Anthony Mayo

Thomas S. Murphy Senior Lecturer of Business Administration

Unit: Organizational Behavior

Contact:

(617) 496-7381

Send Email

Tony Mayo is the Thomas S. Murphy Senior Lecturer of Business Administration in the Organizational Behavior Unit of Harvard Business School (HBS) and the Director of the HBS Leadership Initiative.  He currently teaches FIELD, Field Immersion Experiences for Leadership Development, a new required experiential, field-based course in the first year of the MBA Program.  Previously, he co-created and taught the course, “Great Business Leaders:  The Importance of Contextual Intelligence.”  In addition, Tony teaches extensively in leadership-based executive education programs.  He recently co-authored the textbook Management, which features a new approach for teaching the core principles of management course to undergraduate students based on the integration and dynamic interaction of strategic management, organizational design, and individual leadership.  His previous co-authored works include In Their Time:  The Greatest Business Leaders of the 20th Century, which has been translated into 5 languages, Paths to Power: How Insiders and Outsiders Shaped American Business Leadership, and Entrepreneurs, Managers and Leaders:  What the Airline Industry Can Teach Us About Leadership.  These books were derived from the development of the Great American Business Leaders database that Dean Nitin Nohria and Tony created (see http://www.hbs.edu/leadership/database/index.html).

As Director of the Leadership Initiative, Tony oversees several comprehensive research projects on emerging, global, and legacy leadership and manages a number of executive education programs on leadership development.  He was a co-creator of the High Potentials Leadership DevelopmentLeadership for Senior ExecutivesLeading with Impact, Maximizing Your Leadership Potential, and Leadership Best Practices programs and has been a principal contributor to a number of custom leadership development initiatives.  He launched the executive coaching component for the Program for Leadership Development and currently provides strategic support for a variety of executive coaching programs.

Prior to his current role, Tony  pursued a career in database marketing where he held senior general management positions at advertising agency - Hill Holliday, database management firm - Epsilon, and full-service direct marketing company - DIMAC Marketing Corporation.  Most recently, Tony served as the General Manager of Hill Holliday's Customer Relationship Management Practice. 

At Epsilon, he served as Acting Chief Executive Officer where he had full responsibility for the delivery and management of strategic and database marketing services for Fortune 1000 companies and national not-for-profit organizations.  He also held senior management positions in Epsilon's sales and account management departments.  At DIMAC Marketing Corporation, Tony served as Vice President of Strategic Development and Acting Chief Financial Officer.  In this capacity, Tony led the development of an integrated strategic plan for DIMAC's disparate business units and coordinated the ultimate sale of the company.  Prior to his work in the database marketing industry, Tony served as the Director of MBA Program Administration at Harvard Business School. 

Tony completed his MBA from Harvard Business School and received his Bachelor's Degree, summa cum laude, from Boston College.

Featured Work

Publications

Books

  1. Management

    Leaders have always faced the challenge of inspiring others while making important strategic decisions for their organizations based on ambiguous and conflicting information. A leader's success or failure is often dependent on his or her ability to accurately interpret and process this information. Today's leaders are confronted with challenges and opportunities that are more dynamic and complex than ever before. Leaders need to understand how to harness technological advances, manage and lead a dispersed and diverse workforce, anticipate and react to constant competitive and geopolitical change and uncertainty, compete on a global scale, and operate in a socially responsible and accountable manner. In writing a new textbook on the principles, purpose, and perspective of management, we sought to demonstrate the mutual interconnectivity between three key facets—(1) strategic positioning, (2) organizational design, and (3) individual leadership—which cannot and should not act independently.

    Keywords: management; leadership; business; organization design; organization structure; strategy; Strategy; Leadership; Organizational Design; Management Practices and Processes;

    Citation:

    Gulati, Ranjay, Anthony J. Mayo, and Nitin Nohria. Management. First ed. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning, 2013. View Details
  2. Entrepreneurs, Managers, and Leaders: What the Airline Industry Can Teach Us About Leadership

    'Entrepreneurs, Managers, and Leaders' examines the role that business leaders play in shaping industries and how the evolving context of industries shapes leaders in turn. This co-evolutionary process of leadership and industry development is told through the story of the American airline industry across the 20th century. Entrepreneurs, who explored a variety of different airline concepts in search of a viable business model, dominate the industry's early history. As the industry evolved, a new breed of managers emerged who built a dominant business model that enables their companies to grow dramatically. Later, after the industry matured, leaders took center-stage as agents of change to rebuild and revitalize the industry. The lessons of entrepreneurs, managers, and leaders from the airlines can be applied to understanding any industry's evolution.

    Keywords: Business Model; Entrepreneurship; Leadership Development; Managerial Roles; Supply and Industry; Industry Growth; Air Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., Nitin Nohria, and Mark Rennella. Entrepreneurs, Managers, and Leaders: What the Airline Industry Can Teach Us About Leadership. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. View Details
  3. Paths to Power: How Insiders and Outsiders Shaped American Business Leadership

    Keywords: Leadership; United States;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, Nitin Nohria, and Laura G. Singleton. Paths to Power: How Insiders and Outsiders Shaped American Business Leadership. Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2007. View Details
  4. In Their Time: The Greatest Business Leaders of the 20th Century

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Nitin Nohria. In Their Time: The Greatest Business Leaders of the 20th Century. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 2005. View Details

Journal Articles

  1. Pioneering Entrepreneur Yoshiko Shinohara on Turning Temporary Work into Big Business in Japan

    Tempstaff's founder, a pioneering Japanese entrepreneur, wondered whether she would go to jail for launching her business.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Gender Characteristics; Business Startups; Employment Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., and Mayuka Yamazaki. "Pioneering Entrepreneur Yoshiko Shinohara on Turning Temporary Work into Big Business in Japan." Harvard Business Review 87, no. 10 (October 2009): 30. View Details
  2. Contextual Intelligence in Leadership

