
  74. Profiles of the Class of 1976

    Presents profiles written by six members of the HBS Class of 1976 from the 10th and 20th reunions. The six alumni represent a cross section of the class of 1976 and provide a snapshot of life at the time of the reunions.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    Perlow, Leslie A., and Thomas J. DeLong. "Profiles of the Class of 1976." Harvard Business School Case 403-087, November 2002.
  75. Crucial Conversations

    Todd McKenna, a third-year associate at an investment banking firm, confronts his boss. His boss had told him he would be the top paid associate at the firm, and McKenna finds out that this isn't true. He approaches his boss to find out why he was lied to.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Investment Banking; Executive Compensation; Employee Relationship Management; Rank and Position; Banking Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayraghavan. "Crucial Conversations." Harvard Business School Case 403-027, July 2002. (Revised November 2002.)
  76. Career Strategies and Tactics in Professional Service Firms

    Presents suggestions for ensuring a good start in a professional services career.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Performance Expectations; Performance Effectiveness; Customization and Personalization; Practice; Valuation; Performance Evaluation; Business Startups; Competency and Skills; Learning; Talent and Talent Management; Management Skills; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Career Strategies and Tactics in Professional Service Firms." Harvard Business School Background Note 800-375, April 2000. (Revised October 2002.)
  77. Cirque du Soleil

    Retaining talent is an issue for any company whose success relies on the creativity and excellence of its employees. This is especially true for Cirque du Soleil, the spectacularly successful "circus without animals," whose 2,100 employees include 500 artists--mimes, clowns, acrobats, gymnasts, musicians, and production professionals. Managing a company full of creative people is a juggling act in itself, between keeping its artists happy and pursuing a successful strategy for attracting more business and talent.

    Keywords: Retention; Employee Relationship Management; Business Strategy; Talent and Talent Management; Organizational Culture; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayaraghavan. "Cirque du Soleil." Harvard Business School Case 403-006, July 2002. (Revised October 2002.)
  78. Taj Hotel Group

    R.K. Krishna Kumar, managing director and head of Taj Hotel Group, has to decide whether to reexamine a promotion decision. In an attempt to deliver a level of service quality that met global standards at the Indian hotel chain, Kumar had introduced new personnel management systems at the company. As a result, a committee was now responsible for deciding which managers should be promoted to senior positions at the company. Taj's COO, one of the more respected executives at the company, requested that a committee decision be overturned. Kumar must respect the committee's choice or indulge his popular manager's request to reexamine it.

    Keywords: Decision Making; Human Resources; Leadership Development; Management Teams; Organizational Culture; Alignment; India;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayaraghavan. "Taj Hotel Group." Harvard Business School Case 403-004, July 2002. (Revised October 2002.)
  79. Professional Services Module Seven: Becoming a Professional

    Discusses strategies for balancing private and professional life.

    Keywords: Experience and Expertise; Success; Work-Life Balance;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Seven: Becoming a Professional." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-013, September 2000. (Revised October 2002.)
  80. Bradley Marquez: Reduction in Force (A)

    The Bradley Marquez advertising agency had created a successful niche delivering ethnic markets to their clients, corporate giants like Compaq, Sprint, Texaco, and British Airways. The company was operating in aggressive growth mode when, in 2000, the stock market bubble of the 1990s burst. Now, Andrew Lauder, chief operating officer, faces the possibility of a second round of layoffs and downsizing, "no longer cutting fat but cutting muscle," as Lauder puts it. Being a public company means that warning of upcoming layoffs would violate securities laws.

