Faaiza Rashid

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Doctoral Student

Faaiza is a doctoral student in Organizational Behavior (joint program between Harvard Business School, Department of Sociology and Department of Psychology). She holds a Masters of Science in Technology and Policy from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bachelors of Science in Chemical Engineering and Bachelor of Arts in International Relations from Lehigh University. Faaiza has been a fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Washington DC. She has worked at the global health-care company, Hoffmann–La Roche and at Lehigh University’s Energy Research Center.

Publications

Journal Articles

  1. Leadership Lessons from the Chilean Mine Rescue

    Faaiza Rashid, Amy C. Edmondson and Herman B. Leonard

    Three years ago, when a cave-in at the San José mine in Chile trapped 33 men under 700,000 metric tons of rock, experts estimated the probability of getting them out alive at less than 1%. Yet, after spending a record 69 days underground, all 33 were hoisted up to safety. The inspiring story of their rescue is a case study in how to lead in situations where the stakes, risk, and uncertainty are incredibly high and time pressure is intense. Today executives often find themselves in similar straits. When they do, many feel torn. Should they be directive, taking charge and commanding action? Or should they be empowering, enabling innovation and experimentation? As the successful example of André Sougarret, the chief of the mine rescue operation, shows, the answer is yes—to both. The choice is a false dichotomy. Implementing this dual approach involves three key tasks. Each has directive and enabling components. The first task is envisioning, which requires instilling both realism and hope. The second task is enrolling, which means setting clear boundaries for who is on and off the team, but inviting in helpful collaborators. The third task is engaging—leading disciplined execution while encouraging innovation and experimentation. The authors of this article describe how Sougarret ably juggled all of these tasks, orchestrating the efforts of hundreds of people from different organizations, areas of expertise, and countries in an extraordinary mission that overcame impossible odds.

    Keywords: Leadership; Crisis Management; Learning; Mining; Mining Industry; Chile;

    Citation:

    Rashid, Faaiza, Amy C. Edmondson, and Herman B. Leonard. "Leadership Lessons from the Chilean Mine Rescue." Harvard Business Review 91, nos. 7/8 (July–August 2013): 113–119. View Details

Book Chapters

  1. Risky Trust: How Multi-entity Teams Develop Trust in High Risk Endeavors

    Faaiza Rashid and Amy Edmondson

    Citation:

    Rashid, Faaiza, and Amy Edmondson. "Risky Trust: How Multi-entity Teams Develop Trust in High Risk Endeavors." Chap. 6 in Restoring Trust in Organizations and Leaders: Enduring Challenges and Emerging Answers, edited by Roderick Kramer and Todd Lowell Pittinsky, 129–150. Oxford University Press, 2012. View Details
  2. Developing a Case Study for Interactive Learning: Purpose, Form and Methodology

    Faaiza Rashid

    Citation:

    Rashid, Faaiza. "Developing a Case Study for Interactive Learning: Purpose, Form and Methodology." In The Owner's Dilemma: Driving Success and Innovation in the Design and Construction Industry, edited by Barbara Bryson and Canan Yetmen. Östberg Library of Design Management, 2010. View Details

Working Papers

  1. Risky Trust: How Multi-entity Teams Develop Trust in a High Risk Endeavor

    Faaiza Rashid and Amy C. Edmondson

    This paper explicates the challenge of risky trust, which we define as trust that exists between parties vulnerable to high economic, legal, or reputational risks at individual or organizational levels. Drawing from analyses of data collected in a grounded case study of a multi-million dollar construction project, we identify dimensions, antecedents, and behavioral consequences of risky trust. Undertaken in the U.S. construction industry, a context known for its lack of trust, our study offers insights for trust repair.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Leadership; Business Processes; Groups and Teams; Risk and Uncertainty; Trust; Construction Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Rashid, Faaiza, and Amy C. Edmondson. "Risky Trust: How Multi-entity Teams Develop Trust in a High Risk Endeavor." Harvard Business School Working Paper, No. 11-089, February 2011. View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. The 2010 Chilean Mining Rescue (A)

    Amy C. Edmondson, Faaiza Rashid and Herman B. "Dutch" Leonard

    On August 5, 2010, 700,000 tons of some of the hardest rock in the world caved in Chile's century-old San José mine. The collapse buried 33 miners at a depth almost twice the height of the Empire State Building-over 600 meters (2000 feet) below ground. Never had a recovery been attempted at such depths, let alone in the face of challenges like those posed by the San José mine: unstable terrain, rock so hard it defied ordinary drill bits, severely limited time, and the potentially immobilizing fear that plagued the buried miners. Could the trapped miners and rescue workers mobilize before air and resources were depleted? The case describes the ensuing efforts that draw the resources of countless people and multiple organizations in Chile and around the world.