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Tony. "Contextual Intelligence in Leadership." Business World 26, no. 3 (June 12, 2006). View Details
  3. Double-edged Sword

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Nitin Nohria. "Double-edged Sword." People Management 11, no. 21 (October 27, 2005). View Details
  4. Zeitgeist Leadership

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Nitin Nohria. "Zeitgeist Leadership." Harvard Business Review 83, no. 10 (October 2005). View Details

Cases and Teaching Materials

  1. Introduction to the RC FIELD Course

    Citation:

    MacCormack, Alan, Anthony J. Mayo, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, and Clayton Rose. "Introduction to the RC FIELD Course." Harvard Business School Course Overview Note 615-016, July 2014. View Details
  2. Iz-Lynn Chan at Far East Organization

    Iz-Lynn Chan, assistant director of retail business group and service quality and vice president of Far East retail consultancy for Far East Organization, a private real estate developer group in Singapore, raises service standards in the company's hospitality portfolio, Far East Hospitality. Chan and her small team in the Service Quality and Standards Department (SQSD) for Far East Organization apply to the Singapore government for the National Customer Centric Initiative (CCI) for Far East Hospitality. After being awarded the CCI, Chan must make some tough decisions about how to carry out the CCI. Despite Far East Hospitality's leading market share in mid-tier hotels and serviced residences, there had been a number of new entrants into the market and competition is fierce in Singapore's hospitality industry.

    Keywords: leadership; change management; hospitality; organizational change and transformation; Leadership; Leading Change; Change Management; Service Industry; Singapore;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Anthony J. Mayo, and Dana M. Teppert. "Iz-Lynn Chan at Far East Organization." Harvard Business School Case 413-060, February 2013. (Revised May 2013.) View Details
  3. Iz-Lynn Chan at Far East Organization

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., and Linda A. Hill. "Iz-Lynn Chan at Far East Organization." Harvard Business School Teaching Plan 414-061, January 2014. View Details
  4. Feedback and Coaching Workshop

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony Mayo. "Feedback and Coaching Workshop." Harvard Business School Supplement 413-017, July 2012. View Details
  5. Feedback and Coaching Workshop (TN)

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony J. Mayo. "Feedback and Coaching Workshop (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 413-016, July 2012. View Details
  6. Ramesh Patel at Aragon Entertainment Limited

    Ramesh Patel, a high potential employee, was excited to be named to the company's New Horizons Board, a select team responsible for producing recommendations for new products or line extensions for Aragon Entertainment. Patel's co-worker and friend, Jeremy Gibson was also named to the Board, and the two were assigned to work together on a sub-taskforce. Patel was frustrated by Gibson's lack of effort and support on the taskforce and decides he must confront Gibson about his behavior.

    Keywords: Groups and Teams; Conflict and Resolution; Conflict Management; Interpersonal Communication; Spoken Communication; Communication Intention and Meaning; Jobs and Positions; Performance; Entertainment and Recreation Industry;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., and Joshua D. Margolis. "Ramesh Patel at Aragon Entertainment Limited." Harvard Business School Case 412-042, August 2011. (Revised November 2012.) View Details
  7. Danielle Marcoux at AdNet2Win Technologies

    Danielle Marcoux, Director of Web Design at AdNet2Win Technologies, must decide how best to confront Charles Davide, the Chief Technology Officer and leader of the design team charged with overseeing a major upgrade of the company's proprietary customer loyalty platform. Davide has kept tight control on the development process and has not allowed the design team to discuss difficult issues or challenge each other. Marcoux decides she must confront Davide about his management approach before the team loses their commitment to the design effort.

    Keywords: Management Style; Management Teams; Interpersonal Communication; Creativity; Status and Position; Web Services Industry;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., and Joshua D. Margolis. "Danielle Marcoux at AdNet2Win Technologies." Harvard Business School Case 412-039, August 2011. (Revised November 2012.) View Details
  8. Mary Griffin at Derby Foods

    Mary Griffin, Vice President of Consumer Products, must provide feedback to one of her direct reports, Simon York. York is a strong performer, but he has displayed some poor interpersonal skills in the manner in which he interacts with his team and the production staff. Griffin needs to provide feedback to help prevent York from derailing in his career at Derby Foods.

    Keywords: Outcome or Result; Training; Interpersonal Communication; Labor and Management Relations; Management Skills; Management Style; Management Teams; Managerial Roles;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., and Joshua D. Margolis. "Mary Griffin at Derby Foods." Harvard Business School Case 412-040, August 2011. (Revised November 2012.) View Details
  9. Michael Lester at Lachlan Consulting

    Michael Lester, a consultant with Lachlan, was frustrated by his client's unwillingness to provide key data for an important presentation. Lester must decide how best to confront Nadine Robert, his client, knowing that his personal success and the reputation of his consulting firm hinge on his ability to build and sustain a strong relationship. How firm should he be with the client? What type of feedback would help this situation?