    Keywords: Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Financial Crisis; Price Bubble; Human Resources; Employees; Job Cuts and Outsourcing; Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayaraghavan. "Bradley Marquez: Reduction in Force (A)." Harvard Business School Case 403-005, July 2002. (Revised October 2002.)
  81. Trilogy University

    In early 2001, Trilogy Software faced a slowdown in its business, a large number of unsuccessful customer deployments, and an overall weakening in the enterprise software market. In response, the company revamped its business model and restructured the organization. Joe Liemandt, chairman and CEO of Trilogy, along with members of the company's senior management team must decide whether Trilogy University, the company's internal training program for new college recruits and other recently hired employees, supported or detracted from the company's new objectives. Specifically, they must decide whether and, if so, how Trilogy University, the traditional source of new ideas, new products, and new approaches at Trilogy, should be adapted to reflect the strategic changes that were taking place throughout the organization.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Organizational Design; Alignment; Restructuring; Organizational Structure; Change Management; Business Strategy; Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Michael Paley. "Trilogy University." Harvard Business School Case 403-012, August 2002.
  82. Bradley Marquez: Reduction in Force (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Resignation and Termination; Employees; Advertising Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Vineeta Vijayaraghavan. "Bradley Marquez: Reduction in Force (B)." Harvard Business School Case 403-007, July 2002.
  83. Infosys Technologies

    Creating and sustaining a third-world-based technology company to compete globally (i.e. in the first-world) poses many challenges. Such challenges are examined through the genesis and progression of Infosys Technologies Ltd. Key decisions made by Chairman N.R. Narayana Murthy are particularly highlighted.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business or Company Management; Management Practices and Processes; Business Strategy; Cross-Cultural and Cross-Border Issues; Global Strategy; Growth and Development Strategy; Planning; Technological Innovation; Emerging Markets; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Thomas J. DeLong. "Infosys Technologies." Harvard Business School Case 801-445, May 2001. (Revised May 2002.)
  84. Tradeoffs: Juggling Careers in Professional Services Firms with Private Life TN

    Teaching Note for (9-801-463).

    Keywords: Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "Tradeoffs: Juggling Careers in Professional Services Firms with Private Life TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-137, September 2000. (Revised May 2002.)
  85. Mellon Investor Services

    James Aramanda, head of Mellon Investor Services, must decide how to change the focus of his business. He works with consultants to create a change strategy to enhance a business that is already doing well. Will he be able to interest his professionals in changing the nature of the way they meet customer expectations and demands while simultaneously motivating and including his professionals in the process?

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Change Management; Innovation Leadership; Growth and Development Strategy; Business Strategy; Management Teams; Financial Services Industry; Insurance Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "Mellon Investor Services." Harvard Business School Case 402-036, May 2002.
  86. Tradeoffs: Juggling Careers in Professional Services Firms with Private Life

    Balancing professional and private lives continues to challenge single and committed partners alike. Professionals are expected to work long hours. It is simply part of the ethos of professional service firms. This case focuses on the lives of three couples connected to professional service firms and their ensuing challenges in balancing professional and private life. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Work-Life Balance; Family and Family Relationships; Problems and Challenges; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, Scot Landry, and Scott M O'Neil. "Tradeoffs: Juggling Careers in Professional Services Firms with Private Life." Harvard Business School Case 801-463, June 2001. (Revised May 2002.)
  87. Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (C)

    Supplements the (A) case. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (C)." Harvard Business School Case 800-383, June 2000. (Revised May 2002.)
  88. Venture Law Group (A) & (B), TN

    Teaching Note for (9-800-065) and (9-800-191).

    Keywords: Legal Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, and Thomas J. DeLong. "Venture Law Group (A) & (B), TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 902-215, May 2002.
  89. Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (D)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (D)." Harvard Business School Case 800-172, November 1999. (Revised May 2002.)
  90. Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (B)

    Supplements the (A) case. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (B)." Harvard Business School Case 800-382, June 2000. (Revised April 2002.)
  91. Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (A)

    Ten years into his career after graduating from HBS, Tim Hertach discovers billing irregularities at his consulting firm. He must decide whether (and how) to challenge senior management or to stay quiet and protect his career.