    Keywords: Mining; Chile;

    Citation:

    Edmondson, Amy C., Faaiza Rashid, and Herman B. "Dutch" Leonard. "The 2010 Chilean Mining Rescue (A)." Harvard Business School Case 612-046, November 2011. (Revised October 2014.) View Details
  2. Integrated Project Delivery at Autodesk, Inc. (A)

    Amy C. Edmondson and Faaiza Rashid

    Describes Autodesk's engagement in Integrated Project Delivery—a new model of risk management, inter-firm teamwork, and multi-objective (aesthetic, cost, and sustainability) optimization in building projects. In 2008, Autodesk, Inc., the world's largest design software company, decided to engage in Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) for the design and construction of its new Architecture, Engineering, and Construction Solutions (AECS) Group headquarters near Boston. Under IPD, the project's architect, builder, and client (Autodesk) entered a contractual agreement to share all project risks and profits. During the project, however, Autodesk was unsatisfied with the design progress and asked the project team to introduce a three-story atrium in the headquarters' design. Logistically, it was not a good time to make changes as the team had already made significant design progress. The team was also working under a tight budget and delivery deadline. However, the aesthetics would appear to be greatly improved by changing the design. The project's architect and builder had to decide whether accommodating the atrium into the current schedule and work sequencing was an acceptable risk.

    Keywords: Buildings and Facilities; Business Headquarters; Design; Risk Management; Business Processes; Projects; Groups and Teams; Partners and Partnerships; Cooperation; Construction Industry; Service Industry;

    Citation:

    Edmondson, Amy C., and Faaiza Rashid. "Integrated Project Delivery at Autodesk, Inc. (A)." Harvard Business School Case 610-016, September 2009. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  3. Integrated Project Delivery at Autodesk, Inc. (B)

    Amy C. Edmondson and Faaiza Rashid

    Describes Autodesk's engagement in Integrated Project Delivery—a new model of risk management, inter-firm teamwork, and multi-objective (aesthetic, cost, and sustainability) optimization in building projects. In 2008, Autodesk, Inc. the world's largest design software company, decided to engage in Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) for the design and construction of its new Architecture, Engineering and Construction Solutions (AECS) Group headquarters, near Boston. Under IPD, the project's architect, builder, and client (Autodesk) entered a contractual agreement to share all project risks and profits. During the project, however, Autodesk was unsatisfied with the design progress, and asked the project team to introduce a three-story atrium in the headquarters' design. Logistically, it was not a good time to make changes as the team had already made significant design progress. The team was also working under a tight budget and delivery deadline. However, the aesthetics would appear to be greatly improved by changing the design. The project's architect and builder had to decide whether accommodating the atrium into the current schedule and work sequencing was an acceptable risk.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Groups and Teams; Goals and Objectives; Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Integration; Construction Industry;

    Citation:

    Edmondson, Amy C., and Faaiza Rashid. "Integrated Project Delivery at Autodesk, Inc. (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 610-017, September 2009. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  4. Integrated Project Delivery at Autodesk, Inc. (C)

    Amy C. Edmondson and Faaiza Rashid

    Describes Autodesk's engagement in Integrated Project Delivery—a new model of risk management, inter-firm teamwork, and multi-objective (aesthetic, cost, and sustainability) optimization in building projects. In 2008, Autodesk, Inc. the world's largest design software company, decided to engage in Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) for the design and construction of its new Architecture, Engineering and Construction Solutions (AECS) Group headquarters, near Boston. Under IPD, the project's architect, builder, and client (Autodesk) entered a contractual agreement to share all project risks and profits. During the project, however, Autodesk was unsatisfied with the design progress, and asked the project team to introduce a three-story atrium in the headquarters' design. Logistically, it was not a good time to make changes as the team had already made significant design progress. The team was also working under a tight budget and delivery deadline. However, the aesthetics would appear to be greatly improved by changing the design. The project's architect and builder had to decide whether accommodating the atrium into the current schedule and work sequencing was an acceptable risk.

    Keywords: Risk Management; Groups and Teams; Goals and Objectives; Collaborative Innovation and Invention; Integration; Construction Industry;

    Citation:

    Edmondson, Amy C., and Faaiza Rashid. "Integrated Project Delivery at Autodesk, Inc. (C)." Harvard Business School Supplement 610-018, September 2009. (Revised April 2011.) View Details

Presentations

    Research Summary

  1. Research Interests

    by Faaiza Rashid

    Faaiza’s research focuses on how organizations learn and innovate under novel/uncertain circumstances. Organizational design, organizational sociology, strategic planning, knowledge management, and self-organizing teams are areas of special interest to Faaiza.

      Area of Study

      • Sociology