    Keywords: Outcome or Result; Training; Customer Focus and Relationships; Interpersonal Communication; Success; Reputation;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., and Joshua D. Margolis. "Michael Lester at Lachlan Consulting." Harvard Business School Case 412-041, August 2011. (Revised November 2012.) View Details
  10. Denise Frazer and Paolo Canto: A Case Vignette on Feedback - Denise Frazer's Perspective

    Denise Frazer and Paolo Canto, two HBS students, have decided to give each other feedback on their class participation. While Denise believes that she has provided concrete, actionable feedback to Paolo, she does not feel that Paolo is reciprocating. His feedback is general and superficial. Denise and Paolo have set a time to meet to discuss their latest class participation, and Denise has decided to use this time to address her issues with Paolo. This case should be used with its partner case: Denise Frazer and Paolo Canto: A Case Vignette on Feedback - Paolo Canto's Perspective.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Perspective; Outcome or Result; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony J. Mayo. "Denise Frazer and Paolo Canto: A Case Vignette on Feedback - Denise Frazer's Perspective." Harvard Business School Case 412-045, August 2011. View Details
  11. Denise Frazer and Paolo Canto: A Case Vignette on Feedback - Paolo Canto's Perspective

    Denise Frazer and Paolo Canto, two HBS students, have decided to give each other feedback on their class participation. While Paolo believes that he has been sensitive to Denise in providing feedback, he does not feel that Denise is reciprocating. Her feedback seems to be very negative and feels like a personal attack. He chose to be less negative and use feedback as a way to encourage Denise. He feels that she is not doing the same. Denise and Paolo have set a time to meet to discuss their latest class participation, and Paolo has decided to use this time to address his issues with Denise. This case should be used with its partner case: Denise Frazer and Paolo Canto: A Case Vignette on Feedback - Denise Frazer's Perspective.

    Keywords: Interpersonal Communication; Perspective; Outcome or Result; Performance Evaluation;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony J. Mayo. "Denise Frazer and Paolo Canto: A Case Vignette on Feedback - Paolo Canto's Perspective." Harvard Business School Case 412-046, August 2011. View Details
  12. Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: Riva's Internal Deliberation

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Anthony J. Mayo. "Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: Riva's Internal Deliberation." Harvard Business School Exercise 313-079, September 2012. (Revised September 2013.) View Details
  13. Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: Charlton's Internal Deliberation

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Anthony J. Mayo. "Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: Charlton's Internal Deliberation." Harvard Business School Exercise 313-078, September 2012. (Revised September 2013.) View Details
  14. Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation, Round II: The Charlton Team Perspective

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, and Anthony J. Mayo. "Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation, Round II: The Charlton Team Perspective." Harvard Business School Exercise 313-077, September 2012. (Revised September 2013.) View Details
  15. Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation, Round II: The Riva Team Perspective

    Citation:

    Zelleke, A., and Anthony Mayo. "Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation, Round II: The Riva Team Perspective." Harvard Business School Exercise 313-076, September 2012. (Revised September 2013.) View Details
  16. Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: The Riva Team Perspective

    Keywords: Negotiation Deal;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, Joshua D. Margolis, and Anthony J. Mayo. "Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: The Riva Team Perspective." Harvard Business School Exercise 312-065, October 2011. (Revised September 2012.) View Details
  17. Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: The Charlton Team Perspective

    Keywords: Negotiation Deal;

    Citation:

    Zelleke, Andy, Joshua D. Margolis, and Anthony J. Mayo. "Finalizing a Deal between Riva Corporation and Charlton Corporation: The Charlton Team Perspective." Harvard Business School Exercise 312-066, October 2011. (Revised September 2012.) View Details
  18. Orientation to Rapid Leadership Exercises

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony J. Mayo. "Orientation to Rapid Leadership Exercises." Harvard Business School Module Note 412-063, October 2011. View Details
  19. Feedback Framework for Rapid Leadership Exercises

    Keywords: Leadership;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony J. Mayo. "Feedback Framework for Rapid Leadership Exercises." Harvard Business School Module Note 412-064, October 2011. View Details
  20. Energy Necklace Sculpture Challenge: Leader-1 Instructions

    Explains the exercise and role of the team leader for the Energy Necklace Sculpture Challenge.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Managerial Roles; Management Teams;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony J. Mayo. "Energy Necklace Sculpture Challenge: Leader-1 Instructions." Harvard Business School Exercise 412-068, October 2011. View Details
  21. C.W. Post

    In 1906, C.W. Post had to move his latest breakfast product--corn flakes--from store shelves into cereal bowls nationwide. Post genuinely believed his corn flakes and other breakfast foods would make people well. Through sampling and other innovative sales and marketing techniques, Post convinced consumers and grocers to buy Postum and Grape-Nuts--which generated millions in profits for the Postum Cereal Co. But not Elijah's Manna--the brand name that Post put on his corn flakes boxes when his company introduced the product in 1904. Two years later, it was clearly not selling. To make matters worse, other cereal companies in the burgeoning Battle Creek area where Post's foods were manufactured were cornering the market, in particular, Kelloggs. How was Post going to convince consumers that his corn flakes were better than the rest?

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Innovation and Invention; Brands and Branding; Product Marketing; Sales; Food and Beverage Industry; Battle Creek;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Mark Benson. "C.W. Post." Harvard Business School Case 406-063, December 2005. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  22. C.W. Post (TN)

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Mark Benson. "C.W. Post (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 408-068, September 2007. View Details
  23. Maggie Lena Walker and the Independent Order of St. Luke

    As America struggled to regain its balance in the aftermath of the American Civil War, Maggie Lena Walker did her best to actively effect change by finding solutions to the social and economic problems facing blacks and especially black women. Taking charge of the flailing Independent Order of St. Luke in 1899, Walker transformed the organization into a vibrant and thriving economic engine for blacks. With a vision of economic self-sufficiency, she established a newspaper in 1902, chartered the St. Luke Penny Savings Bank in 1903, becoming the first woman bank president in the United States, and opened a store run by and for blacks. Throughout her life, Walker persevered and thrived despite personal, social, and professional obstacles.