    Keywords: Decisions; Ethics; Accounting; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Tim Hertach at GL Consulting (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-153, November 1999. (Revised April 2002.)
  92. Venture Law Group (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Legal Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Venture Law Group (B)." Harvard Business School Case 800-191, April 2000. (Revised February 2002.)
  93. History of Investment Banking

    Describes the history of investment banking.

    Keywords: Business History; Investment Banking;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Lynn Villadolid Roy. "History of Investment Banking." Harvard Business School Background Note 902-168, January 2002.
  94. Major Global Stock Exchanges, The

    Describes the major global stock exchanges.

    Keywords: Globalization; Financial Markets;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Lynn Villadolid Roy. "Major Global Stock Exchanges, The." Harvard Business School Background Note 902-169, January 2002.
  95. Infosys Technologies, Limited TN

    Teaching Note for (9-801-445).

    Keywords: Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Ying Liu. "Infosys Technologies, Limited TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 902-057, September 2001.
  96. International Profit Associates TN

    Teaching Note for (9-801-397).

    Keywords: Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Ying Liu. "International Profit Associates TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 902-059, September 2001.
  97. &Samhoud Service Management TN

    Teaching Note for (9-801-398).

    Keywords: Consulting Industry; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Ying Liu. "&Samhoud Service Management TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 902-058, September 2001.
  98. &Samhoud Service Management

    &Samhoud, a small service management consulting firm in the Netherlands, grapples with the dilemma of firing its largest client while introducing Heskett's theory of the service profit chain.

    Keywords: Mission and Purpose; Management Practices and Processes; Customer Focus and Relationships; Customer Relationship Management; Consulting Industry; Netherlands;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Monica Mullick. "&Samhoud Service Management." Harvard Business School Case 801-398, March 2001. (Revised May 2001.)
  99. AGENCY.COM (A): Launching an Interactive Service Agency

    Having recently launched one of Silicon Valley's first start-ups, cofounders Chan Suh and Kyle Shannon ponder whether their interactive consulting firm is prepared to bid for work from a very large client.

    Keywords: Business Startups; Internet; Problems and Challenges; Business Strategy; Decision Making; Entrepreneurship; Consulting Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "AGENCY.COM (A): Launching an Interactive Service Agency." Harvard Business School Case 800-061, November 1999. (Revised May 2001.)
  100. Jill Greenthal at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (A): The TCI/AT&T Deal

    Jill Greenthal, managing director at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette, is leading her team of investment bankers to negotiate on behalf of Tele-Communications, Inc. (TCI) on a potential landmark deal with AT&T. Representing TCI in the negotiations is the culmination of relationships that Greenthal has nurtured over the course of a decade. Despite the best efforts of her team, negotiations appear poised on the edge of an impasse. Greenthal wonders what, if anything, her team can do to help find a better alternative.

    Keywords: Leadership; Negotiation Process; Service Delivery; Groups and Teams; Entrepreneurship; Negotiation Deal; Gender Characteristics; Banking Industry; Service Industry; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Sarah S. Khetani. "Jill Greenthal at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (A): The TCI/AT&T Deal." Harvard Business School Case 800-213, March 2000. (Revised May 2001.)
  101. Jill Greenthal at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (B): The TCI/AT&T Deal

    Documents the hectic and grueling work done by Jill Greenthal's team at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette in an attempt to execute a landmark deal on behalf of a key client.

    Keywords: Leadership; Negotiation Process; Service Delivery; Groups and Teams; Entrepreneurship; Negotiation Deal; Gender Characteristics; Banking Industry; Service Industry; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Sarah S. Khetani. "Jill Greenthal at Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette (B): The TCI/AT&T Deal." Harvard Business School Case 800-242, March 2000. (Revised April 2001.)
  102. Thomas Weisel in Conversation with MBA Students March 29,2000

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Ashish Nanda. "Thomas Weisel in Conversation with MBA Students March 29,2000." Harvard Business School Video Supplement 801-804, December 2000.
  103. Alexander Bandelli (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-899-146) and (9-899-230).

