Juan Ma

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Doctoral Student

Juan Ma is a doctoral student in Strategy at Harvard Business School. Her research focus is on emerging markets and global strategy. Juan holds a Bachelor of Business Administration degree from the University of Toronto. Prior to joining HBS, she produced research work on global competitiveness for the Department of International Trade and Foreign Affairs, Canada. Her research work has been covered in media outlets such as the Financial Times. Juan comes from Nanjing, China and she speaks English, Mandarin and Cantonese.In 2011, Juan was awarded Canada’s Governor General’s Silver Medal.

    Publications

    Working Papers

    1. Independent Directors' Dissent on Boards: Evidence from Listed Companies in China

      In this paper, we examine the circumstances under which so-called "independent" directors voice their independent views on public boards in a sample of Chinese firms. First, we ask why independent directors dissent, i.e. how they justify such dissent to public investors. We find that when independent directors dissent, they tend to offer mild, subjective justifications. Overt criticism of the management is rare. Next, we ask when an independent director is more likely to dissent and who is more likely to dissent. Controlling for firm and board characteristics, we find that dissent is significantly correlated with breakdown of social ties between the independent director and the board chair who locates at the center of the board bureaucracy in China. Dissent is more likely to occur when the board chair who appointed the independent director has left the board. Dissent also tends to occur at the end of board "games", defined as a 60-day window prior to departure of the board chair or departure of the independent director herself. The endgame effect is particularly strong, seeing 27% of the dissent issued at board "endgames" which represents only 4% of independent directors' average tenure. While directors with foreign experience are more likely to dissent, we do not find that academics, accountants and lawyers are significantly more active in voicing dissent. Lastly, we show that dissent is consequential to both the director and the firm. For directors, dissent significantly increases one's likelihood of exiting the director labor market, which translates to a more-than-10% estimated loss of annual income. For firms, we document an economically and statistically significant cumulative abnormal return of -0.97% around announcement of dissent. Although the literature has suggested that dissent might be reflective of diverse viewpoints, and perhaps beneficial in and of itself through reduction of firm variability, we do not find this offsetting beneficial effect to be strong.

      Keywords: corporate governance; independent directors; China; China; Asia;

      Citation:

      Ma, Juan, and Tarun Khanna. "Independent Directors' Dissent on Boards: Evidence from Listed Companies in China." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 13-089, April 2013. (Revised May 2013, October 2013.)

      Research Summary

    1. Overview

      Keywords: emerging markets; Global Competitiveness;

        Featured Work

        Financial Times
        03/23/2012

        Linda Anderson

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        What is the recipe for business success? Research from North America indicates that it might have something to do with speaking English.

        Academics have discovered that those countries that have English as at least one of their official languages, or whose language is linguistically close to English have higher rates of international investment.

        Area of Study

        • Strategy