    Keywords: Organizational Change and Adaptation; Leading Change; Ethnicity Characteristics; Race Characteristics; Social Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Welfare or Wellbeing; Business and Community Relations; Gender Characteristics; Banks and Banking;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Shandi Onise Smith. "Maggie Lena Walker and the Independent Order of St. Luke." Harvard Business School Case 409-057, November 2008. (Revised March 2011.) View Details
  24. Jesse Holman Jones and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation

    Jesse Holman Jones is regarded as one of the most influential men in reviving the American economy from the Great Depression. With only an 8th grade education, he rose to the top of the banking, real estate, and lumber industries, as well as the upper echelons of politics as the head of Reconstruction Finance Corp. (RFC), as secretary of commerce and, during World War I, as director general of military relief for the American Red Cross. He was responsible for the transformation of his adopted city Houston, Texas, into the most important city for international commerce in the South. After Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jones was the single most influential and powerful man in the New Deal by virtue of his control of the billions of dollars RFC held. With this power, he greatly affected many American cities and the way our financial system currently operates. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Financial Crisis; Financial Strategy; Business History; Leading Change; Managerial Roles; Business and Government Relations; Power and Influence;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Bridget Gurtler. "Jesse Holman Jones and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation." Harvard Business School Case 406-029, July 2005. (Revised August 2011.) View Details
  25. Jesse Holman Jones and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (TN)

    Teaching Note for 406029.

    Keywords: Transformation; Economic Slowdown and Stagnation; Finance; System; Leadership; Power and Influence; Houston;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., and Johnathan Cromwell. "Jesse Holman Jones and the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 412-051, August 2011. View Details
  26. Walt Disney and the 1941 Animators' Strike

    Focuses on the leadership lessons drawn from the events precipitating the Animator's Strike of 1941, depicting the growing pains of a company that was as much formed and changed by American culture as American culture was formed and changed by it. The tale of Walt Disney's roller-coaster journey from small-town paperboy to underage ambulance-driving serviceman to amateur animator and thrice-failed businessman to iconic leader is told against the backdrop of swift and seeping change in the beginning of the 20th century. An ambitious creative genius, he masterfully pursued emerging technological advantage and uniquely grasped and personified American social mores, but was reckless and naive about strategic business issues, especially concerning intellectual property and human resources management. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Business History; Leadership; Creativity; Culture; Business Strategy; Technology Adoption;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Bridget Gurtler. "Walt Disney and the 1941 Animators' Strike." Harvard Business School Case 406-076, December 2005. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  27. Walt Disney and the 1941 Animators' Strike (TN)

    Keywords: Animation Entertainment;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., and Johnathan Cromwell. "Walt Disney and the 1941 Animators' Strike (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 412-113, February 2012. View Details
  28. C.R. Smith and the Birth of American Airlines

    Presents an overview of the path that C.R. Smith pursued to build American Airlines into one of the largest airlines in the world in the 20th century. Over the course of his 30-year tenure as president of American Airlines, Smith deployed a three-pronged strategy--technology standardization, safety, and customer service--to build his business. Covers the first 50 years of American Airlines' history, beginning with its role as an industry consolidator in the late 1920s. Smith's strategic and operational choices in building American Airlines played a significant role in the overall growth of the airline industry in the United States. Explores the interaction between the growth of a company and an overall industry.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Growth and Development Strategy; Industry Growth; Operations; Air Transportation Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Laura Gaie Singleton. "C.R. Smith and the Birth of American Airlines." Harvard Business School Case 406-082, December 2005. (Revised May 2009.) View Details
  29. Henry J. Kaiser and the Art of the Possible

    From his humble beginnings as a local salesman in New York, Henry J. Kaiser rose to become one of the leading industrialists of 20th century America. Though he had no technical engineering training, Kaiser mastered the management and execution of plans for several large scale projects that contributed to the growth and improvement of contemporary America, including the Hoover Dam, one of the wonders of the modern world. During World War II, when the United States desperately needed ships to deliver manpower and supplies overseas, Kaiser, who had never built a ship before, rose to the challenge and successfully directed the construction of thousands of Liberty ships. These merchant vessels gave the U.S. Navy the overwhelming might to claim victory at sea for America and her Allies. He pioneered shipbuilding techniques that not only allowed him to build ships at unprecedented rates, but he also spurred the whole shipbuilding industry to do the same. His fame made him the object of envy and scorn for shipbuilders all across America, yet he had never built a ship before the war. All of Kaiser's endeavors, from his beginnings in the construction industry all the way to his development of Hawaii's urban landscape, demonstrated his willingness to embrace the unknown, and his determination in the face of setbacks. His combination of entrepreneurship, perseverance, and compassion made him the embodiment of the American spirit.

    Keywords: History; Mission and Purpose; Transition; Management Practices and Processes; Construction; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Leadership Style; Business History; Business Growth and Maturation; Civil Society or Community; Business Strategy; Planning; Construction Industry; Shipping Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., Mark Benson, and David Chen. "Henry J. Kaiser and the Art of the Possible." Harvard Business School Case 408-072, January 2008. (Revised March 2011.) View Details
  30. Henry J. Kaiser and the Art of the Possible (TN)

    Teaching Note for [408072].

    Keywords: Shipping Industry; Construction Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony. "Henry J. Kaiser and the Art of the Possible (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 409-130, June 2009. View Details
  31. William Levitt, Levittown and the Creation of American Suburbia

    Demand for low-cost housing after World War II far exceeded supply. Was this a profitable new market? New York developer William Levitt had to decide. During World War II, Levitt was eager to build basic housing for the working class—otherwise, Levitt & Sons would have been idle due to the federal government ban on all nonessential construction, like the luxury homes that Levitt & Sons typically built on Long Island, New York. Under a contract with the U.S. Navy, Levitt & Sons erected 2,000 homes in a year's time, an effort that gave Levitt & Sons the opportunity to perfect rapid home construction techniques. Levitt had to decide if he would apply those techniques to meet the post-war housing demand. Levitt & Sons had the manufacturing know-how. Would sizable profits follow? Levitt needed to understand the implications of the home improvement loans and mortgages the government guaranteed to returning servicemen as part of their veterans benefits. Levitt had the opportunity to parlay his own World War II experience as a Navy Seabee to market these homes by appealing to the sentiments of veterans like himself who were eager to return home and settle down after the fighting stopped. Levitt's decision would have profound social, economic, and political impact on the lives of returning veterans, their spouses, and their children—the Baby Boomers.