    Keywords: Customer Focus and Relationships; Change; Real Estate Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Stephanie L. Woerner. "Alexander Bandelli (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-028, September 2000. (Revised November 2000.)
  104. Overview of the Professional Services Course, An

    Provides an overview of the HBS MBA Professional Services Course. Presents a structure and an outline intended to serve as a reference and provide orientation to students as the course progresses.

    Keywords: Business Education; Curriculum and Courses; Personal Development and Career;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Ashish Nanda. "Overview of the Professional Services Course, An." Harvard Business School Background Note 800-229, November 1999. (Revised November 2000.)
  105. Thomas Weisel Partners (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-800-215) and (9-800-331).

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Ashish Nanda. "Thomas Weisel Partners (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-015, September 2000. (Revised October 2000.)
  106. Eggrock Partners, LLC (A)

    Explores the challenges of choosing how to grow a professional services firm (PSF). Before developing a growth strategy, the partners need to agree on what business(es) the company should be in. Each of the three partners has differing views of what the company should be doing to develop and maintain strong customer relationships.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business or Company Management; Growth and Development Strategy; Business Model; Expansion; Business Processes; Industry Structures; Customer Focus and Relationships; Employees; Partners and Partnerships; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Myra M. Hart, and Sharon Peyus. "Eggrock Partners, LLC (A)." Harvard Business School Case 800-047, September 1999. (Revised October 2000.)
  107. Eggrock Partners, LLC (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Myra M. Hart, and Sharon Peyus. "Eggrock Partners, LLC (B)." Harvard Business School Case 800-171, January 2000. (Revised September 2000.)
  108. Eggrock Partners, LLC (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-800-047) and (9-800-171).

    Keywords: Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Stephanie L. Woerner. "Eggrock Partners, LLC (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-016, September 2000.
  109. Tim Hertach at GL Consulting Series TN

    Teaching Note for (9-800-153), (9-800-382), (9-800-383), and (9-800-172).

    Keywords: Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Stephanie L. Woerner. "Tim Hertach at GL Consulting Series TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-029, September 2000.
  110. Professional Services Module Two: External Strategy for Sustained Competitive Advantage

    Concerns itself with the strategic dynamics which influence organizations externally.

    Keywords: Competitive Advantage; Competitive Strategy; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Business Startups; Business Plan; Service Operations; For-Profit Firms; Power and Influence; Measurement and Metrics; Business Processes; Management Practices and Processes; Management Analysis, Tools, and Techniques;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Two: External Strategy for Sustained Competitive Advantage." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-008, September 2000.
  111. Professional Services Module Three: Internal Strategy of Organizational Design

    The way in which PSFs organize themselves to leverage strategic capabilities is imperative in achieving high performance.

    Keywords: Organizational Design; Strategy; Performance Capacity; Competency and Skills; Business Startups;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Three: Internal Strategy of Organizational Design." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-009, September 2000.
  112. Professional Services Module Five: Serving Clients Effectively

    It is imperative for the internal systems and processes to be connected to the external processes of client management, competitive adaptation, and service delivery.

    Keywords: Competency and Skills; Customer Relationship Management; Knowledge Acquisition; Service Delivery; Performance Effectiveness; Adaptation; Competitive Strategy;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Five: Serving Clients Effectively." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-011, September 2000.
  113. Professional Services Module One: Introduction to the Challenges Facing PSFs

    This initial module was meant to clarify how the course would be useful to students who would be starting PSFs, working for them as an employee or contractor, managing them, or hiring them from the client side.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Selection and Staffing; Management; Service Delivery; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module One: Introduction to the Challenges Facing PSFs." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-007, September 2000.
  114. Woodland Partners: Field of Dreams? TN

    Teaching Note for (9-800-070).

    Keywords: Banking Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Stephanie L. Woerner. "Woodland Partners: Field of Dreams? TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-017, September 2000.
  115. Professional Services Module Six: Succeeding in PSFs

    Emphasizes the skills and values that we believe successful professionals possess: change management and leadership skills, a proactive career management approach, effective processes of giving and receiving feedback, a clear ethical perspective, balance between private and professional lives, and the ability to cope with ever increasing demands on one's time.

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Six: Succeeding in PSFs." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-012, September 2000.
  116. Professional Services Module Four: Managing the Organization Through Processes

    Focuses on how the internal processes connect strategy with implementation.

    Keywords: Economics; Human Capital; Business or Company Management; Business Processes;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "Professional Services Module Four: Managing the Organization Through Processes." Harvard Business School Background Note 801-010, September 2000.
  117. First Six Months, The: Launching a PSF Career TN

    Teaching Note for (9-800-373).

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Ashish Nanda. "First Six Months, The: Launching a PSF Career TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-138, September 2000.
  118. Union Carbide Deal (Abridged) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-897-201).

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "Union Carbide Deal (Abridged) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-139, September 2000.
  119. Strategic Services at Andersen Consulting TN

    Teaching Note for (9-899-065).

    Keywords: Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "Strategic Services at Andersen Consulting TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-136, September 2000.
  120. Casto Travel TN

    Teaching Note for (9-899-120).

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Service Operations; Management;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Susan Harmeling. "Casto Travel TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-180, September 2000.
  121. Lebenthal & Company TN

    Teaching Note for (9-899-121).

    Keywords: Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Susan Harmeling. "Lebenthal & Company TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-181, September 2000.
  122. Hambrecht & Quist (A) & (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-898-161) and (9-800-214).

    Keywords: Banking Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Nicole Tempest. "Hambrecht & Quist (A) & (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-140, September 2000.
  123. Morgan Stanley Dean Witter Private Client Services (TN)

    Teaching Note for (9-899-107).

    Keywords: Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "Morgan Stanley Dean Witter Private Client Services (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-135, September 2000.
  124. Diamond in the Rough (A) and (B) TN

    Teaching Note for (9-898-115) and (9-898-151).

    Keywords: Service Industry; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Ashish Nanda. "Diamond in the Rough (A) and (B) TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 801-134, September 2000.
  125. Morgan Stanley: Becoming a "One-Firm" Firm and The Firmwide 360-degree Performance Evaluation Process at Morgan Stanley TN

    Teaching Note for (9-400-043) and (9-498-053).

    Citation:

    Burton, M. Diane, Thomas J. DeLong, and Charles A. O'Reilly III. Morgan Stanley: Becoming a "One-Firm" Firm and The Firmwide 360-degree Performance Evaluation Process at Morgan Stanley TN. Harvard Business School Teaching Note 400-078, June 2000.
  126. Rob Parson at Morgan Stanley (A) through (D) and The Firmwide 360-degree Performance Evaluation Process at Morgan Stanley TN

    Teaching Note for (9-498-054), (9-498-055), (9-498-056), (9-498-057), (9-498-058), and (9-498-053).

    Keywords: Performance Evaluation; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Burton, M. Diane, and Thomas J. DeLong. "Rob Parson at Morgan Stanley (A) through (D) and The Firmwide 360-degree Performance Evaluation Process at Morgan Stanley TN." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 400-101, June 2000.
  127. Alexander Bandelli (A)

    Alexander Bandelli has the opportunity to redefine the way real estate business is done in the Northeast region. He has just joined Ronsini and Fitch and has been asked by senior management to move to a client focus rather than the older, traditional transaction focus. Alexander has many challenges before him. How should he prioritize his work? Does he focus outside the organization or internally? Is the organization prepared for this change project? What should he do first?