    Keywords: Demographics; Construction; Business History; Housing; Leadership; Growth and Development Strategy; Product Development; Business and Government Relations; Construction Industry; Real Estate Industry; United States; New York (state, US);

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Mark Benson. "William Levitt, Levittown and the Creation of American Suburbia." Harvard Business School Case 406-062, December 2005. (Revised March 2010.) View Details
  32. William Levitt, Levittown and the Creation of American Suburbia (TN)

    Teaching Note for [406062].

    Keywords: United States;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Johnathan Cromwell. "William Levitt, Levittown and the Creation of American Suburbia (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 410-115, April 2010. (Revised February 2011.) View Details
  33. Henry Luce and the American Century

    Henry Luce, founder of the publishing company which produced Time, Life, Fortune, and Sports Illustrated, created the largest media company in the world by the mid-20th century. Luce's flagship magazine, Time, was able to gross over $20 million in sales during its first decade of publication and over $400 million by the time Luce retired in 1964. Entering the emerging market of magazine journalism early in the 1930s, Luce was able to cover some of the largest political and social events of the 20th century, including Charles Lindbergh's flight, World War II, the Cold War, and the Vietnam War. Combining his unique journalistic ethos and his engaging creative writing style, Luce's magazines often resonated with readers, allowing him to quickly trump competitors such as Newsweek, Forbes, The New Yorker, Esquire, and National Geographic. Yet Luce was also criticized for occasionally using his imaginative style to inject his opinion into stories, going beyond the purview of journalists. Contemporaries complained that Luce was cultivating "middlebrow" cultural tastes instead of striving for journalistic excellence. Nevertheless, Luce's media empire continues to endure into the 21st century, shaping public discourse and influencing public opinion.

    Keywords: Business Growth and Maturation; Business Startups; Entrepreneurship; Business History; Leadership Style; Emerging Markets; Publishing Industry; United States;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Logan Wilcox. "Henry Luce and the American Century." Harvard Business School Case 407-076, January 2007. (Revised May 2008.) View Details
  34. Liz Claiborne and the New Working Woman

    At age 47, with two decades of experience as a lead designer for a Fortune 500 fashion company, Liz Claiborne put her life savings on the line to form Liz Claiborne, Inc., a partnership that included her husband. A decade later, in 1986, Claiborne was CEO of her own Fortune 500 company, reaching that milestone faster than any other business up to that point in history. Because the company did not own any of the factories that made its clothing, Claiborne relied upon her detailed understanding of design and manufacturing processes to instruct successfully her American and offshore contractors on how to mass-produce designer clothing at affordable prices. Claiborne was an industry pioneer in many ways. She developed detailed customer feedback collection systems. She and her staff were in frequent contact with department stores to help them present her clothing in display and to customers. In the 1980s, after building up her designer brand name, Claiborne expanded her business through licensing arrangements with quality manufacturers of apparel, shoes, and accessories.

    Keywords: Leadership; Customer Relationship Management; Business History; Entrepreneurship; Personal Development and Career; Gender Characteristics; Brands and Branding; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Mark Benson. "Liz Claiborne and the New Working Woman." Harvard Business School Case 407-060, November 2006. (Revised May 2008.) View Details
  35. Liz Claiborne and the New Working Woman (TN)

    Teaching Note for [407060].

    Keywords: Gender Characteristics; Apparel and Accessories Industry;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony. "Liz Claiborne and the New Working Woman (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 409-078, January 2009. (Revised March 2011.) View Details
  36. Bill Gates and Steve Jobs

    Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, founders of Microsoft and Apple respectively, have revolutionized the relationship between the individual and computer technology. Once the exclusive domain of academia and research facilities, computers can now be found in every area of business, government, and personal entertainment. Gates and Jobs facilitated this revolution, introducing a generation to the practice of personal computing and laying the foundation for the Information Age. Gates and Jobs turned their curiosity about electronics into a multi-billion dollar industry. From early experiments like the Apple II and DOS to the X-box and the iPod, Gates and Jobs have been committed to pioneering all avenues of technology and distributing them to wide audiences. The journey wasn't without its trials for both CEOs. Gates' antitrust lawsuit of the mid-90s and Jobs' separation from Apple in the late 80s provided challenges to both companies. However, both leaders used these periods of uncertainty as motivation to innovate, taking digital technology into new territory. Pixar Studios, MSNBC, the Xbox, and the phenomena of "infotainment" all arose from the ashes of the corporate controversies. The stories of Bill Gates and Steve Jobs are ultimately one story--it is the story of the personal computer, its software, and its impact upon society. From two college drop-outs based on the West Coast came a revolution which fundamentally influenced the global practice of business.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business History; Technological Innovation; Leadership; Risk and Uncertainty; Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Mark Benson. "Bill Gates and Steve Jobs." Harvard Business School Case 407-028, December 2006. (Revised March 2010.) View Details
  37. Bill Gates and Steve Jobs (TN)

    Keywords: Computer Industry; Information Technology Industry;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony. "Bill Gates and Steve Jobs (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 408-092, November 2007. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  38. Gordon Bethune at Continental Airlines

    A $385 million loss for the final months of fiscal year 1994 signaled Continental might go bankrupt. Could new CEO Gordon Bethune turn Continental around? Continental was in dire straits because the deregulation of the commercial airline industry in 1978 ushered in a new era focused on mergers and acquisitions and bitter employee-management relations. Venerable airline brands with a commitment to quality, like Continental, were prime takeover targets. After Texas Air Chairman Frank Lorenzo (HBS 1963) secured Continental in his hostile takeover bid, tensions escalated between Lorenzo and the old guard--especially when Lorenzo declared Continental bankrupt in the fall of 1983 and then fired and replaced half his staff with cheaper nonunion labor. In October 1994, five months after Continental exited its second bankruptcy, Bethune was elevated to CEO and created a Go Forward Plan to return Continental to profitability. Two years after unveiling the Go Forward Plan, Continental was at the top of the industry in a number of important performance metrics.