    Keywords: Change Management; Customer Focus and Relationships; Management Teams; Real Estate Industry; Northeastern United States;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Catherine M. Conneely. "Alexander Bandelli (A)." Harvard Business School Case 899-146, February 1999. (Revised June 2000.)
  128. Alexander Bandelli (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Real Estate Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Andrew J Farquharson. "Alexander Bandelli (B)." Harvard Business School Case 899-230, February 1999. (Revised June 2000.)
  129. AGENCY.COM (B): Managing Rapid Growth

    AGENCY.COM continues on its path of rapid growth, emerging as a leading interactive consulting firm. Its growth leads to new challenges related to the integration of diverse operations and the financing of future growth.

    Keywords: Growth Management; Problems and Challenges; Entrepreneurship; Internet; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Scot H. Landry. "AGENCY.COM (B): Managing Rapid Growth." Harvard Business School Case 800-062, November 1999. (Revised June 2000.)
  130. Morgan Stanley: Becoming a "One-Firm Firm"

    John Mack, the newly appointed president of Morgan Stanley, feels strongly that the firm needs to change in order to compete in a changing investment banking environment. Mack and his senior team undertake initiatives in order to transform the culture and working style of the firm from individualistic to team-oriented. The case provides detailed information about Morgan Stanley's existing culture and systems as well as the kinds of changes that it hopes to make. Morgan Stanley views the human resource management systems as a tool for attaining strategic objectives.

    Keywords: Human Resources; Goals and Objectives; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Organizational Culture; Performance Evaluation; Competitive Strategy;

    Citation:

    Burton, M. Diane, Thomas J. DeLong, and Katherine Lawrence. Morgan Stanley: Becoming a "One-Firm Firm". Harvard Business School Case 400-043, December 1999. (Revised May 2000.)
  131. Lebenthal and Co., Inc.

    Lebenthal and Co. has prospered in the bond business since 1924. Alexandra Lebenthal, granddaughter of the founders, has stepped up to lead the firm. She faces many challenges as the nature of the financial services business changes in dramatic ways. Can this firm which made its name in selling "odd-lots," compete with the larger financial houses that offer a myriad of products and services? How should Lebenthal and Co. respond? What should be their product mix? Should Alexandra sell the firm? How does she attract the best and brightest employees in the context of these environmental forces?

    Keywords: Transformation; Talent and Talent Management; Bonds; Leadership Development; Service Operations; Problems and Challenges; Competition; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Susan Harmeling. "Lebenthal and Co., Inc." Harvard Business School Case 899-121, December 1998. (Revised May 2000.)
  132. First Six Months, The: Launching a PSF Career

    Presents two situations: 1) two graduating MBAs from Harvard Business School compare and contrast their strategies for getting off to a good start in consulting, and 2) a junior consultant has to deal with of difficult feedback in his very first performance review.

    Keywords: Personal Development and Career; Planning; Practice; Strategy; Performance Evaluation; Adaptation; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "First Six Months, The: Launching a PSF Career." Harvard Business School Case 800-373, April 2000. (Revised April 2000.)
  133. e-Consulting

    Provides an overview of the history and development of the e-consulting industry, as well as the issues facing it.

    Keywords: History; Internet; Growth and Development; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, Thomas E. Agan, and Scot H. Landry. "e-Consulting." Harvard Business School Background Note 800-312, April 2000.
  134. Professionals' Quandaries

    Presents five situations in which professionals face ethical dilemmas.

    Keywords: Ethics; Personal Development and Career; Human Resources; Management Practices and Processes; Situation or Environment;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scot H. Landry. "Professionals' Quandaries." Harvard Business School Case 800-371, April 2000.
  135. Woodland Partners: Field of Dreams?

    Elizabeth Lilly, Richard Rinkett, and Richard Jensen are pondering whether to launch a new investment management firm and, if so, what growth strategy to chart for the potential firm.

    Keywords: Goals and Objectives; Decision Making; Problems and Challenges; Business Startups; Business Processes; Growth and Development Strategy; Financial Services Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Ashish Nanda, and Theodore D. Seides. "Woodland Partners: Field of Dreams?" Harvard Business School Case 800-070, November 1999. (Revised February 2000.)
  136. HBS California Research Center, The

    Harvard Business School's (HBS) California Research Center, a three-year experiment initiated in July 1997 to facilitate research, case-writing, and course development centered in the Silicon Valley Region, has been a "phenomenal success." In June 1999, HBS Dean Kim Clark and faculty are contemplating whether to modify or retain the current mission and scope of the California Research Center.