    Keywords: Transformation; Insolvency and Bankruptcy; Profit; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Performance Improvement; Labor and Management Relations; Air Transportation Industry;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Mark Benson. "Gordon Bethune at Continental Airlines." Harvard Business School Case 406-073, January 2006. (Revised November 2010.) View Details
  39. Gordon Bethune at Continental Airlines (TN)

    A $385 million loss for the final months of fiscal year 1994 signaled Continental might go bankrupt. Could new CEO Gordon Bethune turn Continental around? Continental was in dire straits because the deregulation of the commercial airline industry in 1978 ushered in a new era focused on mergers and acquisitions and bitter employee-management relations. Venerable airline brands with a commitment to quality, like Continental, were prime takeover targets. After Texas Air Chairman Frank Lorenzo (HBS 1963) secured Continental in his hostile takeover bid, tensions escalated between Lorenzo and the old guard--especially when Lorenzo declared Continental bankrupt in the fall of 1983 and then fired and replaced half his staff with cheaper nonunion labor. In October 1994, five months after Continental exited its second bankruptcy, Bethune was elevated to CEO and created a Go Forward Plan to return Continental to profitability. Two years after unveiling the Go Forward Plan, Continental was at the top of the industry in a number of important performance metrics.

    Keywords: Transformation; Insolvency and Bankruptcy; Profit; Leading Change; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Performance Improvement; Labor and Management Relations;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony. "Gordon Bethune at Continental Airlines (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 408-071, October 2007. View Details
  40. General Electric's 20th Century CEOs

    General Electric thrived in every decade of the 20th century. Since its founding in 1892, GE has placed a high value on picking and training the best people. Staff members worked with other scientists in the company's research lab to design and manufacture new and better products to satisfy the growing American consumer demand for lighting, appliances, and consumer electronics in the 1910s to 1920s as well as in the 1950s and 1960s. GE's top executives have shown a clear understanding of the leadership and managerial styles that were appropriate for the years in which they worked. In the first decade of the 20th century, Charles Coffin demonstrated that he was an adept negotiator who amassed great wealth for GE in building generators and power equipment for local utilities in which GE also had a financial stake through bond issues. In the final decades of the 20th century, Jack Welch emphasized that GE should support only the most profitable businesses in the company's portfolio, a logic that led Welch and GE to phase out GE's consumer electronics division while bolstering the financial position of GE capital. Profiles all of GE's top executives.

    Keywords: Business History; Leadership Style; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Style;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Mark Benson. "General Electric's 20th Century CEOs." Harvard Business School Case 406-048, December 2005. (Revised April 2011.) View Details
  41. General Electric's 20th Century CEOs (Abridged)

    General Electric thrived in every decade of the 20th century. Since its founding in 1892, GE has placed a high value on picking and training the best people. Staff members worked with other scientists in the company's research lab to design and manufacture new and better products to satisfy the growing American consumer demand for lighting, appliances, and consumer electronics in the 1910s to 1920s as well as in the 1950s and 1960s. GE's top executives have shown a clear understanding of the leadership and managerial styles that were appropriate for the years in which they worked. In the first decade of the 20th century, Charles Coffin demonstrated that he was an adept negotiator who amassed great wealth for GE in building generators and power equipment for local utilities in which GE also had a financial stake through bond issues. In the final decades of the 20th century, Jack Welch emphasized that GE should support only the most profitable businesses in the company's portfolio, a logic that led Welch and GE to phase out GE's consumer electronics division while bolstering the financial position of GE capital. Profiles all of GE's top executives.

    Keywords: Business History; Leadership Style; Growth and Development Strategy; Management Style;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony J. Mayo, and Mark Benson. "General Electric's 20th Century CEOs (Abridged)." Harvard Business School Case 406-118, May 2006. (Revised February 2012.) View Details
  42. General Electric's 20th Century CEOs (TN)

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J. "General Electric's 20th Century CEOs (TN)." Harvard Business School Teaching Note 412-124, April 2012. View Details
  43. Li Ka-Shing and the Growth of Cheung Kong

    Events in the history of Cheung Kong's growth reveal how Li Ka-Shing applied his skills as a "first-class noticer" to complex political and socioeconomic environments. While Li's determination to succeed is legendary, so are his skills in reading and responding to the policies and norms of the People's Republic of China, British colonial Hong Kong, and the post-World War II international system. Since Li became the taipan of Hutchison Whampoa in the late 1970s, he has adjusted his ownership shares in a vast portfolio of businesses—including ports, energy, real estate, retail, telecommunications, and new media. Illustrates how Li applied his business acumen and his ability as a first-class noticer to decisions about raising or lowering his stake in these businesses, and whether to acquire new ones. After starting Cheung Kong Inc. in 1950, at age 21, Li built upon his knowledge and contacts in the plastics industry to become Hong Kong's King of Plastic Flowers. In the 1960s, amid political turmoil and labor unrest on both the mainland and in colonial Hong Kong, Li purchased rights to properties on Hong Kong island that were selling at distressed rates. Li's successes in industry and real estate continued, and he cultivated contacts and built a strong reputation that set the stage for his purchase of the hong Hutchinson Whampoa, thereby becoming the first Chinese taipan. As taipan, Li reorganized and reallocated his various financial holdings in the 1980s and 1990s as conditions were in flux due to the Westernization of China after Deng Xiaoping succeeded Mao Zedong, and amid concerns about the transfer of Hong Kong from Britain back to China in 1997.

    Keywords: Mergers and Acquisitions; Competency and Skills; Decision Choices and Conditions; Investment Portfolio; Business History; Leadership; Personal Development and Career; Hong Kong;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony J. Mayo, and Mark Benson. "Li Ka-Shing and the Growth of Cheung Kong." Harvard Business School Case 407-062, November 2006. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  44. Li Ka-Shing and the Growth of Cheung Kong

    [Teaching Plan for 407-062]

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony. "Li Ka-Shing and the Growth of Cheung Kong." Harvard Business School Teaching Plan 414-074, March 2014. View Details
  45. J. R. D. Tata

    J.R.D Tata, Chairman of the Indian conglomerate Tata & Sons, played a significant role in building India's economic infrastructure. Under his guidance, Tata & Sons built locomotives, steel refineries, airlines, chemical plants, and technology-based enterprises. Inheriting his title as Chairman in 1938, at the outbreak of World War II, Tata was able to navigate his family-owned companies through the tumultuous political climate of India. He worked with British colonial officers, and later closely with several Indian leaders under both pro- and anti-business government regimes. Applying his family's values to the workplace, Tata & Sons helped revolutionize business practices in India. From instituting the eight-hour work day and paid leave to providing a retirement gratuity, Tata's policies created a standard to which other companies--and eventually Indian government regulators--measured themselves. Blending humane business practices with political savvy and a pioneering spirit, J.R.D Tata is remembered as one of India's most important and influential business leaders. Tata is an example of a 20th century business leader who applied contextual intelligence to a variety of businesses, dramatically changing the landscape of India's infrastructure.

    Keywords: Family Business; Development Economics; Working Conditions; Leadership; Infrastructure; Personal Development and Career; Business and Government Relations; India;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Mark Benson. "J. R. D. Tata." Harvard Business School Case 407-061, December 2006. (Revised April 2014.) View Details
  46. J.R.D. Tata

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony. "J.R.D. Tata." Harvard Business School Teaching Plan 414-075, March 2014. View Details
  47. Chief Timothy Adeola Odutola and Nigeria's Manufacturing Sector

    Chief Timothy Adeola Odutola was an important contributor to Nigeria's manufacturing sector, creating a multimillion-dollar conglomerate including three factories, a retail franchise, a cattle ranch, a 5,000-acre plantation, a sawmill, and an exporting business before the end of British colonial rule in 1960. Seizing business opportunities as he saw demand, Odutola moved between markets at every opportunity, creating companies servicing a diverse variety of needs. Odutola's keen, unwavering interest in improving the infrastructure of Nigeria allowed him to enjoy a successful career in business and politics, despite the vastly fluctuating political landscape of Nigeria. From British rule through civil war and subsequent coups and countercoups, Odutola remained a popular leader for his commitment to promoting Nigerian business ventures. Elevated to Prime Minister of his tribe--the Ijebu-Ode--in 1956, and later selected as the first President of the Manufacturers Association of Nigeria (MAN), Odutola campaigned for manufacturing interests and consulted with government officials about national fiscal policy. As a statesman and as a business leader, Odutola worked tirelessly to improve the infrastructure of his country.

    Keywords: History; Business Conglomerates; Corporate Social Responsibility and Impact; Corporate Entrepreneurship; Success; Leadership Style; Business History; Market Entry and Exit; Personal Development and Career; Business Startups; Manufacturing Industry; Nigeria;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, Foluke Otudeko, and Mark Benson. "Chief Timothy Adeola Odutola and Nigeria's Manufacturing Sector." Harvard Business School Case 407-027, December 2006. (Revised January 2007.) View Details
  48. Sheikh Mohammed and the Making of 'Dubai, Inc.'

    Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum has converted Dubai from a sleepy little coastal village into a world-class city, famous for its ambition, drive, and economic promise. He is the founder, part-owner, and visionary behind companies such as Emirates Airlines, a UAE-based airline serving over 100 destinations; Nakheel, the property developer that built a trilogy of man-made islands; and DP World, a leader in international marine terminal operations. Despite being surrounded by political instability in the Middle East, Sheikh Mohammed pursued capitalism and embraced Western culture while maintaining safety for millions of annual tourists. By 2010, Dubai had the world's tallest building, the most expensive hotel, and the largest shopping mall. But rapid development did not come without difficulties. While hundreds of thousands immigrated to help build the metropolis, labor conditions suffered and some local Emirati felt like they lost aspects of their cultural identity. Growth was rapid, infrastructure was weak, and the real estate bubble grew as the financial crisis loomed. To produce economic, social, and cultural prosperity for the people of Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed had to balance his role as a business leader and a political ruler.

    Keywords: Development Economics; Leadership Style; Emerging Markets; Personal Development and Career; Business and Community Relations; Business and Government Relations; Dubai;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, Nitin Nohria, Umaimah Mendhro, and Johnathan Cromwell. "Sheikh Mohammed and the Making of 'Dubai, Inc.'." Harvard Business School Case 410-063, February 2010. (Revised August 2010.) View Details
  49. Sheikh Mohammed and the Making of "Dubai, Inc." (TN)

    Teaching Note for 410063.

    Keywords: Balance and Stability; Growth and Development; Identity; Government and Politics; Infrastructure; Financial Crisis; Labor; Economic Systems; Culture; Managerial Roles; Local Range; Dubai;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, and Johnathan Cromwell. Sheikh Mohammed and the Making of "Dubai, Inc." (TN). Harvard Business School Teaching Note 410-130, June 2010. View Details
  50. Yoshiko Shinohara and Tempstaff

    The case presents a biographical portrait of Yoshiko Shinohara who founded Tempstaff in 1973, one of the largest temporary staffing agencies in Japan. In addition to chronicling Shinohara's entrepreneurial activities, the case provides contextual background about the role of women in business in Japan in the last few decades of the 20th century.