    Keywords: Business Education; Growth and Development Strategy; Corporate Strategy; Success; Education Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, and Scott D Landry. "HBS California Research Center, The." Harvard Business School Case 800-189, January 2000. (Revised February 2000.)
  137. Hambrecht & Quist (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Banking Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Nicole Tempest. "Hambrecht & Quist (B)." Harvard Business School Case 800-214, January 2000. (Revised February 2000.)
  138. Morgan Stanley Dean Witter Private Client Services

    The 1997 merger of retail giant Dean Witter and investment bank Morgan Stanley was a year old when Bob Sculthorpe was appointed director of Private Client Services (PCS) at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter (MSDW). The firm was still operating under two separate broker-dealer registrations, and there had been no satisfactory resolution to the dilemma facing the leaders of the retail securities division of MSDW. Where did Morgan Stanley PCS and its high net worth focus fit into the retail/investment banking giant? Should Morgan Stanley PCS be merged with the 10,000 account executives of Dean Witter? Sculthorpe faced several dilemmas: Would the highly compensated MS PCS brokers stay in an integrated brokerage unit? Client retention could also be a problem if the two salesforces were merged in a manner inconsistent with the branding of either. With several key PCS investment professionals in various stages of considering whether to leave for competitors, he knew that he must act quickly and decisively.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Business Divisions; Investment Banking; Brands and Branding; Salesforce Management; Competitive Strategy; Retail Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., David M. Darst, Ann K Rusher, and Catherine M. Conneely. "Morgan Stanley Dean Witter Private Client Services." Harvard Business School Case 899-107, December 1998. (Revised December 1999.)
  139. Hambrecht & Quist

    Hambrecht & Quist (H&Q), an investment bank headquartered in San Francisco, has a very unique culture relative to its Wall Street counterparts. Firm members and even competitors describe the culture as entrepreneurial, team-driven, non-bureaucratic, and change-oriented. H&Q's unique culture has given it a number of competitive advantages, including the ability to attract high-quality staff, the ability to win business among its target group of emerging growth companies, and the ability to maintain below-average SG&A costs. However, competition in the investment banking industry is intensifying in 1997-98 due to an unprecedented wave of mega-mergers between investment banks and commercial banks. The new combined banking entities are able to offer customers a broader array of products and services than H&Q is able to offer, creating a significant amount of pressure for H&Q to sell to, or merge with, another financial institution itself. Industry analysts believe it is not a question of whether, but rather of when H&Q will lose its independence. However, H&Q management believes that "selling out" would destroy the very culture that made the firm successful. What action should Dan Case, the CEO and chairman of H&Q, take to balance the seemingly competing demands of maintaining the firm's culture and positioning the firm for future growth?

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Investment Banking; Growth and Development Strategy; Emerging Markets; Organizational Culture; Competitive Advantage; Banking Industry; San Francisco;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Nicole Tempest. "Hambrecht & Quist." Harvard Business School Case 898-161, April 1998. (Revised November 1999.)
  140. Interactive Minds (B)

    Two recent Harvard Business School graduates start a venture capital/consulting firm focused on opportunities related to the Internet.

    Keywords: History; Venture Capital; Internet; Capital Structure; Entrepreneurship; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    Nanda, Ashish, Thomas J. DeLong, Christina L. Darwall, and Scot H. Landry. "Interactive Minds (B)." Harvard Business School Case 800-114, November 1999.
  141. Strategic Services at Andersen Consulting

    Bill Copacino, Andersen Consulting's managing partner of Strategic Services Americas, needed to submit his recommendation to Peter Fuchs, Strategic Services worldwide director, for the operating plan for Strategic Services Americas for fiscal year 1999. Strategic Services had grown by over 40% per year in headcount since 1989, but remained a relatively small part of Andersen Consulting. Copacino and Fuchs were challenged to grow Strategic Services at the level required to increase its relative position in the firm to 10% of its people and 15% of its revenues. As they discussed options, there were no easy answers. Should Strategic Services continue to try to grow at 30% plus per year? Would Strategic Services be able to find enough new and experienced hires to continue to grow? Could the unique culture be maintained? Should they consider acquisitions? Was there an effective way to meet their growth targets?

    Keywords: Strategic Planning; Recruitment; Organizational Culture; Expansion; Business Units; Consulting Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., Catherine M. Conneely, and Abby J. Hansen PHD. "Strategic Services at Andersen Consulting." Harvard Business School Case 899-065, September 1998. (Revised May 1999.)
  142. Diamond in the Rough (A)

    Diamond Technology Partners, a consulting firm based in Chicago, was founded in 1994 by Mel Bergstein and Chris Moffitt, with investment from founding partners and Safeguard Scientifics. In April 1996, just after fiscal year-end, the two largest clients withdrew from projects representing 50% of the previous quarter's revenues. A few weeks earlier, management had put together a $50 million revenue forecast for the year, had hired 28 new employees to start the following September, and had promised employees year-end bonuses. Management also anticipated that the company would go public within the next 12 months. Bergstein wonders whether there is a future for Diamond.

    Keywords: Technology; Entrepreneurship; Going Public; Crisis Management; Finance; Consulting Industry; Chicago;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Catherine M. Conneely. "Diamond in the Rough (A)." Harvard Business School Case 898-115, May 1998. (Revised February 1999.)
  143. Casto Travel

    Maryles Casto had the vision to build the largest travel agency in Silicon Valley, mirroring the growth pattern of the entire area. In 1997 the travel business changed dramatically as airlines chose not to pay travel agencies the fees they once did. Simultaneously, the world of e-commerce introduced the process of ticket purchasing capability over the Internet. This changed the nature of business and the economics in the travel business for good. What should Maryles Casto do to counter these dramatic shifts in her business? Has the business model shifted to such an extent that she should leave the business? What advice do you have for Casto and her executive team?

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Finance; Internet; Change Management; Markets; Travel Industry;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Susan Harmeling. "Casto Travel." Harvard Business School Case 899-120, December 1998.
  144. Diamond in the Rough (B)

    Supplements the (A) case.

    Keywords: Technology; Entrepreneurship; Going Public; Crisis Management; Finance; Consulting Industry; Chicago;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J., and Catherine M. Conneely. "Diamond in the Rough (B)." Harvard Business School Case 898-151, May 1998.

Presentations

  1. The Current State of Professional Service Firms

    Keywords: Business Ventures;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "The Current State of Professional Service Firms." Paper presented at the Harvard Business School Publishing Best Practice Briefing, Mumbai, India, January 01, 2009.
  2. When Professionals Lead: The Challenges of Managing the Professional Services Firm.

    Keywords: Leadership; Management;

    Citation:

    DeLong, Thomas J. "When Professionals Lead: The Challenges of Managing the Professional Services Firm." Lecture at the A Harvard Business School Publishing Best Practice Briefing, Harvard Business School Press, January 17, 2008.

    Research Summary

  1. Overview

    Keywords: Flying Without a Net; organizational behavior; high need to achieve professionals; Leadership; Management Practices and Processes;

  2. Current Research

    I'm currently studying how global organizations organize talent management systems in order to maintain and enhance the performance of professionals.  I'm also interested in the socialization process of organizations based on size and focus of the organization.  I am focusing on the individual, transformational process.

    Teaching

  1. Overview

    Keywords: LEAD; Authentic Leadership Development; Managing Human Capital;

  2. LEAD

    This is a first year, required course.

    Keywords: LEAD; leadership;