    Keywords: Business History; Entrepreneurship; Gender Characteristics; Employment Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony, Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki. "Yoshiko Shinohara and Tempstaff." Harvard Business School Case 409-049, January 2009. (Revised March 2011.) View Details
  51. Kazuo Inamori, a Japanese Entrepreneur

    The case provides insight into a business leader whose cognizance of contextual forces (social, economic, and political) allowed him to drive significant change in an industry and Japanese society in the second half of the twentieth century.

    Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Business History; Leading Change; Management Style; Personal Development and Career; Telecommunications Industry; Japan;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony J., Masako Egawa, and Mayuka Yamazaki. "Kazuo Inamori, a Japanese Entrepreneur." Harvard Business School Case 408-039, January 2008. (Revised May 2014.) View Details
  52. Kazuo Inamori, A Japanese Entrepreneur

    Keywords: entrepreneurship; Japan;

    Citation:

    Mayo, Anthony. "Kazuo Inamori, A Japanese Entrepreneur." Harvard Business School Teaching Plan 414-073, March 2014. View Details
  53. Orientation to Leadership Intelligence Days, 2011

    Julie Bornstein, senior vice president of Sephora Direct, is seeking to double her budget for social media and other digital marketing initiatives for 2011. A number of digital efforts implemented in the past two years seem to be bearing fruit and there is a desire to intensify Sephora's social media, online video and mobile presence. Bornstein must justify the need for the additional funding, determine how best to allocate the money across the various platforms, and establish effective ways to measure return on investment (ROI) for digital marketing spend. She must also take into account that the funding requested will likely come at the expense of Sephora's traditional marketing programs. Importantly, Bornstein needs to begin thinking about a cohesive long-term strategy that clearly identifies the role digital platforms play and how they help Sephora maintain its leadership position in the prestige beauty care space. The constant emergence of new players, such as Groupon and Shop Socially, the growing power of social media platforms such as Facebook, and the way consumer behavior and user generated content are rapidly evolving in a digital era, make her task all the more challenging.

    Keywords: Budgets and Budgeting; Borrowing and Debt; Investment Return; Resource Allocation; Marketing Communications; Marketing Strategy; Consumer Behavior; Online Technology; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony J. Mayo. "Orientation to Leadership Intelligence Days, 2011." Harvard Business School Module Note 412-057, September 2011. View Details
  54. NerveWire, Inc.

    NerveWire, a management consulting and systems integration provider based in Newton, MA, was closing in on its second anniversary. In the beginning days of NerveWire, the major challenge was recruiting--finding the right people who embodied its values and business mission. Traditional business enterprises were thirsty for a new type of consulting organization, a partner that would help them utilize the Internet not as a marketing tool, but as a tool to re-design their business models, their internal value chains, and their extended industry value chains to drive significant ROI. NerveWire was created for just that purpose. The year 2001 brought some very new and different challenges. In the fall of 2000, the economy in the United States fell off a cliff, and by the beginning of 2001, NerveWire's Fortune 500 clients, by and large, had frozen all spending in major new technology-centric business initiatives. A Day in the Life of Kirk Arnold, Video and A Day in the Life of Malcolm Frank, Video are required with this case.

    Keywords: Values and Beliefs; Leadership; Mission and Purpose; Behavior; Internet; Newton;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, and Anthony Mayo. "NerveWire, Inc." Harvard Business School Case 402-022, August 2001. (Revised March 2008.) View Details
  55. Juan Trippe and Pan American World Airways

    A fascination with flight and a forceful personality helped to create a market for air travel and shape the modern airline industry. Masterfully wielding his power and influence, Juan Trippe built Pan American Airways by combining bold moves and blind ambition. Across decades of sweeping cultural and technological change, his tenacity and cunning played a lead role in defining the arc of the aviation industry not only in the United States, but around the world. By studying the opportunities he exploited and the outcomes of his decisions within their historical context, a nuanced understanding of leadership, strategy, and sustainability emerges.

    Keywords: Decision Choices and Conditions; Leadership; Growth and Development Strategy; Industry Growth; Business and Government Relations; Power and Influence; Air Transportation; Air Transportation Industry; Travel Industry;

    Citation:

    Nohria, Nitin, Anthony Mayo, and Mark Rennella. "Juan Trippe and Pan American World Airways." Harvard Business School Case 406-086, January 2006. (Revised July 2007.) View Details
  56. Corey Robinson at Sprint Corporation (B)

    Supplements the (A) case. A rewritten version of an earlier supplement.

    Keywords: Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Anthony Mayo, and Lisa Pode. "Corey Robinson at Sprint Corporation (B)." Harvard Business School Supplement 405-095, June 2005. (Revised January 2006.) View Details
  57. Energy Necklace Sculpture Challenge: Leader-2 Instructions

    Explains the exercise and role of the team leader for the Energy Necklace Sculpture Challenge.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Managerial Roles; Management Teams;

    Citation:

    Margolis, Joshua D., and Anthony J. Mayo. "Energy Necklace Sculpture Challenge: Leader-2 Instructions." Harvard Business School Exercise 412-069, October 2011. View Details
  58. Corey Robinson at Sprint Corporation (A)

    Corey Robinson is promoted to a new position at Sprint during a time of much internal change within the company. Asks readers to consider how he sets the tone to his new management team and how effective he is in building credibility in his new leadership role. A rewritten version of an earlier case.

    Keywords: Leadership Style; Management Skills; Management Teams; Organizational Change and Adaptation; Performance Effectiveness; Personal Development and Career; Power and Influence; Telecommunications Industry;

    Citation:

    Hill, Linda A., Anthony Mayo, and Lisa Pode. "Corey Robinson at Sprint Corporation (A)." Harvard Business School Case 405-094, June 2005. (Revised January 2008.) View Details

        Awards & Honors

      1. Robert F. Greenhill Award: Winner of the 2006–2007 Robert F. Greenhill Award for Outstanding Service to the HBS